Francis Meres, Wits Treasury (Poets)

Palladis tamia Wits treasury being the second part of Wits common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both vniuersities. At London: Printed by P. Short, for Cuthbert Burbie, and are to be solde at his shop at the Royall Exchange, 1598 (STC 17834). The first edition (posted March 26, 2018) was transcribed and encoded from an EEBO facsimile version by students in Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin's 2017 Learning Community "A Rogue's Progress: Mapping Kit Marlowe's Social Networks" at Stonehill College. The current version was published May 1, 2018 with links to the Personography that students in both the Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 course contributed to. The encoding was done by the Spring 2018 class and has not been thoroughly reviewed by the instructors. We're aware that some errors have been introduced via the personography links, but this version offers an example of what undergraduate research and encoding look like before revision. We hope to edit the personography soon!. For more information about the pedagogy and process driving this project, please see www.kitmarlowe.org.

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                    <name><forename>Francis</forename> <surname>Meres</surname></name></respStmt>
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                <bibl><publisher>Printed by P. Short</publisher><publisher>Cuthbert Burbie</publisher><pubPlace>London</pubPlace><date when-custom="1598"/>
                Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm available on the Early English Books Online Database.
                    <idno type="STC">STC 17834<!-- UMI Reel Number: 217:07 --></idno>
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            <div type="chapter">
                <!-- Hastily encoded by KAB - need to fix sizes -->
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Palladis Tamia</hi><lb/>
                WITS
                <hi style="font-size: 125%">TREASVRY</hi><lb/>
                Being the Second part<lb/>
                <hi style="font-style: italic;">of Wits Common</hi><lb/>
                wealth.<lb/>
                By<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style: italic;">Francis Meres Maister</hi><lb/>
                    of Artes of both Vni-<lb/>
                    uerſities<lb/>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Viuitur ingenio cœlera mortis erunt.</hi></foreign><lb/>
                    AT LONDON<lb/>
                    Printed by P Short, for Cuthbert Burbie, and<lb/>
                    are to be ſolde at his shop at the Royall<lb/>
                    Exhange. 1598.
                </fw> 
                <pb/>
                </div>
        
