1867 Lithograph Edition of The Young Idea

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            <title level="m" type="main">McArthur Lithograph Edition of The Young Idea</title>
            <author>A.D. McArthur</author>
            <editor>Mary Isbell</editor>
            <respStmt>
               <resp>Transcription, encoding, and notes</resp>
               <name xml:id="initials">Mary Isbell</name>
            </respStmt>
         </titleStmt>
         <editionStmt>
            <edition>
               <date>2019</date>
            </edition>
         </editionStmt>
         <publicationStmt>
            <publisher>TAPAS</publisher>
            <date>2018</date>
            <availability>
               <p>This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. </p>
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            <biblStruct>
               <monogr>
                  <editor>A.D. McArthur</editor>
                  <title>The Young Idea: A Naval Journal Edited on Board the H.M.S. Chesapeake in 1857, 1858 &amp; 1859 </title>
                  <idno type="callno">Edition created from copy in editor's private collection. Other copies held at British Library: 1757.a.20/ and
                     Beinecke Library: ______</idno>
                  <imprint>
                     <date>1867</date>
                     <biblScope>
                        <!-- type="pubPlace" -->
                        <ref type="address">170 Fleet Street, London, England</ref>
                        <name type="publisher">Paul Jerrard &amp; Son</name>
                     </biblScope>
                     <note type="project">An in-process transcription of the entire run of The Young Idea</note>
                  </imprint>
               </monogr>
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      <profileDesc>
         <particDesc>
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="A_D_McArthur">
                  <note>Alexander D. McArthur, a clerk, joined the Chesapeake on December 9th 1857. He was born on December 25th 1835 in Woolwich,
                     Kent, making him 21 when he came aboard. Census records for the town of Woolwich in 1851 reveal the family of John McAurthur, a
                     captain in the Royal Marines, who lived with his wife Mary E., a son James (a gentleman, aged 29), a son John (no occupation,
                     aged 27), a son Henry (a clerk in the wine trade, aged 17), a son Alexander D (a scholar, aged 15), a son Hanibal (no occupation,
                     aged 13), and a servant Esther Johnson (aged 20).</note>

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                     </msIdentifier></bibl>
                  <bibl>
                  <bibl><msIdentifier><msName>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851. Kew, Surrey, England</msName><institution>The National Archives of the
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               </person>
               <person xml:id="J_W_L_Bampfield">
                  <note>Reverend John William Lewis Bampfield joined the Chesapeake on July 24th 1857 and was a regular contributor to and supporter
                     of The Young Idea. While his age is not recorded in the muster book, census records reveal that Bampfield was born in June of
                     1823, so he was in his mid-thirties during the cruise. He was commissioned as chaplain aboard a different royal naval vessel in
                     Port Royal, Jamaica before his arrival aboard the Chesapeake. His detailed journal provides an additional witness to The Young
                     Idea, providing fascinating points of contrast from the facsimile edition that McArthur had printed in 1867 and offering hints
                     about the authorship of contributions through his inclusion of the initials of authors (a marked list).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Edgell">
                  <note>Harry Edmund Edgell joined the Chesapeake as Commodore after the period chronicled in the issues included in this edition. He
                     was an enthusiastic supporter of The Young Idea. In <hi rend="italics">Martello Tower" in China, and the Pacific in H.M.S.
                        "Tribune," 1856-60</hi>, Francis Martin Norman recounts Edgell's enthusiastic support for a shipboard theatrical aboard H.M.S.
                     Tribune in 1857, when he was captain of the ship. Edgell composed the prologue for the play and painted the drop-scene (50). The
                     National Maritime Museum at Greenwich (NMM) holds over 300 watercolors by Edgell, including some undertaken during the cruise
                     chronicled in The Young Idea. The NMM's biographical note on Edgell reads as follows: "Edgell was promoted to lieutenant in 1828,
                     to commander in 1837 and to captain in 1846. He was appointed to command the Tribune in 1855 when she was in the Crimea. During
                     this commission she went to the Pacific and finally to China. In 1857 Edgell was the Senior Naval Officer at Hong Kong and he
                     transferred into the Bittern tender commanding the gun boats on the Canton River during the hostilities with the Chinese. In 1858
                     be was given command of the squadron in Indian waters, during which time he commanded the Chesapeake and later the Retribution.
                     The latter returned to England and was paid off in 1860. Edgell had no further active employment and was promoted on the retired
                     list, reaching the rank of vice-admiral in 1871."</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Watson">
                  <note>Excerpts from “Watson, Rundle Burges” by <bibl><author>by J.K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert</author></bibl> for the
                           <bibl><title>Oxford Dictionary of National Biography</title></bibl>: <quote>"Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval
                        officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was
                        promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [...] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a
                        CB. [...] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years
                        later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson
                        being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no
                        Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in
                        the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the
                        frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and
                        leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off
                        early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed
                        captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the
                        last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."</quote></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pratt">
                  <note>Excerpt from “Pratt, John Henry” by <bibl><author>Anita McConnell</author></bibl> for the <bibl><title>Oxford Dictionary of
                           National Biography</title></bibl>: <quote>“Pratt, John Henry (bap. 1809, d. 1871), Church of England clergyman and
                        mathematician, was baptized on 30 June 1809 at St Mary Woolnoth, London, one of two sons of Josiah Pratt (1768–1844), Church
                        of England clergyman, and his wife, Elizabeth, formerly Jowett. He was educated at Oakham School, Rutland, and entered
                        Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, in 1829, graduating BA in 1833 as third wrangler. He was elected to a fellowship, and
                        proceeded MA in 1836. After taking orders he was appointed through the influence of Daniel Wilson, bishop of Calcutta, a
                        chaplain of the East India Company in 1838. He became Wilson's domestic chaplain and in 1850 archdeacon of
                     Calcutta.”</quote></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="George_Horner">
                  <note>George Horner, a bandsman, joined the Chesapeake on August 12, 1857. He was born in London in 1817. The muster book for the
                     Chesapeake claims to offer the first entry for George Horner, perhaps meaning this was his first time at sea.<bibl>Muster Book of
                        Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                        38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Charles_Stewart">
                  <note>Charles Stewart, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on May 23, 1857. He was born in London and served aboard HMS
                     Gladiator just before joining the Chesapeake. He was born in 1834.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing
                        1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Thomas_Walsh">
                  <note>Thomas Walsh, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 15, 1857. He was born in London in 1834 and served aboard
                     HMS Cressy just before joining the Chesapeake.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858
                        Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Robert_Wilkinson">
                  <note>Robert Wilkinson, a private in the Royal Marines, joined the Chesapeake on July 25th 1857. He was born in Sitchfield,
                        Staffordshire.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by
                        the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Henry_Underhill">
                  <note>muster#153, ordinary seaman from Alesford, 36 when coming aboard the Chesapeake<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship
                        Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="John_Welsh">
                  <note>John Welsh, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on February 20, 1857. He was born in Mayo<bibl>Muster Book of Her
                        Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                        38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Henry_Montagu">
                  <note>Henry Montagu, yeoman of signals, joined the Chesapeake on July 28, 1857 after serving aboard HMS President. He was born in
                     St. Hilliers, Jersey (the Channel Islands) in 1826, making him 32 at the time of the performance.<bibl>Muster Book of Her
                        Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                        38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Isaac_Wright">
                  <note>Isaac Wright, an ordinary sailor 2nd class, joined the Chesapeake on September 4th 1857. Hew as born in Sunderland in 1835,
                     making him 23 at the time of the performance.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858
                        Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Henry_Hamilton">
                  <note>C. R. B. Hamilton (the only Hamilton in the musters) was a naval cadet who served aboard <orgName ref="Colossus">HMS
                        Colossus</orgName> before joining the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland in December of 1842,
                     making him 15 at the time the performance<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending
                        31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="James_Brown">
                  <note>James Brown, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard <orgName ref="Cuckoo">HMS
                        Cuckoo</orgName> until February 3, 1857. He was born at Sheerness on the 17th of January 1829, making him 28 at the time of
                     the performance<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the
                        National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="William_Connell">
                  <note>William T. Connell, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 31 1857, after serving aboard <orgName ref="Eurydice"
                        >HMS Eurydice</orgName> until 17 June 1857. He was born in London in 1835, making him 27 at the time of the
                        performance.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the
                        National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Taylor">
                  <note>Edward Taylor, Assistant Engineer 3rd class (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 25th 1857. His age was not
                     recorded in the muster book<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858,
                        held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Brownrigg">
                  <note>Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in
                     the muster book.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by
                        the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wilkinson">
                  <note>Mr. Wilkinson, a clerk (a subordinate officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857 after serving aboard HMS Majestic. He
                     was born in Suffolk in 1836, which would make him 22 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta<bibl>Muster Book of Her
                        Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                        38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Shortt">
                  <note>John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in
                     Bombay in 1838, making him 20 at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake
                        Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Reynolds">
                  <note>S. Reynolds, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on September 4th 1857. He was born in Landport (Portsmouth) in 1839,
                     making him 19 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st
                        January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Theobald">
                  <note>C.B. Theobald, a naval cadet, joined the Chesapeake on July 24th 1857. He was born in Mark's Tey, Essex in 1843, making him 15
                     at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858
                        Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cooper">
                  <note>There are three different members of the ship's company with the last name Cooper. The only thing we can tell about the
                     "Cooper" referenced in the cricket match is that he was not a commissioned officer, but an ordinary seaman.<bibl>Muster Book of
                        Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                        38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Chute">
                  <note>Charles T. Chute, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857, after serving aboard Euridice. He was born
                     in London in 1841, making him 17 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake
                        Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bew">
                  <note>James Bew, an experienced seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 1st 1857. He was born in 1833, making him 25 at the time of
                     the cricket match in Calcutta.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March
                        1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Oxley">
                  <note>C.L. Oxley, a midshipman, joined the Chesapeake on July 29th 1857. He was born in 1841, making him 17 at the time of the
                     cricket match in Calcutta.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858,
                        held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Behadoor">
                  <note>Still searching for biographical details on Rajah Behadoor</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hope">
                  <note>Hope played for the "squadron's eleven" and does not appear in Chesapeak muster book, which means he likely belonged to
                     another ship in the squadron<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March
                        1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Haswell">
                  <note>Haswell served aboard Himalaya until he was injured and replaced by Piers.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake
                        Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kelly">
                  <note>Lieutenant Edward Kelly does not appear in the muster book of HMS Chesapeake. <bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship
                        Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                     38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Parkin">
                  <note>George H. Parkin was named acting commander of HMS Chesapeake on February 1st 1858 and came aboard on February 25th after
                     serving aboard Roebuck. <bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858,
                        held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Piers">
                  <note>S.B. Piers, a commander, joined the Chesapeake on July 28th 1857. He was discharged on January 22nd 1858 to serve aboard HMS
                     Himalaya when vice Haswell was invalided.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending
                        31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Faustino">
                  <note>Juan I. Faustino, bandmaster, joined the Chesapeake on September 14th 1857 after serving aboard HMS Imperieuse. He was born in
                     1820 in Allicante, Portugal, making him 37 when he joined the ship's company.<bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake
                        Commencing 1st September 1857 Ending 30th September 1857, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2883)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Namik_Pacha">
                  <note>cite one of the articles on the uprising</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="James_Hammond">
                  <note>James Hammond, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 13 1857, after serving aboard <orgName ref="Eurydice">HMS
                        Eurydice</orgName> until 12 June 1857. He was born in London on November 12, 1837, making him 21 at the time of the
                     performance. He entered the ship as "B1C" or "Boy, first class" and was promoted to Ordinary Seaman (second class) on July 27,
                     1857. He was promoted to Ordinary Seaman (first class) on October 1, 1857, which suggests that he "learned the ropes" quickly and
                     was given more responsibility within four months of joining the Chesapeake. <bibl>Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake
                        Commencing 1st January 1859 Ending 31st March 1859, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2886)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Edward_Mansbridge">
                  <note>Edward Mansbridge, a landsman, joined the Chesapeake on August 13 1857, after serving aboard <orgName ref="Blenheim">HMS
                        Blenheim</orgName> until 12 August 1857. He was born in Landport (a district within Portsmouth) on November 2, 1829, making
                     him 31 at the time of the performance. He entered the ship as a landsman and worked as a stoker.<bibl>Muster Book of Her
                        Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1859 Ending 31st March 1859, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM
                        38/2886)</bibl></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="John_Hurst">
                  <note>Have not yet located Hurst in the musters</note>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
            <listOrg>
               <org xml:id="Pelorus">
                  <note>HMS Pelorus was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. The ship was launched on February 5, 1858 and
                     its masting and fitting-out was completed on September 10, 1857. The ship was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point,
                     with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the
                     1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as
                     steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pelorus was broken up for parts at Devonport on February 3, 1869.
                     David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail &amp; Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham
                     Publishing), 2004.</note>
               </org>
               <org>
                  <orgName xml:id="Roebuck">Roebuck</orgName>
                  <note>HMS Roebuck was a Royal Navy despatch vessel with 5 guns in the Intrepid class. The ship was launched on March 22, 1856 and its
                     masting and fitting-out was completed on August 25, 1857. The ship was 200 feet long, 179 feet 5 1/4 inches at the broadest point,
                     with a depth in the hold of 14 feet 6 inches. The ship was built for a company of 100 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak
                     of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in
                     the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow Class were approved to be built by contract in the Thames [...]"
                     (218). The Roebuck was one of twenty additional vessels ordered in 1855 (218-219). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail &amp;
                     Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.</note>
               </org>
               <org>
                  <orgName xml:id="Cyclops">Cyclops</orgName>
                  <note>HMS Cyclops was a Royal Navy steam vessel with six guns in the Cyclops class. The ship was launched on July 10, 1839. The ship was 190
                     feet 3 inches long, 163 feet 6 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 37 feet 6 inches. The ship was built for a
                     company of 175 to 200 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, the ship was re-armed in 1856 "with 2x 68 pdrds (95cwt) on the pivots
                     and 4 x 10in (84cwt) on the broadside trucks." They also explain that it "was fitted 1856/57 to assist with the laying of the
                     Atlantic cable (151). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail &amp; Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889
                     (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004. </note>
               </org>
               <org>
                  <orgName xml:id="Bentinck">Bentinck</orgName>
                  <note>Need to find about this P and O ship</note>
               </org>
               <org>
                  <orgName xml:id="Blenheim">Blenheim</orgName>
                  <note>Need to find about this Royal Navy vessel</note>
               </org>
               <org>
                  <orgName xml:id="Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>
                  <note>HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several
                     classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). The ship was built in dry dock, launched
                     on September 7, 1855, and its masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. The ship was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches
                     at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. The ship was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake
                     was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail &amp; Steam Navy List: All
                     the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.</note>
               </org>
            </listOrg>
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         <!-- it may be quicker to keep these images as is and link to them in my own transformation (there are just too many to go to the trouble of
            uploading all image files to flickr-->
         <pb n="IMG_1406.JPG"/>
         <div n="1" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday-December 12, 1857</head>
            <head type="sub">No 1.</head>
            <div type="editorial">
               <head>Our Opening Column</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>from our Correspondent</head>
               <head>Grand Dinner Party in celebration of hoisting the Broad Pendant</head>
               <!-- don't forget to format this as a letter...just transcribing the body for now -->
               <p>On Wednesday the 9th a grand dinner party was given by the Ward Room Officers of H.M.S. Chesapeake to their commodore, in honor of
                  his having on that day hoisted his Broad Pendant</p>
               <pb n="IMG_1406l.JPG"/>
               <p>I will not encroach too much on your valuable time, by entering fully into minute details, but proceed to describe, as well, and
                  briefly, as I am able, one of the great features of the week. There is little occasion to name the Bill of Fare, as it might make
                  sundry people's mouths water to no purpose; suffice it to say the table was served in a most "recherche<!-- the e is accented -->"
                  style; the good looking and well dressed sailor boys, being remarkably attentive; the whole being under the able management of Mr.
                  Geo Hoadley, the Mess Steward.</p>
               <p>Scandal, says, that several cries were heard from the background, much resembling the noise that boys make when under punishment,
                  and therefore avers, that the boys' good conduct arose from the fact of a Corporal, having been seen to enter the ward room previous
                  to dinner, with what sailors call a "persuader" in his hand. But as I make it a practice to turn a deaf ear to scandal, (altho'
                  readers may draw their own conclusions) still I am of opinion that they (the boys) have been too well drilled, and the system too
                  good, to allow such a derogatory report to gain ground in any right minded person's opinion. You must pardon me, for having thus
                  digressed from my subject, but as calumnious reports quickly get abroad, and such an one might prove detrimental to that well
                  regulated mess. I take this opportunity of nipping it in the bud: -to proceed:-The culinary department, under the care of Mons: do
                  Blanchearde, (who bids fair to outrival Mr Soyer) gave every satisfaction and the well satisfied look that rested on everyone's
                  face, on the removal of the cloth, would, could he only have seen it, have repaid him well for his unremitting zeal.</p>
               <p>Dessert on the table, and the glasses filled, the usual loyal toast was drunk to the splendid band of the ship, under their leader,
                  Signor Faustine, playing "God save the Queen" followed immediately by "The return of the Admiral". Some slight mistake appears to
                  have been made, in the time appointed for the playing of this Air; but to the fact of the Bandmaster being a foreigner, and as yet,
                  not initiated into English customs, must this mistake be attributed</p>
               <p>After the strains of music had ceased the President Capt. Piers, in an appropriate speech proposed the health of Commodore Watson CB
                  which was drunk with enthusiasm, and no heel tops <note>"no heel tops" is a call made when one has not emptied their glass after a
                     toast</note>, the band playing as before, the "Return of the Admiral" ...</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <div n="7" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 23rd January 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 7</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">
               <p>
                  <!-- Find a way to present information about differences between McArthur and Bampfield (likely a note instead of a ref tag) and then make the change throughout --><ref
                     target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.01">Our long voyage has now come to a close, we may consider that we have arrived at our
                     destination, that our future prospects centre in <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata" facs="Colton_Kolkata"
                        >Calcutta</placeName>.</ref>
               </p>
               <p>What these prospects may be, we are unable to determine at present, although, we may almost dispel the idea of seeing service before
                  the enemy, as we had hoped, our proceedings will most likely consist in various kinds of extra duties, as unpleasant as they are
                  unremunerative.</p>
               <p>But, at this, we must not repine, for, as <persName ref="#Watson">our gallant Commodore</persName> expressed in his speech last
                  Sunday, we do as much good, in assisting the arrival, or departure of vessels, in provisioning, storing, repairing, conveying troops
                  or other equally tame work, as though we were in the field; no doubt, some may be inclined to say, that this<cb n="2"/> is merely a
                  propitiatory view of the case, but, we say, it is the fact, and although our inclination leads us to think otherwise and to feel
                  dissatisfied with the failure of our dearest hopes, yet, this should not lessen our zeal in the exercise of our various duties, and
                  hope must brighten our path with the expectation, of not always having such unsatisfactory employment.</p>
               <p>We cannot disguise the fact that we are "too late for the fair," but yet an old adage says "better late than never" and who knows,
                  or who can foretell, what fortunate circumstances may occur, to reward us for our present disappointment.</p>
               <p>Of the present state of the rebellion we cannot venture to say much; on shore, one heard little or <pb n="TYI1072" facs="TYI1072"
                     /><fw>The Young Idea" Saturday 23<hi rend="superscript">rd</hi> January 1858</fw><cb n="1"/> nothing of it, although we cannot
                  fancy that the hearts of English men and women, can wholly forget the perils of their country people.</p>
               <p>Our information of what is proceeding is therefore very limited, but we hope that next week we may be able to procure intelligence
                  of the successful career of that gallant soldier <persName ref="#Campbell">Sir Colin Campbell</persName>, as well as of a speedy
                  termination to the disturbances in India.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.02">Calcutta!</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Here we are at last! the external appearance is novel and not uninteresting, what is the interior? Such were our reflections when we
                  had time to look around us, and witness the busy scene,- boats of various shapes and build, dropping with the tide, with their
                  swarthy crews, and the steersman wrapped in a linen robe, wielding the huge oar with which he guides the boat; magnificent merchant
                  ships laying close in shore for repairs, discharging cargo, or other purposes, the forest of masts which met the gaze when it
                  extended up the river, the hum of distant voices, the strange figures, carriages &amp; vehicles of various descriptions passing
                  along the Esplanade, all united to excite us with their novelty, and we were forced to satisfy our curiosity by visiting the
                  shore.</p>
               <p>On landing we were assailed by numbers of importunate palanquin<cb n="2"/> bearers, who would hardly listen to the negatives we
                  returned to their vociferations of "Palankie Sail" However we managed to escape in safety, and were pursuing our course towards the
                  town when young lad came forward with an umbrella, and notwithstanding our decisive refusals of his services, he persisted in
                  following and shading us from the sun.</p>
               <p>We found him useful, and intelligent, and had no cause to regret making his acquaintance; he guided us to the bazaars, which
                  reminded us forcibly of the like places for vending goods and merchandize in <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Istanbul"
                     >Constantinople</placeName>. The small low shops and dirty lanes, for we cannot designate them streets, the various costumes of
                  the natives, yellow, blue, red and white, the most part clothed in little save their tawny skins, all meeting the eye in a
                  variegated mass, as the whole extent of the bazaar was comprehended at a glance, the creaking of the drays, or waggons, drawn by two
                  small buffaloes, and made of bamboos, with most primitive wheels and harness, the shouts of the palanquin bearers, as they staggered
                  under the weight of some corpulent old gentleman, who perhaps, entertained the opinion that the sun might melt him, were he to
                  expose himself; the touting of the vendors, who, with salaams, begged us to walk into, each, his particular shop, and become their
                  customers, all this and many other circumstances which struck us at the time, brought back very strongly to our memories the streets
                  and bazaars of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Istanbul">Constantinople</placeName></p>
               <pb n="TYI1073" facs="TYI1073"/>
               <fw>"The Young Idea" Saturday 23 January 1858.</fw>
               <cb n="1"/>
               <p>After purchasing what we required, and we found that the prices first demanded were high but easily beaten down, we determined to
                  visit now the Esplanade, and see what was going on there. We dismissed our guide with a fee with which he appeared very well
                  pleased, &amp; having refreshed ourselves with an ice at Browne's Hotel, we left our purchases there and strolled forth upon the
                  Esplanade.</p>
               <p>Here we found Rotten Row, in miniature, whilst upon the green the lovers of exercise amused themselves with cricket, and quoits. The
                  roads were thronged with vehicles &amp; carriages of every description native and European, filled with ladies &amp; gentlemen,
                  enjoying the fresh air; after the sun had expended his power.</p>
               <p>The complexions of the ladies did not appear to us to have suffered from the heat of the climate, but we suppose they take care not
                  to expose themselves during the day, and thus escape, we could not for one instant entertain an idea of artificial means being
                  resorted to.</p>
               <p>They certainly appeared to pay as much attention to fashion as in England, but we could not wonder at that, when we saw the immense
                  millinery, and bonnet establishments which with open doors and temptingly displayed head dresses, robes, mantles, &amp;c, &amp;c
                  invited the victims to enter and become an easy prey.</p>
               <p>The shades of night falling fast and thick, and not wishing to remain any longer on shore, we returned on board, not as well
                  satisfied with <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>, at first sight, as we had hoped to be.</p>
            </div>
            <cb n="2"/>

            <div type="article">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.03">Up the Hooghly</ref>
               </head>
               <p>On Saturday evening last (Jan 16) although no land was in sight, we found ourselves nearing the channels of the <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Hugli_River">Hooghly</placeName>. At 6 P.M. we obtained soundings with the deep sea lead and two hours
                  afterwards judging ourselves to be sufficiently near the Pilot station, we anchored for the night in 17 fathoms water, our anchor
                  was again weighed at daylight &amp; about 9 A.M. we passed the first large Buoy that marks the approach to the Eastern channel. At
                  noon we were nearing the Pilot Brig, and the Pilot shortly afterwards came on board. We now ran in till 3 P.M. when the strong tide
                  turning against us, we were again anchored for the night in 7 fathoms water. At Evening Quarters we moved several of the after guns
                  forward to bring the vessel to an even keel: still no land in sight, though the red haze in the Evening horizon seemed to tell of
                  its vicinity.</p>
               <p>Daylight again found us under way and about 10 A.M. we descried the low banks of the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Hugli_River"
                     >Hooghly</placeName>, opening on either side of us. With the strong tide in our favor, and our engines working at full power, we
                  now advanced very rapidly; the river banks drew nearer to us; <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Sāgar_Island">Saugar</placeName>
                  appeared on our right <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Khejuri">Kedgeree</placeName> on our left, with a little cluster of shipping
                  at the anchorage. The water which on the previous day had been of a greenish hue, now became very thick and muddy. Objects on shore
                  now became more distinct as the river lessened in width, the banks were still low &amp; level, not an outline of any distant hills
                  to be seen, here &amp; there a rice plantation varied the jungle Native villages, generally clustered about some creek, where a
                  smaller stream <pb n="TYI1074" facs="TYI1074"/><fw>The Young Idea Saturday 23<hi rend="superscript">rd</hi> January 1858.</fw><cb
                     n="1"/> joined the main river, now, and then called our attention. In the stream, we passed many vessels, less favoured than
                  ourselves, taking advantage of the tide to move up the river; others in their downward course, lying at anchor till the tide should
                  turn. <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#BETYI7.01">Now we observed traces of the European settler</ref>, the tall factory of red
                  brick, the neat white house with green blinds drawn down over the windows, the regular avenue of trees, the cultivated patches of
                  sugar cane, the brick field with piles of bricks, furnished from the dark alluvial clay, of which doubtless, the whole Delta of the
                  Ganges is composed. As we moved swiftly up, the banks of the river glided past like a moving panorama, and the eye could never tire
                  of watching the beautiful scene.</p>
               <p>At sunset we came to an anchor in the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Garden_Reach">Garden Reach</placeName>, 2 miles below
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>, one or two pretty houses decked the banks, a forest of masts
                  marked the position of the great capital. a deep red tinge, suffused the sky as the sun sank, and was reflected streakily in the
                  ebbing tide, soon darkness came, the river's banks were left to the howling jackal, or the crickets and toads, that made a ceaseless
                  whirring through the watches of the night.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">
               <head>[No Title]</head>

               <p><ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.04">The capture of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName>, &amp; the
                     relief of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName> are exploits which challenge our national pride, as well
                     as our national thanksgiving…….</ref>.In every shape which war could take, has the ascendancy of the British race been
                  established. We have succeeded in capturing a strong position &amp; we have succeeded in defending a weak one. As besiegers at
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName>, as besieged at <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow"
                     >Lucknow</placeName>, we have been equally triumphant, while the advance of our column to the<cb n="2"/> capital of insurgent
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Ayodhya">Oude</placeName>, presents little less than a miracle of determination &amp;
                  courage.</p>
               <bibl>
                  <title>The Evening Mail</title>
               </bibl>
            </div>

            <div type="naval_intelligence">

               <list type="simple">
                  <head>
                     <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.05">Naval Intelligence</ref>
                  </head>
                  <item>Tuesday 19th H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake"/>Chesapeake weighed early this morning and took up swinging moorings off the
                     Esplanade. She saluted the Governor General, which was returned by the fort.</item>
                  <item>Wednesday 20th Sailed H.M. Steam Vessels "<orgName ref="#Assurance">Assurance</orgName>" and "<orgName ref="#Pelorus"
                        >Pelorus</orgName>" for <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Yangon">Rangoon</placeName>.</item>
                  <item>Thursday 21st Arrived H.M.S.V. "<orgName ref="#Mohawk">Mohawk</orgName>" from <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Trincomalee"
                        >Trincomalee</placeName> having made a very quick passage of four days.</item>
                  <item>H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName>" is about to proceed to England having broken her main shaft, and being
                     very leaky.</item>
                  <item>The "<orgName ref="#Mohawk">Mohawk</orgName>" is to go to <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Yangon">Rangoon</placeName> to join
                     the squadron there.</item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.06">A Swarm of Centipedes</ref>
               </head>

               <p>It appears that since leaving <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Trincomalee">Trincomalee</placeName>, a great number of <ref
                     target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYIappendix2">Centipedes</ref> have been produced on board, so much so that recently at Evening
                  Quarters, each man was required to appear with a Centipede in his possession. We certainly should have thought that such noxious
                  reptiles, and such unpleasant bedfellows would have been flung overboard at the earliest opportunity but learn with surprize that
                  they are carefully retained, and will be coiled round each man's blanket in the event of a campaign on shore.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.07">Conundrums</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="12">Why is <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> like the letter "I."?</item>
                  <item n="13">What the slight difference between a lazy Clerk, and an old retired Seaman?</item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="rebus">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.08">Answer to Rebus</ref>
               </head>
               <l>Though rough may be our sailors "fare"</l>
               <l>Yet the tales of home we'll tell.</l>
               <l>And "well" we'll wish to the dear ones there</l>
               <l>As we think of our last "Farewell</l>
            </div>

            <div type="rebus">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.09">Unanswered</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="10">When it is a rect angle.</item>
                  <item n="11">Because he's quite down in the mouth and nearly going to blubber</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI7.10">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the Office No. 1 Port St. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> every Saturday<lb/> Saturday 23 Jan. 1858</p>

            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1081" facs="TYI1081"/>


         <div n="8" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 30th January 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 8</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.01">Try Again</ref>
               </head>
               <p>It is seldom that any great &amp; unprecedented undertaking will meet with the complete success at the first trial: - the great
                  engineering triumphs of the present century have mostly taught us to expect failure before we achieve success: the Thames Tunnel,
                  the Eddystone Lighthouse, the Plymouth Breakwater, because novel &amp; unexampled works, were therefore in the first instance
                  unsuccessful.</p>
               <p>It is therefore with no surprize that we heard recently either that the Atlantic Telegraph had failed in the first attempt to lay it
                  down, or that the Great Eastern "refuses to move from the spot where it has been built. A second attempt was made to induce this
                  monster of the deep, to take to its aquatic elements; but a second time, it resisted all arguments whether of force or
                  persuasion.</p>
               <p>A fair lady bestowed its name, and called it<cb n="2"/> "Leviathan" but "Leviathan was as resolute as "Great Eastern" and still
                  remained upon the shore. "Try again" must be the motto of the builders.</p>
               <p>Again, we read in an other part of our news that "Big Ben,"-the huge Bell that is to swing in the Clock tower of the Palace of
                  Westminster,-"Big Ben" is cracked, his metal was too thin, or his tongue was too thick, and he will now have to be broken up, and
                  his makers must "Try again" before they bring their work to completion.</p>
               <p>But all these failures, we say, might reasonably be expected; whenever we attempt anything great and noble and unprecedented,
                  neither a first, nor a second, nor a third failure must daunt us. "Try again" must be our motto, and success will eventually crown
                  our perseverance.</p>
               <p>The "Atlantic Telegraph" shall yet exchange the thoughts of John Bull with those of <pb n="TYI1082" facs="TYI1082"/><fw>"The Young
                     Idea" Saturday 30<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> January 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/> Brother Jonathan, "Big Ben" shall yet sound his
                  notes of warning to the denizens of our Metropolis, "Leviathan" shall yet float on the waters, the glory and triumph of our Naval
                  Architects, and the "Young Idea" shall gain the support and interest of all.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.02">A Bird's Eye View of Calcutta</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Those who wish for a birds eye view of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>, we would strongly recommend
                  to ascend the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Ochterlony_Monument">the Ochterbury monument</placeName> on the Esplanade.</p>
               <p>They will be amply repaid for the labouring ascent of the dark winding staircase by the glorious view, which awaits them on emerging
                  at the top. The whole city lies at their feet, spread out before their gaze like a vast map. The winding <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Hugli_River">Hooghly</placeName> with its shipping; the Esplanade, with its mixed multitude of European
                  carriages, palanquine-bearers, riders galloping over the turf, soldiers at their Canteen, and the swarms of dark natives, the
                  handsome European houses, intermingled with the low, dingy-roofed bazaars of the natives, the spires of the Christian Churches, the
                  Moslem mosque, the massive pile, the palace of the Governor General, the large tanks cut in the soil, human habitations interspersed
                  with trees, extend<cb n="2"/>ing to the verge of the horizon of this flat alluvial district, these are but a few, of the object that
                  delight the eye.</p>
               <p>It is not our wish to enter upon an elaborate description but simply to recommend others to attempt the same ascent, to look around
                  for themselves, and to describe with more accurate pen or pencil the scene which we have attempted to de-pict.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.03">Launching the "Leviathan"</ref>
               </head>
               <bibl>
                  <title>The Evening Mail</title>
               </bibl>
               <p>On Saturday (Nov.r 23rd) a third attempt was made to move this gigantic vessel, which we are happy to say was eminently successful,
                  and resulted in the "Leviathan" being gradually lowered down the launching ways some 25 feet in a slow, and beautifully regular
                  manner.</p>
               <p>The whole distance was accomplished without any accident, or delay worth speaking of, and throughout the entire day the advance of
                  the ship was regulated according as Mr. Brunel thought fit, with as much care and certainty, as if the vessel had been a little
                  cutter, instead of a ponderous structure of iron weighing upwards of 12,000 tons</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.04">The Special Thanksgiving At St. Paul's Cathedral</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Last Thursday week the 21st Inst. a special Thanksgiving service was held in St. Paul's Ca<pb n="TYI1083" facs="TYI1083"/><fw>The
                     Young Idea Saturday 30<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> January 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/>thedral, to return thanks for the relief of
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>.</p>
               <p>As it was understood that most of the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName> people would be present the
                  occasion presented too much interest for us to neglect witnessing it, and partaking in the ceremony.</p>
               <p>Accordingly at 1/4 to 10 a.m. we left the ship and engaged a buggy at the landing place, into which four of us were speedily stowed:
                  the driver took us through Fort William and we were thus enabled to take a cursory view of the interior.</p>
               <p>Here we saw several of the native soldiers on guard without any arm save their ramrods, a significant token of the little trust that
                  can be placed upon these men at the present crisis. </p>
               <p>After leaving the fort we emerged upon the race course, the grand stand &amp; swimming post suggesting to our minds the exciting
                  scenes, which we had unfortunately missed witnessing, by not reaching this place at an earlier season.</p>
               <p>It was not long now ere we arrived at the cathedral, although had it not been for a sharp look out kept on our driver, he would most
                  probably have taken us out into the country, as he did not appear to under<cb n="2"/>stand perfectly where we were desirous of being
                  driven to, and was taking a course very different to that we wished. </p>
               <p>On entering the sacred edifice we found that we were very late, but yet managed to obtain seats, although the position was not good
                  being behind the pulpit.</p>
               <p>The interior of the building is spacious and airy; the seats are formed of a species of arm chair, thus portioning off to each one a
                  fair space, and even crinoline must share the same as a gentleman of the most slender proportions and consequently no lady could
                  appropriate to herself more room than would be found convenient to a next seat neighbour. We cannot say how the fair sex approve of
                  this arrangement.</p>
               <p>From the light roof, iron girders dropped, and joined frames of the same material, which ran from one side to the other; we supposed
                  these are intended for the use of punkahs during the hot weather</p>
               <p>Over the altar a fine large painted window, representing the Crucifixion, attracted our attention. The Pulpit, choir, Altar &amp;
                  reading Desks, were draped in black, and noticing that a large number of the congregation were also arrayed in the sable garments of
                  mourning, we were painfully re<pb n="TYI1084" facs="TYI1084"/><fw>"The Young Idea" Saturday 30<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> January
                     1858.</fw><cb n="1"/> minded of the heartrending losses, and bloodshed, which have characterized late times.</p>
               <p>From our position in the rear of the Preacher (<persName ref="#Pratt">Archdeacon Pratt</persName>) we were unfortunately unable to
                  hear his discourse fully, but its main design was to show the great mercy of Almighty God in thus relieving a people who had deemed
                  themselves lost, and had made up their minds to die, as well as to teach us how grateful we should be for all His Mercies, and to
                  put our trust in Him alone.</p>
               <p>We heard the sounds of subdued sobs from the body of the church, and surely it was sufficient to drain tears of joy and gratitude
                  from those who were so fresh from the scene of danger and distress.</p>
               <p>We left the cathedral deeply impressed, with the solemnity, and applicability of the service we had witnessed.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="naval_intelligence">

               <list type="simple">
                  <head>
                     <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.05">Naval Intelligence</ref>
                  </head>
                  <item>26th HMS "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" left her swinging moorings off the Esplanade and moored off Baboo
                     Ghant<lb/>H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Mohawk">Mohawk</orgName>" sailed for <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Yangon"
                        >Rangoon</placeName></item>
                  <item>29th H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Pearl">Pearl</orgName>" hauled out into the stream.</item>
                  <item>30th H.M.St.V. "<orgName ref="#Sparrowhawk">Sparrowhawk</orgName>" sailed this afternoon for <placeName
                        ref="placeography.xml#Yangon">Rangoon</placeName>, having completed her objects</item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="promotions_and_appointments">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.06">Promotions and Appointments</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item><persName ref="#Kelly">Lieut.t Edw.d Kelly</persName> (additional) took passage in H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Pelorus"
                        >Pelorus</orgName>" to which ship he is lent to do duty until further orders.</item>
                  <item><persName ref="#Piers">Commander Shute B. Piers</persName> to the "<orgName ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName>" <persName
                        ref="#Haswell">vice Captain Haswell</persName> Invalided.</item>
                  <item><persName ref="#Brownrigg">Charles I. Brownrigg</persName> Mate to be Lieutenant. The official intimation of this promotion
                     has not been yet received, but as it is announced in the Gazette, we feel much pleasure in announcing it also. At the same time
                     we must state that our pleasure is tinged with regret at losing so good a messmate.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.07">Epitome</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>A Regatta is announced to come off on the 10th Prosc.s but we have not received any information as to the terms or
                     arrangements</item>
                  <item>The Boats crews of H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> have been sent away every evening for half an hour,
                     in order to get into training for the coming Regatta.</item>
                  <item>Cricket has been in vogue during the past week amongst our officers but there has not been any game worthy of being
                     noted.</item>
                  <item>Leave is now granted to the crew of H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" to visit the shore in certain
                     proportions at a time. Several of those who have been allowed to go, have shown so little regard for liberty as to be imprisoned
                     for the night.</item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="letter">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.08">First appearance of an Enemy.</ref>
               </head>
               <floatingText>
                  <body>
                     <opener>To the Editor of the "Young Idea"<lb/>Dear Sir,</opener>
                     <p>While walking the Deck by moonlight, in a contemplative mood, on Thursday Evening, two animals of the order "Rodentia,"
                        usually called "rats" were observed by the Quartermaster near the main mast. Being much troubled by the apparition, and having
                        an intense aversion to anything in the shape of a rat, (except the rat-tat of the postman's knock) I hasten to inform you of
                        the approach of these formidable foes. I sincerely hope, that our smart, though juvenile members of the feline tribe may now
                        be duly trained and disciplined to meet the foe, and I doubt not that a whole host of asiatic rats will soon be made to fly
                        before the sharp claws of a few brave British cats.</p>
                     <closer>I am, Dear Sir,<lb/>Yours very truly</closer>
                     <signed>"Night Watch"</signed>
                     <dateline>"Chesapeake" 29 Jan 1858</dateline>
                  </body>
               </floatingText>
            </div>

            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.09">Answers to Conundrums. 12 &amp; 13</ref>
               </head>
               <p>To answer your two riddles, Sir, I'll try:</p>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="12">Why is <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> like the letter "I."? "I" is the capital of
                     India--true? <lb/> So is "<placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>"--won't my answer do?</item>
                  <item n="13">The Sailor old a "Pensioner" may be, am I not right?<lb/>The early clock, a sad "Pin mummer" he, and so good
                     night.</item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="publication_info">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI8.10">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the Office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. Subscriptions most thankfully received<lb/>Saturday 30th
                  January, 1858.</p>

            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1091" facs="TYI1091"/>

         <div n="9" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 6th February 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 9</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">

               <p>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.01">Already one twelfth of the New Year has flown, and we find ourselves rapidly entering
                     into the second month.</ref>
               </p>
               <p>In this short space of time we have seen much, done much, and heard much: already we miss the faces of one or two shipmates, and
                  expect others to fill their places, and thus it ever is, and ever will be; -faces, and forms will change in the ever revolving
                  diorama of a sailor's life</p>
               <p>We have received our long looked for, eagerly anticipated letters, we have heard from those at home, at the very sight of whose
                  handwriting, we have felt our breasts thrill with emotions of pleasure, and joy, and if such feelings are experienced by a mere
                  knowledge of the characters of the address, we can readily fathom the happiness<cb n="2"/> the glow of exultation, the interest with
                  which we break the seal, and first with rapid glance devour the contents, abstracting the news greedily, in order to learn all in a
                  moment.</p>
               <p>Then comes the second reading, and now we ponder over every word, we digest every sentence, and carefully peruse every line,
                  receiving fresh pleasure from every perusal, and being borne back in memory to our happy homes, where we can fancy we
                  see<lb/>"++++++++" the light<lb/>"of household fires gleam warm &amp; bright"<lb/>we fancy we can hear the joyous laugh of merry
                  friends, the hearty gratulations of the season; we fancy we can feel the warm grasp of friendly recognition, the endearing embrace
                  of parents, sisters, wives, or sweethearts; we read their wishes, their soul breathed <pb n="TYI1092" facs="TYI1092"/><fw>The Young
                     Idea Saturday 6<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> February 1858.</fw>
                  <cb n="1"/> wishes for our happiness, and welfare; and as we close the pages which have expanded our hearts with more real
                  enjoyment, than we have experienced since we parted from the oft remembered writers, we come back to the cold stern reality of
                  distance, of our separation.</p>
               <p>But, stop! We have only spoken of pleasure, as derived from the receipt of letters from our homes; there is yet another view of the
                  matter, and, this, brings grief, in lieu of joy; tears, instead of smiles; and sorrow usurps the place of mirth.</p>
               <p>Note! Some poor comrade receives a letter whose sable edges bespeak the contents; see! with what trembling hand, and bursting heart
                  he retires into some corner, where in secret he can trace with tearful eyes, the lines which convey the sad intelligence of the
                  death of some dear relative, or friend.</p>
               <p>Tis thus that each mail must produce different emotions amongst a body of men, and while some are filled with joy,<cb n="2"/> others
                  are drooping with pain and trouble.</p>
               <p>May we know little of this latter.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.02">The Lucknow Tigers.</ref>
               </head>
               <p>As we believe that many of our readers have availed themselves of our recommendation last week to ascend the Monument on the
                  Esplanade, we will venture to call attention in like manner to the beautiful <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow"
                     >Lucknow</placeName> tigers which may be seen on the payment of one Rupee in Wood Street, Chowringhee.</p>
               <p>They have been lately brought from <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>, where they formed a portion of the
                  Royal Menagerie which the Kings of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Ayodhya">Oude</placeName> have been in the habit of maintaining. </p>
               <p>The first Tiger you see on entering is a beautiful creature most remarkable for its tameness. At <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName> it had been brought up by hand, and led about with only a chain round its
                  neck. It would allow little children to play with it in passing along the streets, and the people of <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName> lamented when they saw it put into a cage, to be carried away.</p>
               <p>There are 6 or 7 others, of which we recollect two particularly, one because of its ferocious growl, the only savage one, and the
                  other as being the largest of all, and distinguished for the beauty of its stripes, which, it will be observed, are all double.</p>
               <p>There is a leopard, which is rather too apt to put its paws through the cage, and a chetah <pb n="TYI1093" facs="TYI1093"/><fw>The
                     Young Idea Saturday 6<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> February 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/> or hunting leopard, which is only confined by
                  a chain, and seems perfectly tame, licking its keeper's hand, and making a gruff, purring, sound, like a cat with a sore throat.</p>
               <p>There is also a fine Giraffe, perfectly tame, and we recommend visitors to beg the Sikh attendant to take a ride on its back. The
                  man, though full sized, seems quite a pigmy when mounted on the tall quadruped; and we defy any one to keep himself from laughing,
                  when the poor beast sets off at a canter.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.03">"India"</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Our papers, and our Reviews, our periodicals, have all one absorbing topic, and that is India. Fresh details of the horrible
                  sufferings which our countrymen &amp; women underwent in the earlier part of the insurrection, further particulars of the movements
                  of our gallant army, praises of those heroic spirits who have fought and perchance have fallen, before the gates of <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName>, or within the walls of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow"
                     >Lucknow</placeName>, comments on the past misgovernment of the country, suggestions towards its better management for the
                  future; these seem to form the staple of what we have received by our two last mails; pictorial papers take up the same subject, and
                  views from india, and illustrations of Hindoo customs, now meet us in every page: when we open our Magazines, we find historical
                  papers, tracing the rise of the British dominion in India, dissertations on the variety of races, or essays on the religious, and
                  various forms of feeling which are to be found in this remarkable Asiatic Peninsula.</p>
               <p>"We spared our readers," says the Times, "as much as we could the pain of revolting and horrible "images; we have no objection<cb
                     n="2"/> that they should know, that there are the most terrible details in the background of outrages perpetrated upon English
                  men and English women." </p>
               <p>"Christianity," writes the same paper in another article, "is not a religion to be propagated by violence, but it is essentially a
                  religion to be diffused by preaching and teaching. Christians may not make converts by the sword, but they are bound, where they
                  can, to make proselytes by instruction *** our administration in India, has presented the spectacle of one of the greatest Christian
                  powers in the world sedulously bent upon ignoring its own belief.**** In future the religion of the dominant race must be plainly
                  professed, instead of being timidly kept in the background, and the field be opened to missionary exertions with the sanction,
                  instead of the disfavour, of the Government."</p>
               <p>These sentiments, no doubt, express the feelings of the great majority of our friends in England, and we prefer giving them in the
                  powerful words of the "Times," to endeavouring to clothe them in our own poor language.</p>
               <p>It may be sufficient for us to rejoice that at such a time, we should have been sent in our floating home, to the very spot on which
                  the eyes of the world, are turned; to see for ourselves something of those scenes which papers so fully describe to our friends at
                  home, and perchance to take part in those transactions, which are yet destined to become matters of history.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.04">Con.</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="14">When is an Editor like a coachman driving a restive tandem?<pb n="TYI1094" facs="TYI1094"/><fw>The Young Idea Saturday
                           6<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> February 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/></item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="naval_intelligence">

