Epigrammes by I.D. & C.M. (Revised)

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                <title>Epigrammes </title>
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                    <name><forename>John</forename> <surname>Davies</surname></name>
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                    <name>Anthony Adamcewicz</name>
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                    <name>Michael Herlihy</name>
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                    <name>Jessica Massey</name>
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                    <name>Brooke Doehler</name>
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                    <name>Stacey Sarto</name>
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                    <resp>Primary editor</resp>
                    <name>Kristen Abbott Bennett</name>
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                    Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin
                </publisher>
                <date>2017</date>
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                    <p>This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.</p>
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                    <author><name ref="xml:DAVI1">John Davies</name></author>
                    <title level="m">Epigrammes and Elegies. By I.D. and C.M.</title>
                    
                    <!-- Pub info difficult to ascertain. ESTC offers the following: "The imprint is false; possibly printed in Scotland by R. Waldegrave, in London by T. Scarlet (if so, before Sept. 1596), or on the continent; see "Studies in bibliography" 25 (1972), p. 151. Publication date estimated by STC." -->
                    
                    <pubPlace>At Middleborough.</pubPlace>
                    
                    <date when-custom="1599" datingMethod="mol:julianSic" calendar="mol:julianSic">,<!-- Date is best guess and that given by both ESTC and EEBO as approximate -->1599</date> <idno type="STC">STC 6350</idno>
                </bibl>
                <bibl>Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm accessed via the Early English Books Online database.</bibl>
            <!-- The letters "t" and "r" are worn throughout the text and there are many gaps in inking that have been supplied if the encoder had a high confidence level. The microfilm facsimile deteriorates much toward the end of the document. -->
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                            <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">EPIGRAMMES</fw><lb/><lb/>
            <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">and</fw><lb/><lb/>
            <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">ELEGIES.</fw><lb/><lb/>
            <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">By I.D. and</fw><lb/><lb/>
            <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">C.M.</fw><lb/><lb/>
                           <figure><figDesc>Printers Ornament</figDesc>
                        </figure>
            <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">At <placeName>Middleborough</placeName></hi></fw> 
            <pb/>
               <!-- End title page -->        
     
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style: italic;">Epigrammata prima.</foreign></head><lb/>
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style: italic;">Ad Musam,</foreign></head><lb/>
                    <lg>
                        <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5em; padding: 0.5em; margin: 0.2em 1em 0;">F</hi>Lie merry <persName>Muſe</persName> vnto that merry towne,</l>
                        <l>where thou mayſt playes, reuels, and triumphes,</l>
                        <l>The houſe of fame, &amp; Theatre of renowne, (ſee</l>
                        <l>VVhere all good wits &amp; ſpirits loue to be.</l>
                    </lg>
                    
                    <lg>
                        <l>Fallin betwene their hands, that loue &amp; praiſe thee</l>
                        <l>and be to them a laughter and a ieſt:</l>
                        <l>but as for them which ſcorning ſhall approue thee,</l>
                        <l> Diſdayne their wits, and thinke thyne owne the beſt.</l></lg>
                    
                    <lg>   
                        <l>But if thou finde any ſo groſe and dull,</l>
                        <l>That thinke I do to priuat Taxing leane:</l>
                        <l>Bid him go hang, for he is but a gull,</l>
                        <l>And knowes not what an Epigramme does meane.</l>
                        <l style="text-intent:1em">Which Taxeth vnder a particular name,</l>
                        <l> A generall vice which merits publique blame.</l></lg></div> 
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">Of</fw><lb/>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">​A3<supplied reason="omitted-in-original">r</supplied></fw><pb/>
                
                    
                    <div type="epigram">       
                        <head style="text-align:center;"> O<hi style="font-style: italic;">f a Gull</hi>.</head> 
                        <lg>         
                            <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5em; padding: 0.5em; margin: 0 2em 1em 0;">O</hi>Ft in my laughing rimes, I name a gull,</l> 
                            <l>But this new terme will many queſtions breede</l>
                            <l>Therefore at firſt I will expreſſe at full,</l>
                            <!-- this last line needs to be brought flush againt the margin -->
                           <l>Who is a true and perfect gull indeede.</l></lg>
                        
                        <lg>  
                            <l>A gull is he, who feares a veluet gowne,</l> 
                            <l>and when a wench is braue, dares not ſpeake to her:</l>
                            <l>A gull is he which trauerſeth the towne,</l>
                            <l>and is for marriage knowne a common wooer.</l></lg> 
                        
                        <lg>
                            <l>A gull is he, which while he prowdlie weares,</l>
                            <l>a ſiluer hilted Rapier by his ſide:</l>
                            <l>Indures the lyes, and knockes about the eares,</l>
                            <l>Whiſt in his ſheath, his ſleeping ſword doth bide.</l></lg>
                        
                        <lg>
                            <l>A gull is he which weares good hanſome cloathes,</l>
                            <l>And ſtandes in preſence ſtroaking vp his hayre:</l>
                            <l>and filles vp his vnperfect ſpeech with othes.</l>
                            <l>but ſpeakesnot one wiſe word throughout the yeere</l>
                            <l style="text-intent:1em"> But to define a gull in termes preciſe,</l>
                            <l style="text-intent:1em"> A gull is he which ſemes, and is not wiſe.</l></lg></div> 
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">In</fw><lb/>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">​
                            A3<supplied reason="omitted-in-original">v</supplied></fw>
            <pb/>
                   
                        <div type="epigram">               
                            <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Fauſtum</foreign> 7</head>
                            <lg> 
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;"><persName>Fauſtus</persName> not lord, nor knight, nor wiſe, nor olde,</l> 
                                <l>To euery place about the towne doth ride,</l>
                                <l>He rides into the fields, Playes to beholde,</l>
                                <l>He rides to <placeName>Powles</placeName>, he rides to th’ordinarie,</l>
                                <l>He rides vnto the houſe of bawderie too.</l>
                                <l>Thither his horſse ſo often doth him carry,</l>
                                <l>That ſhortlie he wil quite forget to go.</l>
                            </lg>
                        </div>
                        
                        
                        <div type="epigram">  
                            <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Katum</foreign> <sic>1</sic></head>
                            <lg>
                                <l><persName>Kate</persName> being pleaſde, wiſht that her pleaſure coulde,</l>
                                <l>Indure as long as a buſfe ierkin would.</l>
                                <l>Content thee <persName>Kate</persName>, although thy pleaſure waſteth,</l>
                                <l>Thy pleaſures place like a buffe ierkin laſteth:</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">For no buffe ierkin hath bin oftner worne,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">Nor hath more ſcrapings or more dresſings born.</l>
                            </lg>
                        </div>
                        
                        
                        <div type="epigram"> 
                            <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Librum</foreign> 9</head>
                            <lg>
                                <l><persName>Liber</persName> doth vaunt how chaſtely he hath liude,</l>
                                <l>Since he hath bin in towne 7 yeeres and more,</l>
                                <l>For that he fweares he hath foure onely fwiude,</l>
                                <l>A maide, a wife, a widow and a whoore:</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">Then Liber thou haſt ſwiude all women kinde,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">For a fift ſort I know thou canſt not finde.</l>
                            </lg></div>
                            <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">In</fw><lb/>
                            <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B1r</supplied></fw>
                            <pb/> 
                        