            <div type="chapter">
            <!-- ASHKA RAMANLAL-->
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><fw type="header"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Wits Treasury</hi></fw></fw>
              <lb/>
                <p style="font-size: 90%;"> <fw type="header">Poets.</fw></p>
                <lb/>
                <p><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5em; padding: 0.5em; margin: 0 2em 1em 0:">A</hi>S ſome do vſe an Amethiſt in compo-<lb/>
                    tations agaynſt drunkennes: ſo cer-<lb/>
                    tain precepts are to be vſed in hearing and<lb/>
                    reading of poets, leaſt they infect the mind<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style: italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Plut</foreign>. &amp; Plin.lib.37.cap.9.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1em;">As in thoſe places where many holſome</hi><lb/>
                    hearbes doe growe, there alſo growes ma-<lb/>
                    ny poyſonfull weedes: ſo in Poets there<lb/>
                    are many excellent things, and many peſti<lb/>
                    lent matters. <hi style="font-style: italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Plut</foreign>.</hi><lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">As</fw><lb/>
           <pb/>     
                <fw type="header" style="font-style:italic;"> <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">Wits Common-wealth.</fw></fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">277</fw><lb/>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1em;">As <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Simoniàes</persName></hi> ſayde, that the <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Theſſali-</persName></hi></hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style: italic;">ans</hi> were more blockiſh, then that they<lb/>
                    could be deceiued of him: ſo the riper and<lb/>
                    pregnanter the wit is, the ſooner it is cor-<lb/>
                    rupted of Poets.<hi style="font-style: italic;">idem.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1em;">As <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Cato</persName></hi>when he was a ſcholler woulde</hi><lb/>
                    not beleeue his maiſter, except hee rende-<lb/>
                    red a reaſon of that he taught him: ſo wee<lb/>
                    are not to beleeue Poets in all that they<lb/>
                    write or ſay, except they yeelde a reaſon.<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style: italic;">Idem.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1em;">As in the ſame paſture the Bee ſeaſeth</hi><lb/>
                    on the flower, the Goate grazeth on the<lb/>
                    ſhrub, the ſwine on the root, and the Oxen,<lb/>
                    Kine and Horſes on the graſſe: ſo in Poets<lb/>
                    one ſeeketh for hiſtorie, an other for orna-<lb/>
                    ment of ſpeech, another for proofe, and an<lb/>
                    other for precepts of good life. <hi style="font-style: italic;">idem.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1em;">As they that come veri ſuddainlie out</hi><lb/>
                    of a very darke place, are greatly troubled,<lb/>
                    except by little and little they be accuſto-<lb/>
                    med to the light: ſo in reading of Poets,<lb/>
                    the opinions of <persName>Phyloſophers</persName> are to bee<lb/>
                    ſowne in the mindes of young ſchollers,<lb/>
                    leaſt many diuerſities of doctrines doe af-<lb/>
                    terwardes diſtract their mindes. <hi style="font-style: italic;">idem.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left: 1em;">As in the portraiture of murder or inceſt,</hi><lb/>
                    we praiſe the Art of him that drewe it, but<lb/>
                    we deteſt the thing it ſelſe: ſo in laſciuious<lb/>
                    Poets let vs imitate their elocution, but<lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">execrate</fw><lb/>
            <pb/>    
            <!-- ROWAN PEREIRA-->
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center;"><fw type="header" style="font-style:italic;">The ſecond part of</fw></fw>
                <p>excrate their wantonnes. <hi style="font-style:italic;">idem.</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="margin-left:1em;">Some thinges that are not excellent of</hi><lb/>
                    themſelues, are good for ſome, bicauſe they<lb/>
                    are meet for them: ſo ſome things are com-<lb/>
                    mended in Poets, which are fit and correſ-<lb/>
                    pondent for the perſons, they ſpeake of, al-<lb/>
                    though in themſelues they bee filthy and<lb/>
                    not to be ſpoken: As lame <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Demonides</persName></hi> wi-<lb/>
                    ſhed, that the ſhoes that were ſtolne from<lb/>
                    him, might fit his feet that had ſtoln them,<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">idem</hi>.<lb/></p> 
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As that ſhip is endaungered, where all</hi><lb/>
                    leane to one ſide, but is in ſafetie, on lea-<lb/>
                    ning one way, and another another way:<lb/>
                    ſo the diſſenſion of Poets among them-<lb/>
                    ſelues, doth make them, that they leſſe in-<lb/>
                    fect their readers. And for this purpoſe our<lb/>
                    Satyriſts, <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Hall</persName>, the Author of <title>Pigmalions</title></hi><lb/>
                    <title>I<hi style="font-style:italic;">mage, and certaine Satyres</hi></title>, <persName>Rankins</persName>, and<lb/>
                    ſuch others, are very profitable.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As a Bee doth gather the iuice of honie</hi><lb/>
                    from flowres, whereas others are onely de-<lb/>
                    lighted with the colour and ſmel: ſo a Phi-<lb/>
                    loſopher findeth that among Poets which<lb/>
                    is profitable for good life, when as others<lb/>
                    are tickled only with pleaſure. <hi style="font-style:italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Plut</foreign></hi>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As wee are delighted in the picture of a</hi><lb/>
                    Viper of a ſpider artificially encloſed with<lb/>
                    in a precious iewell: ſo Poets do delight vs<lb/>
                    in yͤ learned &amp; cũning depainting of vices.<lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">As<lb/></fw>
                <pb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center;"><fw type="header" style="font-style:italic;">Wits Common-wealth.</fw></fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">278</fw><lb/>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As ſome are delighted in coũterfet wines</hi><lb/>
                    confected of fruites, not that they refreſh<lb/>
                    the hart, but that they make drunke: ſo<lb/>
                    ſome are delighted in Poets only for their<lb/>
                    obſcenity, neuer reſpecting their eloquẽce<lb/>
                    good grace, or learning.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As Emperors, kings and princes haue in</hi><lb/>
                    their handes authority to dignifie or diſ-<lb/>
                    grace their nobles, attendants, ſubiects and<lb/>
                    vaſſals: ſo Poets haue the whole power in<lb/>
                    their handes to make men either immor-<lb/>
                    tally famous for their valiant exploites and<lb/>
                    vertuous exerciſes, or perpetually infa-<lb/>
                    mous for their vicious liues.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName>God</persName> giueth life vnto man: ſo a Poet</hi><lb/>
                    giueth ornament vnto it.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As the Greeke and Latine Poets haue</hi><lb/>
                    wonne immortall credit to their natiue<lb/>
                    ſpeech, beeing encouraged and graced by<lb/>
                    liberall patrones and bountifull Benefac-<lb/>
                    tors: ſo our famous and learned Lawreat<lb/>
                    maſters of <placeName>Englãd</placeName> would entitle our Eng-<lb/>
                    liſh to far greater admired excellency, if ei-<lb/>
                    ther the <persName>Emperor <hi style="font-style:italic;">Auguſtus</hi></persName>, or <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Octauia</hi></persName> his<lb/>
                    ſiſter, or noble <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Mecænas</hi></persName> were aliue to re-<lb/>
                    warde and countenaunce them; or if our<lb/>
                    witty Comedians and ſtately Tragedians<lb/>
                    (the glorious and goodlie repreſenters of<lb/>
                    all fine witte, glorified phraſe and queint<lb/>
                    action) bee ſtill ſupported and vphelde,<lb/>
                    by which meanes for lacke of Patrones<lb/></p>
          <pb/>
          <!-- FENDY LORMINE-->
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The ſecond part of</hi></fw>
                <p>(ô ingratefull and damned age) our Poets<lb/>
                    are ſoly or chiefly maintained, countenan-<lb/>
                    ced and patronized.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">In the infancy of <placeName>Greece,</placeName> they that hand-</hi><lb/>
                    led in the audience of the people, graue &amp;<lb/>
                    neceſſary matters, were called wiſe men or<lb/>
                    eloquent men, which they ment by <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Vates</persName></hi>:<lb/>
                    ſo the reſt, which ſang of loue matters, or<lb/>
                    other lighter deuiſes alluring vnto pleaſure<lb/>
                    and delight, were called Poetæ or makers,<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As the holy Prophets and ſanctified A-</hi><lb/>
                    poſtles could neuer haue foretold nor ſpo-<lb/>
                    ken of ſuch ſupernaturall matters, vnleſſe<lb/>
                    they had bin inſpired of God: ſo <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Cicero</persName></hi> in<lb/>
                    his Tuſculane queſtions is of yͤ minde, that<lb/>
                    a Poet cannot expreſſe verſes aboundant-<lb/>
                    ly, ſufficiently, and fully, neither his elo-<lb/>
                    quence can flow pleaſantly, or his wordes<lb/>
                    found well and plenteouſly, without cele-<lb/>
                    ſtiall inſtinction; which Poets themſelues<lb/>
                    do every often and gladly witnes of them-<lb/>
                    ſelues, as namely <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Ouid</persName> in 6, <title>Faſt.</title></hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="font-style:italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Eſt Deus, in nobis agitãte caleſcimus illo</foreign>,&amp; c</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">And our famous English Poet <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Spenſer</persName></hi></hi>,<lb/>
                    who in his <title><hi style="font-style:italic;">Sheepeheards Calender</hi></title> lamen-<lb/>
                    ting the decay of Poetry at theſe dayes,<lb/>
                    faith moſt ſweetly to the fame.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"><fw type="signature" style="font-style:italic;"> Then make thee wings of thine aſpiring wit</fw></hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="margin-left:1em;"><fw type="signature" style="font-style:italic;">And whence thou cameſt fly backe to hea-</fw></hi><lb/>
                   <fw type="signature" style="font-style:italic;">uen apace, &amp;c</fw><lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">As</fw><lb/>
          <pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="font-style:italic; text-align: center;">Wits Common-wealth.</fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">279</fw><lb/>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As a long gowne maketh not an Aduo-</hi><lb/>
                    cate, although a gowne be a fit ornament<lb/>
                    for him: ſo riming nor verſing maketh a<lb/>
                    Poet, albeit the Senate of Poets hath cho-<lb/>
                    ſen verſe as their fitteſt rayment; but it is yͤ<lb/>
                    faining notable images of vertues, vices, or<lb/>
                    what elſe, with that delightfull teaching,<lb/>
                    which muſt bee the right deſcribing note<lb/>
                    to knowe a Poet by,<hi style="font-style:italic;"> <persName>Sir Philip Sidney</persName> in his</hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;"><title>Apology for Poetry</title>.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p style="font-size:150%"><hi style="text-align: center;">A comparatiue diſcourſe of</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="text-align: center;">our Engliſh Poets,with the</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">Greeke, Latine, and Ita-<lb/>
                   lian Poets.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5em; padding: 0.5em; margin: 0 2em 1em 0;">A</hi>S <placeName>Greece</placeName> had three Poets of great an-<lb/>
                    tiquity, <hi style="font-style:italic;"> <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ORPH1">Orpheus</persName>, Linus</hi> and <hi style="font-style:italic;">Muſaus;</hi><lb/>
                    and <hi style="font-style:italic;"><placeName>Italy</placeName></hi>, other three auncient Poets,<hi style="font-style:italic;">Liui-</hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">us <persName>Andronicus</persName>,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ENNI1">Ennius</persName> &amp; <persName>Plautus</persName></hi>: ſo hath<lb/>
                    England three auncient Poets, <hi style="font-style:italic;">Chaucer,</hi><lb/> 
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Gower</persName></hi> and <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Lydgate.</persName></hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1">Homer</persName></hi> is reputed the Prince of Greek</hi><lb/>
                    Poets; and <hi style="font-style:italic;">Petrarch</hi> of Italian Poets: ſo<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">Chaucer</hi> is accounted the God of English<lb/>
                    Poets.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Homer</persName></hi> was the firſt that adorned the</hi><lb/> 
                    Greek tongue with true quantity: ſo <hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PIER1">Piers<lb/> 
                    Plowman</persName></hi> was the firſt that obſerued the<lb/> 
                    true quantitie of our verſe without the<lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">curioſitie</fw><lb/>
          <pb/>  
          <!-- ADAM MOCCIOLA -->   
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The ſecond part of</hi></fw>
                <p>curioſitie of Rime.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"><persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouid</hi></persName> writ a Chronicle from the begin-</hi><lb/>
                    ning of the world to his own time, that is,<lb/>
                    to the raign of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Auguſtus</persName> the Emperour: ſo<lb/>
                    hath <persName style="font-style: italic;">Harding</persName> the Chronicler (after his ma<lb/>
                    ner of old harſh riming) from <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Adam</hi></persName> to his<lb/>
                    time, that is, to the raigne of <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_EDWA2">King Edward</persName><lb/>
                    the fourth.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Sotades Maronites</hi></persName> yͤ Iambicke Poet</hi><lb/>
                    gaue himſelfe wholy to write impure and<lb/>
                    laſciuious things: ſo <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Skeltō</hi></persName> (I know not for<lb/>
                    what great worthines, ſurnamed the Poet<lb/>
                    <persName>Laureat</persName>) applied his wit to ſcurrilities and<lb/>
                    ridiculous matters, ſuch amōg the Greeks<lb/>
                    were called <foreign xml:lang="gr" style="font-style: italic;">Pantomimi</foreign>, with vs Buffons.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"> As <persName style="font-style: italic;">Conſaluo Periz</persName> that excellent lear-</hi><lb/> 
                    ned man, and Secretary to King <persName style="font-style: italic;">Philip of<lb/>
                        <placeName>Spayne</placeName></persName>, in tranſlating the <persName style="font-style: italic;">Ulyſſes</persName> of <persName>Hom-<lb/>
                    er</persName> out of Greeke into Spaniſh, hath by<lb/>
                    good iudgement auoided the faulte of Ry-<lb/>
                    ming, although not fully hit perfect and<lb/>
                    true verſifying: ſo halh <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOWA1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Henrie Howarde</hi></persName><lb/> 
                    that true and noble <persName>Earle of <hi style="font-style: italic;">Surrey</hi></persName> in tran-<lb/>
                    ſlating the fourth book of <title><hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Virgils</persName> <persName>Æneas</persName></hi></title>,<lb/>
                    whom <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_DRAY1" style="font-style: italic;">Michael Drayton</persName> in his <!-- this is a title!--><hi style="font-style: italic;">Englands<lb/> 
                    heroycall Epiſtles</hi> hath enternized for an E-<lb/>
                    piſtle to his faire <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Geraldine</hi></persName>.</p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As theſe Neoterickes <persName style="font-style: italic;">Iouianus Ponta-</persName></hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">nus</hi>, <persName style="font-style: italic;">Politanus</persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MARU1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Marullus Tarchamota</hi></persName>, the<lb/> 
                   two <hi style="font-style: italic;">Stroze</hi> the father and the ſon, <persName style="font-style: italic;">Palin-</persName><lb/>
                   <hi style="text-align:right;"><fw type="catchword" style="font-style: italic;">genius</fw></hi><lb/></p>
           <pb/> 
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic; text-align:center;"> Wits Common-wealth</fw> <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">280</fw><lb/>                       
                <p><hi style="font-style:italic;">genius,</hi><persName style="font-style: italic;">Mantuanus </persName>, <persName>P<hi style="font-style: italic;">hilelphus</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ELIZ1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Quintianus<lb/> 
                    Stoa</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Germanus Brixius</hi></persName> haue obtained<lb/>
                    renown and good place among the aunci-<lb/>
                    ent Latine Poets: ſo alſo theſe Engliſh<lb/>
                    men being Latine Poets, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HADD1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Gualter Haddon</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Nicholas Car</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HARV1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Gabriel Haruey</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Chriſtopher<lb/> 
                    Ocland</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Newton</hi></persName> with his <hi style="font-style: italic;">Leyland,</hi><lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Watſon</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Campion</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;"> Bruno<lb/>
                    ſwerd</hi></persName> &amp; <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Willey</hi></persName>, haue attained good report<lb/> 
                    and honorable aduancement in the Latin <lb/>
                    Empyre.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As the Greeke tongue is made famous</hi><lb/> 
                    and eloquent by <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Homer</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Heſiod</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_EURI1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Euripedes,</hi></persName><lb/> 
                    <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Aeſchilus</persName>, <persName>Sophocles</persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PIND1"> Pindarus</persName>, <persName>Phocylides</persName></hi><lb/>
                    and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ariſtophanes</hi></persName>; and the Latine tongue<lb/>  
                    by <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Virgill</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouid</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Horace</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Silius Italicus</hi></persName>,<lb/> 
                    <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Lucanus</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Lucretius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Auſonius</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Clau-<lb/> 
                    dianus</hi></persName>: ſo the Engliſh tongue is mightily<lb/> 
                    enriched, and gorgeouſlie inueſted in rare<lb/>  
                    ornaments and reſplendent abiliments by<lb/> 
                    ſir<persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Philip Sidney</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Spencer</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Daniel</hi></persName>,  <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Drayton</hi></persName>,<lb/> 
                    <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Warner</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakeſpeare</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Marlow</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Chap-<lb/> 
                    man</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Xenophon</persName></hi>, who did imitate ſo excel-</hi><lb/> 
                    lently, as to giue vs <hi style="font-style: italic;">effigiens iuſhimpery</hi>, the<lb/> 
                    portraiture of a iult Empyre vnder yͤ name<lb/> 
                    of<persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Cyrus</hi></persName> 
                    (as <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Cicero</hi></persName> ſaieth of him) made<lb/> 
                    therein an abſolute heroicall Poem; and as<lb/>  
                    <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Heliodorus</hi></persName> writ in proſe his ſugred inuētiō<lb/> 
                    of that picture of Loue in <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Theagines</hi></persName> and</p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="font-style:italic; text-align:center;">Cariclea</fw>
          <pb/>
          <!--PETER GIL--> 
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic; text-align:center;">The ſecond part of</fw>
                <p><hi style="font-style:italic;">Cartclea</hi>, and yet both excellent admired<lb/>
                    Poets: ſo ſir <persName style="font-style:italic;">Philip Sidney</persName> writ his immortal<lb/>
                    Poem, <persName>The Counteſſe of Pembrookes</persName> <!-- title --> <hi style="font-style:italic;">Ar-<lb/>
                    cadia</hi>, in Profe, and yet our rareſt Poet.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PROP1" style="font-style:italic;">Sextus Propertius</persName> faide;</hi> 
                    <foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style:italic;">Neſcio quid<lb/>
                    magis naſcitur Iliade</foreign>: ſo l ſay of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Spencers<lb/></persName>
                    <!--title --><hi style="font-style:italic;">Fairy Queene</hi>, I knowe not what more ex-<lb/>
                    cellent or exquiſite Poem may be written.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Achilles</persName> had the aduantage of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Hec</persName>-</hi><lb/>
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;">tor</persName>, becauſe it was his fortune to bee extol-<lb/>
                    led and renowned by the heauenly verſe<lb/>
                    of <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1" style="font-style:italic;">Homer</persName>: 
                    ſo <persName style="font-style:italic;">Spenſers Eliſa</persName> 
                    the <title><hi style="font-style:italic;">Fairy Queen</hi></title><lb/>
                    hath the aduantage of all the Queenes in<lb/>
                    the worlde, to bee eternized by ſo diuine<lb/>
                    a Poet.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Theocritus</persName> is famouſed for his <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic;">Idyllia</hi></hi><lb/>
                    in Greeke, and <persName style="font-style:italic;">Virgill</persName> for his <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic;">Eclogs</hi> in La-<lb/>
                    tine:ſo <persName style="font-style:italic;">Spencer</persName> thier imitatour in his <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic;">Shep-<lb/>
                    heardes Calender</hi>, is renowned for the like<lb/>
                    argument, and honoured for fine Poeticall<lb/>
                    inuention, and moſt exquiſit wit.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Parthenius Nicaus</persName> excellently ſung</hi><lb/>
                    the praiſes of his <persName style="font-style:italic;">Arete</persName>: ſo <persName style="font-style:italic;">Daniel</persName> hath di-<lb/>
                    uinely ſonetted the matchleſſe beauty of<lb/>
                    his <persName style="font-style:italic;">Delia</persName>.</p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As euery one mourneth, when hee hea-</hi><lb/>
                    reth of the lamentable plangors of <!--SUPPOSED TO BE A LINE BREAK???-->
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ORPH1" style="font-style:italic;">Thra-<lb/>
                    cian Orpheusfor</persName> his deareſt <!--LINE BREAK???-->
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;">Euridice</persName>: ſo e-<lb/>
                    uery one paſſionateth, when he readeth the<lb/>
                    afflicted death of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Daniels</persName> diſtreſſed 
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;">Roſa-<lb/>
                    mond</persName>.
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">As</fw></p>
         <pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic; text-align:center;"> Wits Common-wealth</fw> <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">281</fw><lb/>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucan</persName> hath mournefully depainted</hi><lb/>
                   the ciuil wars of <hi style="font-style:italic;">Pompey &amp; Cæſar</hi>: ſo hath<lb/>
                   <persName style="font-style:italic;">Daniel</persName> the ciuill wars of Yorke and Lan-<lb/>
                    caſter; and <persName style="font-style:italic;">Drayton</persName> the ciuill wars of <hi style="font-style:italic;">Ed</hi>-<lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">ward</hi> the ſecond, and the Barons.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Virgil</persName> doth imitate <persName style="font-style:italic;">Catullus</persName> in yͤ like</hi><lb/>
                    matter of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Ariadne</persName> for his ſtory of Queene<lb/>
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;">Dido</persName>: ſo <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_DRAY1"  style="font-style:italic;">Michael Drayton</persName> doth imitate<lb/>
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;">Ouid</persName> in his <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic;">Englands Heroical Epiſtles</hi>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Sophocles</persName> was called a Bee for the</hi><lb/>
                    ſweetness of his tongue: ſo in <persName style="font-style:italic;">Charles</persName> <hi style="font-style:italic;">Fitz</hi>-<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">Iefferies</hi> <persName style="font-style:italic;">Drake</persName>, <persName style="font-style:italic;">Drayton</persName> is termed <hi style="font-style:italic;">Golden</hi>-<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">mouth’d</hi>, for the purity and pretiouſneſſe of<lb/>
                    his ſtile and phraſe.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Accius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">M. Attilius</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Milithus</hi></persName></hi><lb/>
                    were called <title><hi style="font-style:italic;">Tragædiographi</hi></title>, becauſe they<lb/>
                    writ Tragedies: ſo may wee truly terme<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;"> <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_DRAY1"> Michael Drayton</persName> <title> Tragædiographi </title></hi>, for<lb/>
                    his paſſionate penning the downfals of va-<lb/>
                    liant <persName style="font-style:italic;">Robert of Normandy</persName>, chaſt <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Matilda</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                    and great <persName style="font-style:italic;">Gaueſton</persName>.<lb/>
                </p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Ioan</hi></persName>. <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Honterus</hi></persName> in Latine verſe writ 3.</hi><lb/>
                    Bookes of Coſinography wͭ Geographicall<lb/>
                    tables: ſo <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Michael Drayton</hi></persName> is now in pen-<lb/>
                    ning in Engliſh verſe a Poem called <hi style="font-style:italic;">Po</hi>-<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;">lu-olbion</hi> Geographical and Hydrographi-<lb/>
                    call of all the foreſts, woods, mountaines,<lb/>
                    fountaines, riuers, lakes, flouds, bathes and<lb/>
                    ſprings that be in England.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Aulus Perſius Flaccus</hi></persName> is reported a-</hi></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">mong</fw>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center;">Oo</fw>
               <pb/>
         <!-- ANDREW RIVELI -->
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The ſecondpart of</hi></fw>           	
                <p>mong al writers to be of an honeſt life and<lb/>
                    vpright conuerſation: ſo <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_DRAY1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Michael Drayton</hi></persName><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">(que toties honoris &amp; amoris caufa nomino)</foreign></hi><lb/>