               <list type="simple">
                  <head>
                     <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.05">Naval Intelligence</ref>
                  </head>
                  <item>4th Feb. H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName>" hauled out into the stream, and is preparing for her departure
                     for England. She will convey refugees from <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>; and other
                     places.</item>
                  <item>A working party under JW Worsley second master, have been employed onboard the "<orgName ref="#Pearl">Pearl</orgName>" during
                     the past week, stowing holds and provisioning her from the Barque "Oceanica"</item>
                  <item>The crew of H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" have been employed turning in the rigging afresh and
                     rattling down.</item>
                  <item>The mail steamer from China arrived this morning. By Advices from that part of the world, we learn of the storming of
                        <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Canton">Canton</placeName>, and the capture of <persName ref="#Ye_Mingchen">Commisioner
                        Yeh</persName>, who is now on board the "Inflexible." Our loss was 118 killed, and wounded; amongst the former we regret to
                     find the name of <choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt.</abbr>
                     </choice> Bates of the "Actaeon," who was shot whilst pointing out the most desirable spot for planting a scaling ladder. We hope
                     next week to be able to place before our readers, a more detailed account of the proceedings against the "celestials"</item>
               </list>
            </div>

            <div type="epitome">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.06">Epitome</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>On Wednesday, our late Commander <choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice> Piers, was received at a farewell dinner in the Ward Room preparatory to his sailing in the "<orgName ref="#Himalaya"
                        >Himalaya</orgName>". The entertainment was of a strictly private character, but the "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake"
                        >Chesapeake</orgName>" band was in attendance, and played a succession of airs, when the cloth was removed. "Auld Lang Syne"
                     followed the proposal of the special toast of the day, namely, "The Health of <choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt.</abbr>
                     </choice> Piers, &amp; a prosperous voyage to the <orgName ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName>."</item>
                  <item>The mail for England will<cb n="2"/> start on Monday next the 8th Inst.</item>
                  <item>We have noticed some young sportsmen have been out with their fowling pieces, but very little success appears to have awarded
                     their juvenile ardour.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="pun">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.07">"Mind your P's and Q's. (By a Calcutta Billiard Player).</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Take care of your ru<hi rend="underlined">pees</hi>, and avoid the Billiard <hi rend="underlined">cues</hi>.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="letter">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.08">To the Editor of the "Young Idea"</ref>
               </head>
               <floatingText>
                  <body>
                     <opener>Dear Mr Editor"</opener>
                     <p>Do give us more riddles this week, for tho' I could not for my life start one out of my own nozzle, yet I greatly enjoy
                        puzzling over what others have started, and though I never wish to be riddled with shot, yet I always like to be peppered with
                        riddles, and in fact the "Young Idea" seems quite imperfect without them.</p>
                     <closer>So, believe me, Dear Mr. Editor<lb/>Your constant reader</closer>
                     <signed>"Puzzlehead"</signed>
                     <dateline><orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> 4 Feb. 1858</dateline>
                  </body>
               </floatingText>

               <p>Ed. our answer is given below</p>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.09">Rebus &amp;c.</ref>
               </head>
               <lg n="I">
                  <l>When I was but a little boy</l>
                  <l>I dearly loved my <hi rend="underlined">first</hi></l>
                  <l>so gayly decked, so neatly dressed</l>
                  <l>so tenderly twas nursed.</l>
               </lg>

               <lg>
                  <l>With martial ardour next I sighed</l>
                  <l>To go where Glory beckoned.</l>
                  <l>I called myself a soldier lad</l>
                  <l>And bravely beat my <hi rend="underlined">second</hi></l>
               </lg>

               <lg>
                  <l>But now grown up to man's estate</l>
                  <l>A sailor bold am I:-</l>
                  <l>And here on the Equator's line</l>
                  <l>All listlessly we lie.</l>
               </lg>

               <lg>
                  <l>The sails flap idly on the mast-</l>
                  <l>My <hi rend="underlined">whole</hi>, My <hi rend="underlined">whole</hi> has caught us:</l>
                  <l>Down with the screw, whirl round the fan,</l>
                  <l>We'll Try what steam has taught us</l>
               </lg>

               <lg>
                  <l>My 7.8.12.4.10.12 oft is seen</l>
                  <l>Floating light from the peaks of the ships of our Queen</l>
                  <l>Without 4.5.8.3.10.2.3. no gun</l>
                  <l>Is much use, Tho' perhaps it is better than none,</l>
                  <l>My 2.3.6.2.3. a vegetable is</l>
                  <l>Which schoolboys oft use when the pedagogue's phiz</l>
                  <l>Betokens some 1.8.4.13. from his cane</l>
                  <l>And they hope by its means to assuage the sharp pain</l>
                  <l>Which tingles their hands, and brings forth their tears</l>
                  <l>My 13.11.9. is a picture quite dread</l>
                  <l>Of human depravity, his senses all dead,</l>
                  <l>His mind over thrown, 'tis easy to trace.</l>
                  <l>The 5.11.2.4. of his fall in his face</l>
                  <l>Bloated, purpled, debauched &amp; disgusting to all</l>
                  <l>His bottle, his enemy, friend, all in all.</l>
                  <l>But my <hi rend="underlined">whole</hi> tis composed of letters 18 </l>
                  <l>And much does the Editor need it, I ween.</l>
                  <l>He really must call all his reader to note,</l>
                  <l>That altho' 'Young Ideas' have their very best vote,</l>
                  <l>Yet he seldom gets more than the "populi vox"</l>
                  <l>But he hopes that <hi rend="underlined">my whole</hi> will appear in his box.</l>
               </lg>
               <p>What two letters of the alphabet will represent?<lb/>A Female name? Voidness? Decline? Goods? Vexation? Dress? &amp; a sensation
                  after a night of dissipation?</p>
            </div>

            <div type="publication_info">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI9.10">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions thankfully received<lb/>Saturday 6 February,
                  1858.</p>

            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1101" facs="TYI1101"/>

         <div n="10" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday February 13 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 10</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">

               <p>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.01">The Past Week has certainly been productive of more excitement, and enjoyment, than
                     any we remember to have witnessed since our departure from England.</ref>
               </p>
               <p>One great event at least, has been its chief characteristic, one day at least, called forth more interest than the others, we speak
                  of the Regatta day, and the attendant entertainment onboard the "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>."</p>
               <p>Although on this important occasion, our men did not acquit themselves in the manner we had hoped, yet it is a source of deep
                  gratification, to know that the reigning prize of the day, the acme of ambition, the "Prize Cup" was won by our men.</p>
               <p>Elsewhere we shall find a detailed account of the circumstances which marked the day, which we must say could not have been finer or
                  more agreeable, nor can we drop this subject without paying our tribute of admiration to the "fair sex," the bright colours<cb n="2"
                  /> of whose tasteful array, enlivened our decks, and gave the ship a holiday appearance,</p>
               <p>Our news this week is somewhat general and extensive; we have news of the movements of the Naval Brigade and the probability of
                  intelligence arriving soon of an attack upon <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>: from <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Yangon">Rangoon</placeName>, accounts would lead us to believe that the disturbances there are not likely
                  to be settled either quickly or quietly, as, by the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> "Englishman" it
                  is reported that Captain Beauchamp <persName ref="#Beauchamp_Seymour">Seymour</persName> has landed the crew of the "<orgName
                     ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName>" with a view of forming a Naval Brigade, but we must not place implicit reliance upon this
                  latter report, as it is as yet unauthenticated.</p>
               <p>We can only hope that we shall not be excluded from a participation of whatever may take place in that quarter.</p>

            </div>
            <div type="letter">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.02">A Savage from the Andaman Islands</ref>
               </head>
               <floatingText>
                  <body>
                     <opener>Dear Sir,</opener>
                     <p>The following account which was given me by a gentleman of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> may
                        perhaps, prove interesting <pb n="TYI1102" facs="TYI1102"/><fw>The "Young Idea" Saturday 13<hi rend="superscript">th</hi>
                           February 1858</fw><cb n="1"/> to the Readers of the "Young Idea"</p>
                     <p>An exploring party was recently sent from <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> to visit the
                           <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Andaman_Islands">Andaman Islands</placeName> in the Bay of Bengal with the view of
                        selecting a site to establish a penal colony, and to banish thither the captive King of <placeName
                           ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName> and his rebel Sepoys. It is remarkable that this group of Islands, tho' so
                        near to the Asiatic Continent, are inhabited by a race of savages, no way akin to the Asiatic tribes, but apparently much
                        nearer allied to the African Negroes. They live in a perfect state of nature, without the slightest vestige of a garment;
                        their huts are mere dens or kennels under which they crawl at night; in fact they seem to be among the most degraded forms of
                        humanity.</p>
                     <p>The first salutation our explorers received was a flight of arrows, but a few musket shots soon dispersed the natives. Two of
                        them were killed, and one captured. This savage has been brought to <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata"
                           >Calcutta</placeName> by Dr. ..... and both he and Mrs...... have done their best to humanize him by kind treatment. He was
                        introduced to several Negroes of different tribes, but none of them could understand his language.</p>
                     <p>He shews himself not insensible to kindness, and was pleased with Dr. .....,'s little child, making signs, that he had a
                        little child also. On one occasion, wishing to show his gratitude to Mrs. ..... &amp; following the custom of his country on
                        such occasions, he took the lady's hand within both his own, raised it solemnly to his lips, and with the deepest respect,
                        spat into it.</p>
                     <signed>
                        <figure>
                           <figDesc>hand-drawn triangle</figDesc>
                           <graphic url="TYI1102a.jpg"/>
                        </figure>
                     </signed>
                  </body>
               </floatingText>
            </div>
            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.03">Se(a)-poys and Sea-devils,</ref>
               </head>
               <p>The consternation struck into the sepoys in Central India by the sight of our Bluejackets, is scarcely to be imagined. "They are not
                  English "men" say the sepoys. "Nor men, at all, but sea-devils who have come up out of the sea to fight for the Englishmen They do
                  not walk like men, but in a rolling way that shows they have claws upon their feet. They are dressed in a way quite different from
                  Englishmen, they are not tall, but very broad, in fact they are about 5 feet high, by 4 feet broad; they can carry big guns on their
                  shoulders, or under their<cb n="2"/> arms; six of them can bring a gun up a hill, which it would take 200 or 300 sepoys to move at
                  all; they never speak a word, and when they attack they can never be driven back; they are cannibals, and eat sepoys when they have
                  salted them down, sepoy bullets cannot kill them."</p>
            </div>
            <div type="previously_published">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.04">Extracts from a Personal Narrative of the Siege of Lucknow</ref>
               </head>
               <p>"Opening of the Siege." The troops mutinied on the 30th of May and after the 30th of June the siege commenced in earnest. The
                  constant din of artillery and musketry, combined with the yells of the demons without, and busy excitement within our defences, kept
                  the women and children in dread of death. </p>
               <p>Some sat patiently, others ran from room to room, thinking the shot pursued them, some cried and beat their chests, others dragged
                  their children from one side of the room to the other, as the roar of the cannon disturbed them, some prayed as they had never
                  prayed before, while others laughed at the fear &amp; confusion of the rest.</p>
               <p><hi rend="underlined">"Relief of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName> by <persName
                        ref="#Sir_Henry_Havelock"><choice>
                           <expan>General></expan>
                           <abbr>Genl.</abbr>
                        </choice>Havelock</persName>"</hi>. Sir James <persName ref="#Outram">Outram</persName> and <persName
                     ref="#Sir_Henry_Havelock"><choice>
                        <expan>General></expan>
                        <abbr>Genl.</abbr>
                     </choice>Havelock</persName> came on the 25th September, and we saw the vast crowns going out of the city to oppose that brave
                  little force for three days we heard the firing of artillery coming closer and closer; On the last day there was a great stir,
                  detachments of the enemy in retreat passed by; onwards came the British Troops, driving the cowards in terror before them.
                  Elephants, camels, carts, horses, bullocks, and men made in masses for the bridge of boats over the <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Gomati_River">Goomtee</placeName>. They crowded on to it, and it broke, sending some to the bottom of the
                  stream, and the rest running up and down the banks in a panic. About 8 o'clock in the Evening we saw Sir J <persName ref="#Outram"
                     >Outram</persName> and <persName ref="#Sir_Henry_Havelock">General Havelock</persName> and staff enter the street facing us,
                  leading the 78th Highlanders &amp; Ferozepore Regiment of sikhs. Instantaneously the entrenchments shook with Hurrahs: they could
                  not hear us, but we went on increasing our noisy joy, and shaking handkerchiefs and caps as they neared the Gate; The sight of that
                  gallant little band, piercing thro' thousands to our rescue, affected many of us to tears. Such devotion!!! Such bravery!!!</p>
               <p><hi rend="underlined">"Adventure in the Mines"</hi>. The enemy were detected mining towards us, as on the previous occasion, and I
                  lay a long time waiting for <pb n="TYI1103" facs="TYI1103"/><fw>The Young Idea" Saturday 13<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> February
                     1858</fw><cb n="1"/> them to break into our gallery. we were suddenly confronted by a strong blow of the Miner's hoe, which
                  brought down the slip of earth dividing us. The man spread out his arms &amp; screamed as I put the muzzle of my pistol to his
                  breast, and shot him. There was a great noise at the top of the shaft; and they called to each other to go, and bring out the dying
                  miner, and his tools. A Sepoy leapt swearing to the bottom; I shot him in the stomach, in the act of firing at me: the commotion now
                  became louder, and the rebels blustered &amp; swore, as if they were all coming down. I taunted them with cowardice, and they,
                  thinking I was a sikh, upbraided me with associating with "<gap reason="indecipherable" atLeast="7" atMost="8" unit="chars"/>" who
                  eat cow's meat and other abominations.</p>
               <p>I told them I was an European Officer, when they ceased their noise, and listened civilly to me. I asked why had they mutinied? They
                  replied, they were fighting for their religion. "How have we threatened your religion? By giving us greased cartridges.
                  *********</p>
               <p>They were now desired by the Havildar, or Native Officer to fire at me, but they refused, saying they wanted to hear the Sahib
                  speak." I challenged the Havildar to come down himself, and then said I would bring him some woman's apparel, this retort caused him
                  to swear, and the others to laugh at him. They now commenced filling up the shaft, and I retired to my own gallery. </p>
               <p><hi rend="underlined">"Escaping in disguise"</hi>. On the 9th November I sought out the spy Kunrigee Lall who - was going back with
                  despatches to <persName ref="#Campbell">Sir Colin Campbell</persName> and imparted to him my desire to venture in disguise in his
                  company My attire was soon completed; I was dressed as a Budmash, or Irregular soldier of the city, with sword and shield, native
                  made shoes, tight trousers, a yellow silk koortah over a close fitting white muslin shirt, a yellow coloured chintz sheet thrown
                  round my shoulders, a cream coloured turban, and a white waistband or "Kummerbund", My face and neck down to the shoulders, and my
                  hands to the wrists, were coloured with lampblack, the cork used being dipped in oil to cause the colour to adhere. After being
                  provided with a small double barrelled pistol, and a pair of broad pyjamahs over the tight trousers, I proceeded with Kunrigee Lall
                  to the banks of the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Gomati_River">river Goomtee</placeName>. We undressed and quickly forded the
                  river, which was about 4 1/2 ft. deep, and about 100 yards wide at this point. My courage failed me while in the water, and if my
                  guide had been within reach, I should perhaps have pulled him back and abandoned the<cb n="2"/> enterprize **** With my <gap
                     reason="indecipherable"/> resting on my shoulder, we advanced among the huts in front, where I accosted a matchlock man, "The
                  night is cold"; he answered to my remark "It is very cold"*** We passed unnoticed thro' a number of Sepoys and matchlock men, some
                  of whom, were escorting persons of rank in palanquins, preceded by torches. I jostled against several armed men in the street, but
                  was not spoken to. **** I was in great spirits when we reached the green fields, into which I had not been for five months
                  Everything around us smelt sweet, and a carrot I took from the roadside, was, the most delicious I ever tasted. I gave vent to my
                  feelings in a conversation with Kenrigee Lall, who joined in my admiration of the province of <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Ayodhya">Oudh</placeName>, and lamented that it was now in the hands of wretches, whose misgovernment and
                  rapacity was ruining it.</p>
               <p><hi rend="underlined">"Arrival at the British Camp"</hi>. By 3 o'clock in the morning we arrived at a grove of mango trees, in which
                  a man was singing at the top of his voice! He was alarmed at hearing us approach, and astonished us also, by calling out a guard of
                  25 Sepoys, all of whom asked questions. Kunrigee Lall lost heart for the first time, and threw away the letter entrusted to him for
                     <persName ref="#Campbell">Sir Colin Campbell</persName> I kept mine safe in my turban. We satisfied the guard that we were poor
                  men travelling to <choice>
                     <orig>Umrona</orig>
                     <reg>Umroula</reg>
                  </choice>, and they told us the road.***</p>
               <p>It was near 4 o'clock in the morning when we heard the English challenge "Who comes there?" We had reached a British cavalry
                  outpost. My eyes filled with joyful tears, and I thanked God for having safely conducted one through this dangerous enterprize. </p>
            </div>
            <div type="regatta_report">

               <head type="main">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.05">"The Young Idea"</ref>
               </head>
               <head type="sub">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.05">The Regatta</ref>
               </head>
               <p>The <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Regatta of this season took place on Wednesday last the 10th Ist.
                  &amp; went off very successfully, under the patronage of Commodore <persName ref="#Watson">Watson</persName>, C.B. &amp; the
                  Officers of the Royal Navy, as also the Judges of the Supreme Court. The Judges on the occasion were <choice>
                     <expan>Lieutenant</expan>
                     <abbr>Lieutt.</abbr>
                  </choice>Woodman R.N. <choice>
                     <expan>Captain</expan>
                     <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                  </choice>. Hill Master attendant, &amp; <choice>
                     <expan>Captain</expan>
                     <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                  </choice> Lovell P.&amp;O. <choice>
                     <expan>Company</expan>
                     <abbr>Compy</abbr>
                  </choice>. These gentlemen were onboard the H.C.'s steamer "<orgName ref="#Proserpine">Proserpine</orgName>" which lay off Baboo's
                  Ghant. Visitors speedily arrived of whom we may safely say the "gentler sex" were the most numerous, and our bridge presented a
                  brilliant spectacle when all the ladies had taken their stations thereon. The scene all round was now most enlivening, the "<orgName
                     ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" &amp; <orgName ref="#Proserpine">Proserpine</orgName> both gaily dressed in flags, the
                  lines of boats filled with well dressed spectators, stretching along the Watery Race-<pb n="TYI1104" facs="TYI1104"/><fw>The "Young
                     Idea" Saturday 13<hi rend="superscript">th</hi> February 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/>course, and the Ghant and its neighbourhood thickly
                  lined with people of all classes. The "<orgName ref="#Proserpine">Proserpine</orgName>" was the starting point and from this the
                  boats proceeded downwards round certain buoys marked with flags and then came up again passing on the shore side of the "<orgName
                     ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" back to the "<orgName ref="#Proserpine">Proserpine</orgName>". The whole distance to be
                  pulled being about a mile and a half.</p>
               <table rows="3" cols="3">
                  <head>1st Race. Ships Gigs 6 oars 1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd prize save entrance.</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Minna</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Green</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Sesostris</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Blue, White Ball</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Semiramis</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Red &amp; White</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>Sesostris came in first but having taken the wrong course Minna was adjudged the winner</p>

               <table rows="3" cols="3">
                  <head>2nd Race. Ships Gigs 4 oars. 1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd Prize save entrance.</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Bella Blue.</cell>
                     <cell role="data">White Ball</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Judith</cell>
                     <cell role="data">American Flag</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Liverpool</cell>
                     <cell role="data">White Blue star</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>The American boat which was pulled by Negroes came in a good second</p>
               <p>The Following also started Hurkaru, Megoera, Defiance, Undaunted Jas Hurtley Proserpone and Griffin.</p>

               <table rows="3" cols="3">
                  <head>3rd Race Racing Gigs 6 Oars. 1st Prize Cup 300 Rs 2nd Prize 100 Rs. 4rd Prize save entrance.</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Coquette</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Pink</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">White Gauntlet</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Blue. White Glove</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Fiery Cross</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Blue Burgee. White Cross</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>The following also started Lotus. True Blue &amp; Will o' Wisp. There was a close struggle between Coquette and White Gauntlet.
                  White Gauntlet came in first, but as she had fowled, "Coquette" was adjudged the winner. The start was bad, and True Blue had an oar
                  broken. Fiery Cross. Which was pulled by Chinese made great play at first, but lost way by coming across a cargo boat.</p>

               <table rows="3" cols="3">
                  <head type="main">4th Race Double lanked ship's cutters. 8.10 &amp; 12 Oars</head>
                  <head type="main">1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd Prize save entrance.</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Semiramis</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Red &amp; White</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label"><orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>Barge</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Blue</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label"><orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> 2d Cutter</cell>
                     <cell role="data">White</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>The following also started <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> 1st Cutter, and Brenda the latter boat being manned by
                  marines from the "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" Immediately on Semiramis passing the winning point, one of the
                  oarsmen (who had evidently made up his mind that his boat was to win) struck up a tune of triumph on the bagpipes, much to the
                  amusement of the spectators.</p>
               <table rows="2" cols="3">
                  <head>5th Race. Launches. 14 to 18 oars. 1st Prize 100Rs 2d Prize. save entrance.</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">
                        <orgName ref="#Pylades">Pylades</orgName>
                     </cell>
                     <cell role="data">Green</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label"><orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> 1st launch</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Red</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>The following also started. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>'s 2d Launch &amp; Pinnace</p>

               <table rows="2" cols="3">
                  <head>6th Race Covered Pancies. 1st Prize 30 Rs. 2d Prize 10 Rs</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Agul Parah</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Red, Black Stripe</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Nonsuch</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Blue. White anchor</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>The following also started. Hela. Mela. Kalee and Arrow</p>


               <table rows="3" cols="2">
                  <head>7th Race. Dinghee Race for all comers</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">1st Prize</cell>
                     <cell role="data">10Rs.</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">2d Prize</cell>
                     <cell role="data">8Rs.</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">3d Prize</cell>
                     <cell role="data">5Rs.</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <p>Six dinghees started of which only three arrived at the winning point, after a smartly contested race</p>
               <p>The Race for screw steamers did not come off, as was announced in the programme.</p>
               <p>Commodore <persName ref="#Watson">Watson</persName> had a first rate tiffin prepared in his cabin, to which the ladies repaired
                  after the second race was over. The band of the <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> aided in the pleasure of the day by
                  playing several selections and airs from our finest operas. After the Gentlemen had refreshed themselves, and the fifth race was
                  over, dancing commenced, and was kept up with great spirit until 6 o'clock. little or no attention being paid to the ensuing
                  races.</p>
               <p>The arrival of this day had been eagerly anticipated, and we are certain that all will agree that it passed off with entire
                  satisfaction, altho' we could not but feel regret at the dancing being broken off at the early hour it was.<cb n="2"/></p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.06">Naval Intelligence</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName> sailed for England on Friday the 12th Instant, with invalids and refugees
                     from <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>. We hope next week to be able to present our readers with a
                     slight account of her arrangements. </item>
                  <item>Commodore <persName ref="#Watson">Watson</persName> C.B. inspected her previous to her departure.</item>
                  <item>H.M.S. Megoera has taken the berth lately occupied by the "<orgName ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName>" and has commenced
                     coaling. She will sail for Sydney early next week.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.07">Epitome.</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>On Thursday night (Feb. 11) about 11 o'clock a very heavy thunderstorm passed over us. The best description of the hailstones
                     which fell on this occasion is to say that in size and shape, though not in colour or taste, they resembled very large
                     "acidulated drops" The lightning was very vivid and of a beautiful pale blue color.</item>
                  <item>Messrs Palmer, Weatherstone and Smithers. Second Class Boys, have taken their departure for England in the "<orgName
                        ref="#Himalaya">Himalaya</orgName>" <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYIappendix3">much regretted by the Master at Arms,
                        and by their respective Masters.</ref></item>
                  <item>A Cricket Ball is announced to take place on Monday the 15th Inst. to which the officers have received a general
                     invitation.</item>
                  <item>We hear that the Royal Navy are likely to be challenged to a match at Cricket by the Officers of the P. and O. Company.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="pun">
               <head>[No Title]</head>

               <p>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.08">Motto for a Tiger's Den. "Mangling done here."</ref>
               </p>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.09">Conundrums</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="15">What is the slight difference between a tiger's foot &amp; a semi-colon?</item>
                  <item n="16">What beer ought dandies to drink?</item>
                  <item n="17">Why ought a man married to a girl of a certain name be never dull or melancholy?</item>
                  <item n="18">When does an insolent Debtor become a Navy man?</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="enigma">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.10">What letters of the Alphabet will represent?</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>(2 Letters) To surpass? A Fowl? Superfluity? A Turkish magistrate? To coop up? &amp; an English County?</item>
                  <item>(3 Letters) A Foe? An Image? A Hollow-place? </item>
                  <item>(4 Letters) A little of honour? Ability? (5 Letters) haste?</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="charade">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.11">Answer to Last Week's Charade.</ref>
               </head>
               <lg>
                  <l>Gaily floats the "burning" light</l>
                  <l>And merrily works the "Trunion?"</l>
                  <l>The schoolboy dreads the cane's sharp "cuts"</l>
                  <l>And reds his hands with "onion"</l>
                  <l>The drunken "sot in" riot" lost</l>
                  <l>soon mourns his destitution </l>
                  <l>And greatly needs the "Young Idea"</l>
                  <l>Some friendly "contribution?"</l>
                  <l>C.</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="enigma">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.12">Answer to Alphabetical Enigmas</ref>
               </head>
               <p>If my sweeheart of only two letters may be M.A. (Emma) L.N. (Ellen) or K.T. (Katey) most surely is she with pockets quite M.T.
                  (Empty) my home in D.K. (decay) How I N.V. (Envy) the rich in their gorgeous R.A. (array) I have sold my F.X. (effects) and am
                  thoroughly needy. No wonder I feel most uncommonly C.D. (seedy).</p>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.13">Unanswered from last week</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="14">When is an Editor like a coachman driving a restive tandem? When he cannot compose the Leader.</item>
               </list>
               <p>Rebus. Doldrum</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI10.14">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. Contributions solicited<lb/>Saturday 13 February, 1858.</p>

            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1111" facs="TYI1111"/>
         <div n="11" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday February 20th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 11</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">

               <p><ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.01">Rumours are now flying about, purporting to remove us from our present snug anchorage
                     at Calcutta for some time;</ref> that we are destined to convey Lady <persName ref="#Charlotte_Canning">Canning</persName> to
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Chennai">Madras</placeName>, and from these, it is said, we steer to <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Yangon">Rangoon</placeName>.</p>
               <p>This will of course involve an absence of some two or three months, and will we hope, be found to prove a beneficial change, for,
                  after all, there is nothing like constant change of air, of scenery, and position for enhancing the excitement and monotony of a sea
                  life.: two varied sentiments, which, however, are most peculiarly our own. </p>
               <p><placeName ref="placeography.xml#Yangon">Rangoon</placeName> we have been informed offers no advantages or inducements as a place of
                  pleasure, and no amusements are to be obtained, wherewith<cb n="2"/> to assist the laggard hours, as each day "draws its slow length
                  along" but then we shall return in a riper mood for the enjoyment of the few recreations <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata"
                     >Calcutta</placeName> affords.</p>
               <p>Besides, we are unable to foresee what other seaport we may visit, what circumstances, may befall us, what fortune may be our lot,
                  and in the fresh kindled sensations of excitement &amp; wonder, which stir our hearts, when visiting strange shores, and towns, and
                  people; we shall find an agreeable relief to the feeling of satiety, to which the interest, we originally felt in this the so-called
                  "City of Palaces" has not begun to succumb; having been disappointed in the hopes we had entertained on arrival <pb n="TYI1112"
                     facs="TYI1112"/><fw>The Young Idea. Saturday 20 February 1858</fw><cb n="1"/></p>
            </div>

            <div type="previously_published">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.02">"Origin of the Name of Delhi</ref>
               </head>
               <p>The city of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName> originally bore the name of Indraprasthe, and was the royal
                  capital of the aboriginal Pandoos. After falling into decay and lying desolate for a period of eight centuries, it was revived again
                  (about A.D. 792) by a descendant of the ancient Kings, entitled Bulwan Deo.</p>
               <p>It was he who changed the name from Indraprasthe to <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName>, the origin of which
                  is related as follows:-</p>
               <p>"There was in one part of the city an iron "kheel" or pillar, said to have been left standing by the ancient "Pandoos" Tradition
                  attached a sacred import to this pillar, and alleged it to be based upon a pedestal fixed in the regions of hell. As Bulwan Deo
                  doubted the truth of the legend, the sceptic monarch determined to test the depth, and he caused the pillar to be violently shaken.
                  A stream of blood immediately gushed up from the earth's centre, and the pillar from that time became loose or in their own language
                  "dheli"</p>
               <p>This was the original of the name of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName></p>
               <p>
                  <bibl>
                     <title><placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Englishman</title>
                  </bibl>
               </p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.03">Our Naval Brigade</ref>
               </head>
               <p>We have as yet said little or nothing about the movements of our Naval Brigade up the country, being ourselves very much in the dark
                  concerning them. But such information as we possess, we are happy to communicate to our Readers.</p>
               <p>We have in fact two separate Brigades, one under <persName ref="#Sir_William_Peel"><choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice> Peel</persName>, the other under <persName ref="#Edward_Southwell_Sotheby"><choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice> Sotheby</persName>: <persName ref="#Sir_William_Peel"><choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice> Peel</persName> taking the greater portion of the "<orgName ref="#Shannon">Shannon</orgName>'s" Crew, and raising a
                  considerable addition from the merchant<cb n="2"/> seamen, numbering in all about 500 men.</p>
               <p>These ascending the river to <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Allahabad">Allahabad</placeName> with several of their heavy guns,
                  advanced afterwards to <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kanpur">Cawnpore</placeName>, where they rendered almost unprecedented
                  service, and are now stationed at Futty ghur, ready to advance upon <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>
                  from the N.W.</p>
               <p><persName ref="#Edward_Southwell_Sotheby"><choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice>Sotheby</persName>, shortly after, having landed his little crew from the "<orgName ref="#Pearl">Pearl</orgName>,'
                  increased his numbers from other sources to about 250 men. These advanced up the river, we believe, as far as <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Chhapra">Chupra</placeName>, and then took to the land: they have marched through <placeName
                     ref="placeography.xml#Gorakhpur">Goruckpoor</placeName> and <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Faizabad">Fyzabad</placeName>, at
                  each place encountering the enemy and rendering good service with their long guns: several companies of <choice>
                     <orig>bra</orig>
                     <reg>brave</reg>
                  </choice> little Ghookas are attached to <persName ref="#Edward_Southwell_Sotheby"><choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice>Sotheby</persName>'s division but our bluejackets have charge of the Artillery; they are now ready to advance upon
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName> from the Eastward, and we may hope therefore, that under the walls
                  of this stronghold, our brave comrades of the "<orgName ref="#Pearl">Pearl</orgName>" and "<orgName ref="#Shannon"
                  >Shannon</orgName>" may again meet in victory, and assist in crushing out the last sparks of the rebellion in India.</p>
               <p>We have told our tale to the best of our knowledge, but if any of our readers possess or can procure more accurate information, we
                  shall be deeply indebted to them for making it public in our</p>
            </div>
            <div type="cricket_report">

               <head type="main">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.04">Sporting Intelligence</ref>
               </head>
               <head type="sub">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.04">Cricket</ref>
               </head>
               <p>On Wednesday the 17th Inst. a match took place on the ground near the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Ochterlony_Monument">the
                     Ochterbury monument</placeName> between the Officers of H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>, and the Petty
                  Officers, assisted by Messrs Mereweather, Budding, &amp; Edwards of <orgName ref="#Pylades">Pylades</orgName>. Having received a
                  good account of the game with the scoring made on this occasion, and this being the first time our club has done battle with other
                  players, we feel bound to give it a place in our columns. <pb n="TYI1113" facs="TYI1113"/><fw>The Young Idea Saturday 20 February
                     1858.</fw><cb n="1"/> The P.O.'s had the first lead, and here we must notice the free batting of <persName ref="#Taylor"
                     >Taylor</persName>, who made some capital hits till a "ripper" from <persName ref="#Brownrigg">Mr Brownrigg</persName> levelled
                  his stirrups to the tune of 24 runs. Of the remainder only three managed to make scores, and amongst them, we may mention a good
                  stroke for 5 of <persName ref="#Reynolds">Reynolds</persName>. Owing to the excellent fielding of <persName ref="#Shortt">Mr.
                     Shortt</persName> as Longstop, they only managed to score 2 Byes.</p>
               <p>The officers now went in, but did not make as much play as was expected: <persName ref="#A_D_McArthur">Mr. McArthur's</persName>
                  wicket being laid low by a "daisy clipper" from Bew at the very first ball. This, and the retiring of our <persName ref="#Brownrigg"
                     >Brownrigg</persName> (to whom all looked for a large score) soon after, by one of the same puzzlers, damped the spirits of the
                  Gentlemen, but the good play of <persName ref="#Theobald">Mr. Theobald</persName>, who kept the field alive till he was caught out
                  by <persName ref="#Cooper">Cooper</persName>: and of <persName ref="#Shortt">Mr Shortt</persName>, who was finally run out, gave
                  them renewed ardour.</p>
               <p>At the conclusion of the first innings which was a close struggle, both parties scored the same, and bets were now freely offered of
                  3 to 1 upon the Gentlemen.</p>
               <p>The P.O's now went in again, and now <persName ref="#Brownrigg">Mr. Brownrigg</persName> shone forth in his true light as a first
                  rate Bowler: their best man soon had his wicket rattled down, and in one over three batsmen took their places and as quickly retired
                  to his well delivered balls which kept the umpire continually employed in repitching the wickets. The result was the P.O's second
                  innings only amounted to 41 runs, making a total of 90.</p>
               <p><persName ref="#Brownrigg">Mr Brownrigg</persName> and <persName ref="#Shortt">Mr Shortt</persName> now took their places, and the
                  play became remarkably good and lively, until <persName ref="#Shortt">Mr Shortt</persName> unfortunately delivered a ball back to
                  the bowler, and was thus caught out.</p>
               <p><persName ref="#Wilkinson">Mr Wilkinson</persName> relieved him, and "fast and furious" was the game. Mr Brownrigg serving out 4s
                  &amp; 5s, &amp; 3s to all parts of the field, <persName ref="#Wilkinson">Mr Wilkinson</persName> backing him up with steady play,
                  and some first rate forward drives. These two remained in for upwards of an hour together, till at last a "disturber" from <persName
                     ref="#Bew">Bew</persName> rattled the bails off <persName ref="#Wilkinson">Mr Wilkinson's</persName> stumps, and came out with
                  his flushing honours thick upon him.</p>
               <p><persName ref="#A_D_McArthur">Mr McArthur</persName> took his bat, but after adding 15 to the score, amongst which were two good
                  hits for 5 and 4, was run out: <persName ref="#Theobald">Mr Theobald</persName> succeeded him, but what<cb n="2"/> the others had
                  apparently gained in play he appeared to have lost for <persName ref="#Cooper">Cooper</persName> soon gained an opening into his
                  wicket. <persName ref="#Chute">Mr Chute</persName> and Mr Moore quickly followed and <persName ref="#Oxley">Mr Oxley</persName> now
                  took vis-a-vis to <persName ref="#Brownrigg">Mr Brownrigg</persName>, and played well and steadily, when darkness coming on the
                  wickets were drawn, <persName ref="#Brownrigg">Mr Brownrigg</persName> carrying his bat out with a score of 102, and there being yet
                  four wickets to go down.<lb/>The following is the score.<lb/>Officers v. Petty Officers<lb/><hi rend="underlined">"H.M.S. <orgName
                        ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>"</hi></p>
               <table rows="13" cols="5">
                  <head>Petty Officers</head>
                  <row role="label">
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data">1st Innings</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data">2nd Innings</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">W. Taylor (1)</cell>
                     <cell role="data">24</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Brownrigg</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">D. Wells</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b McArthur. runout</cell>
                     <cell role="data">6</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. McArthur</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">T. Dukes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">6</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">11</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Brownrigg run out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">J. Bew</cell>
                     <cell role="data">9</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">5</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">T. Reynolds</cell>
                     <cell role="data">8</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">W. Taylor (2)</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. McArthur. run out</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">H. Cooper</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Brownrigg c Brown</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">J. Harding</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Not out</cell>
                     <cell role="data">5</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b McArthur St Brown.</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Mr. Edwards</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Shortt c Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                     <cell role="data">not out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Mr Mereweather</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. McArthur St. Brown</cell>
                     <cell role="data">9</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. &amp;c. Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Byes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                     <cell role="label">Byes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Total</cell>
                     <cell role="data">49</cell>
                     <cell role="label"/>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
               </table>
               <table rows="14" cols="5">
                  <head>Officers</head>
                  <row role="label">
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data">1st Innings</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data">2nd Innings</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Brownrigg</cell>
                     <cell role="data">6</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Bew</cell>
                     <cell role="data">102</cell>
                     <cell role="data">not out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">McArthur</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Bew</cell>
                     <cell role="data">15</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Bew run out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Wilkinson</cell>
                     <cell role="data">4</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Bew</cell>
                     <cell role="data">24</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Bew</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Chute</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Wells</cell>
                     <cell role="data">10</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Wells</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Theobald</cell>
                     <cell role="data">16</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Wells C. Cooper</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Cooper</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">9</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Wells run out</cell>
                     <cell role="data">4</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Wells c Wells</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Oxley</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Wells</cell>
                     <cell role="data">18</cell>
                     <cell role="data">not out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Stanley</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                     <cell role="data">Not out</cell>
                     <cell role="data">-</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Moore</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Bew</cell>
                     <cell role="data">8.</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Wells c Edwards</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Budding</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Bew</cell>
                     <cell role="data">-</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Byes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">6</cell>
                     <cell role="label">Byes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">24</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">No Balls</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Total</cell>
                     <cell role="data">49</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                     <cell role="data">205</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
               </table>
            </div>

            <div type="pun">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.05">"The Great Mo-gul"</ref>
               </head>
               <p>This remarkable species of gull has lately been captured at <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Delhi">Delhi</placeName> where it has
                  existed for several centuries It is the largest gull known, as well as the most destructive, and truculent. In fact those who have
                  effected its capture deserve the gratitude of the world, as Hercules did for destroying the great Hydra. It is supposed that the
                  species will soon be extinct. Its plumage is said to have been very gorgeous, but is now considerably tarnished </p>
               <p>Several young gulls were caught in the same nest, but from their ferocity, were immediately destroyed. <pb n="TYI1114"
                     facs="TYI1114"/><fw>The Young Idea Saturday 20 February 1858</fw><cb n="1"/></p>
            </div>

            <div type="naval_intelligence">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.06">Naval and Military Intelligence</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>On Monday the 15th Inst. H.M. Steam troop ship "Megoera" after being inspected by Commodore R.B. <persName ref="#Watson"
                        >Watson</persName> C.B, sailed for Sydney.</item>
                  <item>On Friday morning the small arm companies, field piece parties, and marines of the Squadron landed and performed a variety of
                     evolutions, returning on board at 7:30 A.M.</item>
                  <item>H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Shannon">Shannon</orgName> arrived at <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Garden_Reach">Garden
                        Reach</placeName> from Point De Galle on Thursday Evening and on Friday morning came up to <placeName
                        ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> mooring ahead of the "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>."
                     She brings the 6th Regiment of Infantry, consisting of 22 officers 580 non commissioned officers and Rank and file, and 22 women
                     and 60 children.</item>
                  <item>H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" commenced provisioning on Friday. The launch laden with provisions,
                     was returning to her on Friday evening when she got aground and notwithstanding the strenuous efforts of W. Worsley, remained
                     firmly aground till the following morning at flood. Mr Shortt having volunteered to relieve Mr Worsley, remained in charge of her
                     all night.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.07">The "Calcutta Englishman" convicted of a Pun.</ref>
               </head>
               <p>The <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Englishman has actually been delivered of a pun. Hear it! Oh ye
                  punsters of the earth, and say what shall be done to our poor shore going contemporary. Describing the Military Review on the
                  Espalanade (Novr 24) "They halted" says the Englishman "near the Peepul tree, and People's tree it ought to be called for it was
                  crowded with human denizens." And this vile pun has actually gone home to England. What shall we do to the man who punned it? Shall
                  we enroll him at once among the Pundits of Hindoostan? or shall we condemn him to stand forever fanning us with the Punkah? or shall
                  we consign him to eternal punishment, in the far distant regions of the Punjaab? Altho many would say "Gently with this pun," we
                  cannot help writing pungently, and making a stir about a pun from such a punster.<cb n="2"/></p>
            </div>

            <div type="epitome">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.08">Epitome</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>On Monday night the annual Ball given by the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Cricket Club came
                     off. It was numerously attended and passed off most satisfactorily.</item>
                  <item>Our officers have been practising Cricket nearly every day of the past week as it was expected that they would be engaged to
                     play the P. and Os but the latter declined to accept the challenge.</item>
                  <item>On Thursday Evening next the Amateurs of the H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> will perform at the
                        <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Lyric Theatre for the Benefit of the Indian Relief fund. The
                     pieces named are "The Seven Clerks" and "Bombastes Furiosa" between which, nautical songs, hornpipes, &amp;c, will vary the
                     amusements. Tickets 5rs each. reserved seats.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="pun">
               <head>[No Title]</head>

               <p>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.09">"Paws for a reply" as the cat said when she scratched the dog for barking at
                     her.</ref>
               </p>
               <p>"There are more ways out of the woods than one," as the rum said when saw a spile coming through the cask.</p>
               <p>Maxim for a <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Storekeeper. <ref
                     target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYIappendix">"If you wish to go up in the world, stick well to your go-down.</ref></p>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.10">Conundrums</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="19">When does a baker most want materials for his trade?</item>
                  <item n="20">When does a good idea resemble the bone of a fowl.</item>
                  <item n="21">Supposing a number of bottles were broken by the fall of a tree, what ejaculation would they give vent to?</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.11">Rebus &amp;c.</ref>
               </head>
               <lg n="I">
                  <l>The sheep &amp; Ox, in concert met</l>
                  <l>To try their voices reckoned</l>
                  <l>The sheep she bleated forth my <hi rend="underlined">first</hi></l>
                  <l>The ox lowed out my <hi rend="underlined">second</hi></l>
               </lg>

               <lg n="II">
                  <l>And as with bleating, lowing sound</l>
                  <l>Their blending voices fluttered</l>
                  <l>A Hindoo squire turned him round.</l>
                  <l>For he heard his title uttered.</l>
               </lg>

            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.12">Unanswered from last week</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="15"> What is the slight difference between a tiger's foot and a semi-colon? The one shows its pause at the end of its
                     clause, and the other its claws at the end of its paws.</item>
                  <item n="16">What beer ought dandies to drink? Spruce beer.</item>
                  <item n="17">When might a man married to a girl of a certain name be never dull, or melancholy? When he is animated
                     (Annie-mated)</item>
                  <item n="18">When does an Insolent Debtor become a Navy man? When he is in or belonging to the Fleet.</item>
               </list>
               <p>Alphabetical Enigmas. To surpass, X.L. A Fowl P.N. Superfluity X.S. A Turkish magistrate K.D. To coop it up M.U. an English County
                  S.X. A Foe N.M.E. An Image F.E.G. A Hollow place K.V.T. A Title of honour X.L.N.C. Ability F.E.K.C. Haste X.P.D.N.C.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="publication_info">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI11.13">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions thankfully received<lb/>Saturday 20 February,
                  1858.</p>

            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1121" facs="TYI1121"/>
         <div n="12" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday February 27th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 12</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">

               <p><ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.01">The Past Week has been extraordinarily productive of events of interest &amp;
                     amusement</ref>, and we feel bound to afford all the space we can for the same The Rajah's dinner, &amp; marriage of his juvenile
                  granddaughter, the Cricket match between our Club &amp; the Squadron and our defeat; the success of our Amateurs in their
                  performance on Thursday night; all afford a supply of intelligence upon the requisite space for which we are loath to encroach. A
                  few days more and we shall look back upon <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> and all the pleasures it
                  has afforded us, as a mem'ry of the past, &amp; fresh scenes will meet us, and in turn give way to others. We shall almost regret
                  the distance, which will soon be placed between us &amp; <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>, for we are
                  desirous to know of the operations at <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Lucknow">Lucknow</placeName>, and it is most likely we shall
                  not hear of the events which will take place in that quarter until some time after their occurrence. We earnestly hope that the blow
                  may be struck speedily, &amp; let us<cb n="2"/> not forget, in our regret for our absence that it is certain to be "all for the
                  best":- for our actions and movements are under the wise ordinance of One who knows more than we can, and who "disposes, when man
                  proposes."</p>
            </div>