                        
                        <div type="epigram">
                            <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Medonem</foreign> 10</head>
                            <lg>
                                <l>Great <persName>Captaine Medon</persName> weares a chaine of golde,</l>
                                <l>which at fiue hundred crownes is valued;</l>
                                <l>For that it was his graundſires chainƏ of olde,</l>
                                <l>when great <persName>king Henry Bulleigne</persName> conquered.</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">and weare it <persName>Medon</persName>, for it may enſue,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">that thou by vertue of his Maſſie <sic>ehaine</sic>,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">a ſtronger towne than <placeName>Bulloigne</placeName> maiſt ſubdue,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent:1em;">Yf wiſemens ſawes be not reputed vaine,</l>
                                <l>For what ſaide <persName>Phillip king of <placeName>Macedon</placeName></persName>?</l>
                                <l>There is no Caſtle ſo wel fortified,</l>
                                <l>But if an Aſſe laden with gold comes on,</l>
                                <l>The guarde wil ſtoope, and gates flie open wide.</l>
                            </lg>
                        </div>
                        
                        
                        <div type="epigram">
                            <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Gellam</foreign> 10</head>
                            <lg>
                                <l><persName>Gella</persName>, if thou doft loue thy ſelfe, take heede,</l>
                                <l>left thou my rimes, vnto thy louer reade,</l>
                                <l>For ſtraight thou grinſt,&amp; then thy louer reeth,</l>
                                <l>Thy canker-eaten gums, and rotten teeth.</l>
                            </lg>
                        </div>
                        
                        <div type="epigram">
                            <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Quintum</foreign> 12</head>
                            <lg>
                                <l><persName>Quintus</persName> his wit infuſed into his braine,</l>
                                <l>Miſlikes the place, and fled into his feete,</l>
                                <l>and the e it wanders vp and down the ſtreetes,</l>
                                <l>Dabled in the durt, and ſoaked in the raine.</l>
                                <l>Doubtleſſe his wit inrendes not to aſpire,</l>
                                <l>Which leaues his head to trauell in the mire.</l>
                            </lg>
                        </div>
            <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">In</fw><lb/>
            <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B1v</supplied></fw><pb/>

                    <div type="epigram">
                        <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Seuerum</foreign> 13</head>
                        <lg>
                            <l>The puritane <persName>Seuerus</persName> oft doth reade,</l>
                            <l>this text that doth pronounce vaine ſpeech a ſinne,</l>
                            <l>That thing defiles a man that doth proceede</l>
                            <l>From out the mouth, not that which enters in.</l>
                            <l>Hence is it, that we ſeldome heare him ſweare,</l>
                            <l>and thereof like a Phariſie he vaunts,</l>
                            <l>but he deuoures more Capons in a yeare,</l>
                            <l>Then would ſuffice a hundreth proteſtants.</l>
                            <l>And ſooth thoſe ſectaries are gluttons all,</l> 
                            <l>Aſwell the threed-bare Cobler as the knight,</l>
                            <l>For thoſe poore ſlaues which haue not wherewithal</l> 
                            <l>Feede on the rich, til they deuoure them quite.</l>
                            <l style="text-indent:1em;">And ſo like Pharoes kine, they eate vp cleane,</l>
                            <l style="text-indent:1em;">Thoſe that be fat, yet ſtill themſelues be leane.</l>
                        </lg>
                    </div>
            
                    <div type="epigram"> 
                        <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Leucam</foreign> 14</head><lb/> 
                        <lg><l><persName>Leuca</persName> in preſence once a fart did let,</l>
                            <l>Some langht a little, ſhe forſooke the place:</l>
                            <l>and madde with ſhame, did eke her gloue forget,</l>
                            <l>which ſhe returned to fetch with baſhfull grace:</l>
                            <l style="text-indent:1em;">And when ſhe would haue ſaid, my gloue</l>
                            <l style="text-indent:1em;">My fart (qd ſhe) which did more laughter moue.</l></lg>
                        
                        <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: center;">2</fw><lb/>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B2r</supplied></fw><pb/>
                    </div>
                    
                    <div type="epigram">
                          <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Macrum</foreign> 15</head><lb/>
                            <lg><l>Thou canſt not ſpeake yet <persName>Macer</persName>, for to ſpeake,</l>
                            <l>is to diſtinguiſh ſoundes ſignificant,</l>
                            <l>Thou with harſh noyſe the ayre doſt rudely breake,</l>
                            <l>But what thou vttereſt common ſence dnth want:</l>
                            <l style="text-indent:1em;">Halfe Engliſh wordes, with fuſtian tearms among</l>
                            <l style="text-indent:1em;">Much like the burthen of a Northerne ſong.</l></lg> 
                        </div>
            
                    <div type="epigram">
                       <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Fauſtum</foreign> 16</head><lb/>
                        <lg>
                            <l>That youth ſaith <persName>Fauſtus</persName>, hath a Lyon ſeene,</l> 
                            <l>Who from a Dycing houſe comes monieleſſe,</l>
                            <l>but when he loſt his hayre, where had he beene,</l>
                            <l>I doubt me had ſeene a Lyoneſſe.</l></lg>
                        </div>
            
                    <div type="epigram">
                         <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Coſmum</foreign>17</head><lb/>
                        <lg><l><persName>Coſmus</persName> hath more diſcourſing in his head,</l> 
                            <l>then loue, when <persName>Pallas</persName> iſſued from his braine,</l> 
                            <l>and ſtill he ſtriues to be deliuered,</l> 
                            <l>Of all his thoughtes at once, but al in vaine.</l>
                            <l>For as we ſee at all the play houſe dores,</l>
                            <l>when ended is the play. the daunce, and fong:</l>
                            <l>A thouſand <unclear reason="brokentype">townſmən</unclear>, gentlemen, &amp; whores</l> 
                            <lb/>
                            <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B2v</supplied></fw>
                            <pb/>
                            
                        <l>Porters &amp; ſeruing-men togither throng,</l> 
                        <l>ſo thoughts of drinking, thriuing, wenching, war</l> 
                        <l>And borrowing money, raging in his minde,</l> 
                        <l>To įſſue all at once ſo forwarde are,</l>
                        <l>As none at all can perfect paſſage finde.</l></lg></div>
                     

                <div type= "epigram">
                    <head style="text-alight;center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Flaccum</foreign> 18</head><lb/>
                    <lg>
                        <l>The falſe knaue Flaccus once a bribe I gaue,</l>
                        <l>The more foole I to bribe ſo falſe a knaue,</l>
                        <l>but he gaue back my bribe, the more foole he,</l>
                        <l>That for my follie, did not couſen me.</l>
                    </lg>
                </div>
                <div type= "epigram">
                    <head style="text-alight;center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Cineam</foreign> 19</head><lb/>
                    <lg>
                        <l>Thou dogged Cineas hated like a dogge,</l>
                        <l>For ſtill thou grumbleſt like a Maftie <sic>dogge<unclear>r</unclear></sic></l>
                        <l>comparſt thy ſelfe to nothing but a dogge,</l>
                        <l>Thou faiſt thou art as weary as a dogge.</l>
                        <l>As angry, ſick, &amp; hungry as a dogge,</l>
                        <l>As dull and melancholy as a dogge:</l>
                        <l>As lazie, ſleepie, &amp; as idle as dogge.</l>
                        <l>But why doſt thou compare thee to a dogge</l>
                        <l>In that, for which all men deſpiſe a dogge,</l>
                        <l>I will compare thee better to a dogge.</l>
                        <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: center;">3</fw><fw type= "catchword" style="text-align: right;">Thou</fw><lb/>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B3r</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
          