                   among ſchollers, ſouldiours, Poets, and all<lb/>
                   ſorts of people, is helde for a man of vertu-<lb/>
                   ous diſpoſition, honeſt conuerſation, and<lb/>
                   wel gouerned cariage, which is almoſt mi-<lb/>
                   raculous among good wits in theſe decli-<lb/>
                   ning and corrupt times, when there is no-<lb/>
                   thing but rogery in villainous man, &amp; whẽ<lb/>
                   cheating and craftines is counted the clea-<lb/>
                   neſt wit, and ſoundeſt wiſedome.</p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As<foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Decius Auſonius Gallus in libris Fa-</hi></foreign></hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">ſtorum</foreign></hi>, penned the occurrences of yͤ world<lb/>
                   from the firſt creation of it to his time, that<lb/>
                    is, to the raigne of the Emperor <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_GRAT1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Gratian</hi></persName>: ſo<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Warner</hi></persName> in his abſolute <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Albions Englande</hi></title><lb/>
                   hath moſt admirably penned the hiſtorie<lb/>
                    of his own country from <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_NOAH1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Noah</hi></persName> to his time,<lb/>
                   that is, to the raign of Queene <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Elizabeth</hi></persName>;<lb/>
                   I haue heard him termd of the beſt wits of<lb/>
                    both our Vniverſities, our Engliſh <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Homer</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_EURI1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Euripedes</hi></persName> is the moſt ſententious a-</hi><lb/>
                    mong the Greek Poets: ſo is <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Warner</hi></persName> amõg<lb/>
                    our Engliſh Poets.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As the ſoule of <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Euphorbus</hi></persName> was thought</hi><lb/>
                    To liue in <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Pythagoras</hi></persName>: ſo the ſweete wittie<lb/>
                    ſoule of <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouid</hi></persName> liues in mellifluous &amp; hony-<lb/>
                    tounged <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakespeare</hi></persName>, witnes his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Venus</hi> and<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style: italic;">Adonis</hi></title>, his <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Lucrece</hi></persName>, his fugred Sonnets<lb/>
                </p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">among</fw>
         <pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Wits Common-Wealth.</hi></fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">282</fw>
                <p>among his priuate friends, &amp; c.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Plautus</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Seneca</hi></persName> are accounted</hi><lb/>
                    the beſt for Comedy and Tragedy among<lb/>
                    the Latines: ſo <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakeſpeare</hi></persName> among yͤ Eng-<lb/>
                    liſh is the moſt excellent in both kinds for<lb/>
                    the ſtage;for Comedy, witnes his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Gētlemē<lb/>
                    of Verona</hi></title>, his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Errors</hi></title>, his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Loue labors ſoft</hi></title>, his<lb/>
                    <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Loue Labours wonne</hi></title>, his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Midſummers night<lb/>
                    dreame</hi></title>, &amp; his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Merchant of Venice</hi></title>:for Tra-<lb/>
                    gedy, his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Richard the 2.</hi></title> <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Richard the 3.</hi></title> <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Hen-<lb/>
                    ry the 4.</hi></title> <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">King Iohn</hi></title>, <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Titus  Andronicus</hi></title> and<lb/>
                    his <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Romeo</hi> and <hi style="font-style: italic;">Iuliet</hi></title>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Epius Stolo</hi></persName> ſaid, that the Muſes would</hi><lb/>
                    ſpeak with <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Plautus</hi></persName> tongue, if they would<lb/>
                    ſpeak Latin; ſo I ſay that the Muſes would<lb/>
                    ſpeak with <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakespeares</hi></persName> fine filed phraſe, if<lb/>
                    they would ſpeak Engliſh.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As<persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Muſaeus</hi></persName>, who wrote the loue of <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Hero</hi></title></hi><lb/>
                    <title>and <hi style="font-style: italic;">Leander</hi></title>, had two excellent ſchollers,<lb/>
                    <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thamaras &amp; Hercules</hi></title>: ſo hath he in <placeName>Eng-<lb/>
                    Land</placeName> two excellent Poets, imitators of him<lb/>
                    In the ſame argument and ſubiect, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Chriſto-<lb/>
                    pher Marlow</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">George Chapman</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As<fw type="signature" style="text-align: Left;"></fw><persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouid</hi></persName> ſaith of his worke;</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="margin-left:2em;"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Iamp opus exegi, quod nec Iouis ira, nec ignis,</hi></foreign></hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="margin-left:2em;"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Nec poterit ferrum, nec edax abolere vetuſtas.</hi></foreign></hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">And as <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Horace</hi></persName> ſaith of his; <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Exegi monu-</hi></foreign></hi><lb/>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">mentũ aere perennius; Regaliq; ſitu pyramidũ</hi></foreign><lb/>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">altius; Quod non imber edax; Non Aquilo</hi></foreign><lb/>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">impotens poſſit diruere; aut innumerabilis</hi></foreign><lb/>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style: italic;">annorum</hi></foreign></fw><lb/>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">Oo2</fw>
                </p>
            <pb/>
            <!-- MACKENZIE PLESHAW -->    
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The ſecondpart of</hi></fw>          
                <p><hi style="font-style: italic;">annorum ſeries &amp; <foreign xml:lang="la">fuga temporum</foreign></hi>: ſo fay I<lb/>
                   ſeuerally of ſir <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Philip Sidneys</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Spencers Da-<lb/>
                       niels</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Draytons</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakeſpeares</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Warners</hi></persName><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">workes;</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"><hi style="font-style:italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Non Iouis ira: imbres: Mars: ferrum:</foreign></hi></hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">flamma, ſenectus,</foreign></hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:2em:"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Hoc opus unda: lues: turbo: venena ruent.</hi></foreign></hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Et quanquam ad plucherrimum hoc opirs e-</hi></foreign></hi><lb/>
                   <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style:italic;">uertendum tres illi Dij conſpirabũt, Cronus,</hi></foreign><lb/>
                   <foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>Vulcanus</persName>, &amp; pater ipſe gentis;</hi></foreign><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style:italic">Non tamen annorum ſeries, non flamma,<lb/>
                   necenſis,</hi></foreign></hi></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;"><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="font-style:italic">Æternumpotuit hoc abolere Decus.</hi></foreign></hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <placeName>Italy</placeName> had <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Dante</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Boccace</hi></persName>,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PETR1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Petrarch</hi></persName>,</hi><lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Taſſo</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Celiano</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Arioſto</hi></persName>: ſo <placeName>England</placeName> had<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ROYD1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Mathew Roydon</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Atchelow</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Tho-</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">Mas Watſon</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Kid</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Robert Greene</hi></persName> &amp;<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PEEL1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">George Peele</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:2em;">As there are eight famous and cheife</hi><lb/>
                   languages, <hi style="font-style:italic;">Hebrew, Greek, Latine, Syriack,</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">Arabricke, Italian, Spaniſh,</hi> and <hi style="font-style:italic;">French</hi>: ſo<lb/>
                   there are eight notable feurall kindes of<lb/>
                   Poets,<hi style="font-style: italic;">Heroick, Lyricke, Tragicke, Comicke</hi>,<lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;">Satiricke, Iambicke, Elegiacke &amp; Paſtoral.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:0.5em;">As <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Homer</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Virgil</hi></persName> among the Greeks</hi><lb/>
                   and Latines are the chiefe Heroick Poets:<lb/>
                   to <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Spencer</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Warner</hi></persName> be our chiefe heroi-<lb/>
                   call Makers.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:0.5em;">As <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PIND1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Pindarus</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Anacreon</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Callimachus</hi></persName></hi><lb/>
                   among the Greekes; and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Horace</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ca-</hi></persName><lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;"><persName><hi style="font-style:italic;"> tullus</hi></persName></fw>
         <pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Wits Common-wealth.</hi></fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">283</fw><lb/>
                <p><persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">tullus</hi></persName> among the Latines are the beſt Ly-<lb/>
                    rick Poets: ſo in this faculty the beſt among<lb/>
                    our Poets are <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Spencer</hi></persName> (who excelleth in all<lb/>
                    kinds) <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Daniel</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Drayton</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakeſpeare</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Brettȭ</hi></persName><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:0.5em;">As theſe Tragicke Poets flouriſhed in</hi><lb/>
                    <placeName>Greece</placeName>, <persName style="font-style: italic;">Aeſchylus</persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_EURI1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Euripedes</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Sophocles</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">A-<lb/>
                   lexander</hi></persName>, <persName style="font-style: italic;">Aetolus</persName>, <persName style="font-style: italic;">Achaeus Erithraeus</persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">A-<lb/>
                   ſtydamas Atheniȇſis</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Apollodorus Tarſenſis</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PHRY1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Nicomachus Phrygius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Theſpis Atticus</hi></persName>, and<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Timon Apolloniates</hi></persName>; and theſe among the<lb/>
                    Latines, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Accius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">M. Attilius</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_POMP1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Pomponius</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">Secundus</hi></persName> and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Seneca</hi></persName>: ſo theſe are our beſt<lb/>
                   for Tragedie, the Lorde <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Buckhurſt</hi></persName>, Doctor<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Leg</hi></persName> of <placeName>Cambridge</placeName>, Doctor <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Edes</hi></persName> of <placeName>Ox-<lb/>
                       forde</placeName>, maiſter <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_FERR1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Edward Ferris,</hi></persName>, the Authour<lb/>
                    of the <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic;">Mirrour for Magiſtrates</hi>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Marlow</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PEEL1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Peele</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Watſon</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Kid</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Shakeſpeare</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Drayton</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Chapman</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Decker</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Beniamin Iohn-</hi></persName><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;">son.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="margin-left:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">M. Anneus Lucanus</hi></persName> writ two excel-</hi><lb/>
                   lent Tragedies, one called <!-- title --><hi style="font-style: italic;">Medea</hi>, the o-<lb/>
                   ther <title>(de Incendio Troiaecum Priami calami-<lb/>
                   tate)</title>: ſo Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">Leg</persName> hath penned two fa-<lb/>
                   mous tragedies, ȳ one of <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Richard the ʒ</hi></persName>. the<lb/>
                   other of the deſtruction of <hi style="font-style: italic;">Ieruſalem.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p>The beſt Poets for Comedy among the<lb/>
                    Greeks are theſe, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MENA1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Menander</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ariſtophanes</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Eupolis Athenienſis</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Alexis Terius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Nico-<lb/>
                   ſtratus</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Amipſias Athenienſis</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Anaxādrides<lb/>
                       Rhodius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ariſtonymus</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Archippus Atheniȇſis</hi></persName>  <lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">and</fw><lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">Oo3</fw>
          <pb/>
          <!-- LAUREN GILLIS -->
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The ſecondpart of</hi></fw>
                <p>and <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Callias Athenienſis</hi></persName>; and among the<lb/>
                   Latines,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Plautus</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Terence</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Næuius</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Sext.</hi></persName><lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Turpilius</hi></persName>,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PORC1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Licinius Imbrex</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Virgilius</hi></persName><lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Romanus</hi></persName>:ſo the beſt for Comedy amongſt<lb/>
                   vs bee, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Edward</hi></persName> Earle of Oxforde, Doctor<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Gager</hi></persName> of Oxforde, <persName>Maiſter <hi style="font-style:italic;"> Rowley</hi></persName> once a<lb/>
                   rare Scholler of learned <placeName>Pembrooke Hall</placeName><lb/>
                   in Cambridge, <persName>Maiſter<hi style="font-style:italic;"> Edwardes</hi></persName>one of<lb/>
                   her <persName>Maieſties Chappell</persName>, eloquent and wit-<lb/>
                   tie <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Iohn Lilly</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Lodge</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Gaſcoyne</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Greene</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Shakeſpeare</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Thomas Naſh</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Thomas Hey-</hi></persName><lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">wood</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Anthony Mundye</hi></persName> our beſt plotter,<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Chapman</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Porter</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Wilſon</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Hathway</hi></persName>, and<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Henry Chettle</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 1em;">As<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Horace</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Lucilius</hi>
                   </persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Iuuenal</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Perſius</hi></persName> &amp;<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_LUCU1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Lucullus</hi></persName> are the beſt for Satyre among<lb/>
                   the <foreign>Latines</foreign>: ſo with vs in the ſame faculty<lb/>
                    theſe are chiefe,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PIER1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Piers Plowman</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Lodge</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   <placeName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Hall</hi> of Imanuel Colledge</placeName> in <placeName>Cambridge</placeName>;<lb/>
                   the Authour of <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">Pigmalions Image, and cer-</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">taine Satyrs</hi>; <hi style="font-stlye:italic;">the Author of <title>Skialetheia</title></hi>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1em;">Among the Greeks I wil name but two</hi><lb/>
                   for <hi style="font-stlye:italic;">Iambicks</hi>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Archilochus Parius</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Hip</hi></persName> -<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">ponax Epheſius</hi></persName>: ſo amongſt vs I name but<lb/>
                    two Iambical Poets,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HARV1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Gabriel Haruey</hi></persName>, and<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_STAN1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Richard Stanyhurſt</hi></persName>, bicauſe I haue ſeene no<lb/>
                   mo in this kind.<lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 1 em;">As theſe are famous among the Greeks<lb/>
                    for Elegie,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MELA1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Melanthus</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Mymnerus Colo</hi></persName>-<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">phonius</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Olympius Myſius</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Parthenius Ni</hi></persName> -<lb/>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;"> <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">cæus</hi></persName></fw> 
          <pb/>
                    <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Wits Common-Wealth.</hi></fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">284</fw><lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">cæus</hi></persName>,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_COUS1">P <hi style="font-style:italic;">hiletas Cous</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Theogenes Megaren</hi></persName> -<lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">ſis</hi></persName>, and <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PIGR1">P<hi style="font-style:italic;">igres Halicarnaſſӕus</hi></persName>; and theſe<lb/>
                    among the Latines, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Mecænas</hi></persName>,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_NASO1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Ovid</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Ti</hi></persName>-<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">bullus</hi></persName>,<persName>P<hi style="font-style:italic;">ropertius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">T. Valgius</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Caſſius</hi></persName><lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Seuerus</hi></persName> &amp; <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Clodius Sabinus</hi></persName>: ſo theſe are the<lb/>
                   moſt paſſionate among vs to bewaile and<lb/>
                   bemoane the perplexities of <persName>Loue</persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Henrie</hi></persName><lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOWA1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Howard</hi></persName> Earle of <placeName>Surrey</placeName>, ſir <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Thomas Wyat</hi></persName><lb/>
                   the elder, ſir <persName>Francis Brian,</persName> <persName>ſir Philip Sid-<lb/>
                       ney</persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;"> ſir Walter Rawley</hi></persName>, ſir <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_DYER1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Edward Dyer</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Spencer</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Daniel</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Drayton</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SHAK1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Shakeſpeare</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Whetſtone</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Gaſcoyne</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Samuell Page</hi></persName>fome-<lb/>
                   times fellow of <placeName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Corpus Chriſti</hi> Colledge</placeName><lb/>
                   in<placeName> Oxford</placeName>,<hi style="font-style: italic"> Churchyard</hi>,<placeName style="font-style:italic"> Bretton</placeName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As </hi><persName style="font-style:italic">Theocritus</persName> in Greeke, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic">Virgil</hi></persName>and<lb/>
                   <placeName>Mantuā</placeName> in Latine, <persName style="font-style: italic">Sonazar</persName> in Italian, and<lb/>
                   the Authour of <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic">Amyntæ Guadia</hi> and <!-- title --><hi style="font-style:italic">Wal-<lb/>
                   ſinghams Melibæus</hi> are the beſt for paſto-<lb/>
                   rall: ſo amongſt vs the beſt in this kind are<lb/>
                   ſir <persName>P<hi style="font-style:italic;">hilip Sidney</hi></persName>,<persName>maſter <hi style="font-style:italic;">Challener</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Spencer</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Stephen Goſſon</hi></persName>,<persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Abraham Fraunce</hi></persName>and<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Barnefield</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1 em;">Theſe and many other <hi style="font-style:italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Epigrammatiſts</foreign></hi></hi><lb/>
                    Latin tongue hath,<persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_LUTA1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Q. Catulus</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PORC1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Porcius Li</hi></persName>-<lb/>
                    <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">cinius</hi></persName>, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_CORN1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Quintus Corniſicius</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Martial</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Cn</hi></persName>.<lb/>
                    <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_GETU1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Getulicus</hi></persName>, and wittie ſir <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Thomas Moore</hi></persName>: ſo<lb/>
                    in Engliſh we haue theſe, <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HEYW1"><hi style="font-style:italic;">Heywood</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Drāte</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Kendal</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Baſtard</hi></persName>, <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Dauies</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent: 1 em;">As noble <persName><hi style="font-style:italic;">Mecænas</hi></persName> that ſprung from the</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style:italic;">Hetruſcan</hi> Kinges not onely graced Poets<lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">by</fw>
                <fw type="signature"> O o 4,</fw>
                <pb/>
         <!-- BAILEY GRANT -->  
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The ſecond part of</hi></fw>
                <p>by his bounty, but alſo by beeing a Poet<lb/>
                   himſelfe; and as <persName style="font-style:italic;">Iames the 6</persName>. nowe king of<lb/>
                   <placeName>Scotland</placeName> is not only a fauorer of Poets, but<lb/>
                   a Poet, as my friend maſter <persName style="font-style:italic;"> Richard Barneſ-<lb/>
                   fielde </persName>hath in this Diſticke paſſing well re-<lb/>
                   corded:<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;"><hi style="font-style:italic;"><persName>The King of Scots</persName> now liuing is a Poet,</hi></hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="text-indent:1em;"><hi style="font-style:italic;">As his Lepanto, and his furies ſhow it:</hi></hi><lb/>
                   ſo <persName style="font-style:italic;">Elizabeth</persName> our dread ſoueraign and gra-<lb/>
                   cious Queene is not only a liberal patrone<lb/>
                   vnto Poets, but an excellent Poet herſelfe,<lb/>
                   whoſe learned, delicate and noble Muſe<lb/>
                   ſurmounteth, be it in <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">Ode, Elegy, Epigram</hi><lb/>
                   or in any other kind of Poem <hi style="font-style:italic;">Heroicke, or</hi><lb/>
                   Lyricke.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;"><persName style="font-style: italic;">Octauia</persName> ſiſer vnto<persName style="font-style:italic;">Auguſtus</persName> the Empe-</hi><lb/>
                    rour was exceeding bountifull vnto Virgil,<lb/>
                    who gaue him for making 26. verſes 1137<lb/>
                    pounds, to wit, tenne <hi style="font-style:italic;">Seſtertiaes</hi> for euerie<lb/>
                    verſe, which amount to aboue 43. pounds<lb/>
                    for euery verſse: ſo learned <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mary</persName>, the ho-<lb/>
                    norable <persName>Counteſſe of <placeName style="font-style:italic;">Pembrook</placeName></persName>, the noble<lb/>
                    ſiſter of immortall ſir <persName style="font-style:italic;">Philip Sidney</persName>, is very<lb/>
                    liberall vnto Poets; beſides ſhee is a moſt<lb/>
                    delicate Poet, of whome I may ſay, as<lb/>
                    <hi style="text-indent:1em;"><orgName style="font-style:italic;">Antipater Sidonius writeth of Sappho</orgName>:</hi><lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Dulcia Mnemoſyne demirans carmina</foreign></hi><lb/>
                   <foreign xml:lang="la">Sapphus</foreign>,<lb/>
                   <hi style="text-indent:1em;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Qurſiuit decima Pieris unde foret</foreign>.</hi><lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">Among</fw><lb/>
          <pb/>
               