            <div type="article">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.02">Dinner Party at Cossipore &amp; Marriage of the Granddaughter of Rajah Behadoor</ref>
               </head>
               <p>On Monday night the 22d Inst. of the Rajah Budderaunth Roy Behadoor celebrated the marriage of his Granddaughter, with a grand
                  dinner party fireworks and a nautch. For the information of those of our readers who were unfortunately unable to go, we will
                  attempt a slight description of the events of the evening, altho' we feel that our pen will fail to convey to the <choice>
                     <orig>edea</orig>
                     <reg>reader</reg>
                  </choice> an adequate impression to that which was the result of witnessing it "in propria persona."</p>
               <p>We left the ship rather late (about 7 PM the dinner being announced for 7:30) and on landing at Baboo's Ghant found to our dismay
                  that no garrie was waiting for us, this caused some little consternation, but a consultation being held, we acted speedily upon its
                  determination, &amp; were quickly ensconced in palanqains on arriving at Wilson's Hotel, we managed to obtain a garrie &amp; without
                  further delay than we could help, set off for Cossipore. Our <gap reason="indecipherable"/> proved to be one of the best of his
                  kind, keeping his cattle well up to the mark.</p>
               <p>We passed through the dirty, dismal, native quarter, faintly lit by the flickering glare of oil lamps, with dusky, half clad forms
                  flitting about in the misty, smoky atmosphere, which made our eyes smart and fill with tears. Here and there in the deep, gloomy,
                  shade of the interior of an old and shaky building, could be seen a dark object bending over the earthenware pan, in which the
                  evening meal was cooking, whilst the flare of the lambent flame as it shot up from under, would for an instant light up his dim
                  countenance &amp; the surrounding objects, and then as instantly subsiding would render the obscurity more intense than ever.</p>
               <p>As we speeded along and left the suburbs of the city, emerging into more open country, the notes of warning our driver had been
                  repeatedly uttering, gradually ceased, and we found ourselves passing extensive gardens, with an occa<pb n="TYI1122" facs="TYI1122"
                     /><fw>The Young Idea" Saturday 27<hi rend="superscript">th</hi>February 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/>sional hut here, &amp; there. At
                  last we arrived at a place where four roads met, &amp; most likely would have proceeded straight on, had not a figure which stood in
                  the road acquainted our driver that his proper course was the turning to the right.</p>
               <p>Shortly after a blaze of light on our left hand told us that we were approaching our goal, a few minutes more and we entered the
                  Rajah's garden. We were quite surprized at the number of lamps, and the brilliancy of the illuminations, it was a transition from
                  night to day: altho we consider that the effect would have been more perfect had the lamps been variegated. On our left was a large
                  tank, surrounded by railings, on which lamps were hung, close together, we are perfectly unable to judge of the probable number in
                  this spot alone, for the tank was one of the largest we have seen, &amp; the lights almost touched on another: the reflection in the
                  still water, greatly enhanced the effect, especially that caused by a large building on the opposite side, which was in one perfect
                  blaze, &amp; of which we shall speak more fully anon.</p>
               <p>The strains of a band met our ears as we rattled down to the garden house, where upon emerging from our trap, we found the dinner
                  was proceeding. We entered and soon procured seats, which were apparently the only empty ones, for we noticed some after arrivals
                  who were unable to obtain even a corner of the table. The dinner was in every respect perfect. having been placed under the sole
                  arrangement of Messrs Wilson &amp; <choice>
                     <expan>Company</expan>
                     <abbr>Co</abbr>
                  </choice> of Auckland Hotel, we regretted much not having arrived in time to witness the appearance of the table previous to the
                  attack, but as it was (fish having been just removed) it looked remarkably well and the taste displayed in the several minutiae
                  which characterize a well laid table, spoke well for the capacity of the hands to whose care the management was entrusted. The room
                  itself was gaily decorated with banners &amp; flags of England, France and Turkey, and was well lighted by chandeliers, and
                  Moderator lamps. The many uniforms, of which red decidedly preponderated, &amp; the glittering of the naval epaulettes, varied with
                  the sober black of the civilians, greatly enhanced the brilliancy of the table.</p>
               <p>Having appeased our appetite and slaked our thirst with first rate champagne &amp; hearing sounds of native music &amp; singing in
                  an adjoining room, we quitted the table and adjourned to the apartment whence the sounds proceeded. On our way thither we stopped to
                  examine several swords &amp; spears, daggers &amp; c of real Damascus steel and beautifully worked, the hilts &amp; crosspieces,
                  inlaid with gold and precious stones of all kinds. We also saw a magnificent diamond in a glass case, said to be worth £180.000. Of
                  furniture we cannot speak as the rooms are all furnished in Eastern style, &amp; consequently there is no display of tables, and
                  chairs, couches, settees, &amp;c, &amp;c, which we see in our commonest drawing rooms in England. One small table &amp; that of
                  marble, supported a tray with betel nut and a jug of water for the benefit of the native guests, &amp; carpets, spread upon a
                  platform in a room through which we passed, were appropriated to their use.</p>
               <p>On entering the room from which the nautch music had proceeded, we found that we were just too late, as we caught a stern view of
                  the musicians, as they passed out of the door opposite to that we entered by. The interior presented a very gay appearance, for here
                  we saw the various garbs and picturesque dresses of the native visitors, who were seated on a cushioned seat which went all round
                  the room. Some were arrayed most magnificently <cb n="2"/>in shawls woven with gold, velvet embroiderd with gold, in fact all the
                  garments were heavy and thick with gold. The Rajah himself wore round his neck a diamond necklace valued at £200,000 and almost all
                  wore heavy massive gold chains.</p>
               <p>The sharp whiz of a rocket announced to us that the fireworks were commencing. We immediately allied forth and found ourselves in
                  front of the tank, which was reflecting on its placid surface the last falling stars of the first rocket: carriages, &amp; horses,
                  were near and around us, and as a blaze of light suddenly illuminated the whole scene before us, the poor frightened animals snorted
                  &amp; started with terror, &amp; required the utmost efforts of the drivers to keep them from fairly bolting away. Our first care
                  was to get out of the way of anything like a horse, and then we turned to view the magnificent spectacle before us. In front &amp;
                  around us on every side, bright masses of flame, shot up in the air, dense masses of smoke curled heavily upwards, thro' which
                  flights of rockets shot with their hissing roar and blue fireballs formed their graceful curves.</p>
               <p>On our right a large piece of firework was set fire to, from its original appearance we supposed that it was intended to pourtray
                  the burning of a house, but as it quickly went into an entire flame, it only represented a burst of flame lighting up the visages of
                  those around us with a pale unearthly glare, and by the strong but fitful illumination which it cast on the projecting points of the
                  building, throwing the recesses into gloomier shadow. In various parts of the gardens, fresh gleams of light shot up &amp; rockets
                  filled the air with their fiery balls, threatening to cause some damage by their falling sticks, which very often descended amongst
                  the crowd.</p>
               <p>The brilliant scene was rendered doubly impressive by the reflecting of water &amp; the dense volume of smoke which hung like a
                  canopy over the whole gardens. The display which formed the finale, was erected on the opposite bank of the tank, to that on which
                  we stood and when first lighted represented a square body of white fire and an arch. As the fire decreased, a blue flickering flame
                  made its appearance, and gradually increased in strength until at last in the square, we read the sentence, "God save the Queen, and
                  the Young couple every Happiness," and the arch shone forth as an arbour over which the blue flame played in a wavy, flickering
                  light. This was immediately hailed with three hearty cheers from the Officers &amp; Englishmen present, and the company then
                  strolled about enjoying in many cases the luxury of <gap reason="indecipherable"/>. We followed the example and then returned to the
                  building to witness the nautch, which was about to recommence.</p>
               <p>After a short time the performers entered. They consisted of a girl, dressed in a dark brown gauze dress, and scarf trimmed &amp;
                  embroidered profusely with gold, and particoloured trousers, made very full so as to hide the feet. Her headdress consisted of a
                  frontlet, hanging over the forehead with side pieces and a backpiece, all of gold or imitation and studded with various coloured
                  stones. Her hands were adorned with rings &amp; from one on each finger a chain communicated with a circular <pb n="TYI1123"
                     facs="TYI1123"/><fw>The Young Idea" Saturday 27<hi rend="superscript">th</hi>February 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/> plate of gold, as
                  also from the bracelets, the back of the hand being thus covered with gold. Her personal appearance was not in the least attractive
                  in fact she looked most remarkably like a monkey dressed up Four musicians accompanied her in her song, which was perfectly
                  unintelligible, altho' good taste was exhibited in the instrumental sound being commanded by the vocal of the musicians two played
                  upon a species of violin supported in a linen band which went round the waist, the bow being handled in much the same manner as a
                  bass viol player would hold it Another had two little brass cymbals about the size of the palm of the hand, which he manipulated
                  with extreme dexterity, and under his able guidance they emitted a pleasant jingling sound. The fourth played on two small drums of
                  curious shape &amp; make suspended round his waist in a linen cloth, and which were played by the action of the fingers &amp; palms
                  of the hand. The costumes of the men were nothing out of the common native dress excepting the nether garments of the "drummer" as
                  we call him, and we heard them very much admired, not only for their pattern, "a pink check":-but for the cut &amp; fit, which would
                  have gained the envy and admiration of all Regent Street, had they been there displayed.</p>
               <p>The dancing consisted of an advancing &amp; retrograde movement, accompanied with a waving motion of the hands the arms being held
                  in would-be graceful positions over the head, &amp; the feet being occasionally brought together so as to make the anclets strike
                  &amp; jingle. Altogether nothing absurd and vapid ever met our gaze, novelty was its only charm, and we left the room to visit the
                  marriage presents &amp; the celebration of the marriage ceremony.</p>
               <p>We bent our steps towards the building we have mentioned as attracting our attention from its blaze of light, when we entered. Here
                  we found all the presents arranged for exhibition, amongst which we noticed cup, and trays of solid silver, two handsome enamelled
                  serpent-bracelets studded with diamonds and amethysts, with large rubies in the heads, a necklace of pearls, with emeralds at
                  equidistances: several handsome cachmere shawls, gold rings, linen pieces silver worked vases, and a bedstead of solid sliver, with
                  rose coloured mosquito curtains and a coverlet of Persian workmanship. Wreaths of white flowers were heaped up in a silver bowl, and
                  on a large plate of the same metal small bouquets of flowers were arranged.</p>
               <p>Close by under a canopy supported by poles of solid silver, sat the bridegroom robed in a splendid shawl, and surrounded by priests
                  in front of him, sat a nautch girl, with her attendant musicians, keeping up a neverending song in Persian and now, we were informed
                  that the ceremony would commence shortly, so we determined to wait and not miss it. Smoking was not considered offensive, so we
                  whiled away the time, scanning &amp; enquiring into the various novelties surrounding us, which excited our curiosity, and which
                  would require the space of a volume to enumerate. The bridegroom appeared to be about 15 years of age and if we might judge by his
                  countenance did not seem to entertain a high notion of the felicity of his situation.</p>
               <p>We had not long to wait before a change took place. The Bridegroom rose from his luxurious seat and the priests arrayed him in snow
                  white linen garments; he now took his station upon a square piece of sandalwood, painted and ornamented in a pretty device, and
                  squatted down in Hindoo fashion upon his haunches: a very strange looking white turban was not placed on his head and in front of
                  this was fastened a high frontlet, made of worked silver wire (and presenting in a front <cb n="2"/> view, the appearance of a
                  parish beadle's cocked hat), with two enormous tassels depending from each end.</p>
               <p>He sat, or rather squatted in this position for about half an hour, when the priests again disrobed him and redressed him in red
                  silk leaving the right shoulder &amp; arm bare, again he squatted down, &amp; the large fronlet was removed, &amp; a smaller but
                  similar headdress took its place &amp; the two bracelets I have mentioned before were clasped on his wrists. He now bared his right
                  knee, and his father who was seated on his right hand between two priests, extended his right hand &amp; placed the two forefingers
                  &amp; thumb on his son's knee; at first we were under the impression that he was testing him by introducing some pointed instrument,
                  but as he remained in this position for about ten minutes, we were unable to determine what the intention was. The presents were
                  then shown to him the shawls, rings &amp;c being passed round so his father who held them before him.</p>
               <p>Shortly after this ceremony the priests, bridegroom &amp; his father rose, and being once more enveloped in the ample folds of the
                  cachmere shawl, he was led away with torchbearers in front, to visit, (as we were informed) the family, &amp; to be introduced for
                  the first time to the bride. During his absence we were decorated with bouquets &amp; wreaths of a sweet smelling white flower,
                  &amp; presented a very gay appearance with our caps and breasts thus adorned.</p>
               <p>About 20 min. elapsed when the bridegroom reappeared and took his station as before on the square of sandalwood, a similar one was
                  placed opposite to him the bride appeared and squatted down upon it; a voice in the crowd immediately called for "Three Cheers for
                  the Bride" which were heartily given. Poor little thing!!! She had arrived at the mature age of 9 and was already to become a wife.
                  She was dressed in red silk similar to her husband, and a ring through her nose. Think of this! Oh! ye' fair brides of England, but
                  let me inform you that this is a religious custom, &amp; was not placed there for her future husband to make use of to "lead her by
                  the nose".</p>
               <p>The fingers of her right hand were now entwined with his, and a wreath of flowers bound round them, the holy water of the Ganges was
                  next poured over the joined hands. A gold ring was then placed in the father's hand, who held it in the vessel containing the holy
                  water, and repeated a long unintelligible rigmarole after the priest, after which it was placed on the two joined hands of the young
                  couple &amp; holy water sprinkled over it, Incense was then burnt, the hands separated and the ceremony completed. </p>
               <p>The happy (?) pair were led off by torchlight. For ourselves, we made it our study to find our garrie and having succeeded after
                  some little trouble, we were speedily borne from this novel and interesting scene, and returned on board heartily pleased with our
                  excursion. </p>


            </div>


            <div type="cricket_report">

               <head type="main">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.03">Sporting Intelligence</ref>
               </head>
               <head type="sub">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.03">Cricket</ref>
               </head>
               <head type="sub">
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.03">Match between the Chesapeake &amp; Squadron</ref>
               </head>

               <p>On Thursday afternoon a Cricket Match took place between the "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>" eleven, and the
                  Squadron eleven, which resulted we are sorry to say in the defeat of the former. The wickets were pitched at 2 P.M. on the ground
                  near <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Ochterlony_Monument">the Ochterbury monument</placeName>, the squadron eleven going into the
                  wickets first. The play was remarkably good, but we consider that the high score made by Mr. <persName ref="#Hope">Hope</persName>
                  was the cause of the Squadron proving the winners. We must give due credit to them, they played beautifully, and owing to their good
                  fielding, the <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>'s were sadly cut up for runs.</p>
               <p>The <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>'s batted much better <pb n="TYI1124" facs="TYI1124"/><fw>The Young Idea Saturday
                        27<hi rend="superscript">th</hi>February 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/> than they fielded, indeed, it was a strange fact, that those
                  from whom little was expected, played well and steadily, and did much to the augmentation of the score. They were greatly dispirited
                  at the early overthrow of their best man Mr <persName ref="#Brownrigg">Brownrigg</persName>, who striking at a ball which was
                  pitched high over his head, tipped the ball right into the hands of mid-wicket.</p>
               <p>The <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>'s were very anxious to finish the game (only one innings having been played) by
                  a second innings on the following day, but the squadron, anxious perhaps to retain the victory, appeared unwilling &amp; finally
                  stated that circumstances would prevent them from playing, and they also declined playing this afternoon, much to the <orgName
                     ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>'s regret.</p>

               <table rows="14" cols="3">
                  <head>Squadron Eleven</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Mr. Mereweather</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Brownrigg c Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Howes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">6</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b McArthur Leg before Wicket</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Rockfort</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Moore</cell>
                     <cell role="data">13</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b McArthur</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Jefferies</cell>
                     <cell role="data">3</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Brownrigg run out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Hope</cell>
                     <cell role="data">50</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b McArthur c Stanley</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Boys</cell>
                     <cell role="data">9</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Shortt Slump McArthur</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Garlick</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">not out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Jordan</cell>
                     <cell role="data">8</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Chute Leg before Wick</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Limbert</cell>
                     <cell role="data">4</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b McArthur. run out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Plow</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Brownrigg</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Wides</cell>
                     <cell role="data">4</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Byes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">14</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Total</cell>
                     <cell role="data">__________</cell>
                     <cell role="data">113.</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>

               <table rows="14" cols="3">
                  <head>Chesapeake Eleven</head>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">Mr. Brownrigg</cell>
                     <cell role="data">13</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Plow. c Garlick</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Shortt</cell>
                     <cell role="data">7</cell>
                     <cell role="data">c Limbert b Moore</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Wilkinson</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b. Plow</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Chute</cell>
                     <cell role="data">4</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Moore</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" McArthur</cell>
                     <cell role="data">16</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Plow</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Moore</cell>
                     <cell role="data">7</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Moore c Limbert</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Kennicott</cell>
                     <cell role="data">10</cell>
                     <cell role="data">not out</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Theobald</cell>
                     <cell role="data">1</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Limbert c Moore</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Oxley</cell>
                     <cell role="data">5</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Moore</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Farquhar</cell>
                     <cell role="data">0</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Now</cell>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="data">" Stanley</cell>
                     <cell role="data">5</cell>
                     <cell role="data">b Moore. run out.</cell>
                  </row>

                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Wides</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label">Byes</cell>
                     <cell role="data">2</cell>
                     <cell role="data"/>
                  </row>
                  <row role="data">
                     <cell role="label"/>
                     <cell role="data">__________</cell>
                     <cell role="data">75</cell>
                  </row>
               </table>
            </div>

            <div type="play_review">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.04">The Theatre</ref>
               </head>
               <p>On Thursday evening the Amateurs of HMS <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> performed for the first time at the
                     <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Lyric Theatre. The Drama performed was <ref rend="new"
                     target="http://victorian.nuigalway.ie/modx/assets/docs/pdf/Vol40ixSeven.pdf">The Seven Clerks" or the Thief &amp; the
                     Denouncer.</ref></p>
               <p>We cannot speak too highly of the creditable manner in which the performers acted, although a shore going paper has been pleased to
                  insult them, and to cast a baneful shadow over their efforts to please. <ref rend="new"
                     target="http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1060150314000060">We only regret that such a splenetic effusion should have ever been
                     permitted to appear in print; the more especially as we consider that jealousy, that greeneyed monster: was the cause of the
                     unwarrantable attack upon the labours of our men.</ref></p>
               <p>The purely acrimonious composition and illiberal manner in which the several "dramatis personae" are pulled to pieces could not have
                  proceeded from any other source, than that of<cb n="2"/> envy and vexation at the successful result of the entertainment, which the
                  writer who is doubtless a member of the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Amateur Performers, never
                  before witnessed, when himself and fellow players have acted.</p>
               <p>But we can afford to take no more notice of him.</p>
               <p>The Drama was ably supported by the various characters, <persName ref="#George_Horner"/>Geo Horner as the Miser, Claude Darnaud was
                  perfect, and <persName ref="#Henry_Underhill"/>Hy Underhill as Simon Siggel, in the hunger which he so well portrayed, produced a
                  sympathetic feeling, which we were under the necessity of allaying directly the theatre closed. We unfortunately cannot spare the
                  space to bring all of the actors to notice, but it will be enough to say that they gave general satisfaction with the exception of
                  our rancorous friend.</p>
               <p>The conclusion, the laughable burlesque tragic opera Bombastes Furioso, was ably sustained and to <persName ref="#Henry_Underhill"
                     >Henry Underhill</persName> as General Bombastes, we must here give the palm for the inimitable manner in which he carried out
                  his part.</p>
               <p>The band of the <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> attended and contributed largely to the entertainment, a prologue
                  written expressly for the occasion by one of the performers was highly thought of and a hornpipe by Thomas Walsh was
                  enthusiastically encored.</p>
               <p>We were very glad to see the front circles so well filled, the ladies appearing to enjoy the novel scene, especially, and we may say
                  that the whole passed off most satisfactorily.</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.05">Naval Intelligence</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>H.M. Gunboat Roebuck arrived on Wednesday afternoon bringing <persName ref="#Parkin">Commander G. H. Parkin</persName> to join
                     the "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>."</item>
                  <item>H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> is to sail on Monday for <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Chennai"
                        >Madras</placeName>, whither she will convey Viscountess <persName ref="#Charlotte_Canning">Canning</persName>. The Hon. Mrs
                     Stuart, the Hon <choice>
                        <expan>Captain</expan>
                        <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                     </choice> Stanley, &amp; Attendants.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="pun">

               <p><ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.06">"Can I offer you any aid"?</ref> said a polite gentleman to a lady who was overcome by
                  the heat, "O! yes, Sir, if you please," replied the fainting beauty "a little lemon-ade."</p>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.07">Conundrums</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="22">When the cook lets the salad fall into the fireplace, what great saracen hero, would you be reminded of?</item>
                  <item n="23">When is a noise like a troublesome creditor?</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.08">Answer to Conundrums</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="21">Supposing a number of bottles were broken by the fall of a tree, what ejaculation would they give vent to?<lb/>0
                     Bottles broken by the falling tree (Good fates attend us)<lb/>If you could speak, I think your cry would be. Tree, mend us!!
                     (Tremendous)<lb/></item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.09">Unanswered from last Week</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Rebus. Ba boo</p>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.10">Conundrums</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="19">When does a baker most want materials for his trade? When he kneads (needs) his dough.</item>
                  <item n="20">When does a good idea resemble a bone of a fowl? When its a merry thought.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI12.11">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the office No. 1 Port Street<lb/>"Chesapeake" every Saturday.<lb/>contributions solicited<lb/>Saturday 27 February,
                  1858.</p>


            </div>
         </div>

         <pb n="TYI1131" facs="TYI1131"/>
         <div n="13" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday March 6th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No. 13</head>
            <cb n="1"/>
            <div type="article">

               <p><ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.01">Once more we thread our pathless track across the waters of the Bay of Bengal; once
                     more our gallant craft obeys the impulse of her wondrous motive power.</ref> Once more the fresh sea breezes fan our heated
                  brows, and we feel their invigorating influence; again in the quiet routine of a sea life we can sit down to peruse our latest
                  intelligence from home, to dream over the past, to form conjectures on the future; again we partake of the pleasures of quiescence,
                  after the excitement attendant upon our stay at <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>.</p>
               <p>We can now look back and ponder upon all we have seen and done, fixing the past scenes and events firm<cb n="2"/> ly in our
                  memories, in that handy memorandum-book, whence in future days we may glean pleasure to ourselves and others by drawing forth from
                  the hidden stores, with which it is enriched: many any interesting account of the "City of Palaces" and other places we have
                  visited, and yet may visit.</p>
               <p>In our present trip we are happily not Entirely debarred from the generous influence, which is ever cast over man by the presence
                  and society of the "fair sex", and even the knowledge that we are conveying to <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Chennai"
                     >Madras</placeName>, the <persName ref="#Charlotte_Canning">Viscountess Canning</persName> and Honble Mrs Stuart, deprives us of
                  the general laxity which cha<pb n="TYI1132" facs="TYI1132"/><fw>The Young Idea" Saturday 6<hi rend="superscript">th</hi>March
                     1858.</fw><cb n="1"/>racterizes us at sea, and causes us to pay more regard to the higher essentials of good breeding, casting
                  aside the ordinary roughness which we assume as soon as the anchor is weighed.</p>
               <p>We hope that a speedy passage may be our fortune, and that it may be our lot to drop anchor once more in the quiet, peaceful harbour
                  of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Trincomalee">Trincomalee</placeName>, there to enjoy the many pleasures which this little spot
                  affords.</p>
            </div>

            <div type="letter">

               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.02">To the Editor of "The Young Idea"</ref>
               </head>
               <floatingText>
                  <body>
                     <opener>Dear Sir.</opener>
                     <p>Accept the congratulations of a friend on the completion of your 12th number and the inauguration of your 13th.</p>
                     <p>The "Young Idea" has now passed triumphant thro' those various dangers to which infancy is subject:- it is in its "teens", and
                        its growing strength and vigour may give good hope that it is not intended to come to an early end.</p>
                     <p>Breathing manly and generous sentiments, enriched with an undercurrent of quiet humour, free from all those personalities,
                        which at first were dreaded, faithfully re<cb n="2"/>cording the thoughts and actions of those on board the "<orgName
                           ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>"</p>
                     <p>"The Young Idea" is now established amongst us as a welcome weekly visitor, and as such I trust it may appear before us each
                        Saturday, and only cease its visits with the return of our floating home to England, and the separation, and dispersion of the
                           "<orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName>s"</p>
                     <closer>Believe me<lb/> Dear Sir<lb/> Yours Truly</closer>
                     <signed>
                        <hi rend="underlined">"Shipmate"</hi>
                     </signed>
                     <dateline><orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName><lb/> 4 March 1858.</dateline>
                  </body>
               </floatingText>
               <p>Ed. We feel highly flattered, and can only say that our success is our reward.</p>

            </div>


            <div type="letter">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.03">The Chesapeake Brigade</ref>
               </head>
               <floatingText>
                  <body>
                     <opener>To the Editor of the "Young Idea"<lb/>Dear Sir</opener>
                     <p>Much disappointment has been caused by your passing over with so slight a mention, what we have considered one of the
                        principal events in our nautical existence; namely the landing of our Bluejackets, and Marines on the morning of the 19th
                        February, for exercise on the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Esplanade. All performed their
                        part so well, all returned to the ship so pleased at their own performance, that I hope, Mr. Editor you will not consider me
                        too obtrusive if I beg for a little longer notice. Everybody knows that the soul of an Editor is everywhere present and that
                        he sees everything and that nothing can escape his keep observation</p>
                     <p>I will not stop to comment on the glass of medicinal liquid which was served out to us on deck before we started, and which I
                        think they called Quinine Wine, and will only suggest to the Doctor that most of us thought a little drop of Rum (neat) would
                        have comforted our inner man much more to our satisfaction.<pb n="TYI1133" facs="TYI1133"/><fw>"The Young Idea" Saturday 6<hi
                              rend="superscript">th</hi>March 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/></p>
                     <p>Our boats were quickly manned, and no time was lost in reaching the shore, and scrambling up the river's bank. It was but just
                        daylight when we were drawn up in order, and commenced our march along the river side. Our pioneers led the way armed with
                        crowbars, and shovels, under the guidance of two Engineers, and showed that they would be as serviceable in the trenches as in
                        the stoke hole: then came our lively band, which made us step out like men, next the company of Marines (Artillery and Light
                        Infantry), then the Bluejackets in their several Divisions:-like men, I say for however we may admire the mechanical march of
                        drilled soldiers, I hope Bluejackets will always have the free use of their arms and legs.</p>
                     <p>When we arrived on the field of action, our Artillery Companies separated and marched to Fort William to bring out their Field
                        pieces, while we remained exercising in the field: it would weary your readers, Mr. Editor to describe the whole course of our
                        proceedings, how we prepared to resist cavalry, formed into square &amp;c-&amp;c:- suffice it to say that great satisfaction
                        was caused to ourselves, and great wonderment to the native niggers, and we only wished that a few hundred Sepoys were there
                        to practice upon in real earnest. As for the Marine Light Infantry they went right away all over the <cb n="2"/>field and I
                        did not wonder at their having a jolly good run - skirmishing they called it - after being so long penned up on board
                        ship.</p>
                     <p>The "bang, bang", of our field pieces, now drew the attention of all <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata"
                           >Calcutta</placeName> upon us, and the fashionable ladies and gentlemen who were out riding, came flocking round us to see
                        so novel a spectacle. The artillery did as beautifully as all the rest of us, and even the small guns worked by small boys,
                        made a very considerable noise on this eventful occasion. But everything must have an end, Mr Editor, so had our field
                        practice, &amp; so also must my letter. See us again drawn up in the line of march, again the lively strains of the
                        "Cheasapeake's" band float over the <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Esplanade, &amp; crowds of
                        Hindoo niggers flock round to see the Regiment of British Tars returning to their "Wooden Walls"</p>
                     <p>It would be unjust not to mention how these wooden walls were guarded in our absence, and how gallantly the Idlers on board
                        prepared to repel boarders in case of invasion:- Those who saw the ship's tailor, doing sentry's duty, with his shears laid
                        aside, and his cutlass girded round him, saw what is not seen every day in Her Majesty's Service.</p>
                     <closer>Believe me,<lb/> Dear Sir,<lb/>
                        <hi rend="underlined">Yours Respectfully</hi></closer>
                     <signed>Bluejacket</signed>
                     <dateline><orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName><lb/>5 March/58</dateline>
                  </body>
               </floatingText>
            </div>

            <div type="article">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.04">The Chesapeake Amateurs</ref>
               </head>
               <p>There is nothing spoken, done, written or effected in this world, but the ever ready <pb n="TYI1134" facs="TYI1134"/><fw>The Young
                     Idea" Saturday 6 March 1858.</fw><cb n="1"/>tongue of criticism is prepared to weaken or destroy its effect. We certainly
                  expected that our Amateurs would not come off scatheless, but we were totally unprepared for such an egregious attack as has been
                  made upon them in the Bengal Hurkaru. It was with mingled feelings of astonishment, anger, and amusement we perused the
                  inconsiderate critique upon their endeavours. The whole when carefully weighed forms a "tout ensemble" of the most ridiculous
                  character, and we therefore advise all those who read it to take it in that light, basing their opinions, not merely upon a sentence
                  extracted here and there but upon the general sentiment it contains. It opens with a personal cut at Mr. Van Gelder, thereby
                  evincing that a wish to bring him before the public as a laughing stock, was a prominent feature in the desire to ridicule, which
                  animated the narrow mind, which presumed to judge of our Amateurs performance. The writer then proceeds to state that "he trembled
                  for the fate of those of Neptune's Hardy Sons"—for why? because "the beauty and fashion of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata"
                     >Calcutta</placeName> were present," most likely he imagined the "hardy sons of Neptune" could never stand a battery of bright
                  eyes, however brave when confronting a battery of heavy guns. But we cannot afford space to pull him to pieces in the manner he
                  deserves, but we must notice one thing. The word "Ditchers." such is the very euphonious appellation which the Histrionic Critic of
                  the Hurkaru claims for himself and his copeers of <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>. We will not now
                  enquire into the origin of the name, but simply observe that such being the title of our assailant, we need not feel surprised to
                  find him such an adept in the art of "flinging mud." We close this article by publishing the Prologue which was read and written
                  expressly for the occasion.</p>
               <lg>
                  <head>Prologue</head>
                  <l>Friends, Patrons of the "Thespian" art; I stand,</l>
                  <l>as spokesman for our little stage struck band;</l>
                  <l>I come kind friends, respectfully to pray</l>
                  <l>Indulgent smiles for this our little play</l>
                  <l>Think not that we aspire to win a "Name"</l>
                  <l>In the high path of Histrionic fame:</l>
                  <l>Or that misled by fierce dramatic rage,</l>
                  <l>We hope like "Lear" to strut upon the stage:</l>
                  <l>No 'tis the aim of our most humble Muse</l>
                  <l>To please our patrons, and ourselves amuse, </l>
                  <l>Just this, no more, as Amateurs we come</l>
                  <l>Let this avowal strike the critics dumb.</l>
                  <l>Tonight, then, if our humble skill avails</l>
                  <l>We represent a legent of "Marseilles"</l>
                  <l>"Bombastes," next with love and fame elate,</l>
                  <l>Shall claim your laughter and your mirth create:</l>
                  <l>Joy, pathos, fun, e'en murder's sanguine strain</l>
                  <l>Mingle and follow in our motley train</l>
                  <l>Thus at the "Clerk's" sad fate, droops pity's eye,</l>
                  <l>Yet "Simon's suppers, funds of mirth supply,</l>
                  <l>With horror "Darnaud's vices now regard</l>
                  <l>And yield to Adolpho's love its due reward</l>
                  <l>Then comes "Bombastes" may he please you all</l>
                  <l>And may you laugh until the curtain fall</l>
                  <l>Well, then, my friends, scare not our sailor's muse</l>
                  <l>Nor to our first trial, applause refuse,</l>
                  <l>So shall our tread each moment firmer grow</l>
                  <l>And the dramatic fire more warmly glow.</l>
                  <l>Encourage this our unfledg'd wings first flight</l>
                  <l>We'll strive and please you more another night,</l>
                  <l>With grateful pride, I cast around my gaze</l>
                  <l>And see a host of English beauty blaze</l>
                  <l>Soft beaming eyes, sweet lips, in smiles arrayed</l>
                  <l>Which might have well Herculean toils repaid</l>
                  <cb n="2"/>
                  <l>Their praise we covet, may we win the meed</l>
                  <l>Our labor's light, the guerdon great indeed</l>
                  <l>But hark! (Bell rings) our little troop impatient rage,</l>
                  <l>Anxious to strut their hour upon the stage.</l>
                  <l>And now my friends with Avon's Bard, I pray</l>
                  <l>Gently you'll judge, kindly you'll hear our play.</l>
               </lg>
               <p>As <persName ref="#Henry_Montagu">Montagu</persName> was the composer of this really creditable piece. We are glad to say that the
                  other <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName> Journals, gave a very good account of the performance.</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.05">Naval Intelligence</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>1st March H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Chesapeake">Chesapeake</orgName> unmoored this morning &amp; proceeded down the <placeName
                        ref="placeography.xml#Hugli_River">Hooghly</placeName>. She came to anchor at 3.</item>
                  <item>2d Weighed at 12.10 and proceeded, anchoring at half past 4. On letting go the Port Anchor when the strain came on the cable
                     it parted close to the bitts. Let go starboard anchor.</item>
                  <item>3d Weighed at 10.30 and proceeded, anchored at 4.30 off <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Khejuri">Kedgeree</placeName>.</item>
                  <item>4th Weighed at 9.20 a.m. and anchored at 12.30 p.m. The Steamer <orgName ref="#Canning">Canning</orgName> arrived from
                        <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Kolkata">Calcutta</placeName>, and anchored alongside about 3 bringing down Viscountess
                        <persName ref="#Charlotte_Canning">Canning</persName>, the Honble Mr rs Stuart and attendants. The</item>
                  <item>Commodore went for her ladyship in his barge, and was received on her coming on board, with a guard of Marines, the band,
                     &amp; the officers in undress.</item>
                  <item>5th Weighed this morning at 11. Lady <persName ref="#Charlotte_Canning">Canning</persName> &amp; retinue on board for
                        <placeName ref="placeography.xml#Chennai">Madras</placeName>.</item>
                  <item>The Chinese mail was boarded and by it Commodore <persName ref="#Watson">Watson</persName> received despatches from Adm l
                        <persName ref="#Beauchamp_Seymour">Seymour</persName>.</item>
                  <item><persName ref="#Brownrigg">Mr Brownrigg</persName> received official intimation of his promotion to Lieutenant, &amp; leaves
                     the Gun Room Mess, much to their regret.</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.06">Facetiae</ref>
               </head>
               <p>A human specimen of the Vegetable Kingdom. A man with carrotty locks, reddish cheeks, a turn up nose, and a sage expression of
                  countenance. When we add a mouth enclosed by two lips (tulips) we think we have described a decided link between the animal and
                  vegetable kingdom.<lb/> A friend enquires whether, when the unfortunate "<orgName ref="#Ava">Ava</orgName>" was launched, the scene
                  presented was an "Avalanche"<lb/> A correspondent has sent us the following Riddle. What country in Africa is like fresh brewed malt
                  liquour? Answer Nubia (New Beer) Really after this we must exclaim "What next?"</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.07">Epitome</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <item>The <orgName ref="#Ava">Ava</orgName> P.&amp;O Co.'s steam packet has been totally wrecked near <placeName
                        ref="placeography.xml#Trincomalee">Trincomalee</placeName> with 25 lakhs of rupees &amp; the mails on board.</item>
                  <item>The Leviathan is afloat.</item>
                  <item><persName ref="#Sir_William_Peel"><choice>
                           <expan>Captain</expan>
                           <abbr>Capt</abbr>
                        </choice> Peel</persName> has been rewarded with a K.C.B.</item>
                  <item>H.M.S. <orgName ref="#Pylades">Pylades</orgName> goes shortly to Suez</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.08">Rebus</ref>
               </head>
               <lg n="1">
                  <l>My first, what is my first? a counterfeit, </l>
                  <l>my second, rears its dangerous rugged head, </l>
                  <l>When the rude blast the heaving waters lash</l>
                  <l>Their crested tops, All foam &amp; busy spray</l>
                  <l>Till safely past the fresh'ning gales to we go</l>
                  <l>My whole oh! Emerald Isle how dear to thee</l>
                  <l>Emblem of Hearts, so light so blithe, so gay</l>
               </lg>
               <lg n="II">
                  <l>a trick its every sound proclaims a cheat</l>
                  <l>From the blue ocean's broad expansive bed</l>
                  <l>The Jurors billow o'er its surface deck</l>
                  <l>Till the poor sailors heart with firm dismay</l>
                  <l>And far astern is left the howling surge</l>
                  <l>St Patrick's day on many a breast shall see</l>
                  <l>Edgland is proud, to hold thee in her sway</l>
               </lg>
            </div>

            <div type="enigma">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.09">Illustrated Enigmas</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="simple">
                  <head>Conundrums</head>
                  <item>
                     <figure>
                        <figDesc>"K" and drawing of bell with the caption "a very valuable article in a ship"</figDesc>
                        <graphic url="TYI1134a.jpg"/>
                     </figure>
                  </item>
                  <item>
                     <figure>
                        <figDesc>"IC" with a strike across it with the caption "an order of architecture"</figDesc>
                        <graphic url="TYI1134b.jpg"/>
                     </figure>
                  </item>
                  <item>
                     <figure>
                        <figDesc>"O." and "ical." with the caption "appertaining to sailors.</figDesc>
                        <graphic url="TYI1134c.jpg"/>
                     </figure>
                  </item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.10">Answers to 22 &amp; 23 not received</ref>
               </head>
               <list type="ordered">
                  <item n="22">Saladin the Great</item>
                  <item n="23">When its a dun</item>
               </list>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>
                  <ref target="variants.youngidea.xml#TYI13.11">The Young Idea</ref>
               </head>
               <p>Published at the office No. 1 Port Street "Chesapeake" every Saturday.<lb/> contributions solicited<lb/>Saturday 27 February,
                  1858.</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1430"/>
         <div n="14" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday March 13th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 14</head>
            <div type="__">

               <p>The question has often been asked "What caused the Mutiny in India? and is yet often asked. This query has been the subject of much
                  dissertation, and various have been the replies given; still, we fancy public opinion has not received a satisfactory answer. The
                  most universal response (and this we consider to be partially caused by some of the mutineers stating that such had been the
                  incentive) has been, the sepoys fancied their religion was threatened, and that they entertained fears of our intentions to convert
                  them. A very plausible story, certainly, but yet, it does not, to our thinking, bring such force, as that with which we were lately
                  made acquainted.</p>
               <p>We had the pleasure some days ago, of conversing with two officers, who had belonged to Native Regiments, which were the first to
                  mutiny. In the course of conversation, which concerned the Rebellion, we asked, "what they considered to have been the principal
                  cause?" They both, Simultaneously answered, "a want of proper and efficient discipline."</p>
               <p>We asked how that could be, as we have always imagined our Indian Forces to have been as well disciplined as English Regiments. The
                  answer was, that they had been for years in a deplorable state, that commanding officers of Regiments, had little or no authority to
                  punish, and that punishments awarded by courts martial, were even set aside, and reprieved by the appeal of the culprit. As an
                  instance, we were informed, that about six months prior to the outbreak, a young English Officer was despatched on detached tudy in
                  command of 200 men, and a native officer<pb n="IMG_1431" facs="__"/>When they reached the station they were ordered to occupy, the
                  two companies were told off for their respective barracks, which were built in two parallel rows, each row capable of containing 100
                  men, and each company was ordered to occupy one. At the order "To your lines, march." both companies made a simultaneous rush, at
                  one of these barracks and began fighting for its occupancy; the bone of contention being its supposed superiority to the other. The
                  Young Officer called his subordinate the native, &amp; [and on and on--ultimately, the British officer had his subordinate and two
                  of the instigators arrested, but those arrested wrote an appeal and were released. The officers telling the story suggest that these
                  men were the first to mutiny and the writer of the piece explains "Can we wonder at the mutiny, when we are made aware of facts like
                  these?"]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Dreadful Suicide</head>
               <p>[details given about the way the man, Richard Kendall A.B, was found and remarks on the fact that "the unhappy man had always been
                  one of the dirtiest men in the ship, and on that account was always in trouble." Perhaps the ship's logs or musters will have
                  something about what punishment for "dirtiness" looks like]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>Calcutta in consternation</head>
               <p>[a letter to the editor about the threat of violence erupting in Calcutta: "the report flew thro' Calcutta that the Barrackpore
                  Sepoys, were in full march upon the town, that they were to find arms at the house of a certain Nawab, on the road, that the jail
                  prisoners were to be let loose, the mob of Calcutta to rise, and join them, the Christian inhabitants slaughtered, and their house
                  given to pillage" the report goes on to explain that "the Nawabs arms turned out to be two rusty muskets"]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Madras</head>
               <p>[notes about the experiences of Madras, beginning with the boat, rowed by singing men. Then the Clarendon Hotel, and an Indian
                  juggler (who also converted a snakeskin into a cobra), bazaars "broader and cleaner" than Calcutta, "natives are marked deeper and
                  plainer than those in Calcutta" passed a Hindoo burial ground, where a body was consumed by flames<pb n="IMG_143l" facs="__"/></p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Pearl's Brigade</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Faceti&#198;</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="conundrum">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1432"/>
         <div n="15" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday March 20th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 15</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>[Princess Victoria Adelaide and prince Frederick getting married]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>An Intruder</head>
               <p>[letter from the ship's cats with response from the editor]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Funeral of the Queen of Oude.</head>
               <p>[thoughts on the death of a Hindu monarch]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The "Ava" Wreck</head>
               <p>[long article about providing assistance to the Ava]<pb n="IMG_1433l" facs="_"/></p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>A sketch from H.M.S. "Chesapeake"</head>
               <p>[an account of the arrival of items recovered from the Ava]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[typical things for this section]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[typical things for this section]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[typical things for this section]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Rebus">
               <head>Rebus</head>
               <p>[typical things for this section]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1434"/>
         <div n="16" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday March 27th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 16</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>[detailed account of attempts to recover treasure from the Ava, and especially the purchase of a new diving suit from Madras that,
                  upon first use, proved "fatal to one of our best men." Sent off some of the Ava with a P and O ship, <orgName ref="#Bentinck"
                     >Bentinck</orgName> and got news and letters from home]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The "Ava"'s Encampment</head>
               <p>[description of the officers of the Ava, who were staying on shore in white tents. Many little details shared, including the fact
                  that there were "Mahometan divers, who thought they would never succeed unless they had a white flag flying. <pb n="IMG_1435"
                    /></p>
               <div type="article">
                  <head>Diving Operations</head>
                  <head type="sub"><hi rend="underline">at the Wreck of the "Ava"</hi></head>
                  <p>[a day-by-day accounting of operations at the Ava, with details about items brought up and the events surrounding the death of Jn
                     Withers, Captain of the afterguard]<pb n="1435l" facs="__"/></p>
               </div>
               <div type="article">
                  <head>Our First Funeral on the Shore</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="naval_intelligence">
                  <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
                  <p>many details, including notice that the Chesapeake will sail for Trincomalee and leave behind the pinnace and diving party</p>
               </div>
               <div type="epitome">
                  <head>Epitome</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="facetiae">
                  <head>FACETIAE</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="Conundrums">
                  <head>Conundrums</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1436"/>
         <div n="17" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">April 3rd 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 17</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>Comments on leaving the wreck and heading to Trincomalee, where things will be peaceful. "For ourselves, we have little to trouble
                  us in the quietness and repose which we have hitherto found in this harbour: separated as we are from other ships, our duties are
                  not such as to detain us from enjoying the pleasures which are boutifully spread around us, and we hope to be able to record in our
                  Journal, many an amusing or instructive incident, many a picnic, watering or shooting party; <pb n="IMG_1436l" facs="__"
                  />[etc.]"</p>
            </div>
            <div type="reprinted">
               <head>The Penal Colony<lb/>in the Andaman Islands</head>
               <p>[Extracts from a "Scinde paper" explaining how some 300 rebels are being transported. The tone is sarcastic and jubilant about their
                  departure--I quote just a bit:] "The Indian government has been extremely liberal to the rascally mutineers. The steamer "Semiramis"
                  has been sent down to the Andamans, with provisions, and clothing, agricultural implements, &amp; _ &amp; sufficient to last two
                  years, as also materials for making huts. She is to remain there to guard the miscreants as also to protect them from the assaults
                  of the natives. The men on their arrival, will have their fetters struck off, and be partially armed, so as to be a match for the
                  Cannibals and their poisoned arrows</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>Sporting on Pigeon Island</head>
               <p>[a report of landing, finding tons of pigeons, killing some, and then also catching some fish. Also includes report of one in the
                  party who shot a bird that dropped into the sea, but was captured by a shark before he could get to it]<pb n="IMG_1437" facs="__"
                  /></p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>Mining Intelligence</head>
               <head type="sub">from our own Commissioner</head>
               <p>[I think this is just meant to be punny]<pb n="IMG_1437l" facs="__"/></p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Diving Operations at the Wreck<lb/>of the "Ava"</head>
               <p>[reports of things being brought up]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="riddles">
               <head>Riddles &amp;c.</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1438"/>
         <div n="18" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday April 10th 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 18</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>Here we are again:--Trincomalee Harbour once more resounds to the heavy splash of our ponderous anchor, as it drops from our bows,
                  and finds its resting place at the bottom, where it firmly grasps with its strong arms, aught that will give it a good hold. Now we
                  are moored alongside the Dock yard, and look around us and think a little</p>
               <p>Three months have passed with rapid flight, since we parted, with some little regret, from this happy place; since when, we have
                  also seen some changes. But Trincomalee is not changed, every object around us bears the same stamp of peaceful security and cool
                  repose. The dark umbrageous hollows in the thickly wooded islands, showing where some little bay is formed, in which the clear
                  water, ripples musically among stones and rocks, mingling with the echoing notes of some water bird, as it wings its way from rock
                  to rock in pursuit of food; or the quiet plash of a fish, which disturbs for a moment the surface of the water, with his leap after
                  a dainty fly;<pb n="IMG_1438l" facs="__"/>the bright waves which dance merrily along as the cool refreshing sea breeze sweeps up the
                  bay; the Commodore's house embowered among trees, the tree clad hill above us, overhanging the white buildings of the dockyard, and
                  surmounted with the solid walls of the fort; all are the same look the same, and are felt as the same.</p>
               <p>We draw comparisons between, the muddy stream, the crowded anchorage, the dusty roads, the commercial bustle, and compact buildings
                  of Calcutta, with the charms of Trincomalee, and we feel how delightful is the change.</p>
               <p>Here we would willingly rest ourselves for some time, but we understand that our days are numbered for this visit, and that we shall
                  shortly convey the treasure recovered from the wreck of the "Ava" to Calcutta; and may not visit Trincomalee again for some time</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Coming into Trincomalee</head>
               <p>The remnant of the Ava's wreck, the huts of her officers, and of our own comrades whom we have left on shore the rocks that rise in
                  various spots near the shore, are fast lost sight of as we steam towards Trincomalee.</p>
               <p>Pigeon Island itself, on which our eyes have so long rested, recedes from our view, as we come in sight of the Rocky eminence and
                  flagstaff of Fort Frederick. The shore behind it is low, with a deep fringe of palms and cocoa huts along the sandy beach and low,
                  round, treeclad hills, behind them. But the Rock itself stands out bold and rugged, advancing, isolated, into the sea, reddish in
                  hue, with only scanty bushes springing from among the crevices, the signal staff rising high on the summit, with two or three guns,
                  and some low buildings beside it, which we believe to be the Soldier's Hospital</p>
               <p>As we round the Rock, we see more buildings belonging to the Fort, and more protecting guns; While the Village of Trincomalee,
                  standing amidst palm trees on the level plain rapidly came into sight; it is a pretty picture.</p>
               <p>We see obelisks rising among the bushes at the Cemetery, various colonnaded houses, partly concealed<pb n="IMG_1439" facs="__"/>by
                  trees, humbler dwellings of the natives, overshadowed by palm trees; a few dark figures, crossing the common that intervenes between
                  the village &amp; the sea. Then a rough rocky promontory meets our view, with small rounded hills, clothed with wild trees and
                  bushes down to the waters' edge. We wind our way round it, and see a harbour opening before us with smooth water receding in various
                  directions among the green, bush covered hills. There is a rough eminence to our right with a small fort on the summit, and a low
                  rocky point jutting out beneath, armed wtih two or three guns. Still we wind round it; we lose sight of the open sea, and the water
                  seems everywhere landlocked, in ever direction there are the low, rocky, but bushy hills, with the bright blue water running into
                  the various windings &amp; inlets, which seem to be interminable.</p>
               <p>We have so wound our way in that we are now at the very back of Fort Frederick, and we see its flagstaff in the distance rising
                  right ahead of us, we are abreast of the little Dock Yard, and here for a time we are made fast to the shore, to coal, and our ship
                  rests in perfect stillness.</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>A trip to Sober Island</head>
               <p>We shoved off from the ship about 4 P.M. in the gig with as good a crew as we could possibly have desired, Men who had evidently
                  made up their minds to a good pull, and to enjoy themselves, and whose merry laughter gave evidence to the universal good humour
                  which prevailed amongst all; in fact a merrier, and (we must say) a noisier crew, we have rarely met with. Under the influence of a
                  long stroke the boat shot rapidly along, our men pulled capitally, when as the island was neared, they evinced a decided
                  determination to admire the scenery which delighted the eye on every side, instead of rowing, and they required some stirring up
                  from those who performed the more pleasant task of steering, to give way the required distance, but as the landing place broke upon
                  their sight a hearty cheer escaped from their lips and they plied their oars so vigorously that we began to entertain fears that the
                  oars would be broken. However we got safely to land, and having made fast the boat, <pb n="IMG_1439l" facs="__"/> and coming
                  back]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Our Naval Brigades.</head>
               <p>[reports on the Shannon assisting at Lucknow and a request that readers contribute extracts from any letters they've received that
                  might be of interest to the general readership]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>An extraordinary (S)cuttle-fish</head>
               <p>[warning readers that fish and snakes can come in through the scuttles left open</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Diving Operations at the Wreck of the <lb/>"Ava</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1452"/>
         <div n="25" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 19th June 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 25</head>
            <div type="article">