                        <l>Thou art as faire and comely as a dogge,</l>
                        <l>Thou art as true and honeſt as a dogge,</l>
                        <l>Thou art as kinde and liberall as a dogge,</l>
                        <l>Thou art as wiſe and valiant as a dogge</l>
                        <l>But Cineas, I haue ofe heard thee tell,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Thou art as like thy father as may be,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Tis like inough, and faith like it well,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">But I am glad thou art not like to me.</l>
                    </lg>
                </div>
                <div type= "epigram">
                    <head style="text-alight;center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Gerontem</foreign> 20</head><lb/>
                    <lg>
                        <l><persName>Geron</persName> mouldie memorie corrects,</l>
                        <l><persName>Old Holinſhed</persName> our famous chronicler,</l>
                        <l>With morrall rules, and pollicie collects,</l>
                        <l>Out of all actions done theiſe foureſcore yeere.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">accounts the time of euery olde euent,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">not frō <persName>Chriſts</persName> birth, nor from the <persName>Princes</persName>raigne,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">But from fame other famous accident,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Which in mens generall notiſe doth remaine.</l>
                        <l>The ſiege of <placeName>Bulloigne</placeName>, and the plaguie ſweat,</l>
                        <l>The going to <placeName>ſaint Quintines</placeName> and <placeName>new hauen</placeName>.</l>
                        <l>The riſing in the North, The froſt ſo great.</l>
                        <l>That cart-wheele prints on <placeName>Thames</placeName> face were ſeene,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">The fall of money, &amp; burning of <persName>Paules</persName> ſteeple,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">The blaſing ſtarre and <persName>Spaniardes</persName> ouerthrow:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">By thieſe euents, notorious to the people,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">He meaſures times, &amp; things forepaſt dosh ſhew.</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">But</fw><lb/>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B3v</supplied></fw>
               <pb/>
                        
                        <l>But moſt of all, he chieſſie reckons by,</l>
                        <l>A priuat chaunce, the death of his curſt wife:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">This is to him the deareſt memorie,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">And th’happieſt accident of all his life.</l></lg>
                </div>     
            
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Marcum</foreign> 21</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>When <persName>Marcus</persName> comes frō <placeName>Mins</placeName>, he ſtil doth ſweare</l>
                        <l>By, come a ſeauen, that all is loſt and gone,</l>
                        <l>But thats not true, for he hath loſt his hayre</l>
                        <l>Onely for that, he came too much at one.</l></lg>
                </div>
            
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Ciprium</foreign> 22</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>The fine youth <persName>Ciprius</persName> is more tierſe and neate,</l>
                        <l>Then the new garden of the olde Temple is,</l>
                        <l>And ſtil the neweſt faſhion he doth get,</l>
                        <l>And with the time doth chaung from that to this,</l>
                        <l>He weares a hat now of the flat crown-block,</l>
                        <l>The treble ruffes, long cloake, &amp; doublet french:</l>
                        <l>He takes Tobacco, and doth weare a locke,</l>
                        <l>And waſtes more time in dreſſing then a Wench.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Yet this new-fangled youth, made for theſe tim<supplied reason="scan-unclear">es</supplied>,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Doth aboue all praiſe olde Gaſcoines times.</l></lg></div>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B4r</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
              
            
            <div type="epigram">      
                <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Cineam</foreign> 23.</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>Whē <persName>Cineas</persName> comes amōgſt his friends in morning</l>
                        <l>He ſliely lookes who firſt his cap doth moue:</l>
                        <l>Him he ſalutes, the reſt ſo glimly ſcorning,</l>
                        <l>As if for euer they had loſt his loue.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">I knowing how it doth the humour fit,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Of this fond gull to be ſaluted firſt:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">catch at my cap, but moue it not a whit:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Which perceiuing he ſeemes ſo ſpite to burſt.</l>
                        <l>But <persName>cineas</persName>, why expect you more of me,</l>
                        <l>Then I of you<sic>’</sic> I am as good a man,</l>
                        <l>And better too by many a quallitie</l>
                        <l>For vault, and daunce, &amp; fence &amp; rime I can,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">You keep a whore at your own charg men tel me</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Indeede friend (cineas) therein you excell me.</l></lg>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Gallum</foreign> 24</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l><persName>Gallus</persName> hath bin this Sommer time in <placeName>Frieſland</placeName>,</l>
                        <l>And now returned he ſpeakes ſuch warlike words</l>
                        <l>As if I coulde their Engliſh vnderſtand,</l>
                        <l>I feare me they would cut my Throat like ſwordes</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">He talks of counterſcarfes and caſomates,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Of parapets, of curteneys and Pallizadojs,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">Of flankers, Rauelings, gab<unclear>i</unclear>ons he prates,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">And of falſe brayes, &amp; fallies &amp; ſcaladoſe:</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">But</fw><lb/>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B4v</supplied></fw>
                        <pb/>

                        <l>But to require ſuch gulling termes as theſe,</l> 
                        <l>With wordes of my profeſſion I replie:</l> 
                        <l>I tel of foorching, vouchers, and counterpleas,</l> 
                        <l>Of Wichernams, eſſoynes, and champartie.</l> 
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">ſo neyther of vs vnderſtanding eyther,</l> 
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em">We part as wiſe as when we came together.</l></lg> 
                    </div>
                
             <div type="epigram">
                 <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Decium</foreign> 25</head><lb/>
                        <lg><l>Audacious Painters haue nine worthies made,</l> 
                            <l>But <persName>Poet Decius</persName> more audacious farre,</l> 
                            <l>Making his miſtres march with men of warre,</l> 
                            <l>With title of tenth worthlie<!-- Cf. nine worthies, Shakespeare LLL? (KAB)--> doth her lade,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">Me thinkes that gul did vſe his termes as fit,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">which termde his loue a Giant for hir wit.</l></lg>
                    </div>
              
                    <div type="epigram">
                        <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Gellam</foreign> 26</head>
                        <lg><l>If gellas beautie be examined</l> 
                            <l>ſhe hath a dull dead eye, a ſaddle noſe,</l> 
                            <l>An ill ſhapte face, with morpheu ouerſpread,</l> 
                            <l>and rotten Teeth with ſhe in laughing ſhowes.</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">Brieflie ſhe is the filthyeſt wench in Towne,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">of all that do the art of whooring vfe:</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">But when ſhe hath put on her ſattin gowne,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">Her out lawne apron, &amp; her veluevt ſhooes.</l>
                            <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">Her</fw><lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">C<supplied reason="omitted-in-original">1r</supplied></fw><pb/>
           
                            <l>Her greene ſilk ſtockings, and her peticoate,</l> 
                            <l>Of Taffa<unclear reason="gap-in-inking">t</unclear>ie, with golden frindge a-rounde:</l> 
                            <l>And is withall perfumed with ciuet hot,</l> 
                            <l>which doth her valiant ſtinking breath confounde</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">Yet ſhe with theſe addicions is no more,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">Then a ſweete, filthe, fine ill fauored whoore.</l></lg> 
                    </div>
              
              
                    <div type="epigram">
                        <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Sillam</foreign> 27</head><lb/>
                        <lg><l>Silla is often challenged to the fielde,</l> 
                            <l>To answere like a gen<unclear reason="gap-in-inking">t</unclear>leman his foes,</l> 
                            <l>But when doth he his only anſwere yeelde,</l> 
                            <l>That he hath liuings &amp; faire landes to loſe.</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em"><persName>Silla</persName>, if none but beggars valiant were,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">The king of ſpaine woulde put vs all in feare.</l></lg>
                    </div>
                
                    <div type="epigram">
                        <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Sillam</foreign> 28</head><lb/>
                        <lg><l>Who dares affirme that <persName>Silla</persName> dare not fight?</l> 
                            <l>when I dare ſweare he dares aduenture more,</l> 
                            <l>Then the moſt braue, moſt all daring wight:</l> 
                            <l>That euer armes with reſollucion bore.</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">He that da<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>e touch the moſt vnholſome whoore,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">That euer was retired into the ſpittle:</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">and dares caourt wenches ſtanding at a dore,</l> 
                            <l style="text-indent: 1em">The porcion of his wit being paſſing litle.</l>
                