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic; text-align:center;"> Wits Common-wealth</fw> <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">285</fw><lb/>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">Among others in times paſt, Poets had</hi><lb/>
                   theſe fauourers, <persName style="font-style:italic;">Auguſtus</persName>, <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mecaenas</persName>, <persName style="font-style:italic;">So-<lb/>
                   phocles</persName>, <persName style="font-style:italic;">Germanicus</persName>, an Emperour, a noble<lb/>
                   man, a Senatour, and a Captaine: ſo of la-<lb/>
                   ter times Poets haue theſe patrones,<persName style="font-style:italic;"> Ro-<lb/>
                   bert</persName> king of Sicil, the great king <persName style="font-style:italic;">Frances</persName> of<lb/>
                   <placeName style="font-style:italic;">France</placeName> king <persName style="font-style:italic;">Iames</persName> of <placeName>Scotland</placeName>, &amp; Queene<lb/>
                   <persName style="font-style:italic;">Elizabeth</persName> of <placeName>England</placeName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As in former times two great Cardinals,</hi><lb/>
                   <persName style="font-style:italic;">Bembus &amp; Biena</persName>, did countenance Poets:<lb/>
                   ſo of late yeares two great preachers haue<lb/>
                   giuen them their right hands in felowſhip,<lb/>
                   <persName style="font-style:italic;">Beza</persName> and <persName>Melancthon</persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;"> As the learned philoſophers <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fracaſtorius</persName></hi><lb/>
                   and <persName style="font-style:italic;">Scaliger</persName> haue highly prized them: ſo<lb/>
                   haue the eloquent Orators <persName style="font-style:italic;">Pontanus</persName> and<lb/>
                   <persName style="font-style:italic;">Muretus</persName> very gloriouſly eſtimated them.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As <persName style="font-style:italic;">Georgius Buckananus Iephthe</persName>, amõgſt</hi><lb/>
                   all moderne Tragedies is able to abide the<lb/>
                   touch of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Ariſtotles</persName> precepts, and <persName style="font-style:italic;">Euripe-<lb/>
                   des</persName> examples: ſo is <persName style="font-style:italic;">Biſhop Watſons Abſalon</persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:2em;">As <hi style="font-style:italic;">Terence</hi> for this tranſlations out of</hi><lb/>
                    <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">Apollodorus &amp; <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MENA1">Menander</persName>, and <hi style="font-style:italic;">Aquilius</hi></hi> for<lb/>
                    his tranſlation out of <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;"> <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MENA11">Menander</persName></hi>, and <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">C.<lb/>
                   Germanicus Augustus</hi> for his out of <persName>Arae<lb/>
                   tus</persName>, and <persName style="font-style:italic;">Auſonius</persName> for his tranſlated <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">Epi<lb/>
                   grams out of Greeke</hi>, and Doctor <persName style="font-style:italic;">Iohnſon</persName><lb/>
                    for his Frogge-fight out of <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1" style="font-style:italic;">Homer</persName>, and<lb/>
                   <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">Watſon</hi> for his <!--title--><hi style="font-style:italic;">Antigone out of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Sophocles</persName></hi>,<lb/>
                   haue got good commendations: ſo theſe<lb/>
                  <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">verſiſers</fw></p>
         <pb/>
         <!--SINEAD O'BRIEN-->
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic; text-align:center;">The ſecond part of</fw>
                <p>verſiſers for their learned tranſlations are<lb/>
                   of good note among vs, <placeName>P<hi style="font-style: italic;">haer</hi></placeName> for <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Vir-<lb/>
                   gils</hi></persName> <title>A<hi style="font-style: italic;">eneads</hi></title>, <persName>G<hi style="font-style: italic;">oldings</hi></persName> for <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouids</hi></persName> <hi style="font-style: italic;"><title>Meta-<lb/>
                   morphoſis</title></hi>, <hi style="font-style: italic;">Harington</hi> for his <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Orlādo Furioſo</hi></persName>,<lb/>
                   the tranflators of <title>S<hi style="font-style: italic;">enecaes Tragedies</hi></title>, <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Bar-<lb/>
                   nabe</hi> <hi style="font-style: italic;">Googe</hi></persName>for<title> P<hi style="font-style: italic;">alingenius</hi></title>, <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Turberuile</hi></title> for<lb/>
                   <title><hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouids Epiſtles</hi></title> and <hi style="font-style: italic;">Mantuan</hi>, and<hi style="font-style: italic;"> Chap-<lb/>
                       man</hi> for his inchoate <hi><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1" style="font-style:italic;">Homer</persName></hi>. <lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As the Latines haue thefe <hi style="font-style: italic;">Emblematiſts</hi>,</hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;">Andreas Alciatus</hi>, <hi style="font-style: italic;">Reuſnerus</hi>, and S<hi style="font-style: italic;">ambu-<lb/>
                   cus</hi>: ſo we haue theſe,<persName> <hi style="font-style: italic;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Geffrey Whitney</hi></hi></persName>, <persName>A<hi style="font-style: italic;">n-<lb/>
                   drew Willet</hi></persName>, and <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Combe</hi></persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PANA1">Nonnus Panapolyta</persName></hi> writ the Goſpell</hi><lb/>
                   of faint I<hi style="font-style: italic;">ohn</hi>  in Greeke Hexameters:ſo l<hi style="font-style: italic;">er-<lb/>
                   uis Markham</hi> hath written<title> <hi style="font-style: italic;">Salomons Can<lb/>
                   ticles</hi></title> in Engliſh verſe.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As<persName> <hi style="font-style: italic;">C</hi>.P<hi style="font-style: italic;">linius</hi></persName> writ the life of P<hi style="font-style: italic;">omponius</hi></hi><lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;">Secūdus</hi>: ſo yong <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Charles Fitz-Ieſſrey</persName></hi>, that<lb/>
                   high touring Falcon, hath moſt gloriouſly<lb/>
                   penned the honourable life and death of<lb/>
                    worthy ſir <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_DRAK1">Francis Drake</persName></hi>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Heſiod</hi></persName> writ learnedly of husbandry</hi><lb/>
                   in Greeke: ſo hath <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Tuſſer</hi></persName> very wittily and<lb/>
                   experimentally written of it in Engliſh.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:2em;">As <persName>A<hi style="font-style: italic;">ntipater</hi> S<hi style="font-style: italic;">idonius</hi></persName> was famous for</hi><lb/>
                   extemporall verſe in Greeke, and <hi style="font-style: italic;">Ouid</hi> for<lb/>
                   his <hi style="font-style: italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la"> Quicquid conabar dicere verſus erat</foreign></hi>:<lb/>
                   ſo was our <hi style="font-style: italic;">Tarleton</hi>, of whome Doctour<lb/>
                   Caſe that learned phyſitian thus ſpeaketh<lb/>
                   in the ſeuenth Booke, ſeuenteenth chap-<lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">ter</fw>
        <pb/> 
                <fw type="header"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Wits Common-wealth</hi></fw><fw type="pageNum">286</fw><lb/>
                <p>ter of his Politikes;<persName> A<hi style="font-style: italic;">ristoteles</hi></persName> <hi style="font-style: italic;">ſuum</hi> <hi style="font-style: italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la"> Theo-<lb/>
                   doretum laudauit quendamperitum Tragæ-<lb/>
                   diarum actorem</foreign></hi>; <hi style="font-style: italic;">Cicero ſuum Roſcium</hi>: <hi style="font-style: italic;">nos</hi><lb/>
                   A<hi style="font-style: italic;">ngli Tarletonum</hi>, <hi style="font-style: italic;">in cuius voce vultu<lb/>
                   omnes iocoſi aſſectus</hi>, <hi style="font-style: italic;"><foreign xml:lang="la"> in cuius cerebroſo ca-<lb/>
                   pite lepidae facetiae habitant</foreign></hi>. And ſo is now<lb/>
                   our wittie<hi style="font-style: italic;"> Wilſon</hi>, who, for learning<lb/>
                   and extemporall witte in this facultie, is<lb/>
                   without compare or compeere, as to his<lb/>
                   great and eternall commendations he ma-<lb/>
                   nifeſted in his chalenge at the Swanne on<lb/>
                    the Banke ſide.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As<hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName> Achilles</persName></hi> tortured the deade bo-</hi><lb/>
                    die of <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HECT1">Hector</persName></hi>, and as <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Antonius</persName></hi>, and his<lb/>
                   wife<hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Fuluia</persName></hi> tormented the liueleſſe corps<lb/>
                    of <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Cicero</persName></hi>: ſo <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HARV1" style="font-style: italic;">Gabriell Haruey</persName> hath ſhewed<lb/>
                   the ſame inhumanitie to <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Greene</persName></hi> that lies<lb/>
                   full low in his graue.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:1em;">As <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Eupolis</persName></hi> of <placeName>Athens</placeName> vſed great liber-</hi><lb/>
                   tie in taxing the vices of men: ſo dooth<lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Thomas Naſh</persName></hi>, witneſſe the broode of the<lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic;">Harueys</hi>.<lb/></p>
                <p><hi style="text-indent:2em;">As <persName>A<hi style="font-style: italic;">ctaeon</hi></persName> was wooried of his owne</hi><lb/>
                   hounds: ſo is <persName>T<hi style="font-style: italic;">om Naſh</hi></persName> of his <title>I<hi style="font-style: italic;">le of Dogs</hi></title>.<lb/>
                    Dogges were the death of <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ERUI1"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Euripedes</hi>,</persName><lb/>
                   but bee not diſconſolate gallant young<lb/>
                   I<hi style="font-style: italic;">uuenall</hi>, <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Linus</persName></hi>, the ſonne of<hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Apollo</persName></hi> died<lb/>
                   the ſame death. Yet God forbid that ſo<lb/>
                   braue a witte ſhould ſo baſely periſh, thine<lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">are</fw>
        <pb/>
                <!-- Kristen Abbott Bennett transcribing and encoding to end -->
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic;">Wits Common-wealth</fw><fw type="pageNum">286v</fw><lb/>
                <p>are but paper dogges, neither is thy ba-<lb/>
                    baniſhment like <persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_NASO1" style="font-style: italiz;">Ovids</persName>, eternally to conuerſe<lb/>
                   with the barbarous <persName style="font-style: italic;">Getes</persName>. Therefore com-<lb/>
                   fort thy ſelfe ſweet <persName style="font-style: italic;">tom.</persName> with <persName style="font-style: italic;">Ciceros</persName><lb/>
                   glorious retrun to <placeName>Rome</placeName>, &amp; with the coun-<lb/>
                   ſel <persName style="font-style: italic;">Aeneas</persName> giues to his ſeabeaten ſoldiors,<lb/>
                   <hi style="font-style: italic">lib.</hi> I.<!--title--><hi style="font-style: italic;">Aenid</hi>.<lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 1em;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">Pluck vp thine heart, &amp; driue from thence</hi><lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 4em;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">both feare and care away:</hi><lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 1em;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">To thinke on this may pleaſure be perhaps</hi><lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 3em;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">another day.</hi><lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 1em;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Durato, &amp; temet rebus ſeruato ſecundis.</foreign><lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 2em;">As <persName style="font-style: italic;">Anacreon</persName> died by the pot: ſo <persName style="font-style: italic;">George</persName><lb/></p>
                <p><persName ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PEEL1">P<hi style="font-style: italic;">eele</hi></persName> by the pox.</p>
                <!-- The "P" in Peele is not italic. Review doc and think about how to encode that - it happense elsewhere also -->
                <p style="text-indent: 3em;">As <persName style="font-style: italic;">Archeſilaus Prytanæus</persName> periſhed by<lb/>
                    wine at a drunken feaſt, as <persName style="font-style: italic;">Hermippus</persName> testi-<lb/>
                    fieth in <persName style="font-style: italic;"><title>Diogenes</title></persName>: ſo <persName style="font-style: italic;">Robert Greene</persName> died of<lb/>
                    a ſurfet taken at Pickeld Herrings, &amp; Rhe-<lb/>
                    nish wine, as witneſeth <persName style="font-style: italic;">Thomas Naſh</persName>, who<lb/>
                    was at the fatall banquet.<lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 2em;">As <persName style="font-style: italic;">Iodelle</persName>, a French tragical poet beeing<lb/>
                    an Epicure, and an Atheiſt, made a pitifull<lb/>
                    end: ſo our tragicall poet <persName style="font-style: italic;">Marlow</persName> for his<lb/>
                    Epicuriſme and Atheiſme had a tragicall<lb/>
                    death; you may read of this <persName style="font-style: italic;">Marlow</persName> more<lb/>
                    at large in the <!--title--><hi style="font-style: italic;">Theatre of Gods iudgements</hi>,<lb/>
                    in the 25. chapter entreating of Epicures<lb/>
                    and Atheiſts.<lb/></p>
                <p style="text-indent: 1em;">As the poet <persName style="font-style: italic;">Lycophron</persName> was ſhot to death<lb/>
                   by a certain riual of his: ſo <persName style="font-style: italic;">Chriſtopher Mar</persName><lb/></p>
                <fw type="catchword"><hi style="font-style: italic;">low</hi></fw>
            <pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="font-style: italic;">Wits Common-wealth</fw><fw type="pageNum">287</fw><lb/>
                <!-- Would love to get page numbers to display and label them properly as recto and verso -->
                <p><persName style="font-style: italic">low</persName> was ſtabd to death by a bawdy Ser-<lb/>
                    uingman, a riuall of his in his lewde loue.<lb/></p>        
            </div>              
        </body>
    </text>
</TEI>
Palladis tamia Wits treasury being the second part of Wits common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both Vniuersities. Author Francis Meres Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Assistant editor Rowan Pereira Encoder Rowan Pereira Encoder Ashka Ramanlal Encoder Fendy Lormine Encoder Sinéad O'Brien Encoder Lauren Gillis Encoder Bailey Grant Encoder MacKenzie Pleshaw Encoder Adam Mocciola Encoder Peter Gill Encoder Andrew Rivelli Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2017