               <p>[explanation for why The Young Idea did not appear on the last three Saturdays (McArthur had been ill]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="poem">
               <head>Diamond Harbour.</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>[a long poem that mentions Kali, just including the final stanza for now]</l>
                  <l>Ere the vast palaced City reared its head</l>
                  <l>From the dank swamps that fringed the Hooghly's bed;</l>
                  <l>While yet enshrined, the hideous idol stood,</l>
                  <l>And vengeful Kali drank her victim's blood;</l>
                  <l><hi rend="underline">Here first</hi> the ventrous trader taught to roam,</l>
                  <l>Found on the Hooghly's banks, a dreary home,</l>
                  <l>Whence issuing like some fabled locust band,</l>
                  <l>The British race now rules with iron hand,</l>
                  <l>And Hindoo Princes, as they yield the sword</l>
                  <l>Own the proud Empire of the Saxon Lord.</l>
               </lg>
               <p>Calcutta derives its name from the Goddess Kali whose worship is of the most horrible description Some say its Indian name was "Kali
                  Cuttah" that is, the "Temple of Kali," others "Kali Ghant", the river steps of Kali</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>A Ramble in Diamond Harbour</head>
               <p>an account of Diamond Harbour contributed to the paper since the editor has been sick <pb n="IMG_1453"/> as the writer
                  describes the plant of interest, he describes asking a native who spoke English what the Hindoo name was: "but he could only tell me
                  it was a thorn flower and a weed; he did not understand that the weeds of Bengal became choice flowers in the conservatories of
                  England" next is a description of a woman begging and a journey in a dirty boat to a slimy shore, and then the discovery of a
                  respectable European house, which was inhabited by a magistrate that was hearing a court case for arson. The magistrate then
                  acquaints the Chesapeake men about the impossibility of learning the truth about this. Very detailed description given of the sights
                  and the account is seemingly written during the trip. </p>
            </div>
            <div type="play_review">
               <head>Theatricals.</head>
               <p>transcribed in a separate file</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="extract">
               <head>Extract from a private letter dated "Ava Camp" 30 May.</head>
               <p>detailed account from Ava camp, including news about boa constrictor</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1456"/>
         <div n="27" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 3rd July 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 27</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>en route to Trincomalie--SO glad to be leaving the sweltering heat of India</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1458"/>
         <div n="28" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 17th July 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 28</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>[the voyage has ended and we are in Trincomalie...some interesting speculation about being sent back to England "the settlement of
                  our question with America"</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="_____"/>
         <div n="29" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">24th July 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 29</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>[the commodore is leaving]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Farewell Dinner to Commdore Watson</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="poem">
               <head>"The Bay of Bengal"</head>
               <p>a song to the tune of something specific</p>

            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Our Ship's Pets</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>

            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1462"/>
         <div n="30" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 31st July 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 30</head>
            <div type="article">

               <p>[The commodore has left--reflections on the many experiences of the first year (using a theatrical metaphor to call it "the first
                  act"]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The "Chesapeake" at Point de Galle.<lb/>Departure of Commdore Watson</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Point de Galle</head>
               <p>[an account of this area--very long and detailed--worth attention]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="poem">
               <head>India's Lament</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums &amp;c.</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="1464" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7906/32541579257_441bc7698d_k_d.jpg"/>
         <div n="31" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 31</head>
            <div type="__">
               <p>[Two other ships of war have arrived and the Chesapeake is temporarily not the flagship of the squadron. The ship is also getting
                  spruced up in preparation for the new commodore]<pb n="1464l"
                     facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7925/47483519771_6e01260311_k_d.jpg"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Bathing at Sober Island</head>
               <figure/>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Making glad the Ship</head>
               <figure/>
               <p>Never does our excellent Bandmaster <persName ref="#Faustino">Signor Faustino</persName>, look so much in his element as when at
                  close of day, when all the duties of the ship are over he is standing up with clairionet in mouth surrounded by Cornets Trombones
                  &amp; Drums, and in his own emphatic language "making glad the ship." The Sailor who has all day long been hauling at ropes, landing
                  stores, working aloft, blacking rigging or scraping &amp; painting &amp;c. will still set to work with vigour &amp; spirit to have
                  his dance in the Evening; dancing is his recreation; his hands may be tired, but his toes are fresh and the Hornpipe, the Polka, or
                  the self invented Country Dance are performed with untried energy to the sound of the fiddle or the horn. The smartest sailor is
                  often the best dancer, &amp; he who has worked hardest with his hands by day, will be the nimblest on his feet by night. In the hard
                  work that has been done this week, stripping the<pb n="IMG_1465"
                     facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7825/32541579027_2c8abf2b7d_k_d.jpg"/>ship, painting, watering, &amp; refitting, we have
                  watched with much pleasure the spirit with which the Evening dance has been sustained. The dancing in many cases has been such as
                  would not disgrace an English Ball room &amp; there is a reality &amp; life in a sailor Dancing, which a Ball room rarely
                  presents.</p>
               <p>Long may our Jack tars continue to dance away their day's fatigue &amp; often may Signor Faustino, with his little circle of
                  Clarionets and Trombones, strike up his merry dance times in harbour &amp; at sea, and still "make glad the ship."</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Wreck Party</head>
               <figure/>
               <p>[description of men from Ava singing songs, including "Ethiopian Serenades" and the "nigger melody banjo and bones"]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Our Geological Researches</head>
               <p>[a continuation of the punniness in an earlier number]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Rogue Elephant</head>
               <p>[a story about rogue elephants that might be interesting to consider in relation to Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Pictorial_Rebus">
               <head>Pictorial Rebus</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="1466"/>
         <div n="32" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 14th August 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>[Lots of things have been going on and "the incidents we have to record, have been divided amongst so many of us, that each will be
                  glad to read a detailed account of the proceedings of the other
                  <!--here is excellent evidence that the paper is created by and for
                     hthe officers only --></p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1468"/>
         <div n="33" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 21st August 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 33</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]Rumour speaks strongly of our near departure from Trincomalie for the Red Sea; on account of the recent massacre of the
                  European population of Jeddah: the change will no doubt be pleasant for a short time, whilst we are enjoying the novelty of the new
                  scenes presented to us &amp; which the "Young Idea" will attempt faithfully to record, but we shall not long prefer the heated
                  climate &amp; barren shores of the Red Sea, to the cool breezes, &amp; verdant coasts of India [rest of the issue not relevant
                  now]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1470" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7869/46759093634_669a877fd1_k_d.jpg"/>
         <div n="33" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 28th August 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 34</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>Our present stay in Trincomalee harbour, has bidden fair to terminate with scenes far less peaceful than those with which it
                  commenced. Sticks have been prepared, revolvers loaded, and threats passed to &amp; fro between some of ourselves on board and our
                  dusky Gentoo neighbours on the shore. WE must honestly confess, that the first offence seems to have proeeded from some of our own
                  bluejackets too anxious to pry into Gentoo mysteries, and interrupt the nocturnal procession of the natives in honor of their "idol
                  deities"; this led to a wanton attack, the following night upon two of our own officers in uniform.</p>
               <p>British blood rose against such an insult, and on the following night it was avenged by a little band of Crusaders, who stormed, and
                  cleared the heathen temple of its worshippers. More desperate vengeance is now threatened by the natives for itis the nature of
                  vengeance thus to propagate itself; but we would hope that here it may end.</p>
               <p>While we admire the true English spirit, which has led our youthful Crusaders, to view a mob of infuriated "niggers" with more
                  indifference, than they would the same number of cats, or monkeys, we would yet hope, that no unnecessary animosity may be
                     raised,<pb n="IMG_1470l" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7843/47482467781_da64f0bebd_k_d.jpg"/>and that in our dealing as
                  Christians, with these Gentoo natives, we may be guided always by a spirit of compassion, &amp; kindness, rather than one of
                  oppression, &amp; contempt.<note>Bampfield's extracts include the initial "B" at the end of this article</note></p>



            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Shooting Trip to Candligar</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="IMG_1471" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7862/46759093604_a209051beb_k_d.jpg"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="sporting_intelligence">
               <head>Cricket Match between the "Cheseapeake, and "Army and Pelorus"</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="play_review">
               <head>Theatre Royal<lb/>H.M.S. "CHESAPEAKE <note>The review included in Bampfield's transcription from The Young Idea is more detailed
                     than the one in the 1867 edition. Bampfield attributes the review to McArthur. It offers a description of precisely how the
                     quarter deck was arranged and who attended the performance. It also includes a cast of characters.</note></head>
               <p>On Friday night the 27th Inst our amateurs provided us with a first rate evenings amusement The Quarter deck was gaily decorated
                  with flags and flowers, and presented a beautiful spectacle, the utmost credit being due to the managers and arrangers of the
                  decorations, we have not space to give a lengthy description of the arrangements, but we cannot refrain from giving the actors that
                  praise which is most justly their due. The pieces chosen were well suited to the various talents of the actors. <persName
                     ref="#George_Horner">Geo Horner</persName> as "King Charles the 2nd looked and acted the "Merry Monarch" well, and <persName
                     ref="#Charles_Stewart">Chas. Stewart</persName> did equally well in the character of Rochester. But no doubt Captain Copp the
                  kind hearted old sailor (<persName ref="#Thomas_Walsh">Thos. Walshe</persName>) was the life and soul of the piece, and kept us in
                  roars of laugher with his quaint sayings whenever he made his appearance. Lady Clara (<persName ref="#John_Hurst">John
                     Hurst</persName>) looked the lady well, but spoke timidly, and Mary (<persName ref="#James_Hammond">Jas Hammond</persName>) also
                  required a little more self confidence</p>
               <p>In the second piece "Raising the Wind", the part of "Jeremy Didler" was ably sustained by <persName ref="#Isaac_Wright">Isaac
                     Wright</persName>, and Fainwould" the simple cockney was admirably impersonated by <persName ref="#Charles_Stewart">Chas.
                     Stewart</persName>, indeed this appeared to us the most perfect impersonation of the Evening. The greatest credit is also due to
                     <persName ref="#William_Connell">Wm Connell</persName> for the way in which he played the lady's part of Miss Laurelia Durable,
                  this appears to be his particular forte. <persName ref="#Thomas_Walsh">Thos. Walshe</persName> again shone as "Sam 'the waiter, and
                  the minor characters also did wel. Seldom have we seen an audience so well pleased or actors so well applauded. The "jig" by
                     <persName ref="#Thomas_Walsh">Thos Walshe</persName> was as excellent as usual, and the "Yo heave oh!" sung by <persName
                     ref="#William_Connell">Wm Connell</persName> produced a pleasing effect by the Chorus which it raised from the Blue jackets
                  present.</p>
               <p>After the play, the Quarter Deck was cleared &amp; a few couples were formed for dancing. A large number of visitors were on board,
                  and we believe very much enjoyed the Evening's entertainment. The Gun Room gave a capital spread despite their want of space &amp;
                  means to their brother officers of the "Pelorus"</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1470" facs="__"/>
         <div n="34" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 28th August 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">No 34</head>
            <div type="article">
               <p>Our present stay in Trincomalie Harbour, has bidden fair to terminate with scenes far less peaceful than those with which it
                  commenced. Sticks have been prepared, revolvers loaded, and threats passed to &amp; fro between some of ourselves on board and our
                  dusky Gentoo neighbours on the shore. We must honestly confess, that the first offence seems to have proceeded from some of our own
                  bluejackets too anxious to pry into Gentoo mysteries, and interrupt the nocturnal procession of the natives in honor of their "idol
                  deities." this led to a wanton attack, the following night upon two of our own officers in uniform.</p>
               <p>British blood rose against such an insult, and on the following night it was avenged by a little band of Crusaders, who stormed, and
                  cleared the heathen temple of its worshippers. More desperate vengeance is now threatended by the natives for it is the nature of
                  vengeance thus to propagate itself; but we would hope that here it may end.</p>
               <p>While we admire the true English spirit, which has led our youthful Crusaders, to view a mob of infuriated "niggers" with more
                  indifference, than they would the same number of cats, or monkeys, we would yet hope, that no unnecessary animosity may be raised<pb
                     n="IMG_1470l" facs="__"/>and that in our dealings as Christians, with these Gentoo natives, we may be guided always by a spirit
                  of compassion, &amp; kindness, rather than onen of oppression &amp; contempt</p>
               <note>In Bampfield's copy of the article, he attributes it to "B"</note>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Trincomalie</head>
               <head type="sub">Latest Intelligence-Storming of the Hindoo Temple. Genl Plainclothes Despatches.</head>
               <p>Our readers are aware that a Telegram had been received reporting an outbreak at Trincomalie, in which it was stated that two
                  officers of the "Chesapeake" had been assaulted by the native Gentoos, and one of them badly wounded, and that General Plainclothes
                  had landed his forces, and punished the natives for their temerity. Since then despatches have been received and we are indebted to
                  the authorities at the Horse Guards, for permission to publish the same. </p>
               <p>long description of how the "General" gathered and ordered his troops [seems to me very much playing at being like the Pearl, who
                  formed brigades to put down the mutiny--there are admiring accounts of their heroism in The Young Idea. Hopping ahead to when things
                  escalate-the series of letters need to be encoded as a shift in the formatting...I can wait to do that until later, though...the
                  various letters are meant to be various reports from commanding officers]</p>
               <p>Not wishing my forces to scatter, I ordered the recall to be sounded &amp; the Brigades mustered, when Capt James was reported
                  missing, search was immediately made, &amp; in a short time he was found at the upper end of the temple senseless &amp; bleeding.
                  The temple was now set on fire, &amp; the interior devoted to destruction, the brigades doing great execution among the Gilt &amp;
                  otherwise richly ornamented Elephants, gods, cars &amp; Peacocks, but the only Trophy brought on board was an Elephants Tusk, having
                  committed as much injury as possible, I ordered a retreat, sending 1st Co of the Light Brigade under Ensign B.L. Zeebub to see the
                  road clear, &amp; boats ready. The Natives seeing us retreating and their temple burning, came out with yells, but did not approach
                  us, &amp; the retreat was quietly effected.</p>
               <p>I have great pleasure in making honorable mention of a gallant act performed Lieut. Furze HB; during the embarcation Private
                  Jaunting fell off the pier head, upon which Lt Furze jumped overboard &amp; swam to his assistance, thereby saving his life. Pte
                  Jaunting not being able to swim I should hope that Lt. Furze may be deemed worthy of the Victoria Cross, as also Corpl Judy, who
                  under a heavy fire carried Capt James on his back from the scene of action.</p>
               <p>I am happy to state that the wounded are doing well, 3 men only being wounded severely, &amp; I must take this opportunity of
                  calling to your Highness' notice the prompt &amp; gallant way in which all my orders were executed, &amp; the steadiness of both
                  officers &amp; men under the heavy fire, of the enemy, as well as the valuable assistance rendered me by Genl. Gander who was
                  severely wounded on this occasion; &amp; I beg to forward to you herewith a return of the forced engaged (Enclosure No 2) together
                  with the casualties which have occurred. The Enemy loass is reported to be severe.</p>
               <note>Bampfield's version of this contribution attributes it to "C.J. Brownrigg." Bampfield also includes extracts from his own journal
                  right after that contribution</note>
            </div>
            <div type="Pictorial_Rebus">
               <head>Pictorial Rebus</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1472"/>
         <div n="35" type="issue"><note>The editorial, written by McArthur, appears in the same location in Bampfield.</note>
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 4 September 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 35</head>
            <div type="editorial">
               
               <p>The last week has seen a great change come o'er our arrangements; destined for Calcutta, already anticipating the sweets of Diamond
                  Harbour, enjoying our visit to Madras, and quite secure from thoughts of sailing, except in a Northerly direction, we have been
                  suddenly disturbed, and all our propsitions overthrown by a Telegram from the Senior Officer ordering us off to Aden</p><p>Altho' we
                  saw a possibility of such an order, and even expected it, which laying in the peaceful harbour of Trincomalee, when first the
                  intelligence of the massacre at Jeddah arrived, still we had dispelled the idea during the intervening fortnight, and the order for
                  us to repoir thither was as unexpected as it was sudden.</p><p>We have heard that the "Cyclops," having been fired upon at Jeddah,
                     has totally destroyed the Forts, so that we shall have little or no work to do there</p><p>We are not sorry that we are called to
                     another part of the station, for we hope to find fresh matter of interest, &amp; amuseument for our columns, and in the shores<pb
                     n="1472l"/>of the Red Sea, so familiar to us thro' biblical, and ancient records, such cannot be wanting.</p><p>All must be glad
                        to hear that the endeavour to lay down the Atlantic Telegraph has at last met with the success, the mighty scheme deserved.
                        England, &amp; America are now linked together, &amp; tho' separated by the vast Atlantic, the ingenuity of man, aided by
                        Providence, has overcome space, time, &amp; every obstacle, &amp; words, &amp; thoughts can now be exchanged, with an
                        inconceivable rapidity</p><note>it must be noted that the conflict at Jeddah escalated primarily because directions sent to
                           the Captain of the Cyclops were not received before he decided to bombard Jeddah--a massive miscommunication resulted.</note>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="IMG_1474" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7884/33606969128_aba3614ce6_k_d.jpg"/>
         <div n="36" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 11th September 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol. 1 No. 36<!-- add the volume in for all othersI was missing it!!--></head>

            <div type="article"><note>This contribution does not appear in Bampfield's extracts. His issue begins with "burial at sea."</note>
               <p>We are now about to cross the Equator for a the third time since leaving England, and as we have a great many on board who have not
                  been subjected to the usual ceremonies of initiation; Father Neptune will perhaps regard us with an angry eye, on our again entering
                  his domains. </p>
               <p>However, as we have several on board, including five colored men, who have never as yet crossed, we shall be compelled to sacrifice
                  them as a Peace offering, in the event of his showing his displeasure by bad weather or otherwise</p>
               <p>How many more times our gallant ship will have to pass the line before she again sees the shores of old England, it is impossible to
                  guess, but before that time arrives, we shall have doubtless visited many fresh places and gone thro' a variety of adventures. Aden
                  our present destination is a place<pb n="IMG_1474l" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7849/33606969328_37ab77f48c_k_d.jpg"/>very
                  seldom visited by ships of War, &amp; will be therefore quite a novelty to nearly the whole of us. What may be our subsequent
                  rendezvous, we cannot at present conjecture, but we shall in all probability enter the Red Sea, and shew our Force to the
                  disaffected tribes on the coast.</p>
               <p>As we are going there in pursuance of Admiralty orders, we shall very likely receive our new Commodore, who will, in all
                  probability, be sent there to meet us.</p>

            </div>
            <div type="poem"><note>Bampfield includes the initials of McArthur and Bampfield for this poem, which is perhaps longer in Bampfield's
               transcription (check on this)--it appears as the first contribution to issue 36.</note>
               <head>The Burial at Sea</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>a poem about burying a boy, 17, who was killed by a fall from aloft 8 September 1858 poem written by McArthur (and signed in the
                     lithograph edition, which is rare)</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <pb n="IMG_1475" facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7804/47430685692_ebd000bd10_k_d.jpg"/>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>The Gentoo Procession at Trincomalie</head>
               <note>Bampfield offers no initial to provide insight into the author of this contribution</note>
               <head type="sub">and attack in Lieutenant Cheson</head>
               <p><!-- come back later and format as a letter --></p>
               <p>Dear Sir<lb/>The lucid despatches of General Plainclothes have already put vividly before the public the night assault on the Gentoo
                  Temple, and the triumph of the British Crusaders. But of the causes which led to that assault, namely the cowardly attack made on
                  the previous Evening on an officer in Naval Uniform little has yet been said. I propose therefore to sketch from memory, so far as
                  my skill enables me, the scene which I accidentally witnessed on that Evening, but in which fortunately, I was no participator.</p>
               <p>I had sauntered down from the Esplanade and the tents of the Cricketers, &amp; was proceeding towards the jetty to procure a canoe,
                  when my attention was aroused by the loud tomtoming, the jingling of bells, &amp; other discordant sounds which proceeded from the
                  vicinity of the Gentoo temple. On entering the green compound in which the temple stands I found the whole space blazing with light,
                  and crowded with Gentoo worshippers, dressed in their gayest attire, evidently keeping a festival in honor of some deity or deities;
                  I know not whom, most probably, some local deities who are supposed to preside over the sacred spot. A grand procession was
                  advancing round the compound, flambeaux bearers in great numbers led the way, musicians followed, playing upon strange discordant
                  instruments, which, all unmisical as they were to my ears, would produce, I doubt not, a pleasing, as well as, an exciting effect
                  upon the minds of a barbarous, or semicultivated people. Nay! I even thought that such perchance, or nearly such, might have been
                  the music spoken of in such sweet strains by the Psalmists of ancient Israel. The three chief instruments were, as well as I could
                  see them, a long shrill clarionet of wood ornamented with brass, a sort of small flageolet, not straight but curved, and a sort of
                  bagpipe played by the pressure of the arm, but without holes, emitting only a dull oozing sound that never varied. The effect of the
                  three combined exceedingly resembled that of our celebrated Highland instrument, but the Musicians ran up &amp; down the holes in
                  wild discordant strains, without an attempt as it seemed to me, at anything resembling a musical air. </p>
               <p>Small tom toms, beat in at both ends, and one large one beaten on one side only, conch shells blown at intervals, with hoarse,
                  braying sound, a steel bar, slung &amp; beaten by a smaller one, after the fasion of the European triangles, and little bells
                  jangling in various parts of the procession, all added to the wild music that rose &amp; fell upon the night breezes. After the
                  musicians came the Nautch girl, the Brahmin priest, &amp; the sacred shrine of the deities The Nautch girl was richly attired, &amp;
                  laded with gold, &amp; jewelled ornaments: the Brahmin a fat, oily man of much lighter hue than the surrounding worshippers, wore
                  upon his head a beautiful chaplet of pearls, but otherwise was bare to the waist; both he and the Nautch Girl kept their faces
                  twined towards the shrine, advancing with backward step. Keeping up a low murmuring chant, bowing their bodies, and waving their
                  arms with graceful motion. The shrine itself was rich &amp; gorgeous, borne upon the heads of numerous dark bearers: the back of it
                  rose, I suppose to the height of 12 feet tripartite, the centre division rising higher than the other two, from this a painted
                  peacock projected, its gorgeously colored tail spreading far, &amp; wide, with a large gilt idol seated on its back. Two smaller
                  idols occupied the two side divisions, gilt like the other, but without the supporting bird: over all three, tall canopies rose,
                  about 18 feet high, shaped like an umbrella, and painted bright red. The whole was illuminated by lofty banners hung with little
                  lamps, &amp; I think with small bells intermixed. Hundreds of dark natives decorated with gay turbans of white, and gilt joined in
                  the procession, swelling at intervals the low chant of the Brahmin &amp; gazing with adoration on the Idol gods. In front of the
                  native houses, where the procession passed, little offerings to the gods were exhibited, chiefly, it appeared to me, dishes of bread
                  &amp; salt. Altogether I must confess it was one of the most striking, if not the most pleasing spectacles I have ever witnessed,
                  reminding one strongly of the religious processions in the South of Europe; the general effect was most imposing, while the bright
                  moonlight shining over groves of Palm trees added solemnity to the surrounding scene.</p>
               <p>The dark Gentoo worshippers, so far from expressing any signs of aversion to our being present at the spectacle, seemed rather to
                  greet us with smiles as they passed the spot where we were standing. As the gorgeous shrine moved on to reenter the temple, Lieut.
                  Nelson<note>Bampfield does not include a specific name in his transcription, instead referring to "Lieut. W__"</note> and two or three of our younger Companions moved with the crowd, hoping to catch a sight<pb n="1475l"
                     facs="https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7829/33606968798_a494180c84_k_d.jpg"/>of the interior of the building. They had already
                  entered the outer enclosure, &amp; were about approaching the vestibule of the temple, (a temporary shed thatched with palm leaves),
                  when, as I understand they were warned not to infringe in the part appropriated to the women. On this they moved to the other side,
                  only catching a glimpse thro' the open gate of the illuminatted interior of the temple, with its white pilasters and sacred carved
                  Elephant. To their surprize they now found themselves violently &amp; ferociously attacked by a large party of men armed with
                  sticks. "Had I attempted to attack them in return" says Lieut Nelson, "I should most probably not have come back alive." With
                  difficulty they retired, all more or less injured. Relying on the interference of the police authorities, I deprecated any hostile
                  demonstration in return, &amp; restrained a party of bluejackets who were running down to the spot from rushing in to attack the
                  natives. How little redress could be obtained from the Court of Justice, I believe is now well known, &amp; few will regret that
                  under the able guidance of our respect Genl Plainclothes, the insult to a British officer was, on the following Evening, so speedily
                  visited with just retribution. Believe me to be Dear Sir Yours Sincerely "Spectator"</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <div n="__" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">__________</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No __</head>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="__">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>FACETIAE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1421" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1740/40668620790_f4ce895caa_k_d.jpg"/>
         <div n="42" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 20th November 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 42</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p> Our stay at Jeddah has worn a very monotonous aspect. Strangers, to the shore, we have only been able to gaze from our bulwarks on
                  the far spreading sands, and barren hills of Arabia, and sigh to don the garment of some Mecca pilgrim, mount on the hump of some
                  fleet camel, and all Christian as we are, penetrate into the holiest shrines, and sanctuaries of Islam. [...]<pb n="TYI1422"/>[...]
               </p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Sailing up the Red Sea.</head>
               <p>Sunday Morning 17 Octr. Having sailed with a fair breeze from Aden yesterday afternoon, we are this morning in sight of the straits
                  of Babel-Mandel. [...details the ship approaching Jeddah with the help of a Arab pilot named Abdullah...] <pb n="TYI1423"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="poem">
               <head>Tuesday 19 Octr 1858</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>The sun had past his highest point, the sea was calm &amp; bright</l>
                  <l>The ship was slowly urged along, by breezes soft and light</l>
                  <l>[...9 quatrains of verse describing a shark eating a midshipman's jacket and then being caught and eaten by the crew]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Late Comet.</head>
               <p>We are sorry that the very brief notes taken by "our own Observer", will not permit us to give any elaborate or scientific account
                  of this beautiful heavenly visitor. It was on the Evening of Septr 30th after dropping anchor at Aden, that our attention was first
                  called to see the bright stranger, which had made its appearance, unpredicted, &amp; unannounced among the celestial bodies of the
                  Northern Hemisphere.[...]<pb n="TYI1424"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Naval_Intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>22nd Octr. H.M.S. Chesapeake arrived at Jeddah on Friday 22nd at 5 P.M. having been piloted in through the outer reefs by Mr Mayes
                  Master of the Cyclops. [...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>On Monday Oct 25 preparations were made for the reception of His Excellency Nemuk Pacha, and the English &amp; French Commissioners,
                  but his Excellency being indiscposed after visiting the "<orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName>" was unable to visit us. The
                  Commissioners however came on board and inspected the ship.[...general reports of storms and boredom]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>A shocking punster, hearing that Jeddah was celebrated for Turquoise, said that if Turks &amp; Arabs were on unfriendly terms, no
                  doubt plenty of "Turk Wars" would be the result. [...other puns]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Enigma">
               <head>Enigma</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>Bone on the wing of yon dark plumag'd bird</l>
                  <l>High o'er the earth how oft I took my flight:[...three quatrains of a riddle]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="Answer_Rebus">
               <head/>
               <lg>
                  <l>!Tis the Emerald Isle where the rough jaunting "car".</l>
                  <l>Will bear you in country or town [in verse explaining that the answer is "carnation"]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="Publication_Information">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>Published at the office No 1 Port St Chesapeake, every Saturday[...]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
         </div>
         <div n="43" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 27th November 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 43</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>Our past week has produced one circumstance which had caused some little excitement amongst the squadron, and has for a short period
                  dispeled the monotony of our life; we refer to the race between our Barge and the "<orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName>'s"
                     Cutter.[...]<pb n="TYI1432"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Jeddah, our Visit to Namik Pacha.</head>
               <head type="sub">Tuesday 26 Octr 1858</head>
               <p>We left our ship, a large party of us, in three Boats at half past 8 a.m., and after various difficulties in avoiding coral rocks,
                  and crossing shoal Water, came alongside the Jetty near the Southern extremity of the Town. Here we perceived the KaimaKhan, or
                  Governor of Jeddah dressed in purple uniform coat, and attended by the Harbour Master in his suit of brown cloth, waiting to receive
                  us. He shook each one by the hand as we ascended the steps &amp; Passing under the gateway, found a number of Arab steeds in gay
                  trappings, &amp; saddles, ready for us to mount. We formed a brilliant cavalcade, as we set out on our progress thro' the town. We
                  were 20 in all, and all attired in our uniform frock coats &amp; swords with white flowing turbans encircling our caps. Captains
                  Pullen, and Parkin led the way, attended by the Kaima Khan, while we followed by twos and threes, and well armed Turkish attendants,
                  Bashi Bazouks we believe with plenty of silver mounted pistols at their girdles welked at our horses heads. After passing an open
                  space in which loungers were sitting smoking hookahs, and drinking coffee, &amp; camels lying wiht piles of goods around them, our
                  road lay thro' the long winding streets of the Bazaars, where articles of every description were exposed for Sale, &amp; human faces
                  of every shape and color met the view. There was so much novelty to attract the eye; that it was difficult to notice anything
                  occurately. The Bazaars were so narrow that two horsemen could with difficulty ride abreast, without pushing against the wares on
                  either side. In some parts swarms of flies rendered our progress annoying. There were broad vessels piled up with dates, or melons,
                  or pomegranates, or oranges; trays on which large broad cakes, or other eatables were exposed for sale. shops in which the porous
                  water coolers, and other simple earthenwares were hangingin, or silks and muslins of various kinds, or strings of breads, amber
                  black or white coral or cornelian, such as devout Musselmen use in prayer, or Turkish slippers; or long pipes and outhpieces; all
                  whihc for a moment only caught the eye as our steeds passed on. The human faces most attracted us, the light hughed caucasian
                  features of the Turk., the well bronzed countenance of the native Arab the broad Ethiopian visage of the black slave, the veiled
                  face of some female, <choice>
                     <orig>here</orig>
                     <corr>her</corr>
                  </choice> eyes only peering thro' the white muslin "yek-mesh", the scowling gaze of the wild Bedouin as he stood erect in his
                  uncleanly brown robe, his head enveloped in a cowl, with his hand ready at the [...interesting exchange about tobacco as snuff, with
                  Pasha saying it was "good for the gums" and his inquiries about the men in black, who it turns out where the chaplains, described by
                  Parkin as "the two professors who instructed the youths in theology &amp; navigation"...will continue in next number]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="sporting_intelligence">
               <head type="main">SPORTING INTELLIGENCE</head>
               <head type="sub">Boat Race between the Chesapeakes Barge and <orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName>'s Cutter.></head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="song">
               <head type="main">(Song)</head>
               <head type="main">The Cheasapeake's Barge</head>
               <head type="sub">Air (Yankee doodle)</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>of the "Chesapeake's of old,</l>
                  <l>[...]</l>
                  <pb n="?????"/>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="Article">
               <head>Namik Pacha, &amp; the Merchants of Jeddah</head>
               <p>It is said that Namik Pacha being fearful that the rich Merchants of Jeddah would remove their wealth at the sight of our English
                  ships, invited them to a friendly entertainment, and in true Eastern spirit then detained them in safe custody. eleven in number. We
                  hear also that the new Sheriff has in a similar way detained several at Mecca, with the view of procuring from them the fine which
                  is supposed will be exacted by the English and French Governments</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Epitome">
               <head type="main">Epitome</head>
               <head type="sub">Festivities in the Ward room.</head>
               <p>On Wednesday Evening 25th Inst several officers from "<orgName ref="#Cyclops">Cyclops</orgName>" and "<orgName ref="#Pelorus"
                     >Pelorus</orgName>" assembled on board the "Chesapeake" and after much merry dancing while the Band was playing on the Main Deck,
                  retired to the Ward room to finish the Evening with a bowl of punch, and a few concomitant songs [more details about celebrations
                  and such...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">
               <head>Rebus</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Publication_Info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>

            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI1441"/>
         <div n="44" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 4th December 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 44</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Jeddah, and our Visit to Namik Pacha</head>
               <head type="sub">continued from last week</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI1442"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="sporting_intelligence">
               <head>SPORTING INTELLIGENCE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>The Editor of The "Young Idea" to his friends on closing the first Year of Publication.</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI1443"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="published_elsewhere">
               <head>The Red Sea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Naval_Intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI1444"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI2011"/>
         <div n="1" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 18th December 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 2. An accident to the Editor prevented last weeks no. from appearing No 1.</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>A visit to the Sheriffe of Mecca</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2012"/></p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>From the Readers to the Editor on commencing his New Volume</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2013"/>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Tricolor and Union Jack</head>
               <p>[...socializing between British and French sailors]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="song">
               <head>Christmas 1858</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>[...]<pb n="TYI2014"/>[...]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Garbarry</head>
               <p>[...interesting story of assisting a ship that got stuck on the reef. Parkin assisted and the Du Chayle sent a boat as well...when
                  the job was done some of the men drank too much]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Naval_Intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">
               <head>Rebus</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="answers">
               <head>Answers to Conundrums Nos. 60 &amp; 61</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI2021"/>
         <div n="2" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 25th December 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 2.</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2022"/>
            <div type="poem">
               <head>Chesapeake's Greeting to "<orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName></head>
               <lg>
                  <l>We've pull'd and we've sail'd together</l>
                  <l>[...]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="rough_yarns">
               <head>Rough Yarns No 1. "The Boutswains Christmas Dinner"</head>
               <p>[...] <pb n="TYI2023"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2024"/>
            <div type="illustration">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>


         <pb n="TYI1441"/>
         <div n="44" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 4th December 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 1. No 44</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Jeddah, and our Visit to Namik Pacha</head>
               <head type="sub">continued from last week</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI1442"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="sporting_intelligence">
               <head>SPORTING INTELLIGENCE</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>The Editor of The "Young Idea" to his friends on closing the first Year of Publication.</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI1443"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="published_elsewhere">
               <head>The Red Sea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Naval_Intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI1444"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Conundrums">
               <head>Conundrums</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI2011"/>
         <div n="1" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 18th December 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 2. An accident to the Editor prevented last weeks no. from appearing No 1.</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>A visit to the Sheriffe of Mecca</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2012"/></p>
            </div>
            <div type="letter">
               <head>From the Readers to the Editor on commencing his New Volume</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2013"/>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Tricolor and Union Jack</head>
               <p>[...socializing between British and French sailors]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="song">
               <head>Christmas 1858</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>[...]<pb n="TYI2014"/>[...]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>The Garbarry</head>
               <p>[...interesting story of assisting a ship that got stuck on the reef. Parkin assisted and the Du Chayle sent a boat as well...when
                  the job was done some of the men drank too much]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="Naval_Intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">
               <head>Rebus</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="answers">
               <head>Answers to Conundrums Nos. 60 &amp; 61</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI2021"/>
         <div n="2" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 25th December 1858</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 2.</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2022"/>
            <div type="poem">
               <head>Chesapeake's Greeting to "<orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName></head>
               <lg>
                  <l>We've pull'd and we've sail'd together</l>
                  <l>[...]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="rough_yarns">
               <head>Rough Yarns No 1. "The Boutswains Christmas Dinner"</head>
               <p>[...] <pb n="TYI2023"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="facetiae">
               <head>Facetiae</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2024"/>
            <div type="illustration">
               <head>[...]</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>

         <pb n="TYI2031"/>
         <div n="3" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 1st January 1859</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 3.</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2032"/>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Christmas Day 1858</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Farewell Dinner to Capt Parkin</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2033" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1754/40668619260_625db61c72_k_d.jpg"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">