                   <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">He</fw><lb/>
                   <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C1v</supplied></fw><pb/>
                
                <l>He that dares giue his deereſt friendes offeuces,</l>
                        <l>which other valiant fooles do feare to do:</l>
                        <l>and when a feuer doth confounde his fences,</l> 
                        <l>dare eate raw biefe, &amp; drinke ſtrong wine thereto.</l> 
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">He that dares take Tobacco on the ſtage,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">dares man a whore at noon-day throgh the ſtreet</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">dares daunce in <placeName>Powles</placeName>, &amp; in this formall age,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">dares ſay &amp; do what euer is vnmeete.</l>
                        <l>Whom feare of ſhame coulde neuer yet affright,</l>
                        <l>Who dares affirme that <persName>Silla</persName> dares not fight?</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Haywodum</foreign> 29</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l><placeName>Haywood</placeName> which in Epigrams did excell,</l> 
                        <l>Is now put down fince my light muſe aroſe:</l>
                        <l>As buckets are put downe into a well,</l> 
                        <l>Or as a ſchoole-boy putteth downe his hoſe.</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Dacum</foreign> 30</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>Amongſt the Poets <persName>Dacus</persName> numbred is,</l>
                        <l>Yet could he neuer make an engliſh rime,</l>
                        <l>but ſome proſe ſpeeches I haue hearde of his,</l>
                        <l>which haue bin ſpoken man a dundreth time.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">The man that keepes the Eliphant hath one,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">wherein he tels the wonders of the beaſt</l>
                    <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: center;">3</fw>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">An</fw><lb/>   
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C1v</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
                    
                    <l>An other <persName>Bankes</persName> pronounced long agoe,</l>
                        <l>when he his curtalls qualities expreſt:</l>
                        <l>He fi<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>ſt taught him that keepes the monuments,</l> 
                        <l>At <placeName>Weſtminſter</placeName> his formall tale to ſay,</l>
                        <l>And alſo him with Puppets repreſents,</l>
                        <l>and alſo him which with the Ape doth play</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em'">Though all his poetrre be like to this,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">Amongst the Poets numbred is.</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Priſcum</foreign> 31</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>VVhhen <persName>Priſcus</persName> raiſde from low to high eſtate.</l>
                        <l>Rode through the ſtreete in pompous iollitie,</l>
                        <l><persName>Caius</persName> his poore famillier friende of late,</l>
                        <l>be-ſpake him thus, Sir now you know not me:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">Tis likely friende (quoth <persName>Priſcus</persName>) to be ſo,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">For at this time my felfe I do not know.</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Brunum</foreign> 32</head><lb/>
                    <!-- Interesting marginalia. There's a series of scrawled numbers that appear to be "4333" followed by 6 more unclear numbers -->
                    <lg><l><persName>Brunus</persName> which thinkes him ſelfe a faire ſweet youth</l>
                        <l>is Thirtie nine yeeres of age at leaſt:</l>
                        <l>Yet was he neuer to confeſſe the truth,</l>
                        <l>but a dry ſtarueling when he was at beſt.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">T<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">h</supplied>is gull was ſick of ſhew his night cap fine,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">and his wrought Pillow onerſpred with lawne:</l>
                        <l>but hath bin well fince his griefes cauſe hath line,</l>
                        <l>At <placeName>Trollups</placeName> by <persName>ſaint Clements</persName> church in pawne.</l> </lg><lb/></div>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C2v</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Francum</foreign> 33</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>When <persName>Francus</persName> comes to ſollace with his whoore</l>
                        <l>He ſends for rods and ſtrips himſelſe ſtark naked:</l>
                        <l>For his luſt ſleepes, and will not riſe before,</l>
                        <l>by whipping of the wench it be awaked.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">I ennui him not, but wiſh he had the powre,</l>
                        <l style="text-intent:1em;">To make me ſelfe his wench but one halfe houre</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Caſtorem</foreign> 34</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l>Ofſpeaking well, why do we learne the skill,</l>
                        <l>Hoping thereby honor and wealth to gaine.</l>
                        <l>Sith rayling <persName>Caſtor</persName> doth by ſpeaking ill,</l>
                        <l>Oppinion of much wit, and golde obtaine.</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Septimum</foreign> 35</head>
                    <lg><l><persName>Septimus</persName> liues, and is like Garlicke feene,</l>
                        <l>for though his head be white, his blade is greene.</l>
                        <l>This olde mad coult deſerues a Martires praiſe,</l> 
                        <l>For he was burned in <persName>Queen Maries</persName> dayes.</l></lg></div>
                <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: center;">3</fw><lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C3r</supplied></fw> 
                <pb/>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align:center;">Of Tobacco 36</head><lb/>
                    <lg><l><persName>Homer</persName> of Moly, and <persName>Nepenthe</persName> fings,</l>
                        <l>Moly the Gods moſt ſoueraigne hearbe diuine.</l>
                        <l><persName>Nepenthe <sic>Hekens</sic></persName> drinke with gladnes brings,</l>
                        <l>harts g<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>iefe expells, &amp; doth the wits refine.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">but this our age an other worlde hath founde,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">frõ whēce an hearb of heauēly power is brought,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">Moly is not ſo ſoueraigne for a wounde.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">nor hath Nepenthe ſo great wonders wrought.</l>
                        <l>It is Tobacco, whoſe ſweet ſubſtanciall fume,</l>
                        <l>The helliſh torment of the Teeth doth eafe</l>
                        <l>By drawing downe,&amp; drying vp the rume,</l>
                        <l>The mother and the nurſ of ech diſeaſe.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">it is Tobacco which doth colde expell,</l>      
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">and cleeres the obſtructions of the arteries,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">and ſurfets threathning death digefteth well,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">decocting all the ſtomacks crudities.</l>
                        <l>It is Tobacco which hath power to clarifie,</l>
                        <l>The clowdie miſtes before dim eies appearing,</l>
                        <l>It is Tobacco which hath power to rarefie, (ring,</l>
                        <l>The thick groſe humor which doth ſtop the hea-</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">The wraſting <persName>Hectick</persName> and the quartaine feuer,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">which doth of <persName>Phiſick</persName> make a mockerie:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">The gowt it cures,&amp; helps il breaths for euer,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em;">Weather the caufe in Teeth of ſtomacke be.</l>
                        <fw type="catchword">And</fw><lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C3v</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                
             <l>And though ill breaths, were by it but confounded</l>
                    <l>Yet that medicine it doth far excell,</l>
                    <l>Which by <persName>ſir Thomas Moore</persName> hath bin propoũded.</l>
                    <l>For this is thought a gentleman-like ſmell,</l>
                    <l>O that I were one of thieſe mountie bankes,</l>
                    <l>which praiſe their oyles, &amp; pouders which they ſel</l>
                    <l>my cuſtomers would giue me coyne with thankes</l>
                    <l>I for this ware, forſooth a Tale would tell,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Yet would I vſe none of theſe tea mes before,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;">I would but ſay, that it the pox wil cure:</l>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;">This were inough, without diſcourſing more,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;">All our braue gallants in the towne t’alure,</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Craſſum</foreign> 37></head><lb/>
                    <lb/>
                    <lg><l><persName>Craſſus</persName> his lies are not pernitious lies,</l>
                        <l>But pleaſant fictions, hurtfull vnto none:</l>
                        <l>But to himſelfe, for no man counts him wiſe,</l>
                        <l>To tell for truth, that which for falſe is knowne.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">he ſweares that <placeName>Caunt</placeName> is threeſcore miles about,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">and that the bridge at <placeName>Paris</placeName> on the <placeName>Seine</placeName>,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">is the of ſuch thicknes, lēgth &amp; breadth, throghout</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">that ſixſcore arches can it ſcarſe ſuſtaine</l>
                        <l>He ſwears he ſaw ſo great a dead mans ſcull,</l>
                        <l>At <placeName>Canterbury</placeName> digde out of the grounde:</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">That</fw><lb/>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C4r</supplied></fw>              
                    <pb/>
                    