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Printed by P. Short Cuthbert Burbie London Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm available on the Early English Books Online Database. STC 17834
Palladis Tamia WITS TREASVRY Being the Second part of Wits Common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both Vni- uerſities Viuitur ingenio cœlera mortis erunt. AT LONDON Printed by P Short, for Cuthbert Burbie, and are to be ſolde at his shop at the Royall Exhange. 1598.
Wits Treasury

Poets.

AS ſome do vſe an Amethiſt in compo- tations agaynſt drunkennes: ſo cer- tain precepts are to be vſed in hearing and reading of poets, leaſt they infect the mind Plut. & Plin.lib.37.cap.9.

As in thoſe places where many holſome hearbes doe growe, there alſo growes ma- ny poyſonfull weedes: ſo in Poets there are many excellent things, and many peſti lent matters. Plut.

As Wits Common-wealth. 277

As Simoniàes ſayde, that the Theſſali- ans were more blockiſh, then that they could be deceiued of him: ſo the riper and pregnanter the wit is, the ſooner it is cor- rupted of Poets.idem.

As Cato when he was a ſcholler woulde not beleeue his maiſter, except hee rende- red a reaſon of that he taught him: ſo wee are not to beleeue Poets in all that they write or ſay, except they yeelde a reaſon. Idem.

As in the ſame paſture the Bee ſeaſeth on the flower, the Goate grazeth on the ſhrub, the ſwine on the root, and the Oxen, Kine and Horſes on the graſſe: ſo in Poets one ſeeketh for hiſtorie, an other for orna- ment of ſpeech, another for proofe, and an other for precepts of good life. idem.

As they that come veri ſuddainlie out of a very darke place, are greatly troubled, except by little and little they be accuſto- med to the light: ſo in reading of Poets, the opinions of Phyloſophers are to bee ſowne in the mindes of young ſchollers, leaſt many diuerſities of doctrines doe af- terwardes diſtract their mindes. idem.

As in the portraiture of murder or inceſt, we praiſe the Art of him that drewe it, but we deteſt the thing it ſelſe: ſo in laſciuious Poets let vs imitate their elocution, but

execrate The ſecond part of

excrate their wantonnes. idem. Some thinges that are not excellent of themſelues, are good for ſome, bicauſe they are meet for them: ſo ſome things are com- mended in Poets, which are fit and correſ- pondent for the perſons, they ſpeake of, al- though in themſelues they bee filthy and not to be ſpoken: As lame Demonides wi- ſhed, that the ſhoes that were ſtolne from him, might fit his feet that had ſtoln them, idem.

As that ſhip is endaungered, where all leane to one ſide, but is in ſafetie, on lea- ning one way, and another another way: ſo the diſſenſion of Poets among them- ſelues, doth make them, that they leſſe in- fect their readers. And for this purpoſe our Satyriſts, Hall, the Author of Pigmalions Image, and certaine Satyres , Rankins, and ſuch others, are very profitable.

As a Bee doth gather the iuice of honie from flowres, whereas others are onely de- lighted with the colour and ſmel: ſo a Phi- loſopher findeth that among Poets which is profitable for good life, when as others are tickled only with pleaſure. Plut .

As wee are delighted in the picture of a Viper of a ſpider artificially encloſed with in a precious iewell: ſo Poets do delight vs in yͤ learned & cũning depainting of vices.

As Wits Common-wealth. 278

As ſome are delighted in coũterfet wines confected of fruites, not that they refreſh the hart, but that they make drunke: ſo ſome are delighted in Poets only for their obſcenity, neuer reſpecting their eloquẽce good grace, or learning.

As Emperors, kings and princes haue in their handes authority to dignifie or diſ- grace their nobles, attendants, ſubiects and vaſſals: ſo Poets haue the whole power in their handes to make men either immor- tally famous for their valiant exploites and vertuous exerciſes, or perpetually infa- mous for their vicious liues.

As God giueth life vnto man: ſo a Poet giueth ornament vnto it.

As the Greeke and Latine Poets haue wonne immortall credit to their natiue ſpeech, beeing encouraged and graced by liberall patrones and bountifull Benefac- tors: ſo our famous and learned Lawreat maſters of Englãd would entitle our Eng- liſh to far greater admired excellency, if ei- ther the Emperor Auguſtus , or Octauia his ſiſter, or noble Mecænas were aliue to re- warde and countenaunce them; or if our witty Comedians and ſtately Tragedians (the glorious and goodlie repreſenters of all fine witte, glorified phraſe and queint action) bee ſtill ſupported and vphelde, by which meanes for lacke of Patrones

The ſecond part of

(ô ingratefull and damned age) our Poets are ſoly or chiefly maintained, countenan- ced and patronized.

In the infancy of Greece, they that hand- led in the audience of the people, graue & neceſſary matters, were called wiſe men or eloquent men, which they ment by Vates : ſo the reſt, which ſang of loue matters, or other lighter deuiſes alluring vnto pleaſure and delight, were called Poetæ or makers,

As the holy Prophets and ſanctified A- poſtles could neuer haue foretold nor ſpo- ken of ſuch ſupernaturall matters, vnleſſe they had bin inſpired of God: ſo Cicero in his Tuſculane queſtions is of yͤ minde, that a Poet cannot expreſſe verſes aboundant- ly, ſufficiently, and fully, neither his elo- quence can flow pleaſantly, or his wordes found well and plenteouſly, without cele- ſtiall inſtinction; which Poets themſelues do every often and gladly witnes of them- ſelues, as namely Ouid in 6, Faſt.

Eſt Deus, in nobis agitãte caleſcimus illo,& c

And our famous English Poet Spenſer , who in his Sheepeheards Calender lamen- ting the decay of Poetry at theſe dayes, faith moſt ſweetly to the fame.

Then make thee wings of thine aſpiring wit And whence thou cameſt fly backe to hea- uen apace, &c

As Wits Common-wealth. 279

As a long gowne maketh not an Aduo- cate, although a gowne be a fit ornament for him: ſo riming nor verſing maketh a Poet, albeit the Senate of Poets hath cho- ſen verſe as their fitteſt rayment; but it is yͤ faining notable images of vertues, vices, or what elſe, with that delightfull teaching, which muſt bee the right deſcribing note to knowe a Poet by, Sir Philip Sidney in his Apology for Poetry.

A comparatiue diſcourſe of our Engliſh Poets,with the Greeke, Latine, and Ita- lian Poets.

AS Greece had three Poets of great an- tiquity, Orpheus, Linus and Muſaus; and Italy , other three auncient Poets,Liui- us Andronicus,Ennius & Plautus : ſo hath England three auncient Poets, Chaucer, Gower and Lydgate.

As Homer is reputed the Prince of Greek Poets; and Petrarch of Italian Poets: ſo Chaucer is accounted the God of English Poets.

As Homer was the firſt that adorned the Greek tongue with true quantity: ſo Piers Plowman was the firſt that obſerued the true quantitie of our verſe without the

curioſitie The ſecond part of

curioſitie of Rime.

Ouid writ a Chronicle from the begin- ning of the world to his own time, that is, to the raign of Auguſtus the Emperour: ſo hath Harding the Chronicler (after his ma ner of old harſh riming) from Adam to his time, that is, to the raigne of King Edward the fourth.

As Sotades Maronites yͤ Iambicke Poet gaue himſelfe wholy to write impure and laſciuious things: ſo Skeltō (I know not for what great worthines, ſurnamed the Poet Laureat) applied his wit to ſcurrilities and ridiculous matters, ſuch amōg the Greeks were called Pantomimi, with vs Buffons.

As Conſaluo Periz that excellent lear- ned man, and Secretary to King Philip of Spayne , in tranſlating the Ulyſſes of Hom- er out of Greeke into Spaniſh, hath by good iudgement auoided the faulte of Ry- ming, although not fully hit perfect and true verſifying: ſo halh Henrie Howarde that true and noble Earle of Surrey in tran- ſlating the fourth book of Virgils Æneas , whom Michael Drayton in his Englands heroycall Epiſtles hath enternized for an E- piſtle to his faire Geraldine .

As theſe Neoterickes Iouianus Ponta- nus, Politanus, Marullus Tarchamota , the two Stroze the father and the ſon, Palin- genius

Wits Common-wealth 280

genius, Mantuanus , Philelphus , Quintianus Stoa and Germanus Brixius haue obtained renown and good place among the aunci- ent Latine Poets: ſo alſo theſe Engliſh men being Latine Poets, Gualter Haddon , Nicholas Car , Gabriel Haruey , Chriſtopher Ocland , Thomas Newton with his Leyland, Thomas Watſon , Thomas Campion , Bruno ſwerd & Willey , haue attained good report and honorable aduancement in the Latin Empyre.

As the Greeke tongue is made famous and eloquent by Homer , Heſiod , Euripedes, Aeſchilus, Sophocles, Pindarus, Phocylides and Ariſtophanes ; and the Latine tongue by Virgill , Ouid , Horace , Silius Italicus , Lucanus , Lucretius , Auſonius and Clau- dianus : ſo the Engliſh tongue is mightily enriched, and gorgeouſlie inueſted in rare ornaments and reſplendent abiliments by ſir Philip Sidney , Spencer , Daniel , Drayton , Warner , Shakeſpeare , Marlow and Chap- man .

As Xenophon , who did imitate ſo excel- lently, as to giue vs effigiens iuſhimpery, the portraiture of a iult Empyre vnder yͤ name of Cyrus (as Cicero ſaieth of him) made therein an abſolute heroicall Poem; and as Heliodorus writ in proſe his ſugred inuētiō of that picture of Loue in Theagines and

Cariclea The ſecond part of

Cartclea, and yet both excellent admired Poets: ſo ſir Philip Sidney writ his immortal Poem, The Counteſſe of Pembrookes Ar- cadia, in Profe, and yet our rareſt Poet.

As Sextus Propertius faide; Neſcio quid magis naſcitur Iliade: ſo l ſay of Spencers Fairy Queene, I knowe not what more ex- cellent or exquiſite Poem may be written.

As Achilles had the aduantage of Hec- tor, becauſe it was his fortune to bee extol- led and renowned by the heauenly verſe of Homer: ſo Spenſers Eliſa the Fairy Queen hath the aduantage of all the Queenes in the worlde, to bee eternized by ſo diuine a Poet.

As Theocritus is famouſed for his Idyllia in Greeke, and Virgill for his Eclogs in La- tine:ſo Spencer thier imitatour in his Shep- heardes Calender, is renowned for the like argument, and honoured for fine Poeticall inuention, and moſt exquiſit wit.

As Parthenius Nicaus excellently ſung the praiſes of his Arete: ſo Daniel hath di- uinely ſonetted the matchleſſe beauty of his Delia.

As euery one mourneth, when hee hea- reth of the lamentable plangors of Thra- cian Orpheusfor his deareſt Euridice: ſo e- uery one paſſionateth, when he readeth the afflicted death of Daniels diſtreſſed Roſa- mond. As

Wits Common-wealth 281

As Lucan hath mournefully depainted the ciuil wars of Pompey & Cæſar: ſo hath Daniel the ciuill wars of Yorke and Lan- caſter; and Drayton the ciuill wars of Ed- ward the ſecond, and the Barons.

As Virgil doth imitate Catullus in yͤ like matter of Ariadne for his ſtory of Queene Dido: ſo Michael Drayton doth imitate Ouid in his Englands Heroical Epiſtles.

As Sophocles was called a Bee for the ſweetness of his tongue: ſo in Charles Fitz- Iefferies Drake, Drayton is termed Golden- mouth’d, for the purity and pretiouſneſſe of his ſtile and phraſe.

As Accius , M. Attilius and Milithus were called Tragædiographi , becauſe they writ Tragedies: ſo may wee truly terme Michael Drayton Tragædiographi , for his paſſionate penning the downfals of va- liant Robert of Normandy, chaſt Matilda , and great Gaueſton.

As Ioan . Honterus in Latine verſe writ 3. Bookes of Coſinography wͭ Geographicall tables: ſo Michael Drayton is now in pen- ning in Engliſh verſe a Poem called Po- lu-olbion Geographical and Hydrographi- call of all the foreſts, woods, mountaines, fountaines, riuers, lakes, flouds, bathes and ſprings that be in England.

As Aulus Perſius Flaccus is reported a-

mong Oo The ſecondpart of

mong al writers to be of an honeſt life and vpright conuerſation: ſo Michael Drayton (que toties honoris & amoris caufa nomino) among ſchollers, ſouldiours, Poets, and all ſorts of people, is helde for a man of vertu- ous diſpoſition, honeſt conuerſation, and wel gouerned cariage, which is almoſt mi- raculous among good wits in theſe decli- ning and corrupt times, when there is no- thing but rogery in villainous man, & whẽ cheating and craftines is counted the clea- neſt wit, and ſoundeſt wiſedome.

As Decius Auſonius Gallus in libris Fa- ſtorum , penned the occurrences of yͤ world from the firſt creation of it to his time, that is, to the raigne of the Emperor Gratian : ſo Warner in his abſolute Albions Englande hath moſt admirably penned the hiſtorie of his own country from Noah to his time, that is, to the raign of Queene Elizabeth ; I haue heard him termd of the beſt wits of both our Vniverſities, our Engliſh Homer .

As Euripedes is the moſt ſententious a- mong the Greek Poets: ſo is Warner amõg our Engliſh Poets.

As the ſoule of Euphorbus was thought To liue in Pythagoras : ſo the ſweete wittie ſoule of Ouid liues in mellifluous & hony- tounged Shakespeare , witnes his Venus and Adonis , his Lucrece , his fugred Sonnets

among Wits Common-Wealth. 282

among his priuate friends, & c.

As Plautus and Seneca are accounted the beſt for Comedy and Tragedy among the Latines: ſo Shakeſpeare among yͤ Eng- liſh is the moſt excellent in both kinds for the ſtage;for Comedy, witnes his Gētlemē of Verona , his Errors , his Loue labors ſoft , his Loue Labours wonne , his Midſummers night dreame , & his Merchant of Venice :for Tra- gedy, his Richard the 2. Richard the 3. Hen- ry the 4. King Iohn , Titus Andronicus and his Romeo and Iuliet .

As Epius Stolo ſaid, that the Muſes would ſpeak with Plautus tongue, if they would ſpeak Latin; ſo I ſay that the Muſes would ſpeak with Shakespeares fine filed phraſe, if they would ſpeak Engliſh.

As Muſaeus , who wrote the loue of Hero and Leander , had two excellent ſchollers, Thamaras & Hercules : ſo hath he in Eng- Land two excellent Poets, imitators of him In the ſame argument and ſubiect, Chriſto- pher Marlow , and George Chapman .

As Ouid ſaith of his worke; Iamp opus exegi, quod nec Iouis ira, nec ignis, Nec poterit ferrum, nec edax abolere vetuſtas.

And as Horace ſaith of his; Exegi monu- mentũ aere perennius; Regaliq; ſitu pyramidũ altius; Quod non imber edax; Non Aquilo impotens poſſit diruere; aut innumerabilis annorum Oo2

The ſecondpart of

annorum ſeries & fuga temporum : ſo fay I ſeuerally of ſir Philip Sidneys , Spencers Da- niels , Draytons , Shakeſpeares , and Warners workes;

Non Iouis ira: imbres: Mars: ferrum: flamma, ſenectus,

Hoc opus unda: lues: turbo: venena ruent.