               <head>Our Christmas Play<note>Bampfield's trancription of this article attributes it to "W"; the review is very similar to the one
                     published in this lithograph edition. </note></head>
               <p>Our Christmas play came off in right merry style on Wednesday Evening (29 Decr). Our quarter deck, roofed in with flags of all
                  nations, presented as gay a Theatre as one would wish to see, while the rising tiers of benches from the deck to the bridge abaft,
                  accommodated a large and happy audience, not only of our own bluejackets, but of those from the "<orgName ref="#Pelorus"
                     >Pelorus</orgName>", the "DuChayla" and the "Roebuck".</p>
               <p>We are proud of our Amateur Performers, who have this time surpassed themselves. The comedy of King Charles the Second" being cast
                  as on the last occasion, we need say little, except to compliment the fair "<persName ref="#James_Hammond">Mary</persName>" the
                  Wapping beauty, around whom the whole plot clusters, on the increasing ease, &amp; freedom with which she plays her part. "<persName
                     ref="#George_Horner">Charles</persName>" was as royal, "<persName ref="#Charles_Stewart">Rochester</persName>" as Manly, and old
                     "<persName ref="#Thomas_Walsh">Copp</persName>" as jolly hearted as ever.</p>
               <p>The two farces which followed kept the audience in a state of continual laughter and applause. <persName ref="#Thomas_Walsh">Thos
                     Walsh</persName>, as "Paddy Carey" was indeed a "broth of a boy", speaking with a rich brogue, whirling his shillelah in true
                  Hibernian spirit, touching the hearts of the audience by the generous<pb n="TYI2034"
                     facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1743/27606331227_4931573b8b_k_d.jpg"/>nature of the deeds represented, and winding up with a
                  song, and a "jig" which brought down thunders of applause. The other characters of the piece were all good, but "Widow Leary" the
                  landlady deserves special mention. She was the yielding widow, and the Irish landlady is perfection.</p>
               <p>In the "Man about Town" the chief burden of the piece rested upon <persName ref="#Isaac_Wright">Isaac Wright</persName> as "Skirts",
                  and well did he sustain it. Coming in which his two large placards of the "Learned Pig," he at once moved our mucles to a state of
                  risibility, which we found it difficult to pause from, such was the continued succession of funny deeds, and speeches. <persName
                     ref="#George_Horner">Horner</persName> as "Dr Mandible" the physician, <persName ref="#Thomas_Walsh">Walsh</persName> as "Topps"
                  the Tiger, and indeed all the minor characters, played up to him well, and the curtain fell amidst loud and long applause.</p>
               <p>We may safely say that all Oficers &amp; men present, whether French or English, were delighted with their Evening's amusement, and
                  we were glad to observe our newly arrived Commodore, tho' rather late or the first piece, thoroughly enjoying the fun of the two
                  Farces.</p>
               <p>A supper was laid out on the Main Deck after the performance; for the Amateurs</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>A Night Alarm</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="answer">
               <head>Answer to Rebus in No 1</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
         </div>
         <pb n="TYI2041"/>
         <div n="4" type="issue">
            <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
            <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
            <head type="sub">Saturday 8th January 1859</head>
            <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 4.</head>
            <div type="article">
               <head>No Title</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2042"/>
            <div type="previously_published">
               <head>Notes about Mecca (from Sale's Koran)</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>"Jack</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2043"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="song">
               <head>Song on the Death of Capt. Sir William Peel KCB R.N.</head>
               <lg>
                  <l>[...]</l>
               </lg>
            </div>
            <div type="article">
               <head>Sand Squalls &amp; Rain Squalls</head>
               <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2044"/>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="naval_intelligence">
               <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="epitome">
               <head>Epitome</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="rebus">
               <head>Rebus</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="advertisement">
               <head>Cheseapeake Amateur Theatricals</head>
               <p>[...requesting funding from voluntary contributions]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="answers">
               <head>Answer to Pictorial Rebus in No 3 Vol 2</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <div type="publication_info">
               <head>The Young Idea</head>
               <p>[...]</p>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2051" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1724/27606330737_ca86ec2427_k_d.jpg"/>
            <div n="5" type="issue">
               <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
               <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
               <head type="sub">Saturday 15th January 1859</head>
               <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 5.</head>
               <div type="article">
                  <head>No Title</head>
                  <p>A tardy act of justice has at length been accomplished, and two of the prime instigators of the "Jeddah Massacre" have paid with
                     their lives the penalty of their murderous deed. We know not who may have been those Eleven wretched Arabs, who on a former
                     occasion were executed on the reefs in the sight of the "Cyclops"; but at all events they were but the tools, the instruments of
                     the crime; the origin of it has been clearly traced home to the three chief men in Jeddah, those whose duty it was to protect,
                     and defend the Christians, and strangers who felt secure in their friends help.</p>
                  <p>Horrible as was the sight of blood on Wednesday morning, we must rejoice as Englishmen, that justice has found out its true
                     victims; the third guilty man, the late Kaima Khan of Jeddah, is, we hear to be sent to Constantinople, to await the Sultan's
                     decree, &amp; tho' we have sipped his coffee, &amp; smoked his pipes, we can scarcely regret that he too should meet with a like
                     fate. To the firmness of the French Commissioner, we believe this act of just retriubution may be attributed. Bombardment or the
                        execu<pb n="TYI2052" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1729/27606327217_e263448a59_k_d.jpg"/>tion of the guilty men were
                     the only alternatives offered, and Namik Pacha, at the last moment, with grief &amp; reluctance signed their death warrant.</p>
                  <p>We may now perhaps consider that the first great objects of the Jeddah Commission, &amp; of our own visit here, has been
                     accomplished, &amp; tho we hear that much still remains to be settled, in the way of indemnification, yet we would indulge a hope
                     that the presence of the Chesapeake may be no longer necessary. This very morning, the "Duchayla" has spread her wings again, and
                     is now speeding on her way to Suez tho', we believe to return again: let us hope that soon we may have to record how the
                     "Chesapeake" also has let fall her long-furled canvass, &amp; is far on her way to Aden &amp; the waters of the East.</p>
               </div>
               <div type="letter">
                  <head type="main">The Jeddah Massacre</head>
                  <head type="sub">Execution of Mahtesil and Amoudi.</head>
                  <floatingText>
                     <body>
                        <opener>To the Editor of the "Young Idea"<lb/>Dear Sir,</opener>
                        <p>As one of those whose duty it was to witness the Execution on Wednesday last (12th), I beg to send you some slight account
                           of what took place, tho' indeed I write even now with a feeling of horror at the spectacle At 4 am, as you know, we were
                           all astir, coffee being served out to the Marines and Boats' crews who were to attend. At One Bell we shoved off from the
                           ship, and it still wanted some time to daylight when we mustered, under Captain Seymour's orders, abreast of the old
                           Turkish hulk whihc is lying off the town. The "<orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName>"' Boats were there and those of
                           the "Ducayla" a goodly squadron in all, three Pinnaces, besides several cutters, and two or three light gigs. The Pinnaces
                           each carried their brass gun in the bows, and all the Boat's crews were well provided with arms, and ammunition in case of
                           any sudden outbreak of the natives. As daylight broke over the walls and minarets of Jeddah, and the more distant hills
                           that bound our landscape to the Eastward, we started from our "rendezvous," the execution being fixed by the Turkish
                           authorities for one hour after daybreak. The Frenchmen led the way, the Boats following one another in single file; it took
                           us fully half an hour to reach the shore, the pilotage among the shoals being diffuclt, and by the time that all
                           arrangments were complete, the "one hour after daybreak" was fast expiring. We found the Turkish guard already drawn up at
                           the scene of execution; it was the square plot of ground on the Custom House Wharf, open to the shipping, and close under
                           the seawall of the town. As we stood facing the sea, the right side of the square was occupied by a company of Turkish
                           soldiers, perhaps 100 in number, a similar company of Albanians occupied the left; while a third side was formed of the
                           English Marines &amp; French Sailors, each fifty in nuber, with their backs against the wall of the town. The French
                           occupied theright of our position, their right thus touching the plank of the Turks, and between us waved, side by side,
                           the flags of our two countries, those flags which had been dishonoured, &amp;<pb n="TYI2053"
                              facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1755/40668618580_b0b4e0fdab_k_d.jpg"/>insulted on that fearful night of the
                           Christian massacre. It wasa picturesque sight, though we stood in shadow, there were the Turks in their red Fez caps, dark
                           brown jackets, with red pipings and black accoutrements, muskets with long shining barrels, the men themselves of fair
                           height but somewhat dingy, and dirty looking. There were the Albanians, light in hue, tall and dressed in white, white
                           jacket, and white loose trousers, white cap with tassel, white ose, white bells, a red sas only relieving the unmixed white
                           of their costume; there werre our own in their blue and red Tunics (for half were Artillery, and half Light Infantry), and
                           their white forage caps; there were the French Sailors, in their blue jackets, and white trousers with red sash, and straw
                           sailors hat, armed with rifle and sword bayonet, while on the seaside, completing the square, were drawn up a single line
                           of Bashi Bazouks &amp; irregular Albanians, dressed in a strange variety of costume armed to the teeth with pistols,
                           swords, daggers, and knives, and of every hue &amp; shade of complexion, some jet black, others light, and fair. Behind all
                           were seen our boats, with their respective crews moored in line a boat's length from the shore, their sterns towards the
                           Quay</p>
                        <p>Our attention was now turned to a gateway in that corner of the Square on which the right of the Albanians rested. It was
                           the gateway leading into the town, adorned with open partico, that projected into the square. From this, as soon as we had
                           formed, guards were despatched to bring in the two prisoners. Everything was still; no inhabitants of the town were to be
                           seen or heard, except the few Turkish Officials who stood on the town wall behind us, or looked from the windows of a house
                           that commanded the Square. All approaches to the spot were closed, and guarded by Turkish sentries </p>
                        <p>But see!!! the prisoners approach and on them every eye is fixed.</p>
                        <p>The first one who entered is an old man thin, and spare, dressed in light green robe flowing to the feet, and white turban;
                           his beard white with age, his eye keen and piercing. His hands were tied behind, above the elbows, and he is attended by a
                           guard on either side, and a third behind; he halts on entering the square, and looks astonished. I can well believe the
                           story that is told that he knew not his approaching fate till that moment he casts his eyes around, and as they rest on our
                           "colours" he seems to comprehend all, and gives himself up to prayer. He is followed at a short interval by the other
                           prisoner, similarly guarded; a taller and apparently a younger man, with robe of dark purple, and white Turban; his hands
                           similarly tied, he is we understand the sheikh of that Arab tribe which committed the massacre, while the older man is the
                           "Chief of Bazaars" the richest and most powerful man in Jeddah. As they seem to hesitate by the gateway, they are pushed on
                           by the guard into the cenre of the square and there they are compelled to kneel down with their faces turned Eastward,
                           towards Mecca. The guards retire, the executioners take their place with sword drawn; wild looking fellows, irregular
                           Albanians, their arms bare to the elbow, their sashes loaded wiht pistols. The old man is the first to suffer: as he bends
                           his head forward, the executioner seems to try his distance carefully with the sword, two or three times; -yet his first
                           blow strikes too low down the back: again the sword is raised, and the blow falls on the neck but does not enter deeply;
                           the old man who is still murmering in prayer, turns his head, as though reproachfully; a third blow is struck, and he falls
                           forward on his face; the gush of blood seems to choke his utterance: his last words of prayer, gurgle out with his
                           lifeblood, but the head is not yet severed; it is butcher's work that follows: the remaining flesh is sawn through with the
                           sword, and the head rolled away from the body: a pool of blood rushed out upon the ground, the executioner lifts the robe
                           of the deceased, and wipes in it his sword and bloodstained fingers.</p>
                        <p>I could look no longer: a sickening sensation came over me: one of the French Sailors, a powerful man, fainted away: I saw
                           not the second execution; the gleam only of a decending sword seemed to flash before my eyes, and in another moment, I
                           heared that all was over: the head of the second prisoner had been severed at a single blow.</p>
                        <pb n="TYI2054"/>
                        <p>The Turkish authorities now advanced and flung over each of the bodies a white sheet; but this made the seem almost more
                           ghastly than before, for you could see the blood spouting from the arteries against the underside of the sheet, and with
                           each gush dying it afresh.</p>
                        <p>I was only too glad when the order was given to leave this scene of blood &amp; reembark in our boats. I am sure that not
                           one of those who saw it woudl ever with to witness such another scene</p>
                        <p>Captain Seymour, H.M.S. "<orgName ref="#Pelorus">Pelorus</orgName>" commanded our force, and was present inside the Square,
                           attended by the Commodore's Secretary and an Aide-de-camp, while Capt Tricault of "Duchayla" remained in charge of the boat
                           squadron.</p>
                        <closer>I remain Dear Sir<lb/>Yours truly</closer>
                        <signed>"Eye Witness"</signed>
                     </body>
                  </floatingText>
               </div>
               <div type="poem">
                  <head>Jeddah.</head>
                  <lg>
                     <l>Ah! Jeddah's towers are gleaming bright</l>
                     <l>[...]</l>
                  </lg>
               </div>
               <div type="naval_intelligence">
                  <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="epitome">
                  <head>Epitome</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
                  <p>Peeping under a screen erected on the main deck, we have ascertained the creation of several new scenes, at which two or three
                     hands were busily paining. We anticipate much pleasure from the production of a new play on our arrival at Aden</p>
               </div>
               <div type="rebus">
                  <head>Rebus</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="publication_info">
                  <head>"The Young Idea"</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2061" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1733/27606330287_1fc7c08300_k_d.jpg"/>
            <div n="6" type="issue">
               <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
               <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
               <head type="sub">Saturday 29th January 1859</head>
               <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 6.</head>
               <div type="article">
                  <head>No Title</head>
                  <p>Only the total absence of all circumstances of note, has for a while, caused our weekly sheet to remain unstained with ink; our
                     pen to be useuless on the desk before us. "The Young Idea" professes to record events, not to invent fiction; but here at Jeddah
                     the record of one day, is a history of the whole: nothing has occurred to vary our monotony, except the hasty visit of our little
                     messenger the "Roebuck."</p>
                  <p>We could almost envy them the fitful way in which they flit from place to place, pausing only for a day, or two at each station;
                     from Jeddah to Suez, or from Aden to Jeddah: they have shivered for a while in the real winter's cold of Egypt; they have
                     wandered through the Oriental Streets, and Bazaars of crowded Cairo; they have gazed on the green valley of the fertilizing Nile;
                     they have climbed to the summit of the Great Pyramid, and penetrated into its close, and half suffocating chambers, and we, all
                     the while, have been idly lying amongst the reefs of Jeddah, our minds gleaning no fresh idea from scenes before us, but
                     wandering vacantly into the future or the past.</p>
               </div>
               <div type="letter">
                  <head>Arabic Numberals</head>
                  <floatingText>
                     <body>
                        <opener>Dear Sir,</opener>
                        <p>It is well known how much European civilization owes to the influence of<pb n="TYI2062"/>the Arabian mind [...]</p>
                        <closer>Dear Sir, Yours very sincerely</closer>
                        <signed>Arithmeticus</signed>
                     </body>
                  </floatingText>
               </div>
               <div type="letter">
                  <head>Arabic Numberals</head>
                  <floatingText>
                     <body>
                        <opener>To the Editor of the "Young Idea"<lb/>Dear Sir</opener>
                        <p>I must call your attention to mistakes which are frequently made in our Rebuses [...]</p>
                        <closer>I remain<lb/>Yours very truly</closer>
                        <signed>"Sphynx"</signed>
                     </body>
                  </floatingText>
                  <p>Ed. We regret exceedingly [...] careless of our "devil."</p>
               </div>
               <div type="previously_published">
                  <head>More Notes about Mecca. <lb/>(chiefly from Sale's Koran).</head>
                  <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2063"/>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="enigma">
                  <head>Historical Enigmas<lb/>No. 1</head>
                  <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2064" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1742/27606329597_eaa576cf96_k_d.jpg"/>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="letter">
                  <head>The last New Riddle from England.</head>
                  <floatingText>
                     <body>
                        <opener>To the Editor of the Yg Idea<lb/>Dear Sir</opener>
                        <p>[...]</p>
                        <closer>I have the honor to be, Sir<lb/>Yours sincerely,</closer>
                        <signed>"Sphynx"</signed>
                     </body>
                  </floatingText>
               </div>
               <div type="naval_intelligence">
                  <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="epitome">
                  <head>Epitome.</head>
                  <p>[...]On Monday (24th) when shifting Topsails Isaac Wright Ordy fell backwards from the main Topsail Yard, but was happily brought
                     up by his knife lanyard hitching, which gave him time to grasp the rigging: we should indeed have been very sorry had anything
                     more serious befallen one, whose comic powers have so lately given us amusement</p>
                  <p>[...]</p>
                  <p>The three Arab dhouws with coal from Aden arrived on Wednesday (26) evening, &amp; we coaled that night, and the two succeeding
                     days.</p>
                  <p>Much amusement was caused in the Ward Room on Wednesday EVening, by the presence of a Messenger from the Pacha of Hoeidah to
                     Namik Pacha (a passenger in one of the Dhows) whose astonishment at various tricks with cards was of the most grotesque
                     description.</p>
               </div>
               <div type="facetiae">
                  <head>Facetiae.</head>
                  <p>A remark being made on the long line of "dhows" lying off Jeddah, [...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="rebus">
                  <head>REBUS</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="answer">
                  <head>Answer to Rebus in No. 5. Expostulation.</head>
               </div>
               <div type="publication_info">
                  <head>"The Young Idea"</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
            </div>
            <pb n="TYI2071" facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1742/40668617730_1d75c894e3_k_d.jpg"/>
            <div n="7" type="issue">
               <head type="main">"The Young Idea"</head>
               <head type="main">Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal</head>
               <head type="sub">Saturday 26 February 1859</head>
               <head type="sub">Vol 2. No 7.</head>
               <div type="article">
                  <head>No Title</head>
                  <p>Our readers will hardly require an excuse for the nonappearance of our Weekly Journal, on the last three Saturdays, (alas' it is
                     now weekly only in name) for all must have felt how monotonously the past-three or four weeks have flet: - unchequered by a
                     single occurrence of note, unmarked by a single episode, wehreby they may be remembered;- productive of naught to interest,
                     amuse, or cheer on such a stagnant state of affairs no wonder that ideas become tainted with dulness and that imaginiation is
                     entirely at a loss to provide amusement.</p>
                  <p>But we cannot let this, our last week at Jeddah pass, without commemorating our release from its influence wihtout hailing our
                     approaching departure, without rendering our last days more cheery by the production of a "Young Idea." Four Months have rolled
                     past quickly beholding us lying inactively in these <pb n="TYI2072"
                        facs="https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1731/27606329307_09ac843bfd_k_d.jpg"/>waters; our anchors rusting in their coral beds,
                     and our minds rusting in the no less corroding bed of sluggish, unvarying, inaction .The change already commences to exercise its
                     beneficial effects, faces begin to brighten, minds begin to expand at the thoughts of the rocky steeps of Aden, of again
                     careering swiftly over the bright waters of the Arabian Sea, of the pleasant verdure of Point de Galle, of the probably
                     occurrences of the next two months.</p>
                  <p>Farewell! then to Jeddah, farewell! to its distant hills, its sandy shores, its glistening walls, and crowded bazaarss; farewell
                     to its deep blue waters, and coral reefs, farewell to its desert borne breezes, adn san ladet atmostphere, adn with us our
                     readers all gladly echo "Farewell"!!!</p>
               </div>
               <div type="letter">
                  <head>The "Great Eastern" Steamship &amp; the Future of Trincomalie</head>
                  <p>[...]<pb n="TYI2073"/>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="article">
                  <head>Notes about Jeddah</head>
                  <p>[...very interesting anecdotes about a visit ashore!]<pb n="TYI2074"/></p>
               </div>
               <div type="enigma">
                  <head>Historical Enigma</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="naval_intelligence">
                  <head>Naval Intelligence</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="epitome">
                  <head>Epitome.</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="promotionsandappointments">
                  <head>Promotions &amp; Appointments</head>
                  <p>[...]8th <persName ref="#A_D_McArthur">Mr A.D. McArthur</persName> Clerk having passed provisionally before Mr Hayward Paymaster
                     to be Act Asst Paymr[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="charade">
                  <head>The Sailor's Charade.</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="answer">
                  <head>Answer to Rebus in No 6. Pomegranate</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="publication_info">
                  <head>-</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="-">
                  <head>-</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="-">
                  <head>-</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="-">
                  <head>-</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="-">
                  <head>-</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
               <div type="-">
                  <head>-</head>
                  <p>[...]</p>
               </div>
            </div>
         </div>
      </body>
   </text>
</TEI>
  1. "The Young Idea"
  2. Our Opening Column
  3. from our Correspondent
  4. Naval Intelligence
  5. Epitome
  6. FACETIAE
  7. Conundrums
  8. "The Young Idea"
  9. [...]
  10. [...]
  11. Naval Intelligence
  12. Epitome
  13. FACETIAE
  14. Conundrums
  15. "The Young Idea"
  16. [...]
  17. [...]
  18. Naval Intelligence
  19. Epitome
  20. FACETIAE
  21. Conundrums
  22. "The Young Idea"
  23. [...]
  24. [...]
  25. Naval Intelligence
  26. Epitome
  27. FACETIAE
  28. Conundrums
  29. "The Young Idea"
  30. [...]
  31. [...]
  32. Naval Intelligence
  33. Epitome
  34. FACETIAE
  35. Conundrums
  36. "The Young Idea"
  37. [...]
  38. [...]
  39. Naval Intelligence
  40. Epitome
  41. FACETIAE
  42. Conundrums
  43. "The Young Idea"
  44. article #1
  45. Calcutta!
  46. Up the Hooghly
  47. [No Title]
  48. naval_intelligence
  49. A Swarm of Centipedes
  50. Conundrums
  51. Answer to Rebus
  52. Unanswered
  53. The Young Idea
  54. "The Young Idea"
  55. Try Again
  56. A Bird's Eye View of Calcutta
  57. Launching the "Leviathan"
  58. The Special Thanksgiving At St. Paul's Cathedral
  59. naval_intelligence
  60. Promotions and Appointments
  61. Epitome
  62. First appearance of an Enemy.
  63. Answers to Conundrums. 12 & 13
  64. The Young Idea
  65. "The Young Idea"
  66. article #1
  67. The Lucknow Tigers.
  68. "India"
  69. Con.
  70. naval_intelligence
  71. Epitome
  72. "Mind your P's and Q's. (By a Calcutta Billiard Player).
  73. To the Editor of the "Young Idea"
  74. Rebus &c.
  75. I
  76. With martial ardour next I sighed
  77. But now grown up to man's estate
  78. The sails flap idly on the mast-
  79. My 7.8.12.4.10.12 oft is seen
  80. The Young Idea
  81. "The Young Idea"
  82. article #1
  83. A Savage from the Andaman Islands
  84. Se(a)-poys and Sea-devils,
  85. Extracts from a Personal Narrative of the Siege of Lucknow
  86. "The Young Idea"
  87. Naval Intelligence
  88. Epitome.
  89. [No Title]
  90. Conundrums
  91. What letters of the Alphabet will represent?
  92. Answer to Last Week's Charade.
  93. Answer to Alphabetical Enigmas
  94. Unanswered from last week
  95. The Young Idea
  96. "The Young Idea"
  97. article #1
  98. "Origin of the Name of Delhi
  99. Our Naval Brigade
  100. Sporting Intelligence
  101. "The Great Mo-gul"
  102. Naval and Military Intelligence
  103. The "Calcutta Englishman" convicted of a Pun.
  104. Epitome
  105. [No Title]
  106. Conundrums
  107. Rebus &c.
  108. I
  109. II
  110. Unanswered from last week
  111. The Young Idea
  112. "The Young Idea"
  113. article #1
  114. Dinner Party at Cossipore & Marriage of the Granddaughter of Rajah Behadoor
  115. Sporting Intelligence
  116. The Theatre
  117. Naval Intelligence
  118. pun
  119. Conundrums
  120. Answer to Conundrums
  121. Unanswered from last Week
  122. Conundrums
  123. The Young Idea
  124. "The Young Idea"
  125. article #1
  126. To the Editor of "The Young Idea"
  127. The Chesapeake Brigade
  128. The Chesapeake Amateurs
  129. Prologue
  130. Naval Intelligence
  131. Facetiae
  132. Epitome
  133. Rebus
  134. 1
  135. II
  136. Illustrated Enigmas
  137. Answers to 22 & 23 not received
  138. The Young Idea
  139. "The Young Idea"
  140. __
  141. Dreadful Suicide
  142. Calcutta in consternation
  143. Madras
  144. The Pearl's Brigade
  145. FacetiÆ
  146. Conundrums
  147. "The Young Idea"
  148. article #1
  149. An Intruder
  150. Funeral of the Queen of Oude.
  151. The "Ava" Wreck
  152. A sketch from H.M.S. "Chesapeake"
  153. Naval Intelligence
  154. Facetiae
  155. Conundrums
  156. Rebus
  157. "The Young Idea"
  158. article #1
  159. The "Ava"'s Encampment
  160. "The Young Idea"
  161. article #1
  162. The Penal Colony in the Andaman Islands
  163. Sporting on Pigeon Island
  164. Mining Intelligence
  165. Diving Operations at the Wreck of the "Ava"
  166. Naval Intelligence
  167. Epitome
  168. FACETIAE
  169. Riddles &c.
  170. "The Young Idea"
  171. article #1
  172. Coming into Trincomalee
  173. A trip to Sober Island
  174. Our Naval Brigades.
  175. An extraordinary (S)cuttle-fish
  176. Diving Operations at the Wreck of the "Ava
  177. Naval Intelligence
  178. FACETIAE
  179. "The Young Idea"
  180. [...]
  181. [...]
  182. Naval Intelligence
  183. Epitome
  184. FACETIAE
  185. Conundrums
  186. "The Young Idea"
  187. [...]
  188. [...]
  189. Naval Intelligence
  190. Epitome
  191. FACETIAE
  192. Conundrums
  193. "The Young Idea"
  194. [...]
  195. [...]
  196. Naval Intelligence
  197. Epitome
  198. FACETIAE
  199. Conundrums
  200. "The Young Idea"
  201. [...]
  202. [...]
  203. Naval Intelligence
  204. Epitome
  205. FACETIAE
  206. Conundrums
  207. "The Young Idea"
  208. [...]
  209. [...]
  210. Naval Intelligence
  211. Epitome
  212. FACETIAE
  213. Conundrums
  214. "The Young Idea"
  215. [...]
  216. [...]
  217. Naval Intelligence
  218. Epitome
  219. FACETIAE
  220. Conundrums
  221. "The Young Idea"
  222. article
  223. Diamond Harbour.
  224. [a long poem that mentions Kali, …
  225. A Ramble in Diamond Harbour
  226. Theatricals.
  227. Naval Intelligence
  228. Extract from a private letter dated "Ava Camp" 30 May.
  229. FACETIAE
  230. Conundrums
  231. "The Young Idea"
  232. [...]
  233. [...]
  234. Naval Intelligence
  235. Epitome
  236. FACETIAE
  237. Conundrums
  238. "The Young Idea"
  239. [...]
  240. [...]
  241. Naval Intelligence
  242. Epitome
  243. FACETIAE
  244. Conundrums
  245. "The Young Idea"
  246. article
  247. [...]
  248. Naval Intelligence
  249. Epitome
  250. FACETIAE
  251. Conundrums
  252. "The Young Idea"
  253. article
  254. [...]
  255. Naval Intelligence
  256. Epitome
  257. FACETIAE
  258. Conundrums
  259. "The Young Idea"
  260. article #1
  261. Farewell Dinner to Commdore Watson
  262. "The Bay of Bengal"
  263. Our Ship's Pets
  264. Naval Intelligence
  265. Epitome
  266. FACETIAE
  267. Conundrums
  268. "The Young Idea"
  269. article #1
  270. The "Chesapeake" at Point de Galle. Departure of Commdore Watson
  271. Point de Galle
  272. India's Lament
  273. Naval Intelligence
  274. FACETIAE
  275. Conundrums &c.
  276. Conundrums
  277. "The Young Idea"
  278. __
  279. Bathing at Sober Island
  280. Making glad the Ship
  281. The Wreck Party
  282. Our Geological Researches
  283. The Rogue Elephant
  284. Naval Intelligence
  285. Epitome
  286. FACETIAE
  287. Pictorial Rebus
  288. "The Young Idea"
  289. article
  290. [...]
  291. "The Young Idea"
  292. No Title
  293. "The Young Idea"
  294. No Title
  295. Shooting Trip to Candligar
  296. Cricket Match between the "Cheseapeake, and "Army and Pelorus"
  297. Theatre Royal H.M.S. "CHESAPEAKE 03The review included in Bampfield's transcription from The Young Idea is more detailed than the one in the 1867 edition. Bampfield attributes the review to McArthur. It offers a description of precisely how the quarter deck was arranged and who attended the performance. It also includes a cast of characters.
  298. "The Young Idea"
  299. article #1
  300. [...]
  301. Naval Intelligence
  302. Epitome
  303. Trincomalie
  304. Pictorial Rebus
  305. "The Young Idea"
  306. editorial
  307. [...]
  308. Naval Intelligence
  309. Epitome
  310. FACETIAE
  311. Conundrums
  312. "The Young Idea"
  313. article
  314. The Burial at Sea
  315. The Gentoo Procession at Trincomalie
  316. Naval Intelligence
  317. [...]
  318. Epitome
  319. FACETIAE
  320. Conundrums
  321. "The Young Idea"
  322. [...]
  323. [...]
  324. Naval Intelligence
  325. Epitome
  326. FACETIAE
  327. Conundrums
  328. "The Young Idea"
  329. No Title
  330. Sailing up the Red Sea.
  331. Tuesday 19 Octr 1858
  332. The Late Comet.
  333. Naval Intelligence
  334. Epitome
  335. Facetiae
  336. Enigma
  337. The Young Idea
  338. "The Young Idea"
  339. No Title
  340. Jeddah, our Visit to Namik Pacha.
  341. SPORTING INTELLIGENCE
  342. (Song)
  343. Namik Pacha, & the Merchants of Jeddah
  344. Epitome
  345. Facetiae
  346. Rebus
  347. The Young Idea
  348. "The Young Idea"
  349. No Title
  350. Jeddah, and our Visit to Namik Pacha
  351. SPORTING INTELLIGENCE
  352. The Editor of The "Young Idea" to his friends on closing the first Year of Publication.
  353. The Red Sea
  354. Naval Intelligence
  355. Epitome
  356. Facetiae
  357. Conundrums
  358. The Young Idea
  359. "The Young Idea"
  360. No Title
  361. A visit to the Sheriffe of Mecca
  362. From the Readers to the Editor on commencing his New Volume
  363. The Tricolor and Union Jack
  364. Christmas 1858
  365. The Garbarry
  366. Naval Intelligence
  367. Epitome
  368. Facetiae
  369. Rebus
  370. Answers to Conundrums Nos. 60 & 61
  371. The Young Idea
  372. "The Young Idea"
  373. No Title
  374. Chesapeake's Greeting to "Pelorus
  375. Rough Yarns No 1. "The Boutswains Christmas Dinner"
  376. Epitome
  377. Facetiae
  378. [...]
  379. "The Young Idea"
  380. No Title
  381. Jeddah, and our Visit to Namik Pacha
  382. SPORTING INTELLIGENCE
  383. The Editor of The "Young Idea" to his friends on closing the first Year of Publication.
  384. The Red Sea
  385. Naval Intelligence
  386. Epitome
  387. Facetiae
  388. Conundrums
  389. The Young Idea
  390. "The Young Idea"
  391. No Title
  392. A visit to the Sheriffe of Mecca
  393. From the Readers to the Editor on commencing his New Volume
  394. The Tricolor and Union Jack
  395. Christmas 1858
  396. The Garbarry
  397. Naval Intelligence
  398. Epitome
  399. Facetiae
  400. Rebus
  401. Answers to Conundrums Nos. 60 & 61
  402. The Young Idea
  403. "The Young Idea"
  404. No Title
  405. Chesapeake's Greeting to "Pelorus
  406. Rough Yarns No 1. "The Boutswains Christmas Dinner"
  407. Epitome
  408. Facetiae
  409. [...]
  410. "The Young Idea"
  411. No Title
  412. Christmas Day 1858
  413. Farewell Dinner to Capt Parkin
  414. Our Christmas Play12Bampfield's trancription of this article attributes it to "W"; the review is very similar to the one published in this lithograph edition.
  415. A Night Alarm
  416. Naval Intelligence
  417. Answer to Rebus in No 1
  418. The Young Idea
  419. "The Young Idea"
  420. No Title
  421. Notes about Mecca (from Sale's Koran)
  422. "Jack
  423. Song on the Death of Capt. Sir William Peel KCB R.N.
  424. Sand Squalls & Rain Squalls
  425. Naval Intelligence
  426. Epitome
  427. Rebus
  428. Cheseapeake Amateur Theatricals
  429. Answer to Pictorial Rebus in No 3 Vol 2
  430. The Young Idea
  431. "The Young Idea"
  432. No Title
  433. The Jeddah Massacre
  434. Jeddah.
  435. Naval Intelligence
  436. Epitome
  437. Rebus
  438. "The Young Idea"
  439. "The Young Idea"
  440. No Title
  441. Arabic Numberals
  442. Arabic Numberals
  443. More Notes about Mecca. (chiefly from Sale's Koran).
  444. Historical Enigmas No. 1
  445. The last New Riddle from England.
  446. Naval Intelligence
  447. Epitome.
  448. Facetiae.
  449. REBUS
  450. Answer to Rebus in No. 5. Expostulation.
  451. "The Young Idea"
  452. "The Young Idea"
  453. No Title
  454. The "Great Eastern" Steamship & the Future of Trincomalie
  455. Notes about Jeddah
  456. Historical Enigma
  457. Naval Intelligence
  458. Epitome.
  459. Promotions & Appointments
  460. The Sailor's Charade.
  461. Answer to Rebus in No 6. Pomegranate
  462. -
  463. -
  464. -
  465. -
  466. -
  467. -
McArthur Lithograph Edition of The Young Idea A.D. McArthur Mary Isbell Transcription, encoding, and notes Mary Isbell 2019 TAPAS 2018

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

A.D. McArthur The Young Idea: A Naval Journal Edited on Board the H.M.S. Chesapeake in 1857, 1858 & 1859 Edition created from copy in editor's private collection. Other copies held at British Library: 1757.a.20/ and Beinecke Library: ______ 1867 170 Fleet Street, London, England Paul Jerrard & Son An in-process transcription of the entire run of The Young Idea

column breaks have not been retained, superscript has not been retained. Individual paragraphs have not been captured, making it seem like an entire contribution is one complete paragraph, which is not the case. Only the beginning of most contributions have been transcribed, followed by [...] indicating additional content to be transcribed. Where there is no title, "No Title" is used as the header.

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday-December 12, 1857 No 1.
Our Opening Column

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from our Correspondent Grand Dinner Party in celebration of hoisting the Broad Pendant

On Wednesday the 9th a grand dinner party was given by the Ward Room Officers of H.M.S. Chesapeake to their commodore, in honor of his having on that day hoisted his Broad Pendant

I will not encroach too much on your valuable time, by entering fully into minute details, but proceed to describe, as well, and briefly, as I am able, one of the great features of the week. There is little occasion to name the Bill of Fare, as it might make sundry people's mouths water to no purpose; suffice it to say the table was served in a most "recherche" style; the good looking and well dressed sailor boys, being remarkably attentive; the whole being under the able management of Mr. Geo Hoadley, the Mess Steward.

Scandal, says, that several cries were heard from the background, much resembling the noise that boys make when under punishment, and therefore avers, that the boys' good conduct arose from the fact of a Corporal, having been seen to enter the ward room previous to dinner, with what sailors call a "persuader" in his hand. But as I make it a practice to turn a deaf ear to scandal, (altho' readers may draw their own conclusions) still I am of opinion that they (the boys) have been too well drilled, and the system too good, to allow such a derogatory report to gain ground in any right minded person's opinion. You must pardon me, for having thus digressed from my subject, but as calumnious reports quickly get abroad, and such an one might prove detrimental to that well regulated mess. I take this opportunity of nipping it in the bud: -to proceed:-The culinary department, under the care of Mons: do Blanchearde, (who bids fair to outrival Mr Soyer) gave every satisfaction and the well satisfied look that rested on everyone's face, on the removal of the cloth, would, could he only have seen it, have repaid him well for his unremitting zeal.

Dessert on the table, and the glasses filled, the usual loyal toast was drunk to the splendid band of the ship, under their leader, Signor Faustine, playing "God save the Queen" followed immediately by "The return of the Admiral". Some slight mistake appears to have been made, in the time appointed for the playing of this Air; but to the fact of the Bandmaster being a foreigner, and as yet, not initiated into English customs, must this mistake be attributed

After the strains of music had ceased the President Capt. Piers, in an appropriate speech proposed the health of Commodore Watson CB which was drunk with enthusiasm, and no heel tops 01 "no heel tops" is a call made when one has not emptied their glass after a toast, the band playing as before, the "Return of the Admiral" ...

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"The Young Idea" "Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 23rd January 1858 No. 7

Our long voyage has now come to a close, we may consider that we have arrived at our destination, that our future prospects centre in Calcutta.

What these prospects may be, we are unable to determine at present, although, we may almost dispel the idea of seeing service before the enemy, as we had hoped, our proceedings will most likely consist in various kinds of extra duties, as unpleasant as they are unremunerative.

But, at this, we must not repine, for, as our gallant Commodore expressed in his speech last Sunday, we do as much good, in assisting the arrival, or departure of vessels, in provisioning, storing, repairing, conveying troops or other equally tame work, as though we were in the field; no doubt, some may be inclined to say, that this is merely a propitiatory view of the case, but, we say, it is the fact, and although our inclination leads us to think otherwise and to feel dissatisfied with the failure of our dearest hopes, yet, this should not lessen our zeal in the exercise of our various duties, and hope must brighten our path with the expectation, of not always having such unsatisfactory employment.

We cannot disguise the fact that we are "too late for the fair," but yet an old adage says "better late than never" and who knows, or who can foretell, what fortunate circumstances may occur, to reward us for our present disappointment.

Of the present state of the rebellion we cannot venture to say much; on shore, one heard little or view page image(s) The Young Idea" Saturday 23rd January 1858 nothing of it, although we cannot fancy that the hearts of English men and women, can wholly forget the perils of their country people.

Our information of what is proceeding is therefore very limited, but we hope that next week we may be able to procure intelligence of the successful career of that gallant soldier Sir Colin Campbell, as well as of a speedy termination to the disturbances in India.

Calcutta!

Here we are at last! the external appearance is novel and not uninteresting, what is the interior? Such were our reflections when we had time to look around us, and witness the busy scene,- boats of various shapes and build, dropping with the tide, with their swarthy crews, and the steersman wrapped in a linen robe, wielding the huge oar with which he guides the boat; magnificent merchant ships laying close in shore for repairs, discharging cargo, or other purposes, the forest of masts which met the gaze when it extended up the river, the hum of distant voices, the strange figures, carriages & vehicles of various descriptions passing along the Esplanade, all united to excite us with their novelty, and we were forced to satisfy our curiosity by visiting the shore.

On landing we were assailed by numbers of importunate palanquin bearers, who would hardly listen to the negatives we returned to their vociferations of "Palankie Sail" However we managed to escape in safety, and were pursuing our course towards the town when young lad came forward with an umbrella, and notwithstanding our decisive refusals of his services, he persisted in following and shading us from the sun.

We found him useful, and intelligent, and had no cause to regret making his acquaintance; he guided us to the bazaars, which reminded us forcibly of the like places for vending goods and merchandize in Constantinople. The small low shops and dirty lanes, for we cannot designate them streets, the various costumes of the natives, yellow, blue, red and white, the most part clothed in little save their tawny skins, all meeting the eye in a variegated mass, as the whole extent of the bazaar was comprehended at a glance, the creaking of the drays, or waggons, drawn by two small buffaloes, and made of bamboos, with most primitive wheels and harness, the shouts of the palanquin bearers, as they staggered under the weight of some corpulent old gentleman, who perhaps, entertained the opinion that the sun might melt him, were he to expose himself; the touting of the vendors, who, with salaams, begged us to walk into, each, his particular shop, and become their customers, all this and many other circumstances which struck us at the time, brought back very strongly to our memories the streets and bazaars of Constantinople

view page image(s) "The Young Idea" Saturday 23 January 1858.

After purchasing what we required, and we found that the prices first demanded were high but easily beaten down, we determined to visit now the Esplanade, and see what was going on there. We dismissed our guide with a fee with which he appeared very well pleased, & having refreshed ourselves with an ice at Browne's Hotel, we left our purchases there and strolled forth upon the Esplanade.

Here we found Rotten Row, in miniature, whilst upon the green the lovers of exercise amused themselves with cricket, and quoits. The roads were thronged with vehicles & carriages of every description native and European, filled with ladies & gentlemen, enjoying the fresh air; after the sun had expended his power.

The complexions of the ladies did not appear to us to have suffered from the heat of the climate, but we suppose they take care not to expose themselves during the day, and thus escape, we could not for one instant entertain an idea of artificial means being resorted to.

They certainly appeared to pay as much attention to fashion as in England, but we could not wonder at that, when we saw the immense millinery, and bonnet establishments which with open doors and temptingly displayed head dresses, robes, mantles, &c, &c invited the victims to enter and become an easy prey.

The shades of night falling fast and thick, and not wishing to remain any longer on shore, we returned on board, not as well satisfied with Calcutta, at first sight, as we had hoped to be.

Up the Hooghly

On Saturday evening last (Jan 16) although no land was in sight, we found ourselves nearing the channels of the Hooghly. At 6 P.M. we obtained soundings with the deep sea lead and two hours afterwards judging ourselves to be sufficiently near the Pilot station, we anchored for the night in 17 fathoms water, our anchor was again weighed at daylight & about 9 A.M. we passed the first large Buoy that marks the approach to the Eastern channel. At noon we were nearing the Pilot Brig, and the Pilot shortly afterwards came on board. We now ran in till 3 P.M. when the strong tide turning against us, we were again anchored for the night in 7 fathoms water. At Evening Quarters we moved several of the after guns forward to bring the vessel to an even keel: still no land in sight, though the red haze in the Evening horizon seemed to tell of its vicinity.

Daylight again found us under way and about 10 A.M. we descried the low banks of the Hooghly, opening on either side of us. With the strong tide in our favor, and our engines working at full power, we now advanced very rapidly; the river banks drew nearer to us; Saugar appeared on our right Kedgeree on our left, with a little cluster of shipping at the anchorage. The water which on the previous day had been of a greenish hue, now became very thick and muddy. Objects on shore now became more distinct as the river lessened in width, the banks were still low & level, not an outline of any distant hills to be seen, here & there a rice plantation varied the jungle Native villages, generally clustered about some creek, where a smaller stream view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 23rd January 1858. joined the main river, now, and then called our attention. In the stream, we passed many vessels, less favoured than ourselves, taking advantage of the tide to move up the river; others in their downward course, lying at anchor till the tide should turn. Now we observed traces of the European settler, the tall factory of red brick, the neat white house with green blinds drawn down over the windows, the regular avenue of trees, the cultivated patches of sugar cane, the brick field with piles of bricks, furnished from the dark alluvial clay, of which doubtless, the whole Delta of the Ganges is composed. As we moved swiftly up, the banks of the river glided past like a moving panorama, and the eye could never tire of watching the beautiful scene.

At sunset we came to an anchor in the Garden Reach, 2 miles below Calcutta, one or two pretty houses decked the banks, a forest of masts marked the position of the great capital. a deep red tinge, suffused the sky as the sun sank, and was reflected streakily in the ebbing tide, soon darkness came, the river's banks were left to the howling jackal, or the crickets and toads, that made a ceaseless whirring through the watches of the night.

[No Title]

The capture of Delhi, & the relief of Lucknow are exploits which challenge our national pride, as well as our national thanksgiving……..In every shape which war could take, has the ascendancy of the British race been established. We have succeeded in capturing a strong position & we have succeeded in defending a weak one. As besiegers at Delhi, as besieged at Lucknow, we have been equally triumphant, while the advance of our column to the capital of insurgent Oude, presents little less than a miracle of determination & courage.

The Evening Mail
Naval Intelligence Tuesday 19th H.M.S. Chesapeake weighed early this morning and took up swinging moorings off the Esplanade. She saluted the Governor General, which was returned by the fort. Wednesday 20th Sailed H.M. Steam Vessels "Assurance" and "Pelorus" for Rangoon. Thursday 21st Arrived H.M.S.V. "Mohawk" from Trincomalee having made a very quick passage of four days. H.M.S. "Himalaya" is about to proceed to England having broken her main shaft, and being very leaky. The "Mohawk" is to go to Rangoon to join the squadron there.
A Swarm of Centipedes

It appears that since leaving Trincomalee, a great number of Centipedes have been produced on board, so much so that recently at Evening Quarters, each man was required to appear with a Centipede in his possession. We certainly should have thought that such noxious reptiles, and such unpleasant bedfellows would have been flung overboard at the earliest opportunity but learn with surprize that they are carefully retained, and will be coiled round each man's blanket in the event of a campaign on shore.

Conundrums Why is Calcutta like the letter "I."? What the slight difference between a lazy Clerk, and an old retired Seaman?
Answer to Rebus Though rough may be our sailors "fare" Yet the tales of home we'll tell. And "well" we'll wish to the dear ones there As we think of our last "Farewell
Unanswered When it is a rect angle. Because he's quite down in the mouth and nearly going to blubber
The Young Idea

Published at the Office No. 1 Port St. Chesapeake every Saturday Saturday 23 Jan. 1858

view page image(s)
"The Young Idea" "Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 30th January 1858 No. 8
Try Again

It is seldom that any great & unprecedented undertaking will meet with the complete success at the first trial: - the great engineering triumphs of the present century have mostly taught us to expect failure before we achieve success: the Thames Tunnel, the Eddystone Lighthouse, the Plymouth Breakwater, because novel & unexampled works, were therefore in the first instance unsuccessful.

It is therefore with no surprize that we heard recently either that the Atlantic Telegraph had failed in the first attempt to lay it down, or that the Great Eastern "refuses to move from the spot where it has been built. A second attempt was made to induce this monster of the deep, to take to its aquatic elements; but a second time, it resisted all arguments whether of force or persuasion.

A fair lady bestowed its name, and called it "Leviathan" but "Leviathan was as resolute as "Great Eastern" and still remained upon the shore. "Try again" must be the motto of the builders.

Again, we read in an other part of our news that "Big Ben,"-the huge Bell that is to swing in the Clock tower of the Palace of Westminster,-"Big Ben" is cracked, his metal was too thin, or his tongue was too thick, and he will now have to be broken up, and his makers must "Try again" before they bring their work to completion.

But all these failures, we say, might reasonably be expected; whenever we attempt anything great and noble and unprecedented, neither a first, nor a second, nor a third failure must daunt us. "Try again" must be our motto, and success will eventually crown our perseverance.

The "Atlantic Telegraph" shall yet exchange the thoughts of John Bull with those of view page image(s) "The Young Idea" Saturday 30th January 1858. Brother Jonathan, "Big Ben" shall yet sound his notes of warning to the denizens of our Metropolis, "Leviathan" shall yet float on the waters, the glory and triumph of our Naval Architects, and the "Young Idea" shall gain the support and interest of all.

A Bird's Eye View of Calcutta

Those who wish for a birds eye view of Calcutta, we would strongly recommend to ascend the the Ochterbury monument on the Esplanade.

They will be amply repaid for the labouring ascent of the dark winding staircase by the glorious view, which awaits them on emerging at the top. The whole city lies at their feet, spread out before their gaze like a vast map. The winding Hooghly with its shipping; the Esplanade, with its mixed multitude of European carriages, palanquine-bearers, riders galloping over the turf, soldiers at their Canteen, and the swarms of dark natives, the handsome European houses, intermingled with the low, dingy-roofed bazaars of the natives, the spires of the Christian Churches, the Moslem mosque, the massive pile, the palace of the Governor General, the large tanks cut in the soil, human habitations interspersed with trees, extending to the verge of the horizon of this flat alluvial district, these are but a few, of the object that delight the eye.

It is not our wish to enter upon an elaborate description but simply to recommend others to attempt the same ascent, to look around for themselves, and to describe with more accurate pen or pencil the scene which we have attempted to de-pict.

Launching the "Leviathan" The Evening Mail

On Saturday (Nov.r 23rd) a third attempt was made to move this gigantic vessel, which we are happy to say was eminently successful, and resulted in the "Leviathan" being gradually lowered down the launching ways some 25 feet in a slow, and beautifully regular manner.

The whole distance was accomplished without any accident, or delay worth speaking of, and throughout the entire day the advance of the ship was regulated according as Mr. Brunel thought fit, with as much care and certainty, as if the vessel had been a little cutter, instead of a ponderous structure of iron weighing upwards of 12,000 tons

The Special Thanksgiving At St. Paul's Cathedral

Last Thursday week the 21st Inst. a special Thanksgiving service was held in St. Paul's Ca view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 30th January 1858. thedral, to return thanks for the relief of Lucknow.

As it was understood that most of the Lucknow people would be present the occasion presented too much interest for us to neglect witnessing it, and partaking in the ceremony.

Accordingly at 1/4 to 10 a.m. we left the ship and engaged a buggy at the landing place, into which four of us were speedily stowed: the driver took us through Fort William and we were thus enabled to take a cursory view of the interior.

Here we saw several of the native soldiers on guard without any arm save their ramrods, a significant token of the little trust that can be placed upon these men at the present crisis.

After leaving the fort we emerged upon the race course, the grand stand & swimming post suggesting to our minds the exciting scenes, which we had unfortunately missed witnessing, by not reaching this place at an earlier season.

It was not long now ere we arrived at the cathedral, although had it not been for a sharp look out kept on our driver, he would most probably have taken us out into the country, as he did not appear to understand perfectly where we were desirous of being driven to, and was taking a course very different to that we wished.

On entering the sacred edifice we found that we were very late, but yet managed to obtain seats, although the position was not good being behind the pulpit.

The interior of the building is spacious and airy; the seats are formed of a species of arm chair, thus portioning off to each one a fair space, and even crinoline must share the same as a gentleman of the most slender proportions and consequently no lady could appropriate to herself more room than would be found convenient to a next seat neighbour. We cannot say how the fair sex approve of this arrangement.

From the light roof, iron girders dropped, and joined frames of the same material, which ran from one side to the other; we supposed these are intended for the use of punkahs during the hot weather

Over the altar a fine large painted window, representing the Crucifixion, attracted our attention. The Pulpit, choir, Altar & reading Desks, were draped in black, and noticing that a large number of the congregation were also arrayed in the sable garments of mourning, we were painfully re view page image(s) "The Young Idea" Saturday 30th January 1858. minded of the heartrending losses, and bloodshed, which have characterized late times.

From our position in the rear of the Preacher (Archdeacon Pratt) we were unfortunately unable to hear his discourse fully, but its main design was to show the great mercy of Almighty God in thus relieving a people who had deemed themselves lost, and had made up their minds to die, as well as to teach us how grateful we should be for all His Mercies, and to put our trust in Him alone.

We heard the sounds of subdued sobs from the body of the church, and surely it was sufficient to drain tears of joy and gratitude from those who were so fresh from the scene of danger and distress.

We left the cathedral deeply impressed, with the solemnity, and applicability of the service we had witnessed.

Naval Intelligence 26th HMS "Chesapeake" left her swinging moorings off the Esplanade and moored off Baboo GhantH.M.S. "Mohawk" sailed for Rangoon 29th H.M.S. "Pearl" hauled out into the stream. 30th H.M.St.V. "Sparrowhawk" sailed this afternoon for Rangoon, having completed her objects
Promotions and Appointments Lieut.t Edw.d Kelly (additional) took passage in H.M.S. "Pelorus" to which ship he is lent to do duty until further orders. Commander Shute B. Piers to the "Himalaya" vice Captain Haswell Invalided. Charles I. Brownrigg Mate to be Lieutenant. The official intimation of this promotion has not been yet received, but as it is announced in the Gazette, we feel much pleasure in announcing it also. At the same time we must state that our pleasure is tinged with regret at losing so good a messmate.
Epitome A Regatta is announced to come off on the 10th Prosc.s but we have not received any information as to the terms or arrangements The Boats crews of H.M.S. Chesapeake have been sent away every evening for half an hour, in order to get into training for the coming Regatta. Cricket has been in vogue during the past week amongst our officers but there has not been any game worthy of being noted. Leave is now granted to the crew of H.M.S. "Chesapeake" to visit the shore in certain proportions at a time. Several of those who have been allowed to go, have shown so little regard for liberty as to be imprisoned for the night.
First appearance of an Enemy. To the Editor of the "Young Idea"Dear Sir,

While walking the Deck by moonlight, in a contemplative mood, on Thursday Evening, two animals of the order "Rodentia," usually called "rats" were observed by the Quartermaster near the main mast. Being much troubled by the apparition, and having an intense aversion to anything in the shape of a rat, (except the rat-tat of the postman's knock) I hasten to inform you of the approach of these formidable foes. I sincerely hope, that our smart, though juvenile members of the feline tribe may now be duly trained and disciplined to meet the foe, and I doubt not that a whole host of asiatic rats will soon be made to fly before the sharp claws of a few brave British cats.

I am, Dear Sir,Yours very truly "Night Watch" "Chesapeake" 29 Jan 1858
Answers to Conundrums. 12 & 13

To answer your two riddles, Sir, I'll try:

Why is Calcutta like the letter "I."? "I" is the capital of India--true? So is "Calcutta"--won't my answer do? The Sailor old a "Pensioner" may be, am I not right?The early clock, a sad "Pin mummer" he, and so good night.
The Young Idea

Published at the Office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. Subscriptions most thankfully receivedSaturday 30th January, 1858.

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"The Young Idea" "Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 6th February 1858 No. 9

Already one twelfth of the New Year has flown, and we find ourselves rapidly entering into the second month.