               <l>That woulde containe of wheat, three buſhels ful</l>
                        <l>And that in <placeName>Kent</placeName>, are twentie yeomen founde,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Of which the pooreſt euery yeere diſpendes,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Fiue thouſand <!-- bullet-like character inserted into double space here --> pound theſe &amp; v. thouſand moe,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">So oft he hath recited to his friendes,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">that now himſelfe, perſwades himſelfe tis ſo:</l>
                        <l>But why doth <persName>Craſſus</persName> tel his lies ſo rife,</l>
                        <l>Of bridges, Townes, and things that haue no life.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">He is a lawyer, and doth wel eſpie,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">That for ſuch lies an action will not lie.</l></lg></div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In<supplied reason="unclear"> </supplied>philonem</foreign> 38</head>
                    <lg><l><persName>Philo</persName> the lawyer and the fortune teller,</l>
                        <l>The ſchoolemaiſter, the midwife &amp; the bawde,</l>
                        <l>The conjurer, the buyer and the ſeller,</l>
                        <l>Of painting which with breathing wil be thawde.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">doth practiſe Phiſicke, &amp; his credite growes,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">as doth the ballade-ſingers auditorie.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">which hath at Tēple bar his ſtanding choſe,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">and to the vnlger ſings an ale-houſe ſtorie.</l>
                        <l>Firſt ſtandes a Porter, then an Oyſter wife,</l>
                        <l>Doth ſtint her crie, &amp; ſtay her ſteps to heare him,</l>
                        <l>Then comes a cutpurfe ready with a Knife,</l>
                        <l>and then a cuntrey Client paſſeth neere him,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">There ſtāds the Cunſtable, there ſtāds the whore</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">And harkning to the ſong mark not ech other.</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">There</fw><lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">C4v</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                
                        <l>There by the Serieant ſtandes the debtor poore,</l>
                        <l>and doth no more miſtrust him then his brother:</l>
                        <l>Thus Orpheus o ſuch hearers giueth Muſique,</l>
                        <l>And Philo to much Pa<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>ients giueth phiſicke.</l>
                    </lg> 
                </div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Fuſcum</foreign> 39</head><lb/>
                    <lg>
                        <l>Fuſeus is free, and hath the worlde at will,</l>
                        <l>Yet in the cour<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">s</supplied>e of the li<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">f</supplied>e the he doth leade:</l>
                        <l>hees like a horſe which turning rounde a mill,</l>
                        <l>doth alwaies in the ſeife ſame circle treade:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">Fi<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>ſt he doth <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>ise at x. and at eleuen</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">He go<supplied reason="gap-in-inking" cert="medium">e</supplied>s to Gilles, where he doth eate til one,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">Then ſees he a play till ſixe, &amp; <supplied reason="broken-type" cert="high">ſ</supplied>ups at ſeauen,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">And after ſupper, ſtraight to bed is gone.</l>
                        <l>and there til <unclear reason="broken-type" cert="high">r</unclear>enne next day he doth reamine,</l>
                        <l>and then he dines, then ſees a commedie:</l>
                        <l>and then he ſuppes, &amp; goes to bed againe,</l>
                        <l>Thus rounde he runs without va<supplied reason="gap-in-inking" cert="medium">r</supplied>etie:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">Saue tha<supplied reason="gap-in-inking" cert="medium">t</supplied>, ſometimes he comes not to the play,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1.5em">But falls into a whoore house on the way.</l></lg></div>
                  <lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">D<supplied reason="omitted-in-original">1r</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                             
                <div type="epigram">                
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Afrum </foreign>40</head><lb/>
                    <lg>
                        <l>The ſmell feaſt after, Trauailes to the Burſe</l>
                        <l>Twice euery day the fl<supplied reason="faded-ink">y</supplied>ing newes to heare,</l>
                        <l>w<supplied reason="faded-ink">h</supplied>ich when he hath no money in his purſe,</l>
                        <l>To <supplied reason="gap-in-inking" cert="high">r</supplied>ichmens Tables he doth often beare:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">He tels how Gronigen is taken in,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">by the braue conduct of illuſtrious Vere:</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">and hoe the ſpainiſh forces Breſt would win.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">but that they do Victorious Norris feare.</l>
                        <l>No ſooner is a ſhip at Sea ſurpriſde,</l>
                        <l>but ſtraight he learnes the newes &amp; doth diſcloſe</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">faire written in a ſcrowle he that the names,<hi style="text-indent:2em"> (it</hi>,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">of all the widowes which the plague hath made.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1em">and perſons, Times &amp; places, ſtill he frames,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent:1.5em">To euery Tale, the better to perſwade:</l>
                        <l>We cal him Fame, for that the wide-mouth ſlaue,</l>
                        <l>will eate as faſt as he wil vtter lies</l>
                        <l>For Fame is ſaide an hundreth mouthes to haue,</l>
                        <l>And he eates more than woulde fiue ſcore ſuffice.</l></lg></div>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">In</fw>   
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">D1v</supplied></fw>
                   <pb/>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In paulum </foreign>41</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>By lawful mart, &amp; by vnlawful ſtealth,</l>
                        <l>Paules in ſpite of enuie fortunate</l>
                        <l>De<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>iues out of the Oceans of much wealth,</l>
                        <l>as he may well maintaine a Lordes eſtate.</l>
                        <l style="margin-left: 1em;">But on the lande a little gulfe there is,</l>
                        <l style="margin-left: 1em;">wherein he drowneth all the wealth of his.</l></lg></div>
                 
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Licum </foreign>42</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>Lycus which lately is to <placeName>Venice</placeName> gone,</l>
                        <l>Shall if he do returne, gaine 3 for one:</l>
                        <l>But x to one, his knowledg and his wit,</l>
                        <l>vvil not be bettered or increaſde a vvhit.</l></lg></div>
                
                <div>
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign>In Publium </foreign>43</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>Publius ſtudent at the common lavv,</l>
                        <l>of<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied> leaues his bookes, &amp; for his recreation:</l>
                        <l>To <placeName>Paris</placeName> garden doth himſelf Withdravve,</l>
                        <l>Where he is rauiſht vvith ſuch delectation</l>
                        <l>as dovvne amongſt the Beares &amp; dogges he goes,</l>
                        <l>vvere vvhilſt he skipping cries <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>o head, To head.</l>
                        <l>His satten doublet &amp; his velue<supplied reason="faded-ink">t</supplied> hoſe,</l> 
                        <l>Are all vvith ſpittle from aboue be-ſpread.</l>
                <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: center;">2</fw><lb/>
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                    <l>When he is like a Fathers cuntrey hall,</l>
                    <l>ſtinking vvi<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>h dogges,&amp; muted al<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">l</supplied> vvith haukes,</l>
                    <l>And rightly too on him this filth do<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>h fall,</l>
                    <l>Which for ſuch filthie ſpots <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">h</supplied>is bookes <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">f</supplied>orſake,</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;"> Leauing olde <persName>Ployden</persName>, <persName>Dier</persName> &amp;, <persName>Brooke</persName> alone,</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;"> To ſee olde <persName>Harry Hunkes</persName> &amp; <persName>Saca<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>iſon</persName>.</l></lg></div>
                