Et quanquam ad plucherrimum hoc opirs e- uertendum tres illi Dij conſpirabũt, Cronus, Vulcanus, & pater ipſe gentis;

Non tamen annorum ſeries, non flamma, necenſis,

Æternumpotuit hoc abolere Decus.

As Italy had Dante , Boccace , Petrarch , Taſſo , Celiano and Arioſto : ſo England had Mathew Roydon , Thomas Atchelow , Tho- Mas Watſon , Thomas Kid , Robert Greene & George Peele .

As there are eight famous and cheife languages, Hebrew, Greek, Latine, Syriack, Arabricke, Italian, Spaniſh, and French: ſo there are eight notable feurall kindes of Poets,Heroick, Lyricke, Tragicke, Comicke, Satiricke, Iambicke, Elegiacke & Paſtoral.

As Homer and Virgil among the Greeks and Latines are the chiefe Heroick Poets: to Spencer and Warner be our chiefe heroi- call Makers.

As Pindarus , Anacreon , and Callimachus among the Greekes; and Horace and Ca-

tullus Wits Common-wealth. 283

tullus among the Latines are the beſt Ly- rick Poets: ſo in this faculty the beſt among our Poets are Spencer (who excelleth in all kinds) Daniel , Drayton , Shakeſpeare , Brettȭ

As theſe Tragicke Poets flouriſhed in Greece, Aeſchylus, Euripedes , Sophocles , A- lexander , Aetolus, Achaeus Erithraeus, A- ſtydamas Atheniȇſis , Apollodorus Tarſenſis , Nicomachus Phrygius , Theſpis Atticus , and Timon Apolloniates ; and theſe among the Latines, Accius , M. Attilius , Pomponius Secundus and Seneca : ſo theſe are our beſt for Tragedie, the Lorde Buckhurſt , Doctor Leg of Cambridge, Doctor Edes of Ox- forde, maiſter Edward Ferris, , the Authour of the Mirrour for Magiſtrates, Marlow , Peele , Watſon , Kid , Shakeſpeare , Drayton , Chapman , Decker , and Beniamin Iohn- son.

As M. Anneus Lucanus writ two excel- lent Tragedies, one called Medea, the o- ther (de Incendio Troiaecum Priami calami- tate): ſo Doctor Leg hath penned two fa- mous tragedies, ȳ one of Richard the ʒ . the other of the deſtruction of Ieruſalem.

The beſt Poets for Comedy among the Greeks are theſe, Menander , Ariſtophanes , Eupolis Athenienſis , Alexis Terius , Nico- ſtratus , Amipſias Athenienſis , Anaxādrides Rhodius , Ariſtonymus , Archippus Atheniȇſis

and Oo3 The ſecondpart of

and Callias Athenienſis ; and among the Latines, Plautus , Terence , Næuius , Sext. Turpilius , Licinius Imbrex , and Virgilius Romanus :ſo the beſt for Comedy amongſt vs bee, Edward Earle of Oxforde, Doctor Gager of Oxforde, Maiſter Rowley once a rare Scholler of learned Pembrooke Hall in Cambridge, Maiſter Edwardes one of her Maieſties Chappell, eloquent and wit- tie Iohn Lilly , Lodge , Gaſcoyne , Greene , Shakeſpeare , Thomas Naſh , Thomas Hey- wood , Anthony Mundye our beſt plotter, Chapman , Porter , Wilſon , Hathway , and Henry Chettle .

As Horace , Lucilius , Iuuenal , Perſius & Lucullus are the beſt for Satyre among the Latines: ſo with vs in the ſame faculty theſe are chiefe, Piers Plowman , Lodge , Hall of Imanuel Colledge in Cambridge; the Authour of Pigmalions Image, and cer- taine Satyrs; the Author of Skialetheia .

Among the Greeks I wil name but two for Iambicks, Archilochus Parius , and Hip - ponax Epheſius : ſo amongſt vs I name but two Iambical Poets, Gabriel Haruey , and Richard Stanyhurſt , bicauſe I haue ſeene no mo in this kind.

As theſe are famous among the Greeks for Elegie, Melanthus , Mymnerus Colo - phonius , Olympius Myſius , Parthenius Ni - cæus Wits Common-Wealth. 284 cæus ,P hiletas Cous , Theogenes Megaren - ſis , and Pigres Halicarnaſſӕus ; and theſe among the Latines, Mecænas , Ovid , Ti - bullus ,Propertius , T. Valgius , Caſſius Seuerus & Clodius Sabinus : ſo theſe are the moſt paſſionate among vs to bewaile and bemoane the perplexities of Loue, Henrie Howard Earle of Surrey, ſir Thomas Wyat the elder, ſir Francis Brian, ſir Philip Sid- ney, ſir Walter Rawley , ſir Edward Dyer , Spencer , Daniel , Drayton , Shakeſpeare , Whetſtone , Gaſcoyne , Samuell Page fome- times fellow of Corpus Chriſti Colledge in Oxford, Churchyard, Bretton.

As Theocritus in Greeke, Virgil and Mantuā in Latine, Sonazar in Italian, and the Authour of Amyntæ Guadia and Wal- ſinghams Melibæus are the beſt for paſto- rall: ſo amongſt vs the beſt in this kind are ſir Philip Sidney ,maſter Challener , Spencer , Stephen Goſſon , Abraham Fraunce and Barnefield .

Theſe and many other Epigrammatiſts Latin tongue hath, Q. Catulus , Porcius Li - cinius , Quintus Corniſicius , Martial , Cn . Getulicus , and wittie ſir Thomas Moore : ſo in Engliſh we haue theſe, Heywood , Drāte , Kendal , Baſtard , Dauies .

As noble Mecænas that ſprung from the Hetruſcan Kinges not onely graced Poets

by O o 4, The ſecond part of

by his bounty, but alſo by beeing a Poet himſelfe; and as Iames the 6. nowe king of Scotland is not only a fauorer of Poets, but a Poet, as my friend maſter Richard Barneſ- fielde hath in this Diſticke paſſing well re- corded:

The King of Scots now liuing is a Poet, As his Lepanto, and his furies ſhow it: ſo Elizabeth our dread ſoueraign and gra- cious Queene is not only a liberal patrone vnto Poets, but an excellent Poet herſelfe, whoſe learned, delicate and noble Muſe ſurmounteth, be it in Ode, Elegy, Epigram or in any other kind of Poem Heroicke, or Lyricke.

Octauia ſiſer vntoAuguſtus the Empe- rour was exceeding bountifull vnto Virgil, who gaue him for making 26. verſes 1137 pounds, to wit, tenne Seſtertiaes for euerie verſe, which amount to aboue 43. pounds for euery verſse: ſo learned Mary, the ho- norable Counteſſe of Pembrook , the noble ſiſter of immortall ſir Philip Sidney, is very liberall vnto Poets; beſides ſhee is a moſt delicate Poet, of whome I may ſay, as Antipater Sidonius writeth of Sappho:

Dulcia Mnemoſyne demirans carmina Sapphus, Qurſiuit decima Pieris unde foret.

Among Wits Common-wealth 285

Among others in times paſt, Poets had theſe fauourers, Auguſtus, Mecaenas, So- phocles, Germanicus, an Emperour, a noble man, a Senatour, and a Captaine: ſo of la- ter times Poets haue theſe patrones, Ro- bert king of Sicil, the great king Frances of France king Iames of Scotland, & Queene Elizabeth of England.

As in former times two great Cardinals, Bembus & Biena, did countenance Poets: ſo of late yeares two great preachers haue giuen them their right hands in felowſhip, Beza and Melancthon.

As the learned philoſophers Fracaſtorius and Scaliger haue highly prized them: ſo haue the eloquent Orators Pontanus and Muretus very gloriouſly eſtimated them.

As Georgius Buckananus Iephthe, amõgſt all moderne Tragedies is able to abide the touch of Ariſtotles precepts, and Euripe- des examples: ſo is Biſhop Watſons Abſalon.

As Terence for this tranſlations out of Apollodorus & Menander, and Aquilius for his tranſlation out of Menander , and C. Germanicus Augustus for his out of Arae tus, and Auſonius for his tranſlated Epi grams out of Greeke, and Doctor Iohnſon for his Frogge-fight out of Homer, and Watſon for his Antigone out of Sophocles , haue got good commendations: ſo theſe verſiſers

The ſecond part of

verſiſers for their learned tranſlations are of good note among vs, Phaer for Vir- gils Aeneads , Goldings for Ouids Meta- morphoſis , Harington for his Orlādo Furioſo , the tranflators of Senecaes Tragedies , Bar- nabe Googe for Palingenius , Turberuile for Ouids Epiſtles and Mantuan, and Chap- man for his inchoate Homer .

As the Latines haue thefe Emblematiſts, Andreas Alciatus, Reuſnerus, and Sambu- cus: ſo we haue theſe, Geffrey Whitney , An- drew Willet , and Thomas Combe .

As Nonnus Panapolyta writ the Goſpell of faint Iohn in Greeke Hexameters:ſo ler- uis Markham hath written Salomons Can ticles in Engliſh verſe.

As C.Plinius writ the life of Pomponius Secūdus: ſo yong Charles Fitz-Ieſſrey , that high touring Falcon, hath moſt gloriouſly penned the honourable life and death of worthy ſir Francis Drake .

As Heſiod writ learnedly of husbandry in Greeke: ſo hath Tuſſer very wittily and experimentally written of it in Engliſh.

As Antipater Sidonius was famous for extemporall verſe in Greeke, and Ouid for his Quicquid conabar dicere verſus erat : ſo was our Tarleton, of whome Doctour Caſe that learned phyſitian thus ſpeaketh in the ſeuenth Booke, ſeuenteenth chap-

ter Wits Common-wealth 286

ter of his Politikes; Aristoteles ſuum Theo- doretum laudauit quendamperitum Tragæ- diarum actorem ; Cicero ſuum Roſcium: nos Angli Tarletonum, in cuius voce vultu omnes iocoſi aſſectus, in cuius cerebroſo ca- pite lepidae facetiae habitant . And ſo is now our wittie Wilſon, who, for learning and extemporall witte in this facultie, is without compare or compeere, as to his great and eternall commendations he ma- nifeſted in his chalenge at the Swanne on the Banke ſide.

As Achilles tortured the deade bo- die of Hector , and as Antonius , and his wife Fuluia tormented the liueleſſe corps of Cicero : ſo Gabriell Haruey hath ſhewed the ſame inhumanitie to Greene that lies full low in his graue.

As Eupolis of Athens vſed great liber- tie in taxing the vices of men: ſo dooth Thomas Naſh , witneſſe the broode of the Harueys.

As Actaeon was wooried of his owne hounds: ſo is Tom Naſh of his Ile of Dogs . Dogges were the death of Euripedes, but bee not diſconſolate gallant young Iuuenall, Linus , the ſonne of Apollo died the ſame death. Yet God forbid that ſo braue a witte ſhould ſo baſely periſh, thine

are Wits Common-wealth 286v

are but paper dogges, neither is thy ba- baniſhment like Ovids, eternally to conuerſe with the barbarous Getes. Therefore com- fort thy ſelfe ſweet tom. with Ciceros glorious retrun to Rome, & with the coun- ſel Aeneas giues to his ſeabeaten ſoldiors, lib. I.Aenid.

Pluck vp thine heart, & driue from thence

both feare and care away:

To thinke on this may pleaſure be perhaps

another day.

Durato, & temet rebus ſeruato ſecundis.

As Anacreon died by the pot: ſo George

Peele by the pox.

As Archeſilaus Prytanæus periſhed by wine at a drunken feaſt, as Hermippus testi- fieth in Diogenes : ſo Robert Greene died of a ſurfet taken at Pickeld Herrings, & Rhe- nish wine, as witneſeth Thomas Naſh, who was at the fatall banquet.

As Iodelle, a French tragical poet beeing an Epicure, and an Atheiſt, made a pitifull end: ſo our tragicall poet Marlow for his Epicuriſme and Atheiſme had a tragicall death; you may read of this Marlow more at large in the Theatre of Gods iudgements, in the 25. chapter entreating of Epicures and Atheiſts.

As the poet Lycophron was ſhot to death by a certain riual of his: ſo Chriſtopher Mar

low Wits Common-wealth 287

low was ſtabd to death by a bawdy Ser- uingman, a riuall of his in his lewde loue.

Orpheus Hero

male

Son of Apollo, ancient Greek legendary hero endowed with superhuman musical skills. Britannica

Ennius, Quintus Quintus Ennius

male

-0239

-0239

Early Roman epic poet, dramatist, and satirist. Britannica

Piers Plowman Piers Piers Ploughman

male

A spiritual model for the character, Will, in an alliterative poem from the late fourteenth century, "The Vision of Piers Plowman." Oxford Bibliographies

King Edward IV Edward York King

male

1442

1483

King of England IV Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Drayton, Michael Michael Drayton

male

1563

1631

Early modern English poet and playwright. Drayton's most popular work was Nymphidia, much influenced by Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream Luminarium

Marullus

male

A rhetorician known for teaching Seneca the Younger. Oxford Reference

Haddon, Gualter Walter

male

1516

1572

Tudor-era ecclesiastical scholar, translator, and poet. Luminarium

Gabriel Harvey

male

1552

1631

Noted for his tenacious participation in literary feuds, he engaged Thomas Nashe in a long-running pamphlet war. Oxford Handbooks

Euripedes Euripedes Euripides

male

-0484

-0406

Early Greek tragic dramatist. Classical Literature

Shakespeare, William William Shakespeare

male

1564

1616

English poet, playwright, and actor Folger

Propertius Propertius

male

-0055

-0016

Wrote four books of elegies Britannica

Noah Noe

male

A biblical figure, featured most frequently in Genesis, who built an Ark to save his family and hold two of every type of animal. Oxford Reference

Petrarch, Francesco Francesco Petrarch

male

1304

1374

Fourteenth-century Italian poet best known for introducing the 8/6 sonnet structure. Oxford Reference

Roydon, Matthew Mathew Roydon

male

1580

1622

An English poet popular at the turn of the seventeenth century. Oxford Reference

Peele, George George Peele

male

1558

1598

Elizabethan English translator, dramatist, and poet. Luminarium

Phrygius, Nicomachus Nicomachus Phrygius

male

One of the tragic poets that flourished in ancient Greece as noted Francis Meres' Wit's Treasury Tapas Project

Menander Menander Menandros

male

-0342

-0291

a Hellenistic Greek dramatist and the best-known representative of Athenian New Comedy. Very little of his work has survived. Ancient Literature

Licinius, Porcius Porcius Licinius

male

0263

0325

Roman emperor who made his armies use a monotheistic form of prayer; he was later defeated by Constantine, exiled, and executed. Britannica