In this short space of time we have seen much, done much, and heard much: already we miss the faces of one or two shipmates, and expect others to fill their places, and thus it ever is, and ever will be; -faces, and forms will change in the ever revolving diorama of a sailor's life

We have received our long looked for, eagerly anticipated letters, we have heard from those at home, at the very sight of whose handwriting, we have felt our breasts thrill with emotions of pleasure, and joy, and if such feelings are experienced by a mere knowledge of the characters of the address, we can readily fathom the happiness the glow of exultation, the interest with which we break the seal, and first with rapid glance devour the contents, abstracting the news greedily, in order to learn all in a moment.

Then comes the second reading, and now we ponder over every word, we digest every sentence, and carefully peruse every line, receiving fresh pleasure from every perusal, and being borne back in memory to our happy homes, where we can fancy we see"++++++++" the light"of household fires gleam warm & bright"we fancy we can hear the joyous laugh of merry friends, the hearty gratulations of the season; we fancy we can feel the warm grasp of friendly recognition, the endearing embrace of parents, sisters, wives, or sweethearts; we read their wishes, their soul breathed view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 6th February 1858. wishes for our happiness, and welfare; and as we close the pages which have expanded our hearts with more real enjoyment, than we have experienced since we parted from the oft remembered writers, we come back to the cold stern reality of distance, of our separation.

But, stop! We have only spoken of pleasure, as derived from the receipt of letters from our homes; there is yet another view of the matter, and, this, brings grief, in lieu of joy; tears, instead of smiles; and sorrow usurps the place of mirth.

Note! Some poor comrade receives a letter whose sable edges bespeak the contents; see! with what trembling hand, and bursting heart he retires into some corner, where in secret he can trace with tearful eyes, the lines which convey the sad intelligence of the death of some dear relative, or friend.

Tis thus that each mail must produce different emotions amongst a body of men, and while some are filled with joy, others are drooping with pain and trouble.

May we know little of this latter.

The Lucknow Tigers.

As we believe that many of our readers have availed themselves of our recommendation last week to ascend the Monument on the Esplanade, we will venture to call attention in like manner to the beautiful Lucknow tigers which may be seen on the payment of one Rupee in Wood Street, Chowringhee.

They have been lately brought from Lucknow, where they formed a portion of the Royal Menagerie which the Kings of Oude have been in the habit of maintaining.

The first Tiger you see on entering is a beautiful creature most remarkable for its tameness. At Lucknow it had been brought up by hand, and led about with only a chain round its neck. It would allow little children to play with it in passing along the streets, and the people of Lucknow lamented when they saw it put into a cage, to be carried away.

There are 6 or 7 others, of which we recollect two particularly, one because of its ferocious growl, the only savage one, and the other as being the largest of all, and distinguished for the beauty of its stripes, which, it will be observed, are all double.

There is a leopard, which is rather too apt to put its paws through the cage, and a chetah view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 6th February 1858. or hunting leopard, which is only confined by a chain, and seems perfectly tame, licking its keeper's hand, and making a gruff, purring, sound, like a cat with a sore throat.

There is also a fine Giraffe, perfectly tame, and we recommend visitors to beg the Sikh attendant to take a ride on its back. The man, though full sized, seems quite a pigmy when mounted on the tall quadruped; and we defy any one to keep himself from laughing, when the poor beast sets off at a canter.

"India"

Our papers, and our Reviews, our periodicals, have all one absorbing topic, and that is India. Fresh details of the horrible sufferings which our countrymen & women underwent in the earlier part of the insurrection, further particulars of the movements of our gallant army, praises of those heroic spirits who have fought and perchance have fallen, before the gates of Delhi, or within the walls of Lucknow, comments on the past misgovernment of the country, suggestions towards its better management for the future; these seem to form the staple of what we have received by our two last mails; pictorial papers take up the same subject, and views from india, and illustrations of Hindoo customs, now meet us in every page: when we open our Magazines, we find historical papers, tracing the rise of the British dominion in India, dissertations on the variety of races, or essays on the religious, and various forms of feeling which are to be found in this remarkable Asiatic Peninsula.

"We spared our readers," says the Times, "as much as we could the pain of revolting and horrible "images; we have no objection that they should know, that there are the most terrible details in the background of outrages perpetrated upon English men and English women."

"Christianity," writes the same paper in another article, "is not a religion to be propagated by violence, but it is essentially a religion to be diffused by preaching and teaching. Christians may not make converts by the sword, but they are bound, where they can, to make proselytes by instruction *** our administration in India, has presented the spectacle of one of the greatest Christian powers in the world sedulously bent upon ignoring its own belief.**** In future the religion of the dominant race must be plainly professed, instead of being timidly kept in the background, and the field be opened to missionary exertions with the sanction, instead of the disfavour, of the Government."

These sentiments, no doubt, express the feelings of the great majority of our friends in England, and we prefer giving them in the powerful words of the "Times," to endeavouring to clothe them in our own poor language.

It may be sufficient for us to rejoice that at such a time, we should have been sent in our floating home, to the very spot on which the eyes of the world, are turned; to see for ourselves something of those scenes which papers so fully describe to our friends at home, and perchance to take part in those transactions, which are yet destined to become matters of history.

Con. When is an Editor like a coachman driving a restive tandem? view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 6th February 1858.
Naval Intelligence 4th Feb. H.M.S. "Himalaya" hauled out into the stream, and is preparing for her departure for England. She will convey refugees from Lucknow; and other places. A working party under JW Worsley second master, have been employed onboard the "Pearl" during the past week, stowing holds and provisioning her from the Barque "Oceanica" The crew of H.M.S. "Chesapeake" have been employed turning in the rigging afresh and rattling down. The mail steamer from China arrived this morning. By Advices from that part of the world, we learn of the storming of Canton, and the capture of Commisioner Yeh, who is now on board the "Inflexible." Our loss was 118 killed, and wounded; amongst the former we regret to find the name of CaptainCapt. Bates of the "Actaeon," who was shot whilst pointing out the most desirable spot for planting a scaling ladder. We hope next week to be able to place before our readers, a more detailed account of the proceedings against the "celestials"
Epitome On Wednesday, our late Commander CaptainCapt Piers, was received at a farewell dinner in the Ward Room preparatory to his sailing in the "Himalaya". The entertainment was of a strictly private character, but the "Chesapeake" band was in attendance, and played a succession of airs, when the cloth was removed. "Auld Lang Syne" followed the proposal of the special toast of the day, namely, "The Health of CaptainCapt. Piers, & a prosperous voyage to the Himalaya." The mail for England will start on Monday next the 8th Inst. We have noticed some young sportsmen have been out with their fowling pieces, but very little success appears to have awarded their juvenile ardour.
"Mind your P's and Q's. (By a Calcutta Billiard Player).

Take care of your rupees, and avoid the Billiard cues.

To the Editor of the "Young Idea" Dear Mr Editor"

Do give us more riddles this week, for tho' I could not for my life start one out of my own nozzle, yet I greatly enjoy puzzling over what others have started, and though I never wish to be riddled with shot, yet I always like to be peppered with riddles, and in fact the "Young Idea" seems quite imperfect without them.

So, believe me, Dear Mr. EditorYour constant reader "Puzzlehead" Chesapeake 4 Feb. 1858

Ed. our answer is given below

Rebus &c. When I was but a little boy I dearly loved my first so gayly decked, so neatly dressed so tenderly twas nursed. With martial ardour next I sighed To go where Glory beckoned. I called myself a soldier lad And bravely beat my second But now grown up to man's estate A sailor bold am I:- And here on the Equator's line All listlessly we lie. The sails flap idly on the mast- My whole, My whole has caught us: Down with the screw, whirl round the fan, We'll Try what steam has taught us My 7.8.12.4.10.12 oft is seen Floating light from the peaks of the ships of our Queen Without 4.5.8.3.10.2.3. no gun Is much use, Tho' perhaps it is better than none, My 2.3.6.2.3. a vegetable is 5 Which schoolboys oft use when the pedagogue's phiz Betokens some 1.8.4.13. from his cane And they hope by its means to assuage the sharp pain Which tingles their hands, and brings forth their tears My 13.11.9. is a picture quite dread 10 Of human depravity, his senses all dead, His mind over thrown, 'tis easy to trace. The 5.11.2.4. of his fall in his face Bloated, purpled, debauched & disgusting to all His bottle, his enemy, friend, all in all. 15 But my whole tis composed of letters 18 And much does the Editor need it, I ween. He really must call all his reader to note, That altho' 'Young Ideas' have their very best vote, Yet he seldom gets more than the "populi vox" 20 But he hopes that my whole will appear in his box.

What two letters of the alphabet will represent?A Female name? Voidness? Decline? Goods? Vexation? Dress? & a sensation after a night of dissipation?

The Young Idea

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions thankfully receivedSaturday 6 February, 1858.

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"The Young Idea" "Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday February 13 1858 No. 10

The Past Week has certainly been productive of more excitement, and enjoyment, than any we remember to have witnessed since our departure from England.

One great event at least, has been its chief characteristic, one day at least, called forth more interest than the others, we speak of the Regatta day, and the attendant entertainment onboard the "Chesapeake."

Although on this important occasion, our men did not acquit themselves in the manner we had hoped, yet it is a source of deep gratification, to know that the reigning prize of the day, the acme of ambition, the "Prize Cup" was won by our men.

Elsewhere we shall find a detailed account of the circumstances which marked the day, which we must say could not have been finer or more agreeable, nor can we drop this subject without paying our tribute of admiration to the "fair sex," the bright colours of whose tasteful array, enlivened our decks, and gave the ship a holiday appearance,

Our news this week is somewhat general and extensive; we have news of the movements of the Naval Brigade and the probability of intelligence arriving soon of an attack upon Lucknow: from Rangoon, accounts would lead us to believe that the disturbances there are not likely to be settled either quickly or quietly, as, by the Calcutta "Englishman" it is reported that Captain Beauchamp Seymour has landed the crew of the "Pelorus" with a view of forming a Naval Brigade, but we must not place implicit reliance upon this latter report, as it is as yet unauthenticated.

We can only hope that we shall not be excluded from a participation of whatever may take place in that quarter.

A Savage from the Andaman Islands Dear Sir,

The following account which was given me by a gentleman of Calcutta may perhaps, prove interesting view page image(s) The "Young Idea" Saturday 13th February 1858 to the Readers of the "Young Idea"

An exploring party was recently sent from Calcutta to visit the Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal with the view of selecting a site to establish a penal colony, and to banish thither the captive King of Delhi and his rebel Sepoys. It is remarkable that this group of Islands, tho' so near to the Asiatic Continent, are inhabited by a race of savages, no way akin to the Asiatic tribes, but apparently much nearer allied to the African Negroes. They live in a perfect state of nature, without the slightest vestige of a garment; their huts are mere dens or kennels under which they crawl at night; in fact they seem to be among the most degraded forms of humanity.

The first salutation our explorers received was a flight of arrows, but a few musket shots soon dispersed the natives. Two of them were killed, and one captured. This savage has been brought to Calcutta by Dr. ..... and both he and Mrs...... have done their best to humanize him by kind treatment. He was introduced to several Negroes of different tribes, but none of them could understand his language.

He shews himself not insensible to kindness, and was pleased with Dr. .....,'s little child, making signs, that he had a little child also. On one occasion, wishing to show his gratitude to Mrs. ..... & following the custom of his country on such occasions, he took the lady's hand within both his own, raised it solemnly to his lips, and with the deepest respect, spat into it.

hand-drawn triangle hand-drawn triangle
Se(a)-poys and Sea-devils,

The consternation struck into the sepoys in Central India by the sight of our Bluejackets, is scarcely to be imagined. "They are not English "men" say the sepoys. "Nor men, at all, but sea-devils who have come up out of the sea to fight for the Englishmen They do not walk like men, but in a rolling way that shows they have claws upon their feet. They are dressed in a way quite different from Englishmen, they are not tall, but very broad, in fact they are about 5 feet high, by 4 feet broad; they can carry big guns on their shoulders, or under their arms; six of them can bring a gun up a hill, which it would take 200 or 300 sepoys to move at all; they never speak a word, and when they attack they can never be driven back; they are cannibals, and eat sepoys when they have salted them down, sepoy bullets cannot kill them."

Extracts from a Personal Narrative of the Siege of Lucknow

"Opening of the Siege." The troops mutinied on the 30th of May and after the 30th of June the siege commenced in earnest. The constant din of artillery and musketry, combined with the yells of the demons without, and busy excitement within our defences, kept the women and children in dread of death.

Some sat patiently, others ran from room to room, thinking the shot pursued them, some cried and beat their chests, others dragged their children from one side of the room to the other, as the roar of the cannon disturbed them, some prayed as they had never prayed before, while others laughed at the fear & confusion of the rest.

"Relief of Lucknow by General>Genl. Havelock". Sir James Outram and General>Genl. Havelock came on the 25th September, and we saw the vast crowns going out of the city to oppose that brave little force for three days we heard the firing of artillery coming closer and closer; On the last day there was a great stir, detachments of the enemy in retreat passed by; onwards came the British Troops, driving the cowards in terror before them. Elephants, camels, carts, horses, bullocks, and men made in masses for the bridge of boats over the Goomtee. They crowded on to it, and it broke, sending some to the bottom of the stream, and the rest running up and down the banks in a panic. About 8 o'clock in the Evening we saw Sir J Outram and General Havelock and staff enter the street facing us, leading the 78th Highlanders & Ferozepore Regiment of sikhs. Instantaneously the entrenchments shook with Hurrahs: they could not hear us, but we went on increasing our noisy joy, and shaking handkerchiefs and caps as they neared the Gate; The sight of that gallant little band, piercing thro' thousands to our rescue, affected many of us to tears. Such devotion!!! Such bravery!!!

"Adventure in the Mines". The enemy were detected mining towards us, as on the previous occasion, and I lay a long time waiting for view page image(s) The Young Idea" Saturday 13th February 1858 them to break into our gallery. we were suddenly confronted by a strong blow of the Miner's hoe, which brought down the slip of earth dividing us. The man spread out his arms & screamed as I put the muzzle of my pistol to his breast, and shot him. There was a great noise at the top of the shaft; and they called to each other to go, and bring out the dying miner, and his tools. A Sepoy leapt swearing to the bottom; I shot him in the stomach, in the act of firing at me: the commotion now became louder, and the rebels blustered & swore, as if they were all coming down. I taunted them with cowardice, and they, thinking I was a sikh, upbraided me with associating with "" who eat cow's meat and other abominations.

I told them I was an European Officer, when they ceased their noise, and listened civilly to me. I asked why had they mutinied? They replied, they were fighting for their religion. "How have we threatened your religion? By giving us greased cartridges. *********

They were now desired by the Havildar, or Native Officer to fire at me, but they refused, saying they wanted to hear the Sahib speak." I challenged the Havildar to come down himself, and then said I would bring him some woman's apparel, this retort caused him to swear, and the others to laugh at him. They now commenced filling up the shaft, and I retired to my own gallery.

"Escaping in disguise". On the 9th November I sought out the spy Kunrigee Lall who - was going back with despatches to Sir Colin Campbell and imparted to him my desire to venture in disguise in his company My attire was soon completed; I was dressed as a Budmash, or Irregular soldier of the city, with sword and shield, native made shoes, tight trousers, a yellow silk koortah over a close fitting white muslin shirt, a yellow coloured chintz sheet thrown round my shoulders, a cream coloured turban, and a white waistband or "Kummerbund", My face and neck down to the shoulders, and my hands to the wrists, were coloured with lampblack, the cork used being dipped in oil to cause the colour to adhere. After being provided with a small double barrelled pistol, and a pair of broad pyjamahs over the tight trousers, I proceeded with Kunrigee Lall to the banks of the river Goomtee. We undressed and quickly forded the river, which was about 4 1/2 ft. deep, and about 100 yards wide at this point. My courage failed me while in the water, and if my guide had been within reach, I should perhaps have pulled him back and abandoned the enterprize **** With my resting on my shoulder, we advanced among the huts in front, where I accosted a matchlock man, "The night is cold"; he answered to my remark "It is very cold"*** We passed unnoticed thro' a number of Sepoys and matchlock men, some of whom, were escorting persons of rank in palanquins, preceded by torches. I jostled against several armed men in the street, but was not spoken to. **** I was in great spirits when we reached the green fields, into which I had not been for five months Everything around us smelt sweet, and a carrot I took from the roadside, was, the most delicious I ever tasted. I gave vent to my feelings in a conversation with Kenrigee Lall, who joined in my admiration of the province of Oudh, and lamented that it was now in the hands of wretches, whose misgovernment and rapacity was ruining it.

"Arrival at the British Camp". By 3 o'clock in the morning we arrived at a grove of mango trees, in which a man was singing at the top of his voice! He was alarmed at hearing us approach, and astonished us also, by calling out a guard of 25 Sepoys, all of whom asked questions. Kunrigee Lall lost heart for the first time, and threw away the letter entrusted to him for Sir Colin Campbell I kept mine safe in my turban. We satisfied the guard that we were poor men travelling to Umrona Umroula , and they told us the road.***

It was near 4 o'clock in the morning when we heard the English challenge "Who comes there?" We had reached a British cavalry outpost. My eyes filled with joyful tears, and I thanked God for having safely conducted one through this dangerous enterprize.

"The Young Idea" The Regatta

The Calcutta Regatta of this season took place on Wednesday last the 10th Ist. & went off very successfully, under the patronage of Commodore Watson, C.B. & the Officers of the Royal Navy, as also the Judges of the Supreme Court. The Judges on the occasion were LieutenantLieutt. Woodman R.N. CaptainCapt . Hill Master attendant, & CaptainCapt Lovell P.&O. CompanyCompy . These gentlemen were onboard the H.C.'s steamer "Proserpine" which lay off Baboo's Ghant. Visitors speedily arrived of whom we may safely say the "gentler sex" were the most numerous, and our bridge presented a brilliant spectacle when all the ladies had taken their stations thereon. The scene all round was now most enlivening, the "Chesapeake" & Proserpine both gaily dressed in flags, the lines of boats filled with well dressed spectators, stretching along the Watery Race- view page image(s) The "Young Idea" Saturday 13th February 1858. course, and the Ghant and its neighbourhood thickly lined with people of all classes. The "Proserpine" was the starting point and from this the boats proceeded downwards round certain buoys marked with flags and then came up again passing on the shore side of the "Chesapeake" back to the "Proserpine". The whole distance to be pulled being about a mile and a half.

1st Race. Ships Gigs 6 oars 1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd prize save entrance. Minna Green 1 Sesostris Blue, White Ball 2 Semiramis Red & White 3

Sesostris came in first but having taken the wrong course Minna was adjudged the winner

2nd Race. Ships Gigs 4 oars. 1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd Prize save entrance. Bella Blue. White Ball 1 Judith American Flag 2 Liverpool White Blue star 3

The American boat which was pulled by Negroes came in a good second

The Following also started Hurkaru, Megoera, Defiance, Undaunted Jas Hurtley Proserpone and Griffin.

3rd Race Racing Gigs 6 Oars. 1st Prize Cup 300 Rs 2nd Prize 100 Rs. 4rd Prize save entrance. Coquette Pink 1 White Gauntlet Blue. White Glove 2 Fiery Cross Blue Burgee. White Cross 3

The following also started Lotus. True Blue & Will o' Wisp. There was a close struggle between Coquette and White Gauntlet. White Gauntlet came in first, but as she had fowled, "Coquette" was adjudged the winner. The start was bad, and True Blue had an oar broken. Fiery Cross. Which was pulled by Chinese made great play at first, but lost way by coming across a cargo boat.

4th Race Double lanked ship's cutters. 8.10 & 12 Oars1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd Prize save entrance. Semiramis Red & White 1 ChesapeakeBarge Blue 2 Chesapeake 2d Cutter White 3

The following also started Chesapeake 1st Cutter, and Brenda the latter boat being manned by marines from the "Chesapeake" Immediately on Semiramis passing the winning point, one of the oarsmen (who had evidently made up his mind that his boat was to win) struck up a tune of triumph on the bagpipes, much to the amusement of the spectators.

5th Race. Launches. 14 to 18 oars. 1st Prize 100Rs 2d Prize. save entrance. Pylades Green 1 Chesapeake 1st launch Red 2

The following also started. Chesapeake's 2d Launch & Pinnace

6th Race Covered Pancies. 1st Prize 30 Rs. 2d Prize 10 Rs Agul Parah Red, Black Stripe 1 Nonsuch Blue. White anchor 2

The following also started. Hela. Mela. Kalee and Arrow

7th Race. Dinghee Race for all comers 1st Prize 10Rs. 2d Prize 8Rs. 3d Prize 5Rs.

Six dinghees started of which only three arrived at the winning point, after a smartly contested race

The Race for screw steamers did not come off, as was announced in the programme.

Commodore Watson had a first rate tiffin prepared in his cabin, to which the ladies repaired after the second race was over. The band of the Chesapeake aided in the pleasure of the day by playing several selections and airs from our finest operas. After the Gentlemen had refreshed themselves, and the fifth race was over, dancing commenced, and was kept up with great spirit until 6 o'clock. little or no attention being paid to the ensuing races.

The arrival of this day had been eagerly anticipated, and we are certain that all will agree that it passed off with entire satisfaction, altho' we could not but feel regret at the dancing being broken off at the early hour it was.

Naval Intelligence H.M.S. Himalaya sailed for England on Friday the 12th Instant, with invalids and refugees from Lucknow. We hope next week to be able to present our readers with a slight account of her arrangements. Commodore Watson C.B. inspected her previous to her departure. H.M.S. Megoera has taken the berth lately occupied by the "Himalaya" and has commenced coaling. She will sail for Sydney early next week.
Epitome. On Thursday night (Feb. 11) about 11 o'clock a very heavy thunderstorm passed over us. The best description of the hailstones which fell on this occasion is to say that in size and shape, though not in colour or taste, they resembled very large "acidulated drops" The lightning was very vivid and of a beautiful pale blue color. Messrs Palmer, Weatherstone and Smithers. Second Class Boys, have taken their departure for England in the "Himalaya" much regretted by the Master at Arms, and by their respective Masters. A Cricket Ball is announced to take place on Monday the 15th Inst. to which the officers have received a general invitation. We hear that the Royal Navy are likely to be challenged to a match at Cricket by the Officers of the P. and O. Company.
Conundrums What is the slight difference between a tiger's foot & a semi-colon? What beer ought dandies to drink? Why ought a man married to a girl of a certain name be never dull or melancholy? When does an insolent Debtor become a Navy man?
What letters of the Alphabet will represent? (2 Letters) To surpass? A Fowl? Superfluity? A Turkish magistrate? To coop up? & an English County? (3 Letters) A Foe? An Image? A Hollow-place? (4 Letters) A little of honour? Ability? (5 Letters) haste?
Answer to Last Week's Charade. Gaily floats the "burning" light And merrily works the "Trunion?" The schoolboy dreads the cane's sharp "cuts" And reds his hands with "onion" The drunken "sot in" riot" lost 5 soon mourns his destitution And greatly needs the "Young Idea" Some friendly "contribution?" C.
Answer to Alphabetical Enigmas

If my sweeheart of only two letters may be M.A. (Emma) L.N. (Ellen) or K.T. (Katey) most surely is she with pockets quite M.T. (Empty) my home in D.K. (decay) How I N.V. (Envy) the rich in their gorgeous R.A. (array) I have sold my F.X. (effects) and am thoroughly needy. No wonder I feel most uncommonly C.D. (seedy).

Unanswered from last week When is an Editor like a coachman driving a restive tandem? When he cannot compose the Leader.

Rebus. Doldrum

The Young Idea

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. Contributions solicitedSaturday 13 February, 1858.

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"The Young Idea" "Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday February 20th 1858 No. 11

Rumours are now flying about, purporting to remove us from our present snug anchorage at Calcutta for some time; that we are destined to convey Lady Canning to Madras, and from these, it is said, we steer to Rangoon.

This will of course involve an absence of some two or three months, and will we hope, be found to prove a beneficial change, for, after all, there is nothing like constant change of air, of scenery, and position for enhancing the excitement and monotony of a sea life.: two varied sentiments, which, however, are most peculiarly our own.

Rangoon we have been informed offers no advantages or inducements as a place of pleasure, and no amusements are to be obtained, wherewith to assist the laggard hours, as each day "draws its slow length along" but then we shall return in a riper mood for the enjoyment of the few recreations Calcutta affords.

Besides, we are unable to foresee what other seaport we may visit, what circumstances, may befall us, what fortune may be our lot, and in the fresh kindled sensations of excitement & wonder, which stir our hearts, when visiting strange shores, and towns, and people; we shall find an agreeable relief to the feeling of satiety, to which the interest, we originally felt in this the so-called "City of Palaces" has not begun to succumb; having been disappointed in the hopes we had entertained on arrival view page image(s) The Young Idea. Saturday 20 February 1858

"Origin of the Name of Delhi

The city of Delhi originally bore the name of Indraprasthe, and was the royal capital of the aboriginal Pandoos. After falling into decay and lying desolate for a period of eight centuries, it was revived again (about A.D. 792) by a descendant of the ancient Kings, entitled Bulwan Deo.

It was he who changed the name from Indraprasthe to Delhi, the origin of which is related as follows:-

"There was in one part of the city an iron "kheel" or pillar, said to have been left standing by the ancient "Pandoos" Tradition attached a sacred import to this pillar, and alleged it to be based upon a pedestal fixed in the regions of hell. As Bulwan Deo doubted the truth of the legend, the sceptic monarch determined to test the depth, and he caused the pillar to be violently shaken. A stream of blood immediately gushed up from the earth's centre, and the pillar from that time became loose or in their own language "dheli"

This was the original of the name of Delhi

Calcutta Englishman

Our Naval Brigade

We have as yet said little or nothing about the movements of our Naval Brigade up the country, being ourselves very much in the dark concerning them. But such information as we possess, we are happy to communicate to our Readers.

We have in fact two separate Brigades, one under CaptainCapt Peel, the other under CaptainCapt Sotheby: CaptainCapt Peel taking the greater portion of the "Shannon's" Crew, and raising a considerable addition from the merchant seamen, numbering in all about 500 men.

These ascending the river to Allahabad with several of their heavy guns, advanced afterwards to Cawnpore, where they rendered almost unprecedented service, and are now stationed at Futty ghur, ready to advance upon Lucknow from the N.W.

CaptainCapt Sotheby, shortly after, having landed his little crew from the "Pearl,' increased his numbers from other sources to about 250 men. These advanced up the river, we believe, as far as Chupra, and then took to the land: they have marched through Goruckpoor and Fyzabad, at each place encountering the enemy and rendering good service with their long guns: several companies of bra brave little Ghookas are attached to CaptainCapt Sotheby's division but our bluejackets have charge of the Artillery; they are now ready to advance upon Lucknow from the Eastward, and we may hope therefore, that under the walls of this stronghold, our brave comrades of the "Pearl" and "Shannon" may again meet in victory, and assist in crushing out the last sparks of the rebellion in India.

We have told our tale to the best of our knowledge, but if any of our readers possess or can procure more accurate information, we shall be deeply indebted to them for making it public in our

Sporting Intelligence Cricket

On Wednesday the 17th Inst. a match took place on the ground near the the Ochterbury monument between the Officers of H.M.S. "Chesapeake, and the Petty Officers, assisted by Messrs Mereweather, Budding, & Edwards of Pylades. Having received a good account of the game with the scoring made on this occasion, and this being the first time our club has done battle with other players, we feel bound to give it a place in our columns. view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 20 February 1858. The P.O.'s had the first lead, and here we must notice the free batting of Taylor, who made some capital hits till a "ripper" from Mr Brownrigg levelled his stirrups to the tune of 24 runs. Of the remainder only three managed to make scores, and amongst them, we may mention a good stroke for 5 of Reynolds. Owing to the excellent fielding of Mr. Shortt as Longstop, they only managed to score 2 Byes.

The officers now went in, but did not make as much play as was expected: Mr. McArthur's wicket being laid low by a "daisy clipper" from Bew at the very first ball. This, and the retiring of our Brownrigg (to whom all looked for a large score) soon after, by one of the same puzzlers, damped the spirits of the Gentlemen, but the good play of Mr. Theobald, who kept the field alive till he was caught out by Cooper: and of Mr Shortt, who was finally run out, gave them renewed ardour.

At the conclusion of the first innings which was a close struggle, both parties scored the same, and bets were now freely offered of 3 to 1 upon the Gentlemen.

The P.O's now went in again, and now Mr. Brownrigg shone forth in his true light as a first rate Bowler: their best man soon had his wicket rattled down, and in one over three batsmen took their places and as quickly retired to his well delivered balls which kept the umpire continually employed in repitching the wickets. The result was the P.O's second innings only amounted to 41 runs, making a total of 90.

Mr Brownrigg and Mr Shortt now took their places, and the play became remarkably good and lively, until Mr Shortt unfortunately delivered a ball back to the bowler, and was thus caught out.

Mr Wilkinson relieved him, and "fast and furious" was the game. Mr Brownrigg serving out 4s & 5s, & 3s to all parts of the field, Mr Wilkinson backing him up with steady play, and some first rate forward drives. These two remained in for upwards of an hour together, till at last a "disturber" from Bew rattled the bails off Mr Wilkinson's stumps, and came out with his flushing honours thick upon him.

Mr McArthur took his bat, but after adding 15 to the score, amongst which were two good hits for 5 and 4, was run out: Mr Theobald succeeded him, but what the others had apparently gained in play he appeared to have lost for Cooper soon gained an opening into his wicket. Mr Chute and Mr Moore quickly followed and Mr Oxley now took vis-a-vis to Mr Brownrigg, and played well and steadily, when darkness coming on the wickets were drawn, Mr Brownrigg carrying his bat out with a score of 102, and there being yet four wickets to go down.The following is the score.Officers v. Petty Officers "H.M.S. Chesapeake"

Petty Officers 1st Innings 2nd Innings W. Taylor (1) 24 b Brownrigg 1 b. Brownrigg D. Wells 0 b McArthur. runout 6 b. McArthur T. Dukes 6 b. Shortt 11 b. Brownrigg run out J. Bew 9 b. Shortt 5 b. Brownrigg T. Reynolds 8 b. Shortt 0 b. Brownrigg W. Taylor (2) 0 b. McArthur. run out 0 b. Brownrigg H. Cooper 0 b. Shortt 1 b. Brownrigg c Brown J. Harding 0 Not out 5 b McArthur St Brown. Mr. Edwards 0 b. Shortt c Shortt 3 not out Mr Mereweather 0 b. McArthur St. Brown 9 b. &c. Brownrigg Byes 2 Byes 0 Total 49 0
Officers 1st Innings 2nd Innings Brownrigg 6 b. Bew 102 not out McArthur 0 b. Bew 15 b Bew run out Wilkinson 4 b Bew 24 b. Bew Chute 0 b. Wells 10 b. Wells Theobald 16 b. Wells C. Cooper 0 b. Cooper Shortt 9 b. Wells run out 4 b. Wells c Wells Oxley 1 b. Wells 18 not out Stanley 2 Not out - Moore 1 b. Bew 8. b Wells c Edwards Budding 3 b Bew - Byes 6 Byes 24 No Balls 1 Total 49 205
"The Great Mo-gul"

This remarkable species of gull has lately been captured at Delhi where it has existed for several centuries It is the largest gull known, as well as the most destructive, and truculent. In fact those who have effected its capture deserve the gratitude of the world, as Hercules did for destroying the great Hydra. It is supposed that the species will soon be extinct. Its plumage is said to have been very gorgeous, but is now considerably tarnished

Several young gulls were caught in the same nest, but from their ferocity, were immediately destroyed. view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 20 February 1858

Naval and Military Intelligence On Monday the 15th Inst. H.M. Steam troop ship "Megoera" after being inspected by Commodore R.B. Watson C.B, sailed for Sydney. On Friday morning the small arm companies, field piece parties, and marines of the Squadron landed and performed a variety of evolutions, returning on board at 7:30 A.M. H.M.S. Shannon arrived at Garden Reach from Point De Galle on Thursday Evening and on Friday morning came up to Calcutta mooring ahead of the "Chesapeake." She brings the 6th Regiment of Infantry, consisting of 22 officers 580 non commissioned officers and Rank and file, and 22 women and 60 children. H.M.S. "Chesapeake" commenced provisioning on Friday. The launch laden with provisions, was returning to her on Friday evening when she got aground and notwithstanding the strenuous efforts of W. Worsley, remained firmly aground till the following morning at flood. Mr Shortt having volunteered to relieve Mr Worsley, remained in charge of her all night.
The "Calcutta Englishman" convicted of a Pun.

The Calcutta Englishman has actually been delivered of a pun. Hear it! Oh ye punsters of the earth, and say what shall be done to our poor shore going contemporary. Describing the Military Review on the Espalanade (Novr 24) "They halted" says the Englishman "near the Peepul tree, and People's tree it ought to be called for it was crowded with human denizens." And this vile pun has actually gone home to England. What shall we do to the man who punned it? Shall we enroll him at once among the Pundits of Hindoostan? or shall we condemn him to stand forever fanning us with the Punkah? or shall we consign him to eternal punishment, in the far distant regions of the Punjaab? Altho many would say "Gently with this pun," we cannot help writing pungently, and making a stir about a pun from such a punster.

Epitome On Monday night the annual Ball given by the Calcutta Cricket Club came off. It was numerously attended and passed off most satisfactorily. Our officers have been practising Cricket nearly every day of the past week as it was expected that they would be engaged to play the P. and Os but the latter declined to accept the challenge. On Thursday Evening next the Amateurs of the H.M.S. Chesapeake will perform at the Calcutta Lyric Theatre for the Benefit of the Indian Relief fund. The pieces named are "The Seven Clerks" and "Bombastes Furiosa" between which, nautical songs, hornpipes, &c, will vary the amusements. Tickets 5rs each. reserved seats.
[No Title]

"Paws for a reply" as the cat said when she scratched the dog for barking at her.

"There are more ways out of the woods than one," as the rum said when saw a spile coming through the cask.

Maxim for a Calcutta Storekeeper. "If you wish to go up in the world, stick well to your go-down.

Conundrums When does a baker most want materials for his trade? When does a good idea resemble the bone of a fowl. Supposing a number of bottles were broken by the fall of a tree, what ejaculation would they give vent to?
Rebus &c. The sheep & Ox, in concert met To try their voices reckoned The sheep she bleated forth my first The ox lowed out my second And as with bleating, lowing sound Their blending voices fluttered A Hindoo squire turned him round. For he heard his title uttered.
Unanswered from last week What is the slight difference between a tiger's foot and a semi-colon? The one shows its pause at the end of its clause, and the other its claws at the end of its paws. What beer ought dandies to drink? Spruce beer. When might a man married to a girl of a certain name be never dull, or melancholy? When he is animated (Annie-mated) When does an Insolent Debtor become a Navy man? When he is in or belonging to the Fleet.

Alphabetical Enigmas. To surpass, X.L. A Fowl P.N. Superfluity X.S. A Turkish magistrate K.D. To coop it up M.U. an English County S.X. A Foe N.M.E. An Image F.E.G. A Hollow place K.V.T. A Title of honour X.L.N.C. Ability F.E.K.C. Haste X.P.D.N.C.

The Young Idea

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions thankfully receivedSaturday 20 February, 1858.

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday February 27th 1858 No. 12

The Past Week has been extraordinarily productive of events of interest & amusement, and we feel bound to afford all the space we can for the same The Rajah's dinner, & marriage of his juvenile granddaughter, the Cricket match between our Club & the Squadron and our defeat; the success of our Amateurs in their performance on Thursday night; all afford a supply of intelligence upon the requisite space for which we are loath to encroach. A few days more and we shall look back upon Calcutta and all the pleasures it has afforded us, as a mem'ry of the past, & fresh scenes will meet us, and in turn give way to others. We shall almost regret the distance, which will soon be placed between us & Calcutta, for we are desirous to know of the operations at Lucknow, and it is most likely we shall not hear of the events which will take place in that quarter until some time after their occurrence. We earnestly hope that the blow may be struck speedily, & let us not forget, in our regret for our absence that it is certain to be "all for the best":- for our actions and movements are under the wise ordinance of One who knows more than we can, and who "disposes, when man proposes."

Dinner Party at Cossipore & Marriage of the Granddaughter of Rajah Behadoor

On Monday night the 22d Inst. of the Rajah Budderaunth Roy Behadoor celebrated the marriage of his Granddaughter, with a grand dinner party fireworks and a nautch. For the information of those of our readers who were unfortunately unable to go, we will attempt a slight description of the events of the evening, altho' we feel that our pen will fail to convey to the edea reader an adequate impression to that which was the result of witnessing it "in propria persona."

We left the ship rather late (about 7 PM the dinner being announced for 7:30) and on landing at Baboo's Ghant found to our dismay that no garrie was waiting for us, this caused some little consternation, but a consultation being held, we acted speedily upon its determination, & were quickly ensconced in palanqains on arriving at Wilson's Hotel, we managed to obtain a garrie & without further delay than we could help, set off for Cossipore. Our proved to be one of the best of his kind, keeping his cattle well up to the mark.

We passed through the dirty, dismal, native quarter, faintly lit by the flickering glare of oil lamps, with dusky, half clad forms flitting about in the misty, smoky atmosphere, which made our eyes smart and fill with tears. Here and there in the deep, gloomy, shade of the interior of an old and shaky building, could be seen a dark object bending over the earthenware pan, in which the evening meal was cooking, whilst the flare of the lambent flame as it shot up from under, would for an instant light up his dim countenance & the surrounding objects, and then as instantly subsiding would render the obscurity more intense than ever.

As we speeded along and left the suburbs of the city, emerging into more open country, the notes of warning our driver had been repeatedly uttering, gradually ceased, and we found ourselves passing extensive gardens, with an occa view page image(s) The Young Idea" Saturday 27thFebruary 1858. sional hut here, & there. At last we arrived at a place where four roads met, & most likely would have proceeded straight on, had not a figure which stood in the road acquainted our driver that his proper course was the turning to the right.

Shortly after a blaze of light on our left hand told us that we were approaching our goal, a few minutes more and we entered the Rajah's garden. We were quite surprized at the number of lamps, and the brilliancy of the illuminations, it was a transition from night to day: altho we consider that the effect would have been more perfect had the lamps been variegated. On our left was a large tank, surrounded by railings, on which lamps were hung, close together, we are perfectly unable to judge of the probable number in this spot alone, for the tank was one of the largest we have seen, & the lights almost touched on another: the reflection in the still water, greatly enhanced the effect, especially that caused by a large building on the opposite side, which was in one perfect blaze, & of which we shall speak more fully anon.

The strains of a band met our ears as we rattled down to the garden house, where upon emerging from our trap, we found the dinner was proceeding. We entered and soon procured seats, which were apparently the only empty ones, for we noticed some after arrivals who were unable to obtain even a corner of the table. The dinner was in every respect perfect. having been placed under the sole arrangement of Messrs Wilson & CompanyCo of Auckland Hotel, we regretted much not having arrived in time to witness the appearance of the table previous to the attack, but as it was (fish having been just removed) it looked remarkably well and the taste displayed in the several minutiae which characterize a well laid table, spoke well for the capacity of the hands to whose care the management was entrusted. The room itself was gaily decorated with banners & flags of England, France and Turkey, and was well lighted by chandeliers, and Moderator lamps. The many uniforms, of which red decidedly preponderated, & the glittering of the naval epaulettes, varied with the sober black of the civilians, greatly enhanced the brilliancy of the table.

Having appeased our appetite and slaked our thirst with first rate champagne & hearing sounds of native music & singing in an adjoining room, we quitted the table and adjourned to the apartment whence the sounds proceeded. On our way thither we stopped to examine several swords & spears, daggers & c of real Damascus steel and beautifully worked, the hilts & crosspieces, inlaid with gold and precious stones of all kinds. We also saw a magnificent diamond in a glass case, said to be worth £180.000. Of furniture we cannot speak as the rooms are all furnished in Eastern style, & consequently there is no display of tables, and chairs, couches, settees, &c, &c, which we see in our commonest drawing rooms in England. One small table & that of marble, supported a tray with betel nut and a jug of water for the benefit of the native guests, & carpets, spread upon a platform in a room through which we passed, were appropriated to their use.

On entering the room from which the nautch music had proceeded, we found that we were just too late, as we caught a stern view of the musicians, as they passed out of the door opposite to that we entered by. The interior presented a very gay appearance, for here we saw the various garbs and picturesque dresses of the native visitors, who were seated on a cushioned seat which went all round the room. Some were arrayed most magnificently in shawls woven with gold, velvet embroiderd with gold, in fact all the garments were heavy and thick with gold. The Rajah himself wore round his neck a diamond necklace valued at £200,000 and almost all wore heavy massive gold chains.

The sharp whiz of a rocket announced to us that the fireworks were commencing. We immediately allied forth and found ourselves in front of the tank, which was reflecting on its placid surface the last falling stars of the first rocket: carriages, & horses, were near and around us, and as a blaze of light suddenly illuminated the whole scene before us, the poor frightened animals snorted & started with terror, & required the utmost efforts of the drivers to keep them from fairly bolting away. Our first care was to get out of the way of anything like a horse, and then we turned to view the magnificent spectacle before us. In front & around us on every side, bright masses of flame, shot up in the air, dense masses of smoke curled heavily upwards, thro' which flights of rockets shot with their hissing roar and blue fireballs formed their graceful curves.

On our right a large piece of firework was set fire to, from its original appearance we supposed that it was intended to pourtray the burning of a house, but as it quickly went into an entire flame, it only represented a burst of flame lighting up the visages of those around us with a pale unearthly glare, and by the strong but fitful illumination which it cast on the projecting points of the building, throwing the recesses into gloomier shadow. In various parts of the gardens, fresh gleams of light shot up & rockets filled the air with their fiery balls, threatening to cause some damage by their falling sticks, which very often descended amongst the crowd.

The brilliant scene was rendered doubly impressive by the reflecting of water & the dense volume of smoke which hung like a canopy over the whole gardens. The display which formed the finale, was erected on the opposite bank of the tank, to that on which we stood and when first lighted represented a square body of white fire and an arch. As the fire decreased, a blue flickering flame made its appearance, and gradually increased in strength until at last in the square, we read the sentence, "God save the Queen, and the Young couple every Happiness," and the arch shone forth as an arbour over which the blue flame played in a wavy, flickering light. This was immediately hailed with three hearty cheers from the Officers & Englishmen present, and the company then strolled about enjoying in many cases the luxury of . We followed the example and then returned to the building to witness the nautch, which was about to recommence.

After a short time the performers entered. They consisted of a girl, dressed in a dark brown gauze dress, and scarf trimmed & embroidered profusely with gold, and particoloured trousers, made very full so as to hide the feet. Her headdress consisted of a frontlet, hanging over the forehead with side pieces and a backpiece, all of gold or imitation and studded with various coloured stones. Her hands were adorned with rings & from one on each finger a chain communicated with a circular view page image(s) The Young Idea" Saturday 27thFebruary 1858. plate of gold, as also from the bracelets, the back of the hand being thus covered with gold. Her personal appearance was not in the least attractive in fact she looked most remarkably like a monkey dressed up Four musicians accompanied her in her song, which was perfectly unintelligible, altho' good taste was exhibited in the instrumental sound being commanded by the vocal of the musicians two played upon a species of violin supported in a linen band which went round the waist, the bow being handled in much the same manner as a bass viol player would hold it Another had two little brass cymbals about the size of the palm of the hand, which he manipulated with extreme dexterity, and under his able guidance they emitted a pleasant jingling sound. The fourth played on two small drums of curious shape & make suspended round his waist in a linen cloth, and which were played by the action of the fingers & palms of the hand. The costumes of the men were nothing out of the common native dress excepting the nether garments of the "drummer" as we call him, and we heard them very much admired, not only for their pattern, "a pink check":-but for the cut & fit, which would have gained the envy and admiration of all Regent Street, had they been there displayed.

The dancing consisted of an advancing & retrograde movement, accompanied with a waving motion of the hands the arms being held in would-be graceful positions over the head, & the feet being occasionally brought together so as to make the anclets strike & jingle. Altogether nothing absurd and vapid ever met our gaze, novelty was its only charm, and we left the room to visit the marriage presents & the celebration of the marriage ceremony.

We bent our steps towards the building we have mentioned as attracting our attention from its blaze of light, when we entered. Here we found all the presents arranged for exhibition, amongst which we noticed cup, and trays of solid silver, two handsome enamelled serpent-bracelets studded with diamonds and amethysts, with large rubies in the heads, a necklace of pearls, with emeralds at equidistances: several handsome cachmere shawls, gold rings, linen pieces silver worked vases, and a bedstead of solid sliver, with rose coloured mosquito curtains and a coverlet of Persian workmanship. Wreaths of white flowers were heaped up in a silver bowl, and on a large plate of the same metal small bouquets of flowers were arranged.

Close by under a canopy supported by poles of solid silver, sat the bridegroom robed in a splendid shawl, and surrounded by priests in front of him, sat a nautch girl, with her attendant musicians, keeping up a neverending song in Persian and now, we were informed that the ceremony would commence shortly, so we determined to wait and not miss it. Smoking was not considered offensive, so we whiled away the time, scanning & enquiring into the various novelties surrounding us, which excited our curiosity, and which would require the space of a volume to enumerate. The bridegroom appeared to be about 15 years of age and if we might judge by his countenance did not seem to entertain a high notion of the felicity of his situation.

We had not long to wait before a change took place. The Bridegroom rose from his luxurious seat and the priests arrayed him in snow white linen garments; he now took his station upon a square piece of sandalwood, painted and ornamented in a pretty device, and squatted down in Hindoo fashion upon his haunches: a very strange looking white turban was not placed on his head and in front of this was fastened a high frontlet, made of worked silver wire (and presenting in a front view, the appearance of a parish beadle's cocked hat), with two enormous tassels depending from each end.

He sat, or rather squatted in this position for about half an hour, when the priests again disrobed him and redressed him in red silk leaving the right shoulder & arm bare, again he squatted down, & the large fronlet was removed, & a smaller but similar headdress took its place & the two bracelets I have mentioned before were clasped on his wrists. He now bared his right knee, and his father who was seated on his right hand between two priests, extended his right hand & placed the two forefingers & thumb on his son's knee; at first we were under the impression that he was testing him by introducing some pointed instrument, but as he remained in this position for about ten minutes, we were unable to determine what the intention was. The presents were then shown to him the shawls, rings &c being passed round so his father who held them before him.