     <div type="epigram">           
         <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Silliam </foreign>44</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>When I this propofition had defended,</l>
                        <l>A covvarde cannot be an honeſt man,</l>
                        <l>Thou <persName>Silla</persName> ſeemeſt foorthvvith to be offended</l>
                        <l>And <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">h</supplied>oldes the con<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">tr</supplied>arie &amp; <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">ſ</supplied>vveres he can.</l>
                        <l>But when I <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>el thee that he will forſake</l>
                        <l>His deareſt friend, in perill of his life,</l>
                        <l>Thou then art changde &amp; ſaist thou disſt miſtake,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;"> Yet I thinke oft, &amp; thinke I thinke aright,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: lem;"> Thy argument argues thou wilt not fight.</l></lg></div>
                   
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign>In Dacum </foreign>45</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>Dacus with ſome good collour &amp; pretence,</l>
                        <l>Tearmes his loues beautie ſilent eloquence:</l>
                        <l>For <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">ſ</supplied>he doth lay more collours face,</l>
                        <l>Then euer <persName>Tullie</persName> vſde <sic>hig</sic> ſpeech to grace.</l></lg></div>
                     <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">In</fw><lb/>
                     <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">D2v</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                    
                 <div type="epigram">
                     <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">In Marcum </foreign>46</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>Why doſt thou Marcus in thy miſerie,</l>
                        <l>Raile &amp; blaſpheme, &amp; call the heauens vn-kinde,</l>
                        <l>The heauens draw no Kindeneſſe vnto thee,</l>
                        <l>Thou haſt the heauens ſo li<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>le in thy minde,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">For in thy life thou neuer v<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">ſ</supplied>eſt prayer,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Bu<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied> at p<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>imero, to encounter faire.</l>
                    </lg>
                </div>
                
                <div type="epigram">
                    <head style="text-align: center;">Meditations of Gull. 47</head>
                    <lg>
                        <l>See yonder melancholie gentleman,</l>
                        <l>Which hoode-winked with his ha<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>, alone doth fit,</l>
                        <l>T<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">h</supplied>inke what he thinkes &amp; tell me if you can,</l>
                        <l>VVhat great affaires troubles his litle wit.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">he thinkes not of the war twixt <placeName>France</placeName> &amp; <placeName>ſpaine</placeName>,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">VVhether it be for <orgName>Europs</orgName> good or ill,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Nor whether the Empire can itſelfe maintaine,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Againſt the the <orgName>Turkiſh</orgName> power encroching ſtil.</l>
                        <l>Nor what great Towne in all the nether landes,</l>
                        <l>The ſta<supplied reason="faded-ink">rr</supplied>es determine to beſiege this ſpring</l>
                        <l>Nor how the <orgName>ſcottiſh</orgName> pollicie now ſtandes,</l>
                        <l>Nor what becomes of ths hiſt mu<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>ining.</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">But he doth feriouflie bethinke him whether</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Of the guld people he be more eſteemde,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">For his long cloake, or his great blacke feather,</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 1em;">By which each gull is now a gallant deemde.</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">3</fw><lb/>
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                            <l>Or of a Iourney he deliberates,</l>
                            <l>To <placeName>Pa<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>is</placeName> garden cocke-pit or the play:</l>
                            <l>Or how to ſteale a dogge he medi<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>ates,</l>
                            <l>Or what he he ſhall vnto his miſt<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>is ſay:</l>
                            <l>Yet with theſe Thoughts he thinks himſelfe moſt </l>
                            <l>To be o<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">f</supplied> Counſell with a King for wit. (fit</l></lg>
                        </div>
                
                        <div type="epigram">
                            <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">Ad Muſam</foreign> 48.</head>
                            <lg>
                                <l>Peace idle muſe,, haue done, for it is time,</l>
                                <l>Since Lowſie <persName>Ponticus</persName> enfues my fame,</l>
                                <l>And ſweares the better ſort are much to blame</l>
                                <l>To make me ſo wel knowne for ill rime</l>
                                <l>Yet Bankes his ho<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>ſe is better known then he,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">ſo are the Cammels &amp; the weſterne hog,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;" >And ſo is <persName>Lepidus</persName> hie printed dogge.</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">why doth not <persName>Ponticus</persName> thier fames enuie.</l>
                                <l>Beſides this muſe of mine,&amp; the black fether.</l>
                                <l>grew both together freſh in eſtimation,</l>
                                <l>and both growne ſtale, were caſt away togither:</l>
                                <l>What fame is this that ſcarſe laſts out of faſhion.</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Onely this laſt in credit doth remaine,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">That frõ henceforth, ech baſtard caſt<supplied reason="error-in-original"> </supplied>forth rime</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Which doth but fauour of a libel vaine.</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Shal call me father, and be thought my crime,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">So dull &amp; wi<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>h ſo litle fence endude,</l>
                                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Is my groſe headed iudge the multitude.</l><lb/></lg></div>
                                <fw type="footer" style="text-align: center;">FINNIS.        I,D.</fw>
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                            <div type="epigram">
                                <head style="text-align: center;"><foreign xml:lang="la">IGNOTO</foreign>.</head>
                                <lg>
                                    <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5em; padding: 0.5em; margin: 0.2em 1em 0;">I</hi> loue thee not for ſacred chaſtstie,</l>
                                    <l>who loues for that nor for thy ſprightly wit:</l>
                                    <l>I loue thee not for thy ſweete modeſtie,</l>
                                    <l>Which makes thee in perfections throane to ſit.</l>
                                </lg>
                                
                                <lg>
                                    <l>I loue thee not for thy inchaunting eye,</l>
                                    <l>Thy beautie rauiſhing perfection:</l>
                                    <l>I loue thee nor for vnchaſt luxurie,</l>
                                    <l>Nor for thy bodies faire proportion.</l>
                                </lg> 
                                
                                <lg>
                                    <l>I loue thee not for that my ſoule doth daunce,</l>
                                    <l>And leap with peaſure when thoſe lips of thine:</l>
                                    <l>giue Muſicall and gracefull vtterance,</l>
                                    <l>To ſome (by thee made happie) poets line.</l>
                                </lg>
                                
                                <lg>
                                    <l>I loue thee not for voice or ſlender ſmall,</l>
                                    <l>But wilt thou know wherefore faire ſweet for all.</l>
                                </lg>  
                                
                                <lg>
                                    <l>Faith(wench) I cannot court thy ſprightly eyes,</l>
                                    <l>wich the baſe Viall places betweene my Thighes</l>
                                    <l>I cannot liſpe, nor to ſome Fiddle ſing,</l>
                                    <l>Nor run vpon a high ſtrecht Minikin.</l>
                                </lg> 
                                
                                <lg>  
                                    <l>I cannot whine in puling Elegies,</l>
                                    <l>Intombing Cupid with ſad obſsquies.</l>
                                </lg>   
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                <lg>
                    <l>I am not faſhioned for theſe amorous times,</l>
                    <l>To cou<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>t thy beutie with la<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">ſ</supplied>ciuious rimes.</l>
                    <l>I cannot dally, caper, daunce and ſing,</l>
                    <l>O<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">y</supplied>ling my ſaint with ſupple ſonneting.</l>
                    <l>I cannot croſſe my armes, or ſigh ay me,</l>
                    <l>Ay me Forlo<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>ne eg<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>egious Fopperie.</l>
                    <l>I cannot bu<supplied reason="unclear" cert="low">ſſ</supplied>thy fill, play with thy hayre,</l>
                    <l>Swearing by loue, Thou art moſt debonaire.</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;">not I by Cock, but ſhall tel rhee roundly, ſoũdly</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;">harke in thine eare, zounds I can <sic>(           )</sic> thee.</l>
                </lg>
                                