General Lucullus, Lucius Lucius Licinius Lucullus

male

-0118

-0056

Lucullus was a roman politician and General. Penelope

Stanyhurst, Richard Richard Stanyhurst Stanihurst

male

1547

1618

Irish alchemist, translator, poet, and historian Library Ireland

Melanthus Melanthus Melanthius Poet

male

A 5th century tragic poet. Author of Atthis, split into two books, only one fragment has survived to date. Oxford Reference

Cous, Philetas Philitas of Cos Philetas de Cos Philetas Cous

male

-0340

-0270

Greek poet and scholar born in Cos which is now the Aegean Islands in Greece. He has been accredited with influencing the Hellenistic school of poetry and Latin poetry. Only fragments of his work have survived. His poem Demeter was especially highly esteemed. Oxford Reference

Pigres Pigres of Halicarnassus

male

Early Greek lyric poet. Introduced iambic parameter. Perseus Bibliography

Ovid Publius Ovius Naso

unknown

-0043

0017

Famous works include Amores, Ars Amatoria, and the Metamophoses. Ancient

Lutatius, Quintus Catulus Quintus Catulus Lutatius

male

-0120

-0060

Roman politican that led the conservative faction of the senate Britannica

Cornisicius, Quintus Quintus Cornisicius Quintus Corniſicius

male

-0004

General, orator, poet Oxford Reference

Getulicus Cornelius Lentulus Gaetulicus

male

Consul and legate of Upper Germany Oxford Reference

Heywood, John John Heywood

male

1497

1580

Playwright and epigrammatist Oxford Reference

Panapolyta, Nonnus Nonnus Panapolyta

male

As written in the Writs of Francis, Nonnus wrote the gospel of Saint John in Greek Hexameter. ODNB

Drake, Francis Francis Drake Sir

male

1540

1596

A sailor and a navigator. He was one of the first englishmen to circumnavigate the globe. Oxford Refernce

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Themes:

Palladis tamia Wits treasury being the second part of Wits common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both Vniuersities. Author Francis Meres Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Assistant editor Rowan Pereira Encoder Rowan Pereira Encoder Ashka Ramanlal Encoder Fendy Lormine Encoder Sinéad O'Brien Encoder Lauren Gillis Encoder Bailey Grant Encoder MacKenzie Pleshaw Encoder Adam Mocciola Encoder Peter Gill Encoder Andrew Rivelli Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2017

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Printed by P. Short Cuthbert Burbie London Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm available on the Early English Books Online Database. STC 17834
Palladis Tamia WITS TREASVRY Being the Second part of Wits Common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both Vni- uerſities Viuitur ingenio cœlera mortis erunt. AT LONDON Printed by P Short, for Cuthbert Burbie, and are to be ſolde at his shop at the Royall Exhange. 1598.
Wits Treasury

Poets.

AS ſome do vſe an Amethiſt in compo- tations agaynſt drunkennes: ſo cer- tain precepts are to be vſed in hearing and reading of poets, leaſt they infect the mind Plut. & Plin.lib.37.cap.9.

As in thoſe places where many holſome hearbes doe growe, there alſo growes ma- ny poyſonfull weedes: ſo in Poets there are many excellent things, and many peſti lent matters. Plut.

As Wits Common-wealth. 277

As Simoniàes ſayde, that the Theſſali- ans were more blockiſh, then that they could be deceiued of him: ſo the riper and pregnanter the wit is, the ſooner it is cor- rupted of Poets.idem.

As Cato when he was a ſcholler woulde not beleeue his maiſter, except hee rende- red a reaſon of that he taught him: ſo wee are not to beleeue Poets in all that they write or ſay, except they yeelde a reaſon. Idem.

As in the ſame paſture the Bee ſeaſeth on the flower, the Goate grazeth on the ſhrub, the ſwine on the root, and the Oxen, Kine and Horſes on the graſſe: ſo in Poets one ſeeketh for hiſtorie, an other for orna- ment of ſpeech, another for proofe, and an other for precepts of good life. idem.

As they that come veri ſuddainlie out of a very darke place, are greatly troubled, except by little and little they be accuſto- med to the light: ſo in reading of Poets, the opinions of Phyloſophers are to bee ſowne in the mindes of young ſchollers, leaſt many diuerſities of doctrines doe af- terwardes diſtract their mindes. idem.

As in the portraiture of murder or inceſt, we praiſe the Art of him that drewe it, but we deteſt the thing it ſelſe: ſo in laſciuious Poets let vs imitate their elocution, but

execrate The ſecond part of

excrate their wantonnes. idem. Some thinges that are not excellent of themſelues, are good for ſome, bicauſe they are meet for them: ſo ſome things are com- mended in Poets, which are fit and correſ- pondent for the perſons, they ſpeake of, al- though in themſelues they bee filthy and not to be ſpoken: As lame Demonides wi- ſhed, that the ſhoes that were ſtolne from him, might fit his feet that had ſtoln them, idem.

As that ſhip is endaungered, where all leane to one ſide, but is in ſafetie, on lea- ning one way, and another another way: ſo the diſſenſion of Poets among them- ſelues, doth make them, that they leſſe in- fect their readers. And for this purpoſe our Satyriſts, Hall, the Author of Pigmalions Image, and certaine Satyres , Rankins, and ſuch others, are very profitable.

As a Bee doth gather the iuice of honie from flowres, whereas others are onely de- lighted with the colour and ſmel: ſo a Phi- loſopher findeth that among Poets which is profitable for good life, when as others are tickled only with pleaſure. Plut .

As wee are delighted in the picture of a Viper of a ſpider artificially encloſed with in a precious iewell: ſo Poets do delight vs in yͤ learned & cũning depainting of vices.

As Wits Common-wealth. 278

As ſome are delighted in coũterfet wines confected of fruites, not that they refreſh the hart, but that they make drunke: ſo ſome are delighted in Poets only for their obſcenity, neuer reſpecting their eloquẽce good grace, or learning.

As Emperors, kings and princes haue in their handes authority to dignifie or diſ- grace their nobles, attendants, ſubiects and vaſſals: ſo Poets haue the whole power in their handes to make men either immor- tally famous for their valiant exploites and vertuous exerciſes, or perpetually infa- mous for their vicious liues.

As God giueth life vnto man: ſo a Poet giueth ornament vnto it.

As the Greeke and Latine Poets haue wonne immortall credit to their natiue ſpeech, beeing encouraged and graced by liberall patrones and bountifull Benefac- tors: ſo our famous and learned Lawreat maſters of Englãd would entitle our Eng- liſh to far greater admired excellency, if ei- ther the Emperor Auguſtus , or Octauia his ſiſter, or noble Mecænas were aliue to re- warde and countenaunce them; or if our witty Comedians and ſtately Tragedians (the glorious and goodlie repreſenters of all fine witte, glorified phraſe and queint action) bee ſtill ſupported and vphelde, by which meanes for lacke of Patrones

The ſecond part of

(ô ingratefull and damned age) our Poets are ſoly or chiefly maintained, countenan- ced and patronized.

In the infancy of Greece, they that hand- led in the audience of the people, graue & neceſſary matters, were called wiſe men or eloquent men, which they ment by Vates : ſo the reſt, which ſang of loue matters, or other lighter deuiſes alluring vnto pleaſure and delight, were called Poetæ or makers,

As the holy Prophets and ſanctified A- poſtles could neuer haue foretold nor ſpo- ken of ſuch ſupernaturall matters, vnleſſe they had bin inſpired of God: ſo Cicero in his Tuſculane queſtions is of yͤ minde, that a Poet cannot expreſſe verſes aboundant- ly, ſufficiently, and fully, neither his elo- quence can flow pleaſantly, or his wordes found well and plenteouſly, without cele- ſtiall inſtinction; which Poets themſelues do every often and gladly witnes of them- ſelues, as namely Ouid in 6, Faſt.

Eſt Deus, in nobis agitãte caleſcimus illo,& c

And our famous English Poet Spenſer , who in his Sheepeheards Calender lamen- ting the decay of Poetry at theſe dayes, faith moſt ſweetly to the fame.

Then make thee wings of thine aſpiring wit And whence thou cameſt fly backe to hea- uen apace, &c

As Wits Common-wealth. 279

As a long gowne maketh not an Aduo- cate, although a gowne be a fit ornament for him: ſo riming nor verſing maketh a Poet, albeit the Senate of Poets hath cho- ſen verſe as their fitteſt rayment; but it is yͤ faining notable images of vertues, vices, or what elſe, with that delightfull teaching, which muſt bee the right deſcribing note to knowe a Poet by, Sir Philip Sidney in his Apology for Poetry.

A comparatiue diſcourſe of our Engliſh Poets,with the Greeke, Latine, and Ita- lian Poets.

AS Greece had three Poets of great an- tiquity, Orpheus, Linus and Muſaus; and Italy , other three auncient Poets,Liui- us Andronicus,Ennius & Plautus : ſo hath England three auncient Poets, Chaucer, Gower and Lydgate.

As Homer is reputed the Prince of Greek Poets; and Petrarch of Italian Poets: ſo Chaucer is accounted the God of English Poets.

As Homer was the firſt that adorned the Greek tongue with true quantity: ſo Piers Plowman was the firſt that obſerued the true quantitie of our verſe without the

curioſitie The ſecond part of

curioſitie of Rime.

Ouid writ a Chronicle from the begin- ning of the world to his own time, that is, to the raign of Auguſtus the Emperour: ſo hath Harding the Chronicler (after his ma ner of old harſh riming) from Adam to his time, that is, to the raigne of King Edward the fourth.

As Sotades Maronites yͤ Iambicke Poet gaue himſelfe wholy to write impure and laſciuious things: ſo Skeltō (I know not for what great worthines, ſurnamed the Poet Laureat) applied his wit to ſcurrilities and ridiculous matters, ſuch amōg the Greeks were called Pantomimi, with vs Buffons.

As Conſaluo Periz that excellent lear- ned man, and Secretary to King Philip of Spayne , in tranſlating the Ulyſſes of Hom- er out of Greeke into Spaniſh, hath by good iudgement auoided the faulte of Ry- ming, although not fully hit perfect and true verſifying: ſo halh Henrie Howarde that true and noble Earle of Surrey in tran- ſlating the fourth book of Virgils Æneas , whom Michael Drayton in his Englands heroycall Epiſtles hath enternized for an E- piſtle to his faire Geraldine .

As theſe Neoterickes Iouianus Ponta- nus, Politanus, Marullus Tarchamota , the two Stroze the father and the ſon, Palin- genius

Wits Common-wealth 280

genius, Mantuanus , Philelphus , Quintianus Stoa and Germanus Brixius haue obtained renown and good place among the aunci- ent Latine Poets: ſo alſo theſe Engliſh men being Latine Poets, Gualter Haddon , Nicholas Car , Gabriel Haruey , Chriſtopher Ocland , Thomas Newton with his Leyland, Thomas Watſon , Thomas Campion , Bruno ſwerd & Willey , haue attained good report and honorable aduancement in the Latin Empyre.

As the Greeke tongue is made famous and eloquent by Homer , Heſiod , Euripedes, Aeſchilus, Sophocles, Pindarus, Phocylides and Ariſtophanes ; and the Latine tongue by Virgill , Ouid , Horace , Silius Italicus , Lucanus , Lucretius , Auſonius and Clau- dianus : ſo the Engliſh tongue is mightily enriched, and gorgeouſlie inueſted in rare ornaments and reſplendent abiliments by ſir Philip Sidney , Spencer , Daniel , Drayton , Warner , Shakeſpeare , Marlow and Chap- man .

As Xenophon , who did imitate ſo excel- lently, as to giue vs effigiens iuſhimpery, the portraiture of a iult Empyre vnder yͤ name of Cyrus (as Cicero ſaieth of him) made therein an abſolute heroicall Poem; and as Heliodorus writ in proſe his ſugred inuētiō of that picture of Loue in Theagines and

Cariclea The ſecond part of

Cartclea, and yet both excellent admired Poets: ſo ſir Philip Sidney writ his immortal Poem, The Counteſſe of Pembrookes Ar- cadia, in Profe, and yet our rareſt Poet.

As Sextus Propertius faide; Neſcio quid magis naſcitur Iliade: ſo l ſay of Spencers Fairy Queene, I knowe not what more ex- cellent or exquiſite Poem may be written.

As Achilles had the aduantage of Hec- tor, becauſe it was his fortune to bee extol- led and renowned by the heauenly verſe of Homer: ſo Spenſers Eliſa the Fairy Queen hath the aduantage of all the Queenes in the worlde, to bee eternized by ſo diuine a Poet.

As Theocritus is famouſed for his Idyllia in Greeke, and Virgill for his Eclogs in La- tine:ſo Spencer thier imitatour in his Shep- heardes Calender, is renowned for the like argument, and honoured for fine Poeticall inuention, and moſt exquiſit wit.

As Parthenius Nicaus excellently ſung the praiſes of his Arete: ſo Daniel hath di- uinely ſonetted the matchleſſe beauty of his Delia.

As euery one mourneth, when hee hea- reth of the lamentable plangors of Thra- cian Orpheusfor his deareſt Euridice: ſo e- uery one paſſionateth, when he readeth the afflicted death of Daniels diſtreſſed Roſa- mond. As

Wits Common-wealth 281

As Lucan hath mournefully depainted the ciuil wars of Pompey & Cæſar: ſo hath Daniel the ciuill wars of Yorke and Lan- caſter; and Drayton the ciuill wars of Ed- ward the ſecond, and the Barons.

As Virgil doth imitate Catullus in yͤ like matter of Ariadne for his ſtory of Queene Dido: ſo Michael Drayton doth imitate Ouid in his Englands Heroical Epiſtles.

As Sophocles was called a Bee for the ſweetness of his tongue: ſo in Charles Fitz- Iefferies Drake, Drayton is termed Golden- mouth’d, for the purity and pretiouſneſſe of his ſtile and phraſe.

As Accius , M. Attilius and Milithus were called Tragædiographi , becauſe they writ Tragedies: ſo may wee truly terme Michael Drayton Tragædiographi , for his paſſionate penning the downfals of va- liant Robert of Normandy, chaſt Matilda , and great Gaueſton.

As Ioan . Honterus in Latine verſe writ 3. Bookes of Coſinography wͭ Geographicall tables: ſo Michael Drayton is now in pen- ning in Engliſh verſe a Poem called Po- lu-olbion Geographical and Hydrographi- call of all the foreſts, woods, mountaines, fountaines, riuers, lakes, flouds, bathes and ſprings that be in England.

As Aulus Perſius Flaccus is reported a-

mong Oo The ſecondpart of

mong al writers to be of an honeſt life and vpright conuerſation: ſo Michael Drayton (que toties honoris & amoris caufa nomino) among ſchollers, ſouldiours, Poets, and all ſorts of people, is helde for a man of vertu- ous diſpoſition, honeſt conuerſation, and wel gouerned cariage, which is almoſt mi- raculous among good wits in theſe decli- ning and corrupt times, when there is no- thing but rogery in villainous man, & whẽ cheating and craftines is counted the clea- neſt wit, and ſoundeſt wiſedome.