Shortly after this ceremony the priests, bridegroom & his father rose, and being once more enveloped in the ample folds of the cachmere shawl, he was led away with torchbearers in front, to visit, (as we were informed) the family, & to be introduced for the first time to the bride. During his absence we were decorated with bouquets & wreaths of a sweet smelling white flower, & presented a very gay appearance with our caps and breasts thus adorned.

About 20 min. elapsed when the bridegroom reappeared and took his station as before on the square of sandalwood, a similar one was placed opposite to him the bride appeared and squatted down upon it; a voice in the crowd immediately called for "Three Cheers for the Bride" which were heartily given. Poor little thing!!! She had arrived at the mature age of 9 and was already to become a wife. She was dressed in red silk similar to her husband, and a ring through her nose. Think of this! Oh! ye' fair brides of England, but let me inform you that this is a religious custom, & was not placed there for her future husband to make use of to "lead her by the nose".

The fingers of her right hand were now entwined with his, and a wreath of flowers bound round them, the holy water of the Ganges was next poured over the joined hands. A gold ring was then placed in the father's hand, who held it in the vessel containing the holy water, and repeated a long unintelligible rigmarole after the priest, after which it was placed on the two joined hands of the young couple & holy water sprinkled over it, Incense was then burnt, the hands separated and the ceremony completed.

The happy (?) pair were led off by torchlight. For ourselves, we made it our study to find our garrie and having succeeded after some little trouble, we were speedily borne from this novel and interesting scene, and returned on board heartily pleased with our excursion.

Sporting Intelligence Cricket Match between the Chesapeake & Squadron

On Thursday afternoon a Cricket Match took place between the "Chesapeake" eleven, and the Squadron eleven, which resulted we are sorry to say in the defeat of the former. The wickets were pitched at 2 P.M. on the ground near the Ochterbury monument, the squadron eleven going into the wickets first. The play was remarkably good, but we consider that the high score made by Mr. Hope was the cause of the Squadron proving the winners. We must give due credit to them, they played beautifully, and owing to their good fielding, the Chesapeake's were sadly cut up for runs.

The Chesapeake's batted much better view page image(s) The Young Idea Saturday 27thFebruary 1858. than they fielded, indeed, it was a strange fact, that those from whom little was expected, played well and steadily, and did much to the augmentation of the score. They were greatly dispirited at the early overthrow of their best man Mr Brownrigg, who striking at a ball which was pitched high over his head, tipped the ball right into the hands of mid-wicket.

The Chesapeake's were very anxious to finish the game (only one innings having been played) by a second innings on the following day, but the squadron, anxious perhaps to retain the victory, appeared unwilling & finally stated that circumstances would prevent them from playing, and they also declined playing this afternoon, much to the Chesapeake's regret.

Squadron Eleven Mr. Mereweather 0 b Brownrigg c Brownrigg " Howes 6 b McArthur Leg before Wicket " Rockfort 0 b Brownrigg " Moore 13 b McArthur " Jefferies 3 b Brownrigg run out " Hope 50 b McArthur c Stanley " Boys 9 b Shortt Slump McArthur " Garlick 0 not out " Jordan 8 b Chute Leg before Wick " Limbert 4 b McArthur. run out " Plow 2 b Brownrigg Wides 4 Byes 14 Total __________ 113.
Chesapeake Eleven Mr. Brownrigg 13 b Plow. c Garlick " Shortt 7 c Limbert b Moore " Wilkinson 2 b. Plow " Chute 4 b Moore " McArthur 16 b Plow " Moore 7 b Moore c Limbert " Kennicott 10 not out " Theobald 1 b Limbert c Moore " Oxley 5 b Moore " Farquhar 0 b Now " Stanley 5 b Moore. run out. Wides 2 Byes 2 __________ 75
The Theatre

On Thursday evening the Amateurs of HMS Chesapeake performed for the first time at the Calcutta Lyric Theatre. The Drama performed was The Seven Clerks" or the Thief & the Denouncer.

We cannot speak too highly of the creditable manner in which the performers acted, although a shore going paper has been pleased to insult them, and to cast a baneful shadow over their efforts to please. We only regret that such a splenetic effusion should have ever been permitted to appear in print; the more especially as we consider that jealousy, that greeneyed monster: was the cause of the unwarrantable attack upon the labours of our men.

The purely acrimonious composition and illiberal manner in which the several "dramatis personae" are pulled to pieces could not have proceeded from any other source, than that of envy and vexation at the successful result of the entertainment, which the writer who is doubtless a member of the Calcutta Amateur Performers, never before witnessed, when himself and fellow players have acted.

But we can afford to take no more notice of him.

The Drama was ably supported by the various characters, Geo Horner as the Miser, Claude Darnaud was perfect, and Hy Underhill as Simon Siggel, in the hunger which he so well portrayed, produced a sympathetic feeling, which we were under the necessity of allaying directly the theatre closed. We unfortunately cannot spare the space to bring all of the actors to notice, but it will be enough to say that they gave general satisfaction with the exception of our rancorous friend.

The conclusion, the laughable burlesque tragic opera Bombastes Furioso, was ably sustained and to Henry Underhill as General Bombastes, we must here give the palm for the inimitable manner in which he carried out his part.

The band of the Chesapeake attended and contributed largely to the entertainment, a prologue written expressly for the occasion by one of the performers was highly thought of and a hornpipe by Thomas Walsh was enthusiastically encored.

We were very glad to see the front circles so well filled, the ladies appearing to enjoy the novel scene, especially, and we may say that the whole passed off most satisfactorily.

Naval Intelligence H.M. Gunboat Roebuck arrived on Wednesday afternoon bringing Commander G. H. Parkin to join the "Chesapeake." H.M.S. Chesapeake is to sail on Monday for Madras, whither she will convey Viscountess Canning. The Hon. Mrs Stuart, the Hon CaptainCapt Stanley, & Attendants.

"Can I offer you any aid"? said a polite gentleman to a lady who was overcome by the heat, "O! yes, Sir, if you please," replied the fainting beauty "a little lemon-ade."

Conundrums When the cook lets the salad fall into the fireplace, what great saracen hero, would you be reminded of? When is a noise like a troublesome creditor?
Answer to Conundrums Supposing a number of bottles were broken by the fall of a tree, what ejaculation would they give vent to?0 Bottles broken by the falling tree (Good fates attend us)If you could speak, I think your cry would be. Tree, mend us!! (Tremendous)
Conundrums When does a baker most want materials for his trade? When he kneads (needs) his dough. When does a good idea resemble a bone of a fowl? When its a merry thought.
The Young Idea

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street"Chesapeake" every Saturday.contributions solicitedSaturday 27 February, 1858.

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday March 6th 1858 No. 13

Once more we thread our pathless track across the waters of the Bay of Bengal; once more our gallant craft obeys the impulse of her wondrous motive power. Once more the fresh sea breezes fan our heated brows, and we feel their invigorating influence; again in the quiet routine of a sea life we can sit down to peruse our latest intelligence from home, to dream over the past, to form conjectures on the future; again we partake of the pleasures of quiescence, after the excitement attendant upon our stay at Calcutta.

We can now look back and ponder upon all we have seen and done, fixing the past scenes and events firm ly in our memories, in that handy memorandum-book, whence in future days we may glean pleasure to ourselves and others by drawing forth from the hidden stores, with which it is enriched: many any interesting account of the "City of Palaces" and other places we have visited, and yet may visit.

In our present trip we are happily not Entirely debarred from the generous influence, which is ever cast over man by the presence and society of the "fair sex", and even the knowledge that we are conveying to Madras, the Viscountess Canning and Honble Mrs Stuart, deprives us of the general laxity which cha view page image(s) The Young Idea" Saturday 6thMarch 1858. racterizes us at sea, and causes us to pay more regard to the higher essentials of good breeding, casting aside the ordinary roughness which we assume as soon as the anchor is weighed.

We hope that a speedy passage may be our fortune, and that it may be our lot to drop anchor once more in the quiet, peaceful harbour of Trincomalee, there to enjoy the many pleasures which this little spot affords.

To the Editor of "The Young Idea" Dear Sir.

Accept the congratulations of a friend on the completion of your 12th number and the inauguration of your 13th.

The "Young Idea" has now passed triumphant thro' those various dangers to which infancy is subject:- it is in its "teens", and its growing strength and vigour may give good hope that it is not intended to come to an early end.

Breathing manly and generous sentiments, enriched with an undercurrent of quiet humour, free from all those personalities, which at first were dreaded, faithfully recording the thoughts and actions of those on board the "Chesapeake"

"The Young Idea" is now established amongst us as a welcome weekly visitor, and as such I trust it may appear before us each Saturday, and only cease its visits with the return of our floating home to England, and the separation, and dispersion of the "Chesapeakes"

Believe me Dear Sir Yours Truly "Shipmate" Chesapeake 4 March 1858.

Ed. We feel highly flattered, and can only say that our success is our reward.

The Chesapeake Brigade To the Editor of the "Young Idea"Dear Sir

Much disappointment has been caused by your passing over with so slight a mention, what we have considered one of the principal events in our nautical existence; namely the landing of our Bluejackets, and Marines on the morning of the 19th February, for exercise on the Calcutta Esplanade. All performed their part so well, all returned to the ship so pleased at their own performance, that I hope, Mr. Editor you will not consider me too obtrusive if I beg for a little longer notice. Everybody knows that the soul of an Editor is everywhere present and that he sees everything and that nothing can escape his keep observation

I will not stop to comment on the glass of medicinal liquid which was served out to us on deck before we started, and which I think they called Quinine Wine, and will only suggest to the Doctor that most of us thought a little drop of Rum (neat) would have comforted our inner man much more to our satisfaction. view page image(s) "The Young Idea" Saturday 6thMarch 1858.

Our boats were quickly manned, and no time was lost in reaching the shore, and scrambling up the river's bank. It was but just daylight when we were drawn up in order, and commenced our march along the river side. Our pioneers led the way armed with crowbars, and shovels, under the guidance of two Engineers, and showed that they would be as serviceable in the trenches as in the stoke hole: then came our lively band, which made us step out like men, next the company of Marines (Artillery and Light Infantry), then the Bluejackets in their several Divisions:-like men, I say for however we may admire the mechanical march of drilled soldiers, I hope Bluejackets will always have the free use of their arms and legs.

When we arrived on the field of action, our Artillery Companies separated and marched to Fort William to bring out their Field pieces, while we remained exercising in the field: it would weary your readers, Mr. Editor to describe the whole course of our proceedings, how we prepared to resist cavalry, formed into square &c-&c:- suffice it to say that great satisfaction was caused to ourselves, and great wonderment to the native niggers, and we only wished that a few hundred Sepoys were there to practice upon in real earnest. As for the Marine Light Infantry they went right away all over the field and I did not wonder at their having a jolly good run - skirmishing they called it - after being so long penned up on board ship.

The "bang, bang", of our field pieces, now drew the attention of all Calcutta upon us, and the fashionable ladies and gentlemen who were out riding, came flocking round us to see so novel a spectacle. The artillery did as beautifully as all the rest of us, and even the small guns worked by small boys, made a very considerable noise on this eventful occasion. But everything must have an end, Mr Editor, so had our field practice, & so also must my letter. See us again drawn up in the line of march, again the lively strains of the "Cheasapeake's" band float over the Calcutta Esplanade, & crowds of Hindoo niggers flock round to see the Regiment of British Tars returning to their "Wooden Walls"

It would be unjust not to mention how these wooden walls were guarded in our absence, and how gallantly the Idlers on board prepared to repel boarders in case of invasion:- Those who saw the ship's tailor, doing sentry's duty, with his shears laid aside, and his cutlass girded round him, saw what is not seen every day in Her Majesty's Service.

Believe me, Dear Sir, Yours Respectfully Bluejacket Chesapeake 5 March/58
The Chesapeake Amateurs

There is nothing spoken, done, written or effected in this world, but the ever ready view page image(s) The Young Idea" Saturday 6 March 1858. tongue of criticism is prepared to weaken or destroy its effect. We certainly expected that our Amateurs would not come off scatheless, but we were totally unprepared for such an egregious attack as has been made upon them in the Bengal Hurkaru. It was with mingled feelings of astonishment, anger, and amusement we perused the inconsiderate critique upon their endeavours. The whole when carefully weighed forms a "tout ensemble" of the most ridiculous character, and we therefore advise all those who read it to take it in that light, basing their opinions, not merely upon a sentence extracted here and there but upon the general sentiment it contains. It opens with a personal cut at Mr. Van Gelder, thereby evincing that a wish to bring him before the public as a laughing stock, was a prominent feature in the desire to ridicule, which animated the narrow mind, which presumed to judge of our Amateurs performance. The writer then proceeds to state that "he trembled for the fate of those of Neptune's Hardy Sons"—for why? because "the beauty and fashion of Calcutta were present," most likely he imagined the "hardy sons of Neptune" could never stand a battery of bright eyes, however brave when confronting a battery of heavy guns. But we cannot afford space to pull him to pieces in the manner he deserves, but we must notice one thing. The word "Ditchers." such is the very euphonious appellation which the Histrionic Critic of the Hurkaru claims for himself and his copeers of Calcutta. We will not now enquire into the origin of the name, but simply observe that such being the title of our assailant, we need not feel surprised to find him such an adept in the art of "flinging mud." We close this article by publishing the Prologue which was read and written expressly for the occasion.

Prologue Friends, Patrons of the "Thespian" art; I stand, as spokesman for our little stage struck band; I come kind friends, respectfully to pray Indulgent smiles for this our little play Think not that we aspire to win a "Name" 5 In the high path of Histrionic fame: Or that misled by fierce dramatic rage, We hope like "Lear" to strut upon the stage: No 'tis the aim of our most humble Muse To please our patrons, and ourselves amuse,  10 Just this, no more, as Amateurs we come Let this avowal strike the critics dumb. Tonight, then, if our humble skill avails We represent a legent of "Marseilles" "Bombastes," next with love and fame elate, 15 Shall claim your laughter and your mirth create: Joy, pathos, fun, e'en murder's sanguine strain Mingle and follow in our motley train Thus at the "Clerk's" sad fate, droops pity's eye, Yet "Simon's suppers, funds of mirth supply, 20 With horror "Darnaud's vices now regard And yield to Adolpho's love its due reward Then comes "Bombastes" may he please you all And may you laugh until the curtain fall Well, then, my friends, scare not our sailor's muse 25 Nor to our first trial, applause refuse, So shall our tread each moment firmer grow And the dramatic fire more warmly glow. Encourage this our unfledg'd wings first flight We'll strive and please you more another night, 30 With grateful pride, I cast around my gaze And see a host of English beauty blaze Soft beaming eyes, sweet lips, in smiles arrayed Which might have well Herculean toils repaid Their praise we covet, may we win the meed 35 Our labor's light, the guerdon great indeed But hark! (Bell rings) our little troop impatient rage, Anxious to strut their hour upon the stage. And now my friends with Avon's Bard, I pray Gently you'll judge, kindly you'll hear our play. 40

As Montagu was the composer of this really creditable piece. We are glad to say that the other Calcutta Journals, gave a very good account of the performance.

Naval Intelligence 1st March H.M.S. Chesapeake unmoored this morning & proceeded down the Hooghly. She came to anchor at 3. 2d Weighed at 12.10 and proceeded, anchoring at half past 4. On letting go the Port Anchor when the strain came on the cable it parted close to the bitts. Let go starboard anchor. 3d Weighed at 10.30 and proceeded, anchored at 4.30 off Kedgeree. 4th Weighed at 9.20 a.m. and anchored at 12.30 p.m. The Steamer Canning arrived from Calcutta, and anchored alongside about 3 bringing down Viscountess Canning, the Honble Mr rs Stuart and attendants. The Commodore went for her ladyship in his barge, and was received on her coming on board, with a guard of Marines, the band, & the officers in undress. 5th Weighed this morning at 11. Lady Canning & retinue on board for Madras. The Chinese mail was boarded and by it Commodore Watson received despatches from Adm l Seymour. Mr Brownrigg received official intimation of his promotion to Lieutenant, & leaves the Gun Room Mess, much to their regret.
Facetiae

A human specimen of the Vegetable Kingdom. A man with carrotty locks, reddish cheeks, a turn up nose, and a sage expression of countenance. When we add a mouth enclosed by two lips (tulips) we think we have described a decided link between the animal and vegetable kingdom. A friend enquires whether, when the unfortunate "Ava" was launched, the scene presented was an "Avalanche" A correspondent has sent us the following Riddle. What country in Africa is like fresh brewed malt liquour? Answer Nubia (New Beer) Really after this we must exclaim "What next?"

Epitome The Ava P.&O Co.'s steam packet has been totally wrecked near Trincomalee with 25 lakhs of rupees & the mails on board. The Leviathan is afloat. CaptainCapt Peel has been rewarded with a K.C.B. H.M.S. Pylades goes shortly to Suez
Rebus My first, what is my first? a counterfeit, my second, rears its dangerous rugged head, When the rude blast the heaving waters lash Their crested tops, All foam & busy spray Till safely past the fresh'ning gales to we go 5 My whole oh! Emerald Isle how dear to thee Emblem of Hearts, so light so blithe, so gay a trick its every sound proclaims a cheat From the blue ocean's broad expansive bed The Jurors billow o'er its surface deck Till the poor sailors heart with firm dismay And far astern is left the howling surge 5 St Patrick's day on many a breast shall see Edgland is proud, to hold thee in her sway
Illustrated Enigmas Conundrums
"K" and drawing of bell with the caption "a very valuable article in a ship" "K" and drawing of bell with the caption "a very valuable article in a ship"
"IC" with a strike across it with the caption "an order of architecture" "IC" with a strike across it with the caption "an order of architecture"
"O." and "ical." with the caption "appertaining to sailors. "O." and "ical." with the caption "appertaining to sailors.
Answers to 22 & 23 not received Saladin the Great When its a dun
The Young Idea

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions solicitedSaturday 27 February, 1858.

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday March 13th 1858 No 14

The question has often been asked "What caused the Mutiny in India? and is yet often asked. This query has been the subject of much dissertation, and various have been the replies given; still, we fancy public opinion has not received a satisfactory answer. The most universal response (and this we consider to be partially caused by some of the mutineers stating that such had been the incentive) has been, the sepoys fancied their religion was threatened, and that they entertained fears of our intentions to convert them. A very plausible story, certainly, but yet, it does not, to our thinking, bring such force, as that with which we were lately made acquainted.

We had the pleasure some days ago, of conversing with two officers, who had belonged to Native Regiments, which were the first to mutiny. In the course of conversation, which concerned the Rebellion, we asked, "what they considered to have been the principal cause?" They both, Simultaneously answered, "a want of proper and efficient discipline."

We asked how that could be, as we have always imagined our Indian Forces to have been as well disciplined as English Regiments. The answer was, that they had been for years in a deplorable state, that commanding officers of Regiments, had little or no authority to punish, and that punishments awarded by courts martial, were even set aside, and reprieved by the appeal of the culprit. As an instance, we were informed, that about six months prior to the outbreak, a young English Officer was despatched on detached tudy in command of 200 men, and a native officer view page image(s)When they reached the station they were ordered to occupy, the two companies were told off for their respective barracks, which were built in two parallel rows, each row capable of containing 100 men, and each company was ordered to occupy one. At the order "To your lines, march." both companies made a simultaneous rush, at one of these barracks and began fighting for its occupancy; the bone of contention being its supposed superiority to the other. The Young Officer called his subordinate the native, & [and on and on--ultimately, the British officer had his subordinate and two of the instigators arrested, but those arrested wrote an appeal and were released. The officers telling the story suggest that these men were the first to mutiny and the writer of the piece explains "Can we wonder at the mutiny, when we are made aware of facts like these?"]

Dreadful Suicide

[details given about the way the man, Richard Kendall A.B, was found and remarks on the fact that "the unhappy man had always been one of the dirtiest men in the ship, and on that account was always in trouble." Perhaps the ship's logs or musters will have something about what punishment for "dirtiness" looks like]

Calcutta in consternation

[a letter to the editor about the threat of violence erupting in Calcutta: "the report flew thro' Calcutta that the Barrackpore Sepoys, were in full march upon the town, that they were to find arms at the house of a certain Nawab, on the road, that the jail prisoners were to be let loose, the mob of Calcutta to rise, and join them, the Christian inhabitants slaughtered, and their house given to pillage" the report goes on to explain that "the Nawabs arms turned out to be two rusty muskets"]

Madras

[notes about the experiences of Madras, beginning with the boat, rowed by singing men. Then the Clarendon Hotel, and an Indian juggler (who also converted a snakeskin into a cobra), bazaars "broader and cleaner" than Calcutta, "natives are marked deeper and plainer than those in Calcutta" passed a Hindoo burial ground, where a body was consumed by flames view page image(s)

The Pearl's Brigade

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FacetiÆ

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Conundrums

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday March 20th 1858 No 15

[Princess Victoria Adelaide and prince Frederick getting married]

An Intruder

[letter from the ship's cats with response from the editor]

Funeral of the Queen of Oude.

[thoughts on the death of a Hindu monarch]

The "Ava" Wreck

[long article about providing assistance to the Ava] view page image(s)

A sketch from H.M.S. "Chesapeake"

[an account of the arrival of items recovered from the Ava]

Naval Intelligence

[typical things for this section]

Facetiae

[typical things for this section]

Conundrums

[typical things for this section]

Rebus

[typical things for this section]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday March 27th 1858 No 16

[detailed account of attempts to recover treasure from the Ava, and especially the purchase of a new diving suit from Madras that, upon first use, proved "fatal to one of our best men." Sent off some of the Ava with a P and O ship, Bentinck and got news and letters from home]

The "Ava"'s Encampment

[description of the officers of the Ava, who were staying on shore in white tents. Many little details shared, including the fact that there were "Mahometan divers, who thought they would never succeed unless they had a white flag flying.

Diving Operations at the Wreck of the "Ava"

[a day-by-day accounting of operations at the Ava, with details about items brought up and the events surrounding the death of Jn Withers, Captain of the afterguard] view page image(s)

Our First Funeral on the Shore

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Naval Intelligence

many details, including notice that the Chesapeake will sail for Trincomalee and leave behind the pinnace and diving party

Epitome

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FACETIAE

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Conundrums

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal April 3rd 1858 No 17

Comments on leaving the wreck and heading to Trincomalee, where things will be peaceful. "For ourselves, we have little to trouble us in the quietness and repose which we have hitherto found in this harbour: separated as we are from other ships, our duties are not such as to detain us from enjoying the pleasures which are boutifully spread around us, and we hope to be able to record in our Journal, many an amusing or instructive incident, many a picnic, watering or shooting party; view page image(s)[etc.]"

The Penal Colonyin the Andaman Islands

[Extracts from a "Scinde paper" explaining how some 300 rebels are being transported. The tone is sarcastic and jubilant about their departure--I quote just a bit:] "The Indian government has been extremely liberal to the rascally mutineers. The steamer "Semiramis" has been sent down to the Andamans, with provisions, and clothing, agricultural implements, & _ & sufficient to last two years, as also materials for making huts. She is to remain there to guard the miscreants as also to protect them from the assaults of the natives. The men on their arrival, will have their fetters struck off, and be partially armed, so as to be a match for the Cannibals and their poisoned arrows

Sporting on Pigeon Island

[a report of landing, finding tons of pigeons, killing some, and then also catching some fish. Also includes report of one in the party who shot a bird that dropped into the sea, but was captured by a shark before he could get to it] view page image(s)

Mining Intelligence from our own Commissioner

[I think this is just meant to be punny] view page image(s)

Diving Operations at the Wreckof the "Ava"

[reports of things being brought up]

Naval Intelligence

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Epitome

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FACETIAE

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Riddles &c.

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday April 10th 1858 No 18

Here we are again:--Trincomalee Harbour once more resounds to the heavy splash of our ponderous anchor, as it drops from our bows, and finds its resting place at the bottom, where it firmly grasps with its strong arms, aught that will give it a good hold. Now we are moored alongside the Dock yard, and look around us and think a little

Three months have passed with rapid flight, since we parted, with some little regret, from this happy place; since when, we have also seen some changes. But Trincomalee is not changed, every object around us bears the same stamp of peaceful security and cool repose. The dark umbrageous hollows in the thickly wooded islands, showing where some little bay is formed, in which the clear water, ripples musically among stones and rocks, mingling with the echoing notes of some water bird, as it wings its way from rock to rock in pursuit of food; or the quiet plash of a fish, which disturbs for a moment the surface of the water, with his leap after a dainty fly; view page image(s)the bright waves which dance merrily along as the cool refreshing sea breeze sweeps up the bay; the Commodore's house embowered among trees, the tree clad hill above us, overhanging the white buildings of the dockyard, and surmounted with the solid walls of the fort; all are the same look the same, and are felt as the same.

We draw comparisons between, the muddy stream, the crowded anchorage, the dusty roads, the commercial bustle, and compact buildings of Calcutta, with the charms of Trincomalee, and we feel how delightful is the change.

Here we would willingly rest ourselves for some time, but we understand that our days are numbered for this visit, and that we shall shortly convey the treasure recovered from the wreck of the "Ava" to Calcutta; and may not visit Trincomalee again for some time

Coming into Trincomalee

The remnant of the Ava's wreck, the huts of her officers, and of our own comrades whom we have left on shore the rocks that rise in various spots near the shore, are fast lost sight of as we steam towards Trincomalee.

Pigeon Island itself, on which our eyes have so long rested, recedes from our view, as we come in sight of the Rocky eminence and flagstaff of Fort Frederick. The shore behind it is low, with a deep fringe of palms and cocoa huts along the sandy beach and low, round, treeclad hills, behind them. But the Rock itself stands out bold and rugged, advancing, isolated, into the sea, reddish in hue, with only scanty bushes springing from among the crevices, the signal staff rising high on the summit, with two or three guns, and some low buildings beside it, which we believe to be the Soldier's Hospital

As we round the Rock, we see more buildings belonging to the Fort, and more protecting guns; While the Village of Trincomalee, standing amidst palm trees on the level plain rapidly came into sight; it is a pretty picture.

We see obelisks rising among the bushes at the Cemetery, various colonnaded houses, partly concealed view page image(s)by trees, humbler dwellings of the natives, overshadowed by palm trees; a few dark figures, crossing the common that intervenes between the village & the sea. Then a rough rocky promontory meets our view, with small rounded hills, clothed with wild trees and bushes down to the waters' edge. We wind our way round it, and see a harbour opening before us with smooth water receding in various directions among the green, bush covered hills. There is a rough eminence to our right with a small fort on the summit, and a low rocky point jutting out beneath, armed wtih two or three guns. Still we wind round it; we lose sight of the open sea, and the water seems everywhere landlocked, in ever direction there are the low, rocky, but bushy hills, with the bright blue water running into the various windings & inlets, which seem to be interminable.

We have so wound our way in that we are now at the very back of Fort Frederick, and we see its flagstaff in the distance rising right ahead of us, we are abreast of the little Dock Yard, and here for a time we are made fast to the shore, to coal, and our ship rests in perfect stillness.

A trip to Sober Island

We shoved off from the ship about 4 P.M. in the gig with as good a crew as we could possibly have desired, Men who had evidently made up their minds to a good pull, and to enjoy themselves, and whose merry laughter gave evidence to the universal good humour which prevailed amongst all; in fact a merrier, and (we must say) a noisier crew, we have rarely met with. Under the influence of a long stroke the boat shot rapidly along, our men pulled capitally, when as the island was neared, they evinced a decided determination to admire the scenery which delighted the eye on every side, instead of rowing, and they required some stirring up from those who performed the more pleasant task of steering, to give way the required distance, but as the landing place broke upon their sight a hearty cheer escaped from their lips and they plied their oars so vigorously that we began to entertain fears that the oars would be broken. However we got safely to land, and having made fast the boat, view page image(s) and coming back]

Our Naval Brigades.

[reports on the Shannon assisting at Lucknow and a request that readers contribute extracts from any letters they've received that might be of interest to the general readership]

An extraordinary (S)cuttle-fish

[warning readers that fish and snakes can come in through the scuttles left open

Diving Operations at the Wreck of the "Ava

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Naval Intelligence

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FACETIAE

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 19th June 1858 No 25

[explanation for why The Young Idea did not appear on the last three Saturdays (McArthur had been ill]

Diamond Harbour. [a long poem that mentions Kali, just including the final stanza for now] Ere the vast palaced City reared its head From the dank swamps that fringed the Hooghly's bed; While yet enshrined, the hideous idol stood, And vengeful Kali drank her victim's blood; 5 Here first the ventrous trader taught to roam, Found on the Hooghly's banks, a dreary home, Whence issuing like some fabled locust band, The British race now rules with iron hand, And Hindoo Princes, as they yield the sword 10 Own the proud Empire of the Saxon Lord.

Calcutta derives its name from the Goddess Kali whose worship is of the most horrible description Some say its Indian name was "Kali Cuttah" that is, the "Temple of Kali," others "Kali Ghant", the river steps of Kali

A Ramble in Diamond Harbour

an account of Diamond Harbour contributed to the paper since the editor has been sick as the writer describes the plant of interest, he describes asking a native who spoke English what the Hindoo name was: "but he could only tell me it was a thorn flower and a weed; he did not understand that the weeds of Bengal became choice flowers in the conservatories of England" next is a description of a woman begging and a journey in a dirty boat to a slimy shore, and then the discovery of a respectable European house, which was inhabited by a magistrate that was hearing a court case for arson. The magistrate then acquaints the Chesapeake men about the impossibility of learning the truth about this. Very detailed description given of the sights and the account is seemingly written during the trip.

Theatricals.

transcribed in a separate file

Naval Intelligence

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Extract from a private letter dated "Ava Camp" 30 May.

detailed account from Ava camp, including news about boa constrictor

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 3rd July 1858 Vol 1. No 27

en route to Trincomalie--SO glad to be leaving the sweltering heat of India

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 17th July 1858 Vol 1. No 28

[the voyage has ended and we are in Trincomalie...some interesting speculation about being sent back to England "the settlement of our question with America"

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal 24th July 1858 Vol 1. No 29

[the commodore is leaving]

Farewell Dinner to Commdore Watson

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"The Bay of Bengal"

a song to the tune of something specific

Our Ship's Pets

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 31st July 1858 Vol 1. No 30

[The commodore has left--reflections on the many experiences of the first year (using a theatrical metaphor to call it "the first act"]

The "Chesapeake" at Point de Galle.Departure of Commdore Watson

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Point de Galle

[an account of this area--very long and detailed--worth attention]

India's Lament

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal __________ Vol 1. No 31

[Two other ships of war have arrived and the Chesapeake is temporarily not the flagship of the squadron. The ship is also getting spruced up in preparation for the new commodore] view page image(s)[...]

Bathing at Sober Island

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Making glad the Ship

Never does our excellent Bandmaster Signor Faustino, look so much in his element as when at close of day, when all the duties of the ship are over he is standing up with clairionet in mouth surrounded by Cornets Trombones & Drums, and in his own emphatic language "making glad the ship." The Sailor who has all day long been hauling at ropes, landing stores, working aloft, blacking rigging or scraping & painting &c. will still set to work with vigour & spirit to have his dance in the Evening; dancing is his recreation; his hands may be tired, but his toes are fresh and the Hornpipe, the Polka, or the self invented Country Dance are performed with untried energy to the sound of the fiddle or the horn. The smartest sailor is often the best dancer, & he who has worked hardest with his hands by day, will be the nimblest on his feet by night. In the hard work that has been done this week, stripping the view page image(s)ship, painting, watering, & refitting, we have watched with much pleasure the spirit with which the Evening dance has been sustained. The dancing in many cases has been such as would not disgrace an English Ball room & there is a reality & life in a sailor Dancing, which a Ball room rarely presents.

Long may our Jack tars continue to dance away their day's fatigue & often may Signor Faustino, with his little circle of Clarionets and Trombones, strike up his merry dance times in harbour & at sea, and still "make glad the ship."

The Wreck Party

[description of men from Ava singing songs, including "Ethiopian Serenades" and the "nigger melody banjo and bones"]

Our Geological Researches

[a continuation of the punniness in an earlier number]

The Rogue Elephant

[a story about rogue elephants that might be interesting to consider in relation to Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"]

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 14th August 1858 Vol 1. No __

[Lots of things have been going on and "the incidents we have to record, have been divided amongst so many of us, that each will be glad to read a detailed account of the proceedings of the other

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 21st August 1858 Vol 1. No 33
No Title

[...]Rumour speaks strongly of our near departure from Trincomalie for the Red Sea; on account of the recent massacre of the European population of Jeddah: the change will no doubt be pleasant for a short time, whilst we are enjoying the novelty of the new scenes presented to us & which the "Young Idea" will attempt faithfully to record, but we shall not long prefer the heated climate & barren shores of the Red Sea, to the cool breezes, & verdant coasts of India [rest of the issue not relevant now]

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 28th August 1858 Vol 1. No 34
No Title

Our present stay in Trincomalee harbour, has bidden fair to terminate with scenes far less peaceful than those with which it commenced. Sticks have been prepared, revolvers loaded, and threats passed to & fro between some of ourselves on board and our dusky Gentoo neighbours on the shore. WE must honestly confess, that the first offence seems to have proeeded from some of our own bluejackets too anxious to pry into Gentoo mysteries, and interrupt the nocturnal procession of the natives in honor of their "idol deities"; this led to a wanton attack, the following night upon two of our own officers in uniform.

British blood rose against such an insult, and on the following night it was avenged by a little band of Crusaders, who stormed, and cleared the heathen temple of its worshippers. More desperate vengeance is now threatened by the natives for itis the nature of vengeance thus to propagate itself; but we would hope that here it may end.

While we admire the true English spirit, which has led our youthful Crusaders, to view a mob of infuriated "niggers" with more indifference, than they would the same number of cats, or monkeys, we would yet hope, that no unnecessary animosity may be raised, view page image(s)and that in our dealing as Christians, with these Gentoo natives, we may be guided always by a spirit of compassion, & kindness, rather than one of oppression, & contempt.02 Bampfield's extracts include the initial "B" at the end of this article

Shooting Trip to Candligar

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Cricket Match between the "Cheseapeake, and "Army and Pelorus"

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Theatre RoyalH.M.S. "CHESAPEAKE 03 The review included in Bampfield's transcription from The Young Idea is more detailed than the one in the 1867 edition. Bampfield attributes the review to McArthur. It offers a description of precisely how the quarter deck was arranged and who attended the performance. It also includes a cast of characters.

On Friday night the 27th Inst our amateurs provided us with a first rate evenings amusement The Quarter deck was gaily decorated with flags and flowers, and presented a beautiful spectacle, the utmost credit being due to the managers and arrangers of the decorations, we have not space to give a lengthy description of the arrangements, but we cannot refrain from giving the actors that praise which is most justly their due. The pieces chosen were well suited to the various talents of the actors. Geo Horner as "King Charles the 2nd looked and acted the "Merry Monarch" well, and Chas. Stewart did equally well in the character of Rochester. But no doubt Captain Copp the kind hearted old sailor (Thos. Walshe) was the life and soul of the piece, and kept us in roars of laugher with his quaint sayings whenever he made his appearance. Lady Clara (John Hurst) looked the lady well, but spoke timidly, and Mary (Jas Hammond) also required a little more self confidence

In the second piece "Raising the Wind", the part of "Jeremy Didler" was ably sustained by Isaac Wright, and Fainwould" the simple cockney was admirably impersonated by Chas. Stewart, indeed this appeared to us the most perfect impersonation of the Evening. The greatest credit is also due to Wm Connell for the way in which he played the lady's part of Miss Laurelia Durable, this appears to be his particular forte. Thos. Walshe again shone as "Sam 'the waiter, and the minor characters also did wel. Seldom have we seen an audience so well pleased or actors so well applauded. The "jig" by Thos Walshe was as excellent as usual, and the "Yo heave oh!" sung by Wm Connell produced a pleasing effect by the Chorus which it raised from the Blue jackets present.

After the play, the Quarter Deck was cleared & a few couples were formed for dancing. A large number of visitors were on board, and we believe very much enjoyed the Evening's entertainment. The Gun Room gave a capital spread despite their want of space & means to their brother officers of the "Pelorus"

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 28th August 1858 No 34

Our present stay in Trincomalie Harbour, has bidden fair to terminate with scenes far less peaceful than those with which it commenced. Sticks have been prepared, revolvers loaded, and threats passed to & fro between some of ourselves on board and our dusky Gentoo neighbours on the shore. We must honestly confess, that the first offence seems to have proceeded from some of our own bluejackets too anxious to pry into Gentoo mysteries, and interrupt the nocturnal procession of the natives in honor of their "idol deities." this led to a wanton attack, the following night upon two of our own officers in uniform.

British blood rose against such an insult, and on the following night it was avenged by a little band of Crusaders, who stormed, and cleared the heathen temple of its worshippers. More desperate vengeance is now threatended by the natives for it is the nature of vengeance thus to propagate itself; but we would hope that here it may end.

While we admire the true English spirit, which has led our youthful Crusaders, to view a mob of infuriated "niggers" with more indifference, than they would the same number of cats, or monkeys, we would yet hope, that no unnecessary animosity may be raised view page image(s)and that in our dealings as Christians, with these Gentoo natives, we may be guided always by a spirit of compassion, & kindness, rather than onen of oppression & contempt

04 In Bampfield's copy of the article, he attributes it to "B"
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Trincomalie Latest Intelligence-Storming of the Hindoo Temple. Genl Plainclothes Despatches.

Our readers are aware that a Telegram had been received reporting an outbreak at Trincomalie, in which it was stated that two officers of the "Chesapeake" had been assaulted by the native Gentoos, and one of them badly wounded, and that General Plainclothes had landed his forces, and punished the natives for their temerity. Since then despatches have been received and we are indebted to the authorities at the Horse Guards, for permission to publish the same.

long description of how the "General" gathered and ordered his troops [seems to me very much playing at being like the Pearl, who formed brigades to put down the mutiny--there are admiring accounts of their heroism in The Young Idea. Hopping ahead to when things escalate-the series of letters need to be encoded as a shift in the formatting...I can wait to do that until later, though...the various letters are meant to be various reports from commanding officers]

Not wishing my forces to scatter, I ordered the recall to be sounded & the Brigades mustered, when Capt James was reported missing, search was immediately made, & in a short time he was found at the upper end of the temple senseless & bleeding. The temple was now set on fire, & the interior devoted to destruction, the brigades doing great execution among the Gilt & otherwise richly ornamented Elephants, gods, cars & Peacocks, but the only Trophy brought on board was an Elephants Tusk, having committed as much injury as possible, I ordered a retreat, sending 1st Co of the Light Brigade under Ensign B.L. Zeebub to see the road clear, & boats ready. The Natives seeing us retreating and their temple burning, came out with yells, but did not approach us, & the retreat was quietly effected.

I have great pleasure in making honorable mention of a gallant act performed Lieut. Furze HB; during the embarcation Private Jaunting fell off the pier head, upon which Lt Furze jumped overboard & swam to his assistance, thereby saving his life. Pte Jaunting not being able to swim I should hope that Lt. Furze may be deemed worthy of the Victoria Cross, as also Corpl Judy, who under a heavy fire carried Capt James on his back from the scene of action.

I am happy to state that the wounded are doing well, 3 men only being wounded severely, & I must take this opportunity of calling to your Highness' notice the prompt & gallant way in which all my orders were executed, & the steadiness of both officers & men under the heavy fire, of the enemy, as well as the valuable assistance rendered me by Genl. Gander who was severely wounded on this occasion; & I beg to forward to you herewith a return of the forced engaged (Enclosure No 2) together with the casualties which have occurred. The Enemy loass is reported to be severe.

05 Bampfield's version of this contribution attributes it to "C.J. Brownrigg." Bampfield also includes extracts from his own journal right after that contribution
Pictorial Rebus

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06 The editorial, written by McArthur, appears in the same location in Bampfield. "The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 4 September 1858 Vol 1. No 35

The last week has seen a great change come o'er our arrangements; destined for Calcutta, already anticipating the sweets of Diamond Harbour, enjoying our visit to Madras, and quite secure from thoughts of sailing, except in a Northerly direction, we have been suddenly disturbed, and all our propsitions overthrown by a Telegram from the Senior Officer ordering us off to Aden

Altho' we saw a possibility of such an order, and even expected it, which laying in the peaceful harbour of Trincomalee, when first the intelligence of the massacre at Jeddah arrived, still we had dispelled the idea during the intervening fortnight, and the order for us to repoir thither was as unexpected as it was sudden.

We have heard that the "Cyclops," having been fired upon at Jeddah, has totally destroyed the Forts, so that we shall have little or no work to do there

We are not sorry that we are called to another part of the station, for we hope to find fresh matter of interest, & amuseument for our columns, and in the shores of the Red Sea, so familiar to us thro' biblical, and ancient records, such cannot be wanting.

All must be glad to hear that the endeavour to lay down the Atlantic Telegraph has at last met with the success, the mighty scheme deserved. England, & America are now linked together, & tho' separated by the vast Atlantic, the ingenuity of man, aided by Providence, has overcome space, time, & every obstacle, & words, & thoughts can now be exchanged, with an inconceivable rapidity

07 it must be noted that the conflict at Jeddah escalated primarily because directions sent to the Captain of the Cyclops were not received before he decided to bombard Jeddah--a massive miscommunication resulted.
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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 11th September 1858 Vol. 1 No. 36
08 This contribution does not appear in Bampfield's extracts. His issue begins with "burial at sea."

We are now about to cross the Equator for a the third time since leaving England, and as we have a great many on board who have not been subjected to the usual ceremonies of initiation; Father Neptune will perhaps regard us with an angry eye, on our again entering his domains.

However, as we have several on board, including five colored men, who have never as yet crossed, we shall be compelled to sacrifice them as a Peace offering, in the event of his showing his displeasure by bad weather or otherwise

How many more times our gallant ship will have to pass the line before she again sees the shores of old England, it is impossible to guess, but before that time arrives, we shall have doubtless visited many fresh places and gone thro' a variety of adventures. Aden our present destination is a place view page image(s)very seldom visited by ships of War, & will be therefore quite a novelty to nearly the whole of us. What may be our subsequent rendezvous, we cannot at present conjecture, but we shall in all probability enter the Red Sea, and shew our Force to the disaffected tribes on the coast.

As we are going there in pursuance of Admiralty orders, we shall very likely receive our new Commodore, who will, in all probability, be sent there to meet us.

09 Bampfield includes the initials of McArthur and Bampfield for this poem, which is perhaps longer in Bampfield's transcription (check on this)--it appears as the first contribution to issue 36. The Burial at Sea a poem about burying a boy, 17, who was killed by a fall from aloft 8 September 1858 poem written by McArthur (and signed in the lithograph edition, which is rare)
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The Gentoo Procession at Trincomalie 10 Bampfield offers no initial to provide insight into the author of this contribution and attack in Lieutenant Cheson

Dear SirThe lucid despatches of General Plainclothes have already put vividly before the public the night assault on the Gentoo Temple, and the triumph of the British Crusaders. But of the causes which led to that assault, namely the cowardly attack made on the previous Evening on an officer in Naval Uniform little has yet been said. I propose therefore to sketch from memory, so far as my skill enables me, the scene which I accidentally witnessed on that Evening, but in which fortunately, I was no participator.

I had sauntered down from the Esplanade and the tents of the Cricketers, & was proceeding towards the jetty to procure a canoe, when my attention was aroused by the loud tomtoming, the jingling of bells, & other discordant sounds which proceeded from the vicinity of the Gentoo temple. On entering the green compound in which the temple stands I found the whole space blazing with light, and crowded with Gentoo worshippers, dressed in their gayest attire, evidently keeping a festival in honor of some deity or deities; I know not whom, most probably, some local deities who are supposed to preside over the sacred spot. A grand procession was advancing round the compound, flambeaux bearers in great numbers led the way, musicians followed, playing upon strange discordant instruments, which, all unmisical as they were to my ears, would produce, I doubt not, a pleasing, as well as, an exciting effect upon the minds of a barbarous, or semicultivated people. Nay! I even thought that such perchance, or nearly such, might have been the music spoken of in such sweet strains by the Psalmists of ancient Israel. The three chief instruments were, as well as I could see them, a long shrill clarionet of wood ornamented with brass, a sort of small flageolet, not straight but curved, and a sort of bagpipe played by the pressure of the arm, but without holes, emitting only a dull oozing sound that never varied. The effect of the three combined exceedingly resembled that of our celebrated Highland instrument, but the Musicians ran up & down the holes in wild discordant strains, without an attempt as it seemed to me, at anything resembling a musical air.

Small tom toms, beat in at both ends, and one large one beaten on one side only, conch shells blown at intervals, with hoarse, braying sound, a steel bar, slung & beaten by a smaller one, after the fasion of the European triangles, and little bells jangling in various parts of the procession, all added to the wild music that rose & fell upon the night breezes. After the musicians came the Nautch girl, the Brahmin priest, & the sacred shrine of the deities The Nautch girl was richly attired, & laded with gold, & jewelled ornaments: the Brahmin a fat, oily man of much lighter hue than the surrounding worshippers, wore upon his head a beautiful chaplet of pearls, but otherwise was bare to the waist; both he and the Nautch Girl kept their faces twined towards the shrine, advancing with backward step. Keeping up a low murmuring chant, bowing their bodies, and waving their arms with graceful motion. The shrine itself was rich & gorgeous, borne upon the heads of numerous dark bearers: the back of it rose, I suppose to the height of 12 feet tripartite, the centre division rising higher than the other two, from this a painted peacock projected, its gorgeously colored tail spreading far, & wide, with a large gilt idol seated on its back. Two smaller idols occupied the two side divisions, gilt like the other, but without the supporting bird: over all three, tall canopies rose, about 18 feet high, shaped like an umbrella, and painted bright red. The whole was illuminated by lofty banners hung with little lamps, & I think with small bells intermixed. Hundreds of dark natives decorated with gay turbans of white, and gilt joined in the procession, swelling at intervals the low chant of the Brahmin & gazing with adoration on the Idol gods. In front of the native houses, where the procession passed, little offerings to the gods were exhibited, chiefly, it appeared to me, dishes of bread & salt. Altogether I must confess it was one of the most striking, if not the most pleasing spectacles I have ever witnessed, reminding one strongly of the religious processions in the South of Europe; the general effect was most imposing, while the bright moonlight shining over groves of Palm trees added solemnity to the surrounding scene.