                <lg>
                    <l>Sweet wench I loue thee, yet I will not ſue,</l>
                    <l>O<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied> ſhew my loue as muskie Cou<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>tiers doe,</l>
                    <l>I<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">l</supplied>e not carou<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">ſ</supplied>e health to honor thee,</l>
                    <l>In this ſame bez<supplied reason="unclear" cert="low">i</supplied> drunken curtefie.</l>
                    <l>and when als quaſde, eate vp my bowſing glaſſe.</l>
                    <l>In glory <supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>t I am thy feruile aſſe.</l>
                    <l>nor will I weare a rotten burbon locke.</l>
                    <l>as ſome ſworne peſant to a female ſmock.</l>
                    <l>wel fea<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>urde laſſe, Thou knoweſt I loue the deere</l>
                    <l>Yet for thy ſake I will not bore mine eare</l>
                    <l>To hang thy dur<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied>ie ſilken ſhootires there.</l>
                    <l>nor for thy loue will I once gnaſh a brick,</l>
                    <l>O<supplied reason="gap-in-inking" cert="low">r</supplied> ſome pied collou<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">r</supplied>s in by bonnet ſtiche.</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;">bu<supplied reason="gap-in-inking">t</supplied> by the chaps of hell to do thee good,</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;">Ile freely ſpend my Thriſe decocted bloud.</l></lg></div>
                    <fw type="footer" style="text-align: center;">FINIS.</fw><lb/>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">D4v</fw>
          
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</TEI>
Epigrammes Author John Davies Encoder Anthony Adamcewicz Encoder Seamus Bruno Encoder Jacqueline Davis Encoder Julianna Fitzpatrick Encoder Malana Manchanda Encoder Joseph McNamara Encoder Lindsey Morrissette Encoder Ethan Vidyarthy Encoder Michael Herlihy Encoder Jessica Massey Encoder Morgan Silva Encoder Brooke Doehler Encoder Stacey Sarto Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2017