As Decius Auſonius Gallus in libris Fa- ſtorum , penned the occurrences of yͤ world from the firſt creation of it to his time, that is, to the raigne of the Emperor Gratian : ſo Warner in his abſolute Albions Englande hath moſt admirably penned the hiſtorie of his own country from Noah to his time, that is, to the raign of Queene Elizabeth ; I haue heard him termd of the beſt wits of both our Vniverſities, our Engliſh Homer .

As Euripedes is the moſt ſententious a- mong the Greek Poets: ſo is Warner amõg our Engliſh Poets.

As the ſoule of Euphorbus was thought To liue in Pythagoras : ſo the ſweete wittie ſoule of Ouid liues in mellifluous & hony- tounged Shakespeare , witnes his Venus and Adonis , his Lucrece , his fugred Sonnets

among Wits Common-Wealth. 282

among his priuate friends, & c.

As Plautus and Seneca are accounted the beſt for Comedy and Tragedy among the Latines: ſo Shakeſpeare among yͤ Eng- liſh is the moſt excellent in both kinds for the ſtage;for Comedy, witnes his Gētlemē of Verona , his Errors , his Loue labors ſoft , his Loue Labours wonne , his Midſummers night dreame , & his Merchant of Venice :for Tra- gedy, his Richard the 2. Richard the 3. Hen- ry the 4. King Iohn , Titus Andronicus and his Romeo and Iuliet .

As Epius Stolo ſaid, that the Muſes would ſpeak with Plautus tongue, if they would ſpeak Latin; ſo I ſay that the Muſes would ſpeak with Shakespeares fine filed phraſe, if they would ſpeak Engliſh.

As Muſaeus , who wrote the loue of Hero and Leander , had two excellent ſchollers, Thamaras & Hercules : ſo hath he in Eng- Land two excellent Poets, imitators of him In the ſame argument and ſubiect, Chriſto- pher Marlow , and George Chapman .

As Ouid ſaith of his worke; Iamp opus exegi, quod nec Iouis ira, nec ignis, Nec poterit ferrum, nec edax abolere vetuſtas.

And as Horace ſaith of his; Exegi monu- mentũ aere perennius; Regaliq; ſitu pyramidũ altius; Quod non imber edax; Non Aquilo impotens poſſit diruere; aut innumerabilis annorum Oo2

The ſecondpart of

annorum ſeries & fuga temporum : ſo fay I ſeuerally of ſir Philip Sidneys , Spencers Da- niels , Draytons , Shakeſpeares , and Warners workes;

Non Iouis ira: imbres: Mars: ferrum: flamma, ſenectus,

Hoc opus unda: lues: turbo: venena ruent.

Et quanquam ad plucherrimum hoc opirs e- uertendum tres illi Dij conſpirabũt, Cronus, Vulcanus, & pater ipſe gentis;

Non tamen annorum ſeries, non flamma, necenſis,

Æternumpotuit hoc abolere Decus.

As Italy had Dante , Boccace , Petrarch , Taſſo , Celiano and Arioſto : ſo England had Mathew Roydon , Thomas Atchelow , Tho- Mas Watſon , Thomas Kid , Robert Greene & George Peele .

As there are eight famous and cheife languages, Hebrew, Greek, Latine, Syriack, Arabricke, Italian, Spaniſh, and French: ſo there are eight notable feurall kindes of Poets,Heroick, Lyricke, Tragicke, Comicke, Satiricke, Iambicke, Elegiacke & Paſtoral.

As Homer and Virgil among the Greeks and Latines are the chiefe Heroick Poets: to Spencer and Warner be our chiefe heroi- call Makers.

As Pindarus , Anacreon , and Callimachus among the Greekes; and Horace and Ca-

tullus Wits Common-wealth. 283

tullus among the Latines are the beſt Ly- rick Poets: ſo in this faculty the beſt among our Poets are Spencer (who excelleth in all kinds) Daniel , Drayton , Shakeſpeare , Brettȭ

As theſe Tragicke Poets flouriſhed in Greece, Aeſchylus, Euripedes , Sophocles , A- lexander , Aetolus, Achaeus Erithraeus, A- ſtydamas Atheniȇſis , Apollodorus Tarſenſis , Nicomachus Phrygius , Theſpis Atticus , and Timon Apolloniates ; and theſe among the Latines, Accius , M. Attilius , Pomponius Secundus and Seneca : ſo theſe are our beſt for Tragedie, the Lorde Buckhurſt , Doctor Leg of Cambridge, Doctor Edes of Ox- forde, maiſter Edward Ferris, , the Authour of the Mirrour for Magiſtrates, Marlow , Peele , Watſon , Kid , Shakeſpeare , Drayton , Chapman , Decker , and Beniamin Iohn- son.

As M. Anneus Lucanus writ two excel- lent Tragedies, one called Medea, the o- ther (de Incendio Troiaecum Priami calami- tate): ſo Doctor Leg hath penned two fa- mous tragedies, ȳ one of Richard the ʒ . the other of the deſtruction of Ieruſalem.

The beſt Poets for Comedy among the Greeks are theſe, Menander , Ariſtophanes , Eupolis Athenienſis , Alexis Terius , Nico- ſtratus , Amipſias Athenienſis , Anaxādrides Rhodius , Ariſtonymus , Archippus Atheniȇſis

and Oo3 The ſecondpart of

and Callias Athenienſis ; and among the Latines, Plautus , Terence , Næuius , Sext. Turpilius , Licinius Imbrex , and Virgilius Romanus :ſo the beſt for Comedy amongſt vs bee, Edward Earle of Oxforde, Doctor Gager of Oxforde, Maiſter Rowley once a rare Scholler of learned Pembrooke Hall in Cambridge, Maiſter Edwardes one of her Maieſties Chappell, eloquent and wit- tie Iohn Lilly , Lodge , Gaſcoyne , Greene , Shakeſpeare , Thomas Naſh , Thomas Hey- wood , Anthony Mundye our beſt plotter, Chapman , Porter , Wilſon , Hathway , and Henry Chettle .

As Horace , Lucilius , Iuuenal , Perſius & Lucullus are the beſt for Satyre among the Latines: ſo with vs in the ſame faculty theſe are chiefe, Piers Plowman , Lodge , Hall of Imanuel Colledge in Cambridge; the Authour of Pigmalions Image, and cer- taine Satyrs; the Author of Skialetheia .

Among the Greeks I wil name but two for Iambicks, Archilochus Parius , and Hip - ponax Epheſius : ſo amongſt vs I name but two Iambical Poets, Gabriel Haruey , and Richard Stanyhurſt , bicauſe I haue ſeene no mo in this kind.

As theſe are famous among the Greeks for Elegie, Melanthus , Mymnerus Colo - phonius , Olympius Myſius , Parthenius Ni - cæus Wits Common-Wealth. 284 cæus ,P hiletas Cous , Theogenes Megaren - ſis , and Pigres Halicarnaſſӕus ; and theſe among the Latines, Mecænas , Ovid , Ti - bullus ,Propertius , T. Valgius , Caſſius Seuerus & Clodius Sabinus : ſo theſe are the moſt paſſionate among vs to bewaile and bemoane the perplexities of Loue, Henrie Howard Earle of Surrey, ſir Thomas Wyat the elder, ſir Francis Brian, ſir Philip Sid- ney, ſir Walter Rawley , ſir Edward Dyer , Spencer , Daniel , Drayton , Shakeſpeare , Whetſtone , Gaſcoyne , Samuell Page fome- times fellow of Corpus Chriſti Colledge in Oxford, Churchyard, Bretton.

As Theocritus in Greeke, Virgil and Mantuā in Latine, Sonazar in Italian, and the Authour of Amyntæ Guadia and Wal- ſinghams Melibæus are the beſt for paſto- rall: ſo amongſt vs the beſt in this kind are ſir Philip Sidney ,maſter Challener , Spencer , Stephen Goſſon , Abraham Fraunce and Barnefield .

Theſe and many other Epigrammatiſts Latin tongue hath, Q. Catulus , Porcius Li - cinius , Quintus Corniſicius , Martial , Cn . Getulicus , and wittie ſir Thomas Moore : ſo in Engliſh we haue theſe, Heywood , Drāte , Kendal , Baſtard , Dauies .

As noble Mecænas that ſprung from the Hetruſcan Kinges not onely graced Poets

by O o 4, The ſecond part of

by his bounty, but alſo by beeing a Poet himſelfe; and as Iames the 6. nowe king of Scotland is not only a fauorer of Poets, but a Poet, as my friend maſter Richard Barneſ- fielde hath in this Diſticke paſſing well re- corded:

The King of Scots now liuing is a Poet, As his Lepanto, and his furies ſhow it: ſo Elizabeth our dread ſoueraign and gra- cious Queene is not only a liberal patrone vnto Poets, but an excellent Poet herſelfe, whoſe learned, delicate and noble Muſe ſurmounteth, be it in Ode, Elegy, Epigram or in any other kind of Poem Heroicke, or Lyricke.

Octauia ſiſer vntoAuguſtus the Empe- rour was exceeding bountifull vnto Virgil, who gaue him for making 26. verſes 1137 pounds, to wit, tenne Seſtertiaes for euerie verſe, which amount to aboue 43. pounds for euery verſse: ſo learned Mary, the ho- norable Counteſſe of Pembrook , the noble ſiſter of immortall ſir Philip Sidney, is very liberall vnto Poets; beſides ſhee is a moſt delicate Poet, of whome I may ſay, as Antipater Sidonius writeth of Sappho:

Dulcia Mnemoſyne demirans carmina Sapphus, Qurſiuit decima Pieris unde foret.

Among Wits Common-wealth 285

Among others in times paſt, Poets had theſe fauourers, Auguſtus, Mecaenas, So- phocles, Germanicus, an Emperour, a noble man, a Senatour, and a Captaine: ſo of la- ter times Poets haue theſe patrones, Ro- bert king of Sicil, the great king Frances of France king Iames of Scotland, & Queene Elizabeth of England.

As in former times two great Cardinals, Bembus & Biena, did countenance Poets: ſo of late yeares two great preachers haue giuen them their right hands in felowſhip, Beza and Melancthon.

As the learned philoſophers Fracaſtorius and Scaliger haue highly prized them: ſo haue the eloquent Orators Pontanus and Muretus very gloriouſly eſtimated them.

As Georgius Buckananus Iephthe, amõgſt all moderne Tragedies is able to abide the touch of Ariſtotles precepts, and Euripe- des examples: ſo is Biſhop Watſons Abſalon.

As Terence for this tranſlations out of Apollodorus & Menander, and Aquilius for his tranſlation out of Menander , and C. Germanicus Augustus for his out of Arae tus, and Auſonius for his tranſlated Epi grams out of Greeke, and Doctor Iohnſon for his Frogge-fight out of Homer, and Watſon for his Antigone out of Sophocles , haue got good commendations: ſo theſe verſiſers

The ſecond part of

verſiſers for their learned tranſlations are of good note among vs, Phaer for Vir- gils Aeneads , Goldings for Ouids Meta- morphoſis , Harington for his Orlādo Furioſo , the tranflators of Senecaes Tragedies , Bar- nabe Googe for Palingenius , Turberuile for Ouids Epiſtles and Mantuan, and Chap- man for his inchoate Homer .

As the Latines haue thefe Emblematiſts, Andreas Alciatus, Reuſnerus, and Sambu- cus: ſo we haue theſe, Geffrey Whitney , An- drew Willet , and Thomas Combe .

As Nonnus Panapolyta writ the Goſpell of faint Iohn in Greeke Hexameters:ſo ler- uis Markham hath written Salomons Can ticles in Engliſh verſe.

As C.Plinius writ the life of Pomponius Secūdus: ſo yong Charles Fitz-Ieſſrey , that high touring Falcon, hath moſt gloriouſly penned the honourable life and death of worthy ſir Francis Drake .

As Heſiod writ learnedly of husbandry in Greeke: ſo hath Tuſſer very wittily and experimentally written of it in Engliſh.

As Antipater Sidonius was famous for extemporall verſe in Greeke, and Ouid for his Quicquid conabar dicere verſus erat : ſo was our Tarleton, of whome Doctour Caſe that learned phyſitian thus ſpeaketh in the ſeuenth Booke, ſeuenteenth chap-

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ter of his Politikes; Aristoteles ſuum Theo- doretum laudauit quendamperitum Tragæ- diarum actorem ; Cicero ſuum Roſcium: nos Angli Tarletonum, in cuius voce vultu omnes iocoſi aſſectus, in cuius cerebroſo ca- pite lepidae facetiae habitant . And ſo is now our wittie Wilſon, who, for learning and extemporall witte in this facultie, is without compare or compeere, as to his great and eternall commendations he ma- nifeſted in his chalenge at the Swanne on the Banke ſide.

As Achilles tortured the deade bo- die of Hector , and as Antonius , and his wife Fuluia tormented the liueleſſe corps of Cicero : ſo Gabriell Haruey hath ſhewed the ſame inhumanitie to Greene that lies full low in his graue.

As Eupolis of Athens vſed great liber- tie in taxing the vices of men: ſo dooth Thomas Naſh , witneſſe the broode of the Harueys.

As Actaeon was wooried of his owne hounds: ſo is Tom Naſh of his Ile of Dogs . Dogges were the death of Euripedes, but bee not diſconſolate gallant young Iuuenall, Linus , the ſonne of Apollo died the ſame death. Yet God forbid that ſo braue a witte ſhould ſo baſely periſh, thine

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are but paper dogges, neither is thy ba- baniſhment like Ovids, eternally to conuerſe with the barbarous Getes. Therefore com- fort thy ſelfe ſweet tom. with Ciceros glorious retrun to Rome, & with the coun- ſel Aeneas giues to his ſeabeaten ſoldiors, lib. I.Aenid.

Pluck vp thine heart, & driue from thence

both feare and care away:

To thinke on this may pleaſure be perhaps

another day.

Durato, & temet rebus ſeruato ſecundis.

As Anacreon died by the pot: ſo George

Peele by the pox.

As Archeſilaus Prytanæus periſhed by wine at a drunken feaſt, as Hermippus testi- fieth in Diogenes : ſo Robert Greene died of a ſurfet taken at Pickeld Herrings, & Rhe- nish wine, as witneſeth Thomas Naſh, who was at the fatall banquet.

As Iodelle, a French tragical poet beeing an Epicure, and an Atheiſt, made a pitifull end: ſo our tragicall poet Marlow for his Epicuriſme and Atheiſme had a tragicall death; you may read of this Marlow more at large in the Theatre of Gods iudgements, in the 25. chapter entreating of Epicures and Atheiſts.

As the poet Lycophron was ſhot to death by a certain riual of his: ſo Chriſtopher Mar

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low was ſtabd to death by a bawdy Ser- uingman, a riuall of his in his lewde loue.