The dark Gentoo worshippers, so far from expressing any signs of aversion to our being present at the spectacle, seemed rather to greet us with smiles as they passed the spot where we were standing. As the gorgeous shrine moved on to reenter the temple, Lieut. Nelson11 Bampfield does not include a specific name in his transcription, instead referring to "Lieut. W__" and two or three of our younger Companions moved with the crowd, hoping to catch a sight view page image(s)of the interior of the building. They had already entered the outer enclosure, & were about approaching the vestibule of the temple, (a temporary shed thatched with palm leaves), when, as I understand they were warned not to infringe in the part appropriated to the women. On this they moved to the other side, only catching a glimpse thro' the open gate of the illuminatted interior of the temple, with its white pilasters and sacred carved Elephant. To their surprize they now found themselves violently & ferociously attacked by a large party of men armed with sticks. "Had I attempted to attack them in return" says Lieut Nelson, "I should most probably not have come back alive." With difficulty they retired, all more or less injured. Relying on the interference of the police authorities, I deprecated any hostile demonstration in return, & restrained a party of bluejackets who were running down to the spot from rushing in to attack the natives. How little redress could be obtained from the Court of Justice, I believe is now well known, & few will regret that under the able guidance of our respect Genl Plainclothes, the insult to a British officer was, on the following Evening, so speedily visited with just retribution. Believe me to be Dear Sir Yours Sincerely "Spectator"

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 20th November 1858 Vol 1. No 42
No Title

Our stay at Jeddah has worn a very monotonous aspect. Strangers, to the shore, we have only been able to gaze from our bulwarks on the far spreading sands, and barren hills of Arabia, and sigh to don the garment of some Mecca pilgrim, mount on the hump of some fleet camel, and all Christian as we are, penetrate into the holiest shrines, and sanctuaries of Islam. [...] [...]

Sailing up the Red Sea.

Sunday Morning 17 Octr. Having sailed with a fair breeze from Aden yesterday afternoon, we are this morning in sight of the straits of Babel-Mandel. [...details the ship approaching Jeddah with the help of a Arab pilot named Abdullah...] [...]

Tuesday 19 Octr 1858 The sun had past his highest point, the sea was calm & bright The ship was slowly urged along, by breezes soft and light [...9 quatrains of verse describing a shark eating a midshipman's jacket and then being caught and eaten by the crew]
The Late Comet.

We are sorry that the very brief notes taken by "our own Observer", will not permit us to give any elaborate or scientific account of this beautiful heavenly visitor. It was on the Evening of Septr 30th after dropping anchor at Aden, that our attention was first called to see the bright stranger, which had made its appearance, unpredicted, & unannounced among the celestial bodies of the Northern Hemisphere.[...] [...]

Naval Intelligence

22nd Octr. H.M.S. Chesapeake arrived at Jeddah on Friday 22nd at 5 P.M. having been piloted in through the outer reefs by Mr Mayes Master of the Cyclops. [...]

Epitome

On Monday Oct 25 preparations were made for the reception of His Excellency Nemuk Pacha, and the English & French Commissioners, but his Excellency being indiscposed after visiting the "Pelorus" was unable to visit us. The Commissioners however came on board and inspected the ship.[...general reports of storms and boredom]

Facetiae

A shocking punster, hearing that Jeddah was celebrated for Turquoise, said that if Turks & Arabs were on unfriendly terms, no doubt plenty of "Turk Wars" would be the result. [...other puns]

Enigma Bone on the wing of yon dark plumag'd bird High o'er the earth how oft I took my flight:[...three quatrains of a riddle]
!Tis the Emerald Isle where the rough jaunting "car". Will bear you in country or town [in verse explaining that the answer is "carnation"]
The Young Idea Published at the office No 1 Port St Chesapeake, every Saturday[...]
"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 27th November 1858 Vol 1. No 43
No Title

Our past week has produced one circumstance which had caused some little excitement amongst the squadron, and has for a short period dispeled the monotony of our life; we refer to the race between our Barge and the "Pelorus's" Cutter.[...] [...]

Jeddah, our Visit to Namik Pacha. Tuesday 26 Octr 1858

We left our ship, a large party of us, in three Boats at half past 8 a.m., and after various difficulties in avoiding coral rocks, and crossing shoal Water, came alongside the Jetty near the Southern extremity of the Town. Here we perceived the KaimaKhan, or Governor of Jeddah dressed in purple uniform coat, and attended by the Harbour Master in his suit of brown cloth, waiting to receive us. He shook each one by the hand as we ascended the steps & Passing under the gateway, found a number of Arab steeds in gay trappings, & saddles, ready for us to mount. We formed a brilliant cavalcade, as we set out on our progress thro' the town. We were 20 in all, and all attired in our uniform frock coats & swords with white flowing turbans encircling our caps. Captains Pullen, and Parkin led the way, attended by the Kaima Khan, while we followed by twos and threes, and well armed Turkish attendants, Bashi Bazouks we believe with plenty of silver mounted pistols at their girdles welked at our horses heads. After passing an open space in which loungers were sitting smoking hookahs, and drinking coffee, & camels lying wiht piles of goods around them, our road lay thro' the long winding streets of the Bazaars, where articles of every description were exposed for Sale, & human faces of every shape and color met the view. There was so much novelty to attract the eye; that it was difficult to notice anything occurately. The Bazaars were so narrow that two horsemen could with difficulty ride abreast, without pushing against the wares on either side. In some parts swarms of flies rendered our progress annoying. There were broad vessels piled up with dates, or melons, or pomegranates, or oranges; trays on which large broad cakes, or other eatables were exposed for sale. shops in which the porous water coolers, and other simple earthenwares were hangingin, or silks and muslins of various kinds, or strings of breads, amber black or white coral or cornelian, such as devout Musselmen use in prayer, or Turkish slippers; or long pipes and outhpieces; all whihc for a moment only caught the eye as our steeds passed on. The human faces most attracted us, the light hughed caucasian features of the Turk., the well bronzed countenance of the native Arab the broad Ethiopian visage of the black slave, the veiled face of some female, here her eyes only peering thro' the white muslin "yek-mesh", the scowling gaze of the wild Bedouin as he stood erect in his uncleanly brown robe, his head enveloped in a cowl, with his hand ready at the [...interesting exchange about tobacco as snuff, with Pasha saying it was "good for the gums" and his inquiries about the men in black, who it turns out where the chaplains, described by Parkin as "the two professors who instructed the youths in theology & navigation"...will continue in next number]

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE Boat Race between the Chesapeakes Barge and Pelorus's Cutter.>

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(Song) The Cheasapeake's Barge Air (Yankee doodle) of the "Chesapeake's of old, [...]
Namik Pacha, & the Merchants of Jeddah

It is said that Namik Pacha being fearful that the rich Merchants of Jeddah would remove their wealth at the sight of our English ships, invited them to a friendly entertainment, and in true Eastern spirit then detained them in safe custody. eleven in number. We hear also that the new Sheriff has in a similar way detained several at Mecca, with the view of procuring from them the fine which is supposed will be exacted by the English and French Governments

Epitome Festivities in the Ward room.

On Wednesday Evening 25th Inst several officers from "Cyclops" and "Pelorus" assembled on board the "Chesapeake" and after much merry dancing while the Band was playing on the Main Deck, retired to the Ward room to finish the Evening with a bowl of punch, and a few concomitant songs [more details about celebrations and such...]

Facetiae

[...]

Rebus

[...]

The Young Idea

[...]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 4th December 1858 Vol 1. No 44
No Title

[...]

Jeddah, and our Visit to Namik Pacha continued from last week

[...] [...]

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE

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The Editor of The "Young Idea" to his friends on closing the first Year of Publication.

[...] [...]

The Red Sea

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Naval Intelligence

[...] [...]

Epitome

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Facetiae

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Conundrums

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The Young Idea

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 18th December 1858 Vol 2. An accident to the Editor prevented last weeks no. from appearing No 1.
No Title

[...]

A visit to the Sheriffe of Mecca

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From the Readers to the Editor on commencing his New Volume

[...]

The Tricolor and Union Jack

[...socializing between British and French sailors]

Christmas 1858 [...] [...]
The Garbarry

[...interesting story of assisting a ship that got stuck on the reef. Parkin assisted and the Du Chayle sent a boat as well...when the job was done some of the men drank too much]

Naval Intelligence

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Epitome

[...]

Facetiae

[...]

Rebus

[...]

Answers to Conundrums Nos. 60 & 61

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The Young Idea

[...]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 25th December 1858 Vol 2. No 2.
No Title

[...]

Chesapeake's Greeting to "Pelorus We've pull'd and we've sail'd together [...]
Rough Yarns No 1. "The Boutswains Christmas Dinner"

[...] [...]

Epitome

[...]

Facetiae

[...]

[...]

[...]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 4th December 1858 Vol 1. No 44
No Title

[...]

Jeddah, and our Visit to Namik Pacha continued from last week

[...] [...]

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE

[...]

The Editor of The "Young Idea" to his friends on closing the first Year of Publication.

[...] [...]

The Red Sea

[...]

Naval Intelligence

[...] [...]

Epitome

[...]

Facetiae

[...]

Conundrums

[...]

The Young Idea

[...]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 18th December 1858 Vol 2. An accident to the Editor prevented last weeks no. from appearing No 1.
No Title

[...]

A visit to the Sheriffe of Mecca

[...]

From the Readers to the Editor on commencing his New Volume

[...]

The Tricolor and Union Jack

[...socializing between British and French sailors]

Christmas 1858 [...] [...]
The Garbarry

[...interesting story of assisting a ship that got stuck on the reef. Parkin assisted and the Du Chayle sent a boat as well...when the job was done some of the men drank too much]

Naval Intelligence

[...]

Epitome

[...]

Facetiae

[...]

Rebus

[...]

Answers to Conundrums Nos. 60 & 61

[...]

The Young Idea

[...]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 25th December 1858 Vol 2. No 2.
No Title

[...]

Chesapeake's Greeting to "Pelorus We've pull'd and we've sail'd together [...]
Rough Yarns No 1. "The Boutswains Christmas Dinner"

[...] [...]

Epitome

[...]

Facetiae

[...]

[...]

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 1st January 1859 Vol 2. No 3.
No Title

[...]

Christmas Day 1858

[...]

Farewell Dinner to Capt Parkin

[...] view page image(s)[...]

Our Christmas Play12 Bampfield's trancription of this article attributes it to "W"; the review is very similar to the one published in this lithograph edition.

Our Christmas play came off in right merry style on Wednesday Evening (29 Decr). Our quarter deck, roofed in with flags of all nations, presented as gay a Theatre as one would wish to see, while the rising tiers of benches from the deck to the bridge abaft, accommodated a large and happy audience, not only of our own bluejackets, but of those from the "Pelorus", the "DuChayla" and the "Roebuck".

We are proud of our Amateur Performers, who have this time surpassed themselves. The comedy of King Charles the Second" being cast as on the last occasion, we need say little, except to compliment the fair "Mary" the Wapping beauty, around whom the whole plot clusters, on the increasing ease, & freedom with which she plays her part. "Charles" was as royal, "Rochester" as Manly, and old "Copp" as jolly hearted as ever.

The two farces which followed kept the audience in a state of continual laughter and applause. Thos Walsh, as "Paddy Carey" was indeed a "broth of a boy", speaking with a rich brogue, whirling his shillelah in true Hibernian spirit, touching the hearts of the audience by the generous view page image(s)nature of the deeds represented, and winding up with a song, and a "jig" which brought down thunders of applause. The other characters of the piece were all good, but "Widow Leary" the landlady deserves special mention. She was the yielding widow, and the Irish landlady is perfection.

In the "Man about Town" the chief burden of the piece rested upon Isaac Wright as "Skirts", and well did he sustain it. Coming in which his two large placards of the "Learned Pig," he at once moved our mucles to a state of risibility, which we found it difficult to pause from, such was the continued succession of funny deeds, and speeches. Horner as "Dr Mandible" the physician, Walsh as "Topps" the Tiger, and indeed all the minor characters, played up to him well, and the curtain fell amidst loud and long applause.

We may safely say that all Oficers & men present, whether French or English, were delighted with their Evening's amusement, and we were glad to observe our newly arrived Commodore, tho' rather late or the first piece, thoroughly enjoying the fun of the two Farces.

A supper was laid out on the Main Deck after the performance; for the Amateurs

A Night Alarm

[...]

Naval Intelligence

[...]

Answer to Rebus in No 1

[...]

The Young Idea

[...]

"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 8th January 1859 Vol 2. No 4.
No Title

[...]

Notes about Mecca (from Sale's Koran)

[...]

"Jack

[...] [...]

Song on the Death of Capt. Sir William Peel KCB R.N. [...]
Sand Squalls & Rain Squalls

[...] [...]

Naval Intelligence

[...]

Epitome

[...]

Rebus

[...]

Cheseapeake Amateur Theatricals

[...requesting funding from voluntary contributions]

Answer to Pictorial Rebus in No 3 Vol 2

[...]

The Young Idea

[...]

view page image(s)
"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 15th January 1859 Vol 2. No 5.
No Title

A tardy act of justice has at length been accomplished, and two of the prime instigators of the "Jeddah Massacre" have paid with their lives the penalty of their murderous deed. We know not who may have been those Eleven wretched Arabs, who on a former occasion were executed on the reefs in the sight of the "Cyclops"; but at all events they were but the tools, the instruments of the crime; the origin of it has been clearly traced home to the three chief men in Jeddah, those whose duty it was to protect, and defend the Christians, and strangers who felt secure in their friends help.

Horrible as was the sight of blood on Wednesday morning, we must rejoice as Englishmen, that justice has found out its true victims; the third guilty man, the late Kaima Khan of Jeddah, is, we hear to be sent to Constantinople, to await the Sultan's decree, & tho' we have sipped his coffee, & smoked his pipes, we can scarcely regret that he too should meet with a like fate. To the firmness of the French Commissioner, we believe this act of just retriubution may be attributed. Bombardment or the execu view page image(s)tion of the guilty men were the only alternatives offered, and Namik Pacha, at the last moment, with grief & reluctance signed their death warrant.

We may now perhaps consider that the first great objects of the Jeddah Commission, & of our own visit here, has been accomplished, & tho we hear that much still remains to be settled, in the way of indemnification, yet we would indulge a hope that the presence of the Chesapeake may be no longer necessary. This very morning, the "Duchayla" has spread her wings again, and is now speeding on her way to Suez tho', we believe to return again: let us hope that soon we may have to record how the "Chesapeake" also has let fall her long-furled canvass, & is far on her way to Aden & the waters of the East.

The Jeddah Massacre Execution of Mahtesil and Amoudi. To the Editor of the "Young Idea"Dear Sir,

As one of those whose duty it was to witness the Execution on Wednesday last (12th), I beg to send you some slight account of what took place, tho' indeed I write even now with a feeling of horror at the spectacle At 4 am, as you know, we were all astir, coffee being served out to the Marines and Boats' crews who were to attend. At One Bell we shoved off from the ship, and it still wanted some time to daylight when we mustered, under Captain Seymour's orders, abreast of the old Turkish hulk whihc is lying off the town. The "Pelorus"' Boats were there and those of the "Ducayla" a goodly squadron in all, three Pinnaces, besides several cutters, and two or three light gigs. The Pinnaces each carried their brass gun in the bows, and all the Boat's crews were well provided with arms, and ammunition in case of any sudden outbreak of the natives. As daylight broke over the walls and minarets of Jeddah, and the more distant hills that bound our landscape to the Eastward, we started from our "rendezvous," the execution being fixed by the Turkish authorities for one hour after daybreak. The Frenchmen led the way, the Boats following one another in single file; it took us fully half an hour to reach the shore, the pilotage among the shoals being diffuclt, and by the time that all arrangments were complete, the "one hour after daybreak" was fast expiring. We found the Turkish guard already drawn up at the scene of execution; it was the square plot of ground on the Custom House Wharf, open to the shipping, and close under the seawall of the town. As we stood facing the sea, the right side of the square was occupied by a company of Turkish soldiers, perhaps 100 in number, a similar company of Albanians occupied the left; while a third side was formed of the English Marines & French Sailors, each fifty in nuber, with their backs against the wall of the town. The French occupied theright of our position, their right thus touching the plank of the Turks, and between us waved, side by side, the flags of our two countries, those flags which had been dishonoured, & view page image(s)insulted on that fearful night of the Christian massacre. It wasa picturesque sight, though we stood in shadow, there were the Turks in their red Fez caps, dark brown jackets, with red pipings and black accoutrements, muskets with long shining barrels, the men themselves of fair height but somewhat dingy, and dirty looking. There were the Albanians, light in hue, tall and dressed in white, white jacket, and white loose trousers, white cap with tassel, white ose, white bells, a red sas only relieving the unmixed white of their costume; there werre our own in their blue and red Tunics (for half were Artillery, and half Light Infantry), and their white forage caps; there were the French Sailors, in their blue jackets, and white trousers with red sash, and straw sailors hat, armed with rifle and sword bayonet, while on the seaside, completing the square, were drawn up a single line of Bashi Bazouks & irregular Albanians, dressed in a strange variety of costume armed to the teeth with pistols, swords, daggers, and knives, and of every hue & shade of complexion, some jet black, others light, and fair. Behind all were seen our boats, with their respective crews moored in line a boat's length from the shore, their sterns towards the Quay

Our attention was now turned to a gateway in that corner of the Square on which the right of the Albanians rested. It was the gateway leading into the town, adorned with open partico, that projected into the square. From this, as soon as we had formed, guards were despatched to bring in the two prisoners. Everything was still; no inhabitants of the town were to be seen or heard, except the few Turkish Officials who stood on the town wall behind us, or looked from the windows of a house that commanded the Square. All approaches to the spot were closed, and guarded by Turkish sentries

But see!!! the prisoners approach and on them every eye is fixed.

The first one who entered is an old man thin, and spare, dressed in light green robe flowing to the feet, and white turban; his beard white with age, his eye keen and piercing. His hands were tied behind, above the elbows, and he is attended by a guard on either side, and a third behind; he halts on entering the square, and looks astonished. I can well believe the story that is told that he knew not his approaching fate till that moment he casts his eyes around, and as they rest on our "colours" he seems to comprehend all, and gives himself up to prayer. He is followed at a short interval by the other prisoner, similarly guarded; a taller and apparently a younger man, with robe of dark purple, and white Turban; his hands similarly tied, he is we understand the sheikh of that Arab tribe which committed the massacre, while the older man is the "Chief of Bazaars" the richest and most powerful man in Jeddah. As they seem to hesitate by the gateway, they are pushed on by the guard into the cenre of the square and there they are compelled to kneel down with their faces turned Eastward, towards Mecca. The guards retire, the executioners take their place with sword drawn; wild looking fellows, irregular Albanians, their arms bare to the elbow, their sashes loaded wiht pistols. The old man is the first to suffer: as he bends his head forward, the executioner seems to try his distance carefully with the sword, two or three times; -yet his first blow strikes too low down the back: again the sword is raised, and the blow falls on the neck but does not enter deeply; the old man who is still murmering in prayer, turns his head, as though reproachfully; a third blow is struck, and he falls forward on his face; the gush of blood seems to choke his utterance: his last words of prayer, gurgle out with his lifeblood, but the head is not yet severed; it is butcher's work that follows: the remaining flesh is sawn through with the sword, and the head rolled away from the body: a pool of blood rushed out upon the ground, the executioner lifts the robe of the deceased, and wipes in it his sword and bloodstained fingers.

I could look no longer: a sickening sensation came over me: one of the French Sailors, a powerful man, fainted away: I saw not the second execution; the gleam only of a decending sword seemed to flash before my eyes, and in another moment, I heared that all was over: the head of the second prisoner had been severed at a single blow.

The Turkish authorities now advanced and flung over each of the bodies a white sheet; but this made the seem almost more ghastly than before, for you could see the blood spouting from the arteries against the underside of the sheet, and with each gush dying it afresh.

I was only too glad when the order was given to leave this scene of blood & reembark in our boats. I am sure that not one of those who saw it woudl ever with to witness such another scene

Captain Seymour, H.M.S. "Pelorus" commanded our force, and was present inside the Square, attended by the Commodore's Secretary and an Aide-de-camp, while Capt Tricault of "Duchayla" remained in charge of the boat squadron.

I remain Dear SirYours truly "Eye Witness"
Jeddah. Ah! Jeddah's towers are gleaming bright [...]
Naval Intelligence

[...]

Epitome

[...]

Peeping under a screen erected on the main deck, we have ascertained the creation of several new scenes, at which two or three hands were busily paining. We anticipate much pleasure from the production of a new play on our arrival at Aden

Rebus

[...]

"The Young Idea"

[...]

view page image(s)
"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 29th January 1859 Vol 2. No 6.
No Title

Only the total absence of all circumstances of note, has for a while, caused our weekly sheet to remain unstained with ink; our pen to be useuless on the desk before us. "The Young Idea" professes to record events, not to invent fiction; but here at Jeddah the record of one day, is a history of the whole: nothing has occurred to vary our monotony, except the hasty visit of our little messenger the "Roebuck."

We could almost envy them the fitful way in which they flit from place to place, pausing only for a day, or two at each station; from Jeddah to Suez, or from Aden to Jeddah: they have shivered for a while in the real winter's cold of Egypt; they have wandered through the Oriental Streets, and Bazaars of crowded Cairo; they have gazed on the green valley of the fertilizing Nile; they have climbed to the summit of the Great Pyramid, and penetrated into its close, and half suffocating chambers, and we, all the while, have been idly lying amongst the reefs of Jeddah, our minds gleaning no fresh idea from scenes before us, but wandering vacantly into the future or the past.

Arabic Numberals Dear Sir,

It is well known how much European civilization owes to the influence of the Arabian mind [...]

Dear Sir, Yours very sincerely Arithmeticus
Arabic Numberals To the Editor of the "Young Idea"Dear Sir

I must call your attention to mistakes which are frequently made in our Rebuses [...]

I remainYours very truly "Sphynx"

Ed. We regret exceedingly [...] careless of our "devil."

More Notes about Mecca. (chiefly from Sale's Koran).

[...] [...]

Historical EnigmasNo. 1

[...] view page image(s)[...]

The last New Riddle from England. To the Editor of the Yg IdeaDear Sir

[...]

I have the honor to be, SirYours sincerely, "Sphynx"
Naval Intelligence

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Epitome.

[...]On Monday (24th) when shifting Topsails Isaac Wright Ordy fell backwards from the main Topsail Yard, but was happily brought up by his knife lanyard hitching, which gave him time to grasp the rigging: we should indeed have been very sorry had anything more serious befallen one, whose comic powers have so lately given us amusement

[...]

The three Arab dhouws with coal from Aden arrived on Wednesday (26) evening, & we coaled that night, and the two succeeding days.

Much amusement was caused in the Ward Room on Wednesday EVening, by the presence of a Messenger from the Pacha of Hoeidah to Namik Pacha (a passenger in one of the Dhows) whose astonishment at various tricks with cards was of the most grotesque description.

Facetiae.

A remark being made on the long line of "dhows" lying off Jeddah, [...]

REBUS

[...]

Answer to Rebus in No. 5. Expostulation.
"The Young Idea"

[...]

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 26 February 1859 Vol 2. No 7.
No Title

Our readers will hardly require an excuse for the nonappearance of our Weekly Journal, on the last three Saturdays, (alas' it is now weekly only in name) for all must have felt how monotonously the past-three or four weeks have flet: - unchequered by a single occurrence of note, unmarked by a single episode, wehreby they may be remembered;- productive of naught to interest, amuse, or cheer on such a stagnant state of affairs no wonder that ideas become tainted with dulness and that imaginiation is entirely at a loss to provide amusement.

But we cannot let this, our last week at Jeddah pass, without commemorating our release from its influence wihtout hailing our approaching departure, without rendering our last days more cheery by the production of a "Young Idea." Four Months have rolled past quickly beholding us lying inactively in these view page image(s)waters; our anchors rusting in their coral beds, and our minds rusting in the no less corroding bed of sluggish, unvarying, inaction .The change already commences to exercise its beneficial effects, faces begin to brighten, minds begin to expand at the thoughts of the rocky steeps of Aden, of again careering swiftly over the bright waters of the Arabian Sea, of the pleasant verdure of Point de Galle, of the probably occurrences of the next two months.

Farewell! then to Jeddah, farewell! to its distant hills, its sandy shores, its glistening walls, and crowded bazaarss; farewell to its deep blue waters, and coral reefs, farewell to its desert borne breezes, adn san ladet atmostphere, adn with us our readers all gladly echo "Farewell"!!!

The "Great Eastern" Steamship & the Future of Trincomalie

[...] [...]

Notes about Jeddah

[...very interesting anecdotes about a visit ashore!]

Historical Enigma

[...]

Naval Intelligence

[...]

Epitome.

[...]

Promotions & Appointments

[...]8th Mr A.D. McArthur Clerk having passed provisionally before Mr Hayward Paymaster to be Act Asst Paymr[...]

The Sailor's Charade.

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Answer to Rebus in No 6. Pomegranate

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Watson

Excerpts from “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J.K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [...] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [...] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."

Pelorus

HMS Pelorus was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. The ship was launched on February 5, 1858 and its masting and fitting-out was completed on September 10, 1857. The ship was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pelorus was broken up for parts at Devonport on February 3, 1869. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.

Pratt

Excerpt from “Pratt, John Henry” by Anita McConnell for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Pratt, John Henry (bap. 1809, d. 1871), Church of England clergyman and mathematician, was baptized on 30 June 1809 at St Mary Woolnoth, London, one of two sons of Josiah Pratt (1768–1844), Church of England clergyman, and his wife, Elizabeth, formerly Jowett. He was educated at Oakham School, Rutland, and entered Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, in 1829, graduating BA in 1833 as third wrangler. He was elected to a fellowship, and proceeded MA in 1836. After taking orders he was appointed through the influence of Daniel Wilson, bishop of Calcutta, a chaplain of the East India Company in 1838. He became Wilson's domestic chaplain and in 1850 archdeacon of Calcutta.”

Kelly

Lieutenant Edward Kelly does not appear in the muster book of HMS Chesapeake. Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Piers

S.B. Piers, a commander, joined the Chesapeake on July 28th 1857. He was discharged on January 22nd 1858 to serve aboard HMS Himalaya when vice Haswell was invalided.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Haswell

Haswell served aboard Himalaya until he was injured and replaced by Piers.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Taylor

Edward Taylor, Assistant Engineer 3rd class (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 25th 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster bookMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Reynolds

S. Reynolds, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on September 4th 1857. He was born in Landport (Portsmouth) in 1839, making him 19 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Shortt

John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in Bombay in 1838, making him 20 at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

A_D_McArthur

Alexander D. McArthur, a clerk, joined the Chesapeake on December 9th 1857. He was born on December 25th 1835 in Woolwich, Kent, making him 21 when he came aboard. Census records for the town of Woolwich in 1851 reveal the family of John McAurthur, a captain in the Royal Marines, who lived with his wife Mary E., a son James (a gentleman, aged 29), a son John (no occupation, aged 27), a son Henry (a clerk in the wine trade, aged 17), a son Alexander D (a scholar, aged 15), a son Hanibal (no occupation, aged 13), and a servant Esther Johnson (aged 20).

Theobald

C.B. Theobald, a naval cadet, joined the Chesapeake on July 24th 1857. He was born in Mark's Tey, Essex in 1843, making him 15 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Cooper

There are three different members of the ship's company with the last name Cooper. The only thing we can tell about the "Cooper" referenced in the cricket match is that he was not a commissioned officer, but an ordinary seaman.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Wilkinson

Mr. Wilkinson, a clerk (a subordinate officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857 after serving aboard HMS Majestic. He was born in Suffolk in 1836, which would make him 22 at the time of the cricket match in CalcuttaMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Bew

James Bew, an experienced seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 1st 1857. He was born in 1833, making him 25 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Chute

Charles T. Chute, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857, after serving aboard Euridice. He was born in London in 1841, making him 17 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Oxley

C.L. Oxley, a midshipman, joined the Chesapeake on July 29th 1857. He was born in 1841, making him 17 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Hope

Hope played for the "squadron's eleven" and does not appear in Chesapeak muster book, which means he likely belonged to another ship in the squadronMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

George_Horner

George Horner, a bandsman, joined the Chesapeake on August 12, 1857. He was born in London in 1817. The muster book for the Chesapeake claims to offer the first entry for George Horner, perhaps meaning this was his first time at sea.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Henry_Underhill

muster#153, ordinary seaman from Alesford, 36 when coming aboard the ChesapeakeMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Parkin

George H. Parkin was named acting commander of HMS Chesapeake on February 1st 1858 and came aboard on February 25th after serving aboard Roebuck. Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Henry_Montagu

Henry Montagu, yeoman of signals, joined the Chesapeake on July 28, 1857 after serving aboard HMS President. He was born in St. Hilliers, Jersey (the Channel Islands) in 1826, making him 32 at the time of the performance.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Faustino

Juan I. Faustino, bandmaster, joined the Chesapeake on September 14th 1857 after serving aboard HMS Imperieuse. He was born in 1820 in Allicante, Portugal, making him 37 when he joined the ship's company.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st September 1857 Ending 30th September 1857, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2883)

Charles_Stewart

Charles Stewart, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on May 23, 1857. He was born in London and served aboard HMS Gladiator just before joining the Chesapeake. He was born in 1834.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

Thomas_Walsh

Thomas Walsh, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 15, 1857. He was born in London in 1834 and served aboard HMS Cressy just before joining the Chesapeake.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

John_Hurst

Have not yet located Hurst in the musters

James_Hammond

James Hammond, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 13 1857, after serving aboard HMS Eurydice until 12 June 1857. He was born in London on November 12, 1837, making him 21 at the time of the performance. He entered the ship as "B1C" or "Boy, first class" and was promoted to Ordinary Seaman (second class) on July 27, 1857. He was promoted to Ordinary Seaman (first class) on October 1, 1857, which suggests that he "learned the ropes" quickly and was given more responsibility within four months of joining the Chesapeake. Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1859 Ending 31st March 1859, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2886)

Isaac_Wright

Isaac Wright, an ordinary sailor 2nd class, joined the Chesapeake on September 4th 1857. Hew as born in Sunderland in 1835, making him 23 at the time of the performance.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

William_Connell

William T. Connell, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 31 1857, after serving aboard HMS Eurydice until 17 June 1857. He was born in London in 1835, making him 27 at the time of the performance.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)

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McArthur Lithograph Edition of The Young Idea A.D. McArthur Mary Isbell Transcription, encoding, and notes Mary Isbell 2019 TAPAS 2018

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

A.D. McArthur The Young Idea: A Naval Journal Edited on Board the H.M.S. Chesapeake in 1857, 1858 & 1859 Edition created from copy in editor's private collection. Other copies held at British Library: 1757.a.20/ and Beinecke Library: ______ 1867 170 Fleet Street, London, England Paul Jerrard & Son An in-process transcription of the entire run of The Young Idea
Alexander D. McArthur, a clerk, joined the Chesapeake on December 9th 1857. He was born on December 25th 1835 in Woolwich, Kent, making him 21 when he came aboard. Census records for the town of Woolwich in 1851 reveal the family of John McAurthur, a captain in the Royal Marines, who lived with his wife Mary E., a son James (a gentleman, aged 29), a son John (no occupation, aged 27), a son Henry (a clerk in the wine trade, aged 17), a son Alexander D (a scholar, aged 15), a son Hanibal (no occupation, aged 13), and a servant Esther Johnson (aged 20). Reverend John William Lewis Bampfield joined the Chesapeake on July 24th 1857 and was a regular contributor to and supporter of The Young Idea. While his age is not recorded in the muster book, census records reveal that Bampfield was born in June of 1823, so he was in his mid-thirties during the cruise. He was commissioned as chaplain aboard a different royal naval vessel in Port Royal, Jamaica before his arrival aboard the Chesapeake. His detailed journal provides an additional witness to The Young Idea, providing fascinating points of contrast from the facsimile edition that McArthur had printed in 1867 and offering hints about the authorship of contributions through his inclusion of the initials of authors (a marked list). Harry Edmund Edgell joined the Chesapeake as Commodore after the period chronicled in the issues included in this edition. He was an enthusiastic supporter of The Young Idea. In Martello Tower" in China, and the Pacific in H.M.S. "Tribune," 1856-60, Francis Martin Norman recounts Edgell's enthusiastic support for a shipboard theatrical aboard H.M.S. Tribune in 1857, when he was captain of the ship. Edgell composed the prologue for the play and painted the drop-scene (50). The National Maritime Museum at Greenwich (NMM) holds over 300 watercolors by Edgell, including some undertaken during the cruise chronicled in The Young Idea. The NMM's biographical note on Edgell reads as follows: "Edgell was promoted to lieutenant in 1828, to commander in 1837 and to captain in 1846. He was appointed to command the Tribune in 1855 when she was in the Crimea. During this commission she went to the Pacific and finally to China. In 1857 Edgell was the Senior Naval Officer at Hong Kong and he transferred into the Bittern tender commanding the gun boats on the Canton River during the hostilities with the Chinese. In 1858 be was given command of the squadron in Indian waters, during which time he commanded the Chesapeake and later the Retribution. The latter returned to England and was paid off in 1860. Edgell had no further active employment and was promoted on the retired list, reaching the rank of vice-admiral in 1871." Excerpts from “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J.K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography : "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [...] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [...] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era." Excerpt from “Pratt, John Henry” by Anita McConnell for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography : “Pratt, John Henry (bap. 1809, d. 1871), Church of England clergyman and mathematician, was baptized on 30 June 1809 at St Mary Woolnoth, London, one of two sons of Josiah Pratt (1768–1844), Church of England clergyman, and his wife, Elizabeth, formerly Jowett. He was educated at Oakham School, Rutland, and entered Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, in 1829, graduating BA in 1833 as third wrangler. He was elected to a fellowship, and proceeded MA in 1836. After taking orders he was appointed through the influence of Daniel Wilson, bishop of Calcutta, a chaplain of the East India Company in 1838. He became Wilson's domestic chaplain and in 1850 archdeacon of Calcutta.” George Horner, a bandsman, joined the Chesapeake on August 12, 1857. He was born in London in 1817. The muster book for the Chesapeake claims to offer the first entry for George Horner, perhaps meaning this was his first time at sea.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Charles Stewart, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on May 23, 1857. He was born in London and served aboard HMS Gladiator just before joining the Chesapeake. He was born in 1834.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Thomas Walsh, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 15, 1857. He was born in London in 1834 and served aboard HMS Cressy just before joining the Chesapeake.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Robert Wilkinson, a private in the Royal Marines, joined the Chesapeake on July 25th 1857. He was born in Sitchfield, Staffordshire.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) muster#153, ordinary seaman from Alesford, 36 when coming aboard the ChesapeakeMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) John Welsh, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on February 20, 1857. He was born in MayoMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Henry Montagu, yeoman of signals, joined the Chesapeake on July 28, 1857 after serving aboard HMS President. He was born in St. Hilliers, Jersey (the Channel Islands) in 1826, making him 32 at the time of the performance.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Isaac Wright, an ordinary sailor 2nd class, joined the Chesapeake on September 4th 1857. Hew as born in Sunderland in 1835, making him 23 at the time of the performance.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) C. R. B. Hamilton (the only Hamilton in the musters) was a naval cadet who served aboard HMS Colossus before joining the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland in December of 1842, making him 15 at the time the performanceMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) James Brown, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard HMS Cuckoo until February 3, 1857. He was born at Sheerness on the 17th of January 1829, making him 28 at the time of the performanceMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) William T. Connell, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 31 1857, after serving aboard HMS Eurydice until 17 June 1857. He was born in London in 1835, making him 27 at the time of the performance.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Edward Taylor, Assistant Engineer 3rd class (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 25th 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster bookMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Mr. Wilkinson, a clerk (a subordinate officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857 after serving aboard HMS Majestic. He was born in Suffolk in 1836, which would make him 22 at the time of the cricket match in CalcuttaMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in Bombay in 1838, making him 20 at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) S. Reynolds, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on September 4th 1857. He was born in Landport (Portsmouth) in 1839, making him 19 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) C.B. Theobald, a naval cadet, joined the Chesapeake on July 24th 1857. He was born in Mark's Tey, Essex in 1843, making him 15 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) There are three different members of the ship's company with the last name Cooper. The only thing we can tell about the "Cooper" referenced in the cricket match is that he was not a commissioned officer, but an ordinary seaman.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Charles T. Chute, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23rd 1857, after serving aboard Euridice. He was born in London in 1841, making him 17 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) James Bew, an experienced seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 1st 1857. He was born in 1833, making him 25 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) C.L. Oxley, a midshipman, joined the Chesapeake on July 29th 1857. He was born in 1841, making him 17 at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Still searching for biographical details on Rajah Behadoor Hope played for the "squadron's eleven" and does not appear in Chesapeak muster book, which means he likely belonged to another ship in the squadronMuster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Haswell served aboard Himalaya until he was injured and replaced by Piers.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Lieutenant Edward Kelly does not appear in the muster book of HMS Chesapeake. Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) George H. Parkin was named acting commander of HMS Chesapeake on February 1st 1858 and came aboard on February 25th after serving aboard Roebuck. Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) S.B. Piers, a commander, joined the Chesapeake on July 28th 1857. He was discharged on January 22nd 1858 to serve aboard HMS Himalaya when vice Haswell was invalided.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884) Juan I. Faustino, bandmaster, joined the Chesapeake on September 14th 1857 after serving aboard HMS Imperieuse. He was born in 1820 in Allicante, Portugal, making him 37 when he joined the ship's company.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st September 1857 Ending 30th September 1857, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2883) cite one of the articles on the uprising James Hammond, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on July 13 1857, after serving aboard HMS Eurydice until 12 June 1857. He was born in London on November 12, 1837, making him 21 at the time of the performance. He entered the ship as "B1C" or "Boy, first class" and was promoted to Ordinary Seaman (second class) on July 27, 1857. He was promoted to Ordinary Seaman (first class) on October 1, 1857, which suggests that he "learned the ropes" quickly and was given more responsibility within four months of joining the Chesapeake. Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1859 Ending 31st March 1859, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2886) Edward Mansbridge, a landsman, joined the Chesapeake on August 13 1857, after serving aboard HMS Blenheim until 12 August 1857. He was born in Landport (a district within Portsmouth) on November 2, 1829, making him 31 at the time of the performance. He entered the ship as a landsman and worked as a stoker.Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1859 Ending 31st March 1859, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2886) Have not yet located Hurst in the musters HMS Pelorus was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. The ship was launched on February 5, 1858 and its masting and fitting-out was completed on September 10, 1857. The ship was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pelorus was broken up for parts at Devonport on February 3, 1869. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004. Roebuck HMS Roebuck was a Royal Navy despatch vessel with 5 guns in the Intrepid class. The ship was launched on March 22, 1856 and its masting and fitting-out was completed on August 25, 1857. The ship was 200 feet long, 179 feet 5 1/4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet 6 inches. The ship was built for a company of 100 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow Class were approved to be built by contract in the Thames [...]" (218). The Roebuck was one of twenty additional vessels ordered in 1855 (218-219). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004. Cyclops HMS Cyclops was a Royal Navy steam vessel with six guns in the Cyclops class. The ship was launched on July 10, 1839. The ship was 190 feet 3 inches long, 163 feet 6 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 37 feet 6 inches. The ship was built for a company of 175 to 200 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, the ship was re-armed in 1856 "with 2x 68 pdrds (95cwt) on the pivots and 4 x 10in (84cwt) on the broadside trucks." They also explain that it "was fitted 1856/57 to assist with the laying of the Atlantic cable (151). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004. Bentinck Need to find about this P and O ship Blenheim Need to find about this Royal Navy vessel Chesapeake HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). The ship was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and its masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. The ship was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. The ship was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.

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"The Young Idea" Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday-December 12, 1857 No 1.
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from our Correspondent Grand Dinner Party in celebration of hoisting the Broad Pendant

On Wednesday the 9th a grand dinner party was given by the Ward Room Officers of H.M.S. Chesapeake to their commodore, in honor of his having on that day hoisted his Broad Pendant

I will not encroach too much on your valuable time, by entering fully into minute details, but proceed to describe, as well, and briefly, as I am able, one of the great features of the week. There is little occasion to name the Bill of Fare, as it might make sundry people's mouths water to no purpose; suffice it to say the table was served in a most "recherche" style; the good looking and well dressed sailor boys, being remarkably attentive; the whole being under the able management of Mr. Geo Hoadley, the Mess Steward.

Scandal, says, that several cries were heard from the background, much resembling the noise that boys make when under punishment, and therefore avers, that the boys' good conduct arose from the fact of a Corporal, having been seen to enter the ward room previous to dinner, with what sailors call a "persuader" in his hand. But as I make it a practice to turn a deaf ear to scandal, (altho' readers may draw their own conclusions) still I am of opinion that they (the boys) have been too well drilled, and the system too good, to allow such a derogatory report to gain ground in any right minded person's opinion. You must pardon me, for having thus digressed from my subject, but as calumnious reports quickly get abroad, and such an one might prove detrimental to that well regulated mess. I take this opportunity of nipping it in the bud: -to proceed:-The culinary department, under the care of Mons: do Blanchearde, (who bids fair to outrival Mr Soyer) gave every satisfaction and the well satisfied look that rested on everyone's face, on the removal of the cloth, would, could he only have seen it, have repaid him well for his unremitting zeal.

Dessert on the table, and the glasses filled, the usual loyal toast was drunk to the splendid band of the ship, under their leader, Signor Faustine, playing "God save the Queen" followed immediately by "The return of the Admiral". Some slight mistake appears to have been made, in the time appointed for the playing of this Air; but to the fact of the Bandmaster being a foreigner, and as yet, not initiated into English customs, must this mistake be attributed

After the strains of music had ceased the President Capt. Piers, in an appropriate speech proposed the health of Commodore Watson CB which was drunk with enthusiasm, and no heel tops "no heel tops" is a call made when one has not emptied their glass after a toast, the band playing as before, the "Return of the Admiral" ...

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"The Young Idea" "Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal Saturday 23rd January 1858 No. 7

Our long voyage has now come to a close, we may consider that we have arrived at our destination, that our future prospects centre in Calcutta.

What these prospects may be, we are unable to determine at present, although, we may almost dispel the idea of seeing service before the enemy, as we had hoped, our proceedings will most likely consist in various kinds of extra duties, as unpleasant as they are unremunerative.

But, at this, we must not repine, for, as our gallant Commodore expressed in his speech last Sunday, we do as much good, in assisting the arrival, or departure of vessels, in provisioning, storing, repairing, conveying troops or other equally tame work, as though we were in the field; no doubt, some may be inclined to say, that this is merely a propitiatory view of the case, but, we say, it is the fact, and although our inclination leads us to think otherwise and to feel dissatisfied with the failure of our dearest hopes, yet, this should not lessen our zeal in the exercise of our various duties, and hope must brighten our path with the expectation, of not always having such unsatisfactory employment.

We cannot disguise the fact that we are "too late for the fair," but yet an old adage says "better late than never" and who knows, or who can foretell, what fortunate circumstances may occur, to reward us for our present disappointment.

Of the present state of the rebellion we cannot venture to say much; on shore, one heard little or The Young Idea" Saturday 23rd January 1858 nothing of it, although we cannot fancy that the hearts of English men and women, can wholly forget the perils of their country people.

Our information of what is proceeding is therefore very limited, but we hope that next week we may be able to procure intelligence of the successful career of that gallant soldier Sir Colin Campbell, as well as of a speedy termination to the disturbances in India.

Calcutta!

Here we are at last! the external appearance is novel and not uninteresting, what is the interior? Such were our reflections when we had time to look around us, and witness the busy scene,- boats of various shapes and build, dropping with the tide, with their swarthy crews, and the steersman wrapped in a linen robe, wielding the huge oar with which he guides the boat; magnificent merchant ships laying close in shore for repairs, discharging cargo, or other purposes, the forest of masts which met the gaze when it extended up the river, the hum of distant voices, the strange figures, carriages & vehicles of various descriptions passing along the Esplanade, all united to excite us with their novelty, and we were forced to satisfy our curiosity by visiting the shore.

On landing we were assailed by numbers of importunate palanquin bearers, who would hardly listen to the negatives we returned to their vociferations of "Palankie Sail" However we managed to escape in safety, and were pursuing our course towards the town when young lad came forward with an umbrella, and notwithstanding our decisive refusals of his services, he persisted in following and shading us from the sun.

We found him useful, and intelligent, and had no cause to regret making his acquaintance; he guided us to the bazaars, which reminded us forcibly of the like places for vending goods and merchandize in Constantinople. The small low shops and dirty lanes, for we cannot designate them streets, the various costumes of the natives, yellow, blue, red and white, the most part clothed in little save their tawny skins, all meeting the eye in a variegated mass, as the whole extent of the bazaar was comprehended at a glance, the creaking of the drays, or waggons, drawn by two small buffaloes, and made of bamboos, with most primitive wheels and harness, the shouts of the palanquin bearers, as they staggered under the weight of some corpulent old gentleman, who perhaps, entertained the opinion that the sun might melt him, were he to expose himself; the touting of the vendors, who, with salaams, begged us to walk into, each, his particular shop, and become their customers, all this and many other circumstances which struck us at the time, brought back very strongly to our memories the streets and bazaars of Constantinople

"The Young Idea" Saturday 23 January 1858.

After purchasing what we required, and we found that the prices first demanded were high but easily beaten down, we determined to visit now the Esplanade, and see what was going on there. We dismissed our guide with a fee with which he appeared very well pleased, & having refreshed ourselves with an ice at Browne's Hotel, we left our purchases there and strolled forth upon the Esplanade.

Here we found Rotten Row, in miniature, whilst upon the green the lovers of exercise amused themselves with cricket, and quoits. The roads were thronged with vehicles & carriages of every description native and European, filled with ladies & gentlemen, enjoying the fresh air; after the sun had expended his power.

The complexions of the ladies did not appear to us to have suffered from the heat of the climate, but we suppose they take care not to expose themselves during the day, and thus escape, we could not for one instant entertain an idea of artificial means being resorted to.

They certainly appeared to pay as much attention to fashion as in England, but we could not wonder at that, when we saw the immense millinery, and bonnet establishments which with open doors and temptingly displayed head dresses, robes, mantles, &c, &c invited the victims to enter and become an easy prey.

The shades of night falling fast and thick, and not wishing to remain any longer on shore, we returned on board, not as well satisfied with