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

John Davies Epigrammes and Elegies. By I.D. and C.M. At Middleborough. ,1599 STC 6350 Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm accessed via the Early English Books Online database.
EPIGRAMMES and ELEGIES. By I.D. and C.M.
Printers Ornament
At Middleborough
Epigrammata prima. Ad Musam, FLie merry Muſe vnto that merry towne, where thou mayſt playes, reuels, and triumphes, The houſe of fame, & Theatre of renowne, (ſee VVhere all good wits & ſpirits loue to be. Fallin betwene their hands, that loue & praiſe thee and be to them a laughter and a ieſt: but as for them which ſcorning ſhall approue thee, Diſdayne their wits, and thinke thyne owne the beſt. But if thou finde any ſo groſe and dull, That thinke I do to priuat Taxing leane: Bid him go hang, for he is but a gull, And knowes not what an Epigramme does meane. Which Taxeth vnder a particular name, 5 A generall vice which merits publique blame.
Of ​A3r
Of a Gull. OFt in my laughing rimes, I name a gull, But this new terme will many queſtions breede Therefore at firſt I will expreſſe at full, Who is a true and perfect gull indeede. A gull is he, who feares a veluet gowne, and when a wench is braue, dares not ſpeake to her: A gull is he which trauerſeth the towne, and is for marriage knowne a common wooer. A gull is he, which while he prowdlie weares, a ſiluer hilted Rapier by his ſide: Indures the lyes, and knockes about the eares, Whiſt in his ſheath, his ſleeping ſword doth bide. A gull is he which weares good hanſome cloathes, And ſtandes in preſence ſtroaking vp his hayre: and filles vp his vnperfect ſpeech with othes. but ſpeakesnot one wiſe word throughout the yeere But to define a gull in termes preciſe, 5 A gull is he which ſemes, and is not wiſe.
In ​ A3v
In Fauſtum 7 Fauſtus not lord, nor knight, nor wiſe, nor olde, To euery place about the towne doth ride, He rides into the fields, Playes to beholde, He rides to Powles, he rides to th’ordinarie, He rides vnto the houſe of bawderie too. 5 Thither his horſse ſo often doth him carry, That ſhortlie he wil quite forget to go.
In Katum 1 Kate being pleaſde, wiſht that her pleaſure coulde, Indure as long as a buſfe ierkin would. Content thee Kate, although thy pleaſure waſteth, Thy pleaſures place like a buffe ierkin laſteth: For no buffe ierkin hath bin oftner worne, 5 Nor hath more ſcrapings or more dresſings born.
In Librum 9 Liber doth vaunt how chaſtely he hath liude, Since he hath bin in towne 7 yeeres and more, For that he fweares he hath foure onely fwiude, A maide, a wife, a widow and a whoore: Then Liber thou haſt ſwiude all women kinde, 5 For a fift ſort I know thou canſt not finde.
In B1r
In Medonem 10 Great Captaine Medon weares a chaine of golde, which at fiue hundred crownes is valued; For that it was his graundſires chainƏ of olde, when great king Henry Bulleigne conquered. and weare it Medon, for it may enſue, 5 that thou by vertue of his Maſſie ehaine, a ſtronger towne than Bulloigne maiſt ſubdue, Yf wiſemens ſawes be not reputed vaine, For what ſaide Phillip king of Macedon ? There is no Caſtle ſo wel fortified, 10 But if an Aſſe laden with gold comes on, The guarde wil ſtoope, and gates flie open wide.
In Gellam 10 Gella, if thou doft loue thy ſelfe, take heede, left thou my rimes, vnto thy louer reade, For ſtraight thou grinſt,& then thy louer reeth, Thy canker-eaten gums, and rotten teeth.
In Quintum 12 Quintus his wit infuſed into his braine, Miſlikes the place, and fled into his feete, and the e it wanders vp and down the ſtreetes, Dabled in the durt, and ſoaked in the raine. Doubtleſſe his wit inrendes not to aſpire, 5 Which leaues his head to trauell in the mire.
In B1v
In Seuerum 13 The puritane Seuerus oft doth reade, this text that doth pronounce vaine ſpeech a ſinne, That thing defiles a man that doth proceede From out the mouth, not that which enters in. Hence is it, that we ſeldome heare him ſweare, 5 and thereof like a Phariſie he vaunts, but he deuoures more Capons in a yeare, Then would ſuffice a hundreth proteſtants. And ſooth thoſe ſectaries are gluttons all, Aſwell the threed-bare Cobler as the knight, 10 For thoſe poore ſlaues which haue not wherewithal Feede on the rich, til they deuoure them quite. And ſo like Pharoes kine, they eate vp cleane, Thoſe that be fat, yet ſtill themſelues be leane.
In Leucam 14 Leuca in preſence once a fart did let, Some langht a little, ſhe forſooke the place: and madde with ſhame, did eke her gloue forget, which ſhe returned to fetch with baſhfull grace: And when ſhe would haue ſaid, my gloue 5 My fart (qd ſhe) which did more laughter moue. 2 B2r
In Macrum 15 Thou canſt not ſpeake yet Macer, for to ſpeake, is to diſtinguiſh ſoundes ſignificant, Thou with harſh noyſe the ayre doſt rudely breake, But what thou vttereſt common ſence dnth want: Halfe Engliſh wordes, with fuſtian tearms among 5 Much like the burthen of a Northerne ſong.
In Fauſtum 16 That youth ſaith Fauſtus, hath a Lyon ſeene, Who from a Dycing houſe comes monieleſſe, but when he loſt his hayre, where had he beene, I doubt me had ſeene a Lyoneſſe.
In Coſmum17 Coſmus hath more diſcourſing in his head, then loue, when Pallas iſſued from his braine, and ſtill he ſtriues to be deliuered, Of all his thoughtes at once, but al in vaine. For as we ſee at all the play houſe dores, 5 when ended is the play. the daunce, and fong: A thouſand townſmən, gentlemen, & whores B2v Porters & ſeruing-men togither throng, ſo thoughts of drinking, thriuing, wenching, war And borrowing money, raging in his minde, 10 To įſſue all at once ſo forwarde are, As none at all can perfect paſſage finde.
In Flaccum 18 The falſe knaue Flaccus once a bribe I gaue, The more foole I to bribe ſo falſe a knaue, but he gaue back my bribe, the more foole he, That for my follie, did not couſen me.
In Cineam 19 Thou dogged Cineas hated like a dogge, For ſtill thou grumbleſt like a Maftie dogger comparſt thy ſelfe to nothing but a dogge, Thou faiſt thou art as weary as a dogge. As angry, ſick, & hungry as a dogge, 5 As dull and melancholy as a dogge: As lazie, ſleepie, & as idle as dogge. But why doſt thou compare thee to a dogge In that, for which all men deſpiſe a dogge, I will compare thee better to a dogge. 10 3 Thou B3r Thou art as faire and comely as a dogge, Thou art as true and honeſt as a dogge, Thou art as kinde and liberall as a dogge, Thou art as wiſe and valiant as a dogge But Cineas, I haue ofe heard thee tell, 15 Thou art as like thy father as may be, Tis like inough, and faith like it well, But I am glad thou art not like to me.
In Gerontem 20 Geron mouldie memorie corrects, Old Holinſhed our famous chronicler, With morrall rules, and pollicie collects, Out of all actions done theiſe foureſcore yeere. accounts the time of euery olde euent, 5 not frō Chriſts birth, nor from the Princesraigne, But from fame other famous accident, Which in mens generall notiſe doth remaine. The ſiege of Bulloigne, and the plaguie ſweat, The going to ſaint Quintines and new hauen10 The riſing in the North, The froſt ſo great. That cart-wheele prints on Thames face were ſeene, The fall of money, & burning of Paules ſteeple, The blaſing ſtarre and Spaniardes ouerthrow: By thieſe euents, notorious to the people, 15 He meaſures times, & things forepaſt dosh ſhew. But B3v But moſt of all, he chieſſie reckons by, A priuat chaunce, the death of his curſt wife: This is to him the deareſt memorie, And th’happieſt accident of all his life. 20
In Marcum 21 When Marcus comes frō Mins, he ſtil doth ſweare By, come a ſeauen, that all is loſt and gone, But thats not true, for he hath loſt his hayre Onely for that, he came too much at one.
In Ciprium 22 The fine youth Ciprius is more tierſe and neate, Then the new garden of the olde Temple is, And ſtil the neweſt faſhion he doth get, And with the time doth chaung from that to this, He weares a hat now of the flat crown-block, 5 The treble ruffes, long cloake, & doublet french: He takes Tobacco, and doth weare a locke, And waſtes more time in dreſſing then a Wench. Yet this new-fangled youth, made for theſe times, Doth aboue all praiſe olde Gaſcoines times. 10
B4r
In Cineam 23. Whē Cineas comes amōgſt his friends in morning He ſliely lookes who firſt his cap doth moue: Him he ſalutes, the reſt ſo glimly ſcorning, As if for euer they had loſt his loue. I knowing how it doth the humour fit, 5 Of this fond gull to be ſaluted firſt: catch at my cap, but moue it not a whit: Which perceiuing he ſeemes ſo ſpite to burſt. But cineas, why expect you more of me, Then I of you I am as good a man, 10 And better too by many a quallitie For vault, and daunce, & fence & rime I can, You keep a whore at your own charg men tel me Indeede friend (cineas) therein you excell me.
In Gallum 24 Gallus hath bin this Sommer time in Frieſland, And now returned he ſpeakes ſuch warlike words As if I coulde their Engliſh vnderſtand, I feare me they would cut my Throat like ſwordes He talks of counterſcarfes and caſomates, 5 Of parapets, of curteneys and Pallizadojs, Of flankers, Rauelings, gabions he prates, And of falſe brayes, & fallies & ſcaladoſe: But B4v But to require ſuch gulling termes as theſe, With wordes of my profeſſion I replie: 10 I tel of foorching, vouchers, and counterpleas, Of Wichernams, eſſoynes, and champartie. ſo neyther of vs vnderſtanding eyther, We part as wiſe as when we came together.
In Decium 25 Audacious Painters haue nine worthies made, But Poet Decius more audacious farre, Making his miſtres march with men of warre, With title of tenth worthlie doth her lade, Me thinkes that gul did vſe his termes as fit, 5 which termde his loue a Giant for hir wit.
In Gellam 26 If gellas beautie be examined ſhe hath a dull dead eye, a ſaddle noſe, An ill ſhapte face, with morpheu ouerſpread, and rotten Teeth with ſhe in laughing ſhowes. Brieflie ſhe is the filthyeſt wench in Towne, 5 of all that do the art of whooring vfe: But when ſhe hath put on her ſattin gowne, Her out lawne apron, & her veluevt ſhooes. Her C1r Her greene ſilk ſtockings, and her peticoate, Of Taffatie, with golden frindge a-rounde: 10 And is withall perfumed with ciuet hot, which doth her valiant ſtinking breath confounde Yet ſhe with theſe addicions is no more, Then a ſweete, filthe, fine ill fauored whoore.
In Sillam 27 Silla is often challenged to the fielde, To answere like a gentleman his foes, But when doth he his only anſwere yeelde, That he hath liuings & faire landes to loſe. Silla, if none but beggars valiant were, 5 The king of ſpaine woulde put vs all in feare.
In Sillam 28 Who dares affirme that Silla dare not fight? when I dare ſweare he dares aduenture more, Then the moſt braue, moſt all daring wight: That euer armes with reſollucion bore. He that dare touch the moſt vnholſome whoore, 5 That euer was retired into the ſpittle: and dares caourt wenches ſtanding at a dore, The porcion of his wit being paſſing litle. He C1v He that dares giue his deereſt friendes offeuces, which other valiant fooles do feare to do: 10 and when a feuer doth confounde his fences, dare eate raw biefe, & drinke ſtrong wine thereto. He that dares take Tobacco on the ſtage, dares man a whore at noon-day throgh the ſtreet dares daunce in Powles, & in this formall age, 15 dares ſay & do what euer is vnmeete. Whom feare of ſhame coulde neuer yet affright, Who dares affirme that Silla dares not fight?
In Haywodum 29 Haywood which in Epigrams did excell, Is now put down fince my light muſe aroſe: As buckets are put downe into a well, Or as a ſchoole-boy putteth downe his hoſe.
In Dacum 30 Amongſt the Poets Dacus numbred is, Yet could he neuer make an engliſh rime, but ſome proſe ſpeeches I haue hearde of his, which haue bin ſpoken man a dundreth time. The man that keepes the Eliphant hath one, 5 wherein he tels the wonders of the beaſt 3 An C1v An other Bankes pronounced long agoe, when he his curtalls qualities expreſt: He firſt taught him that keepes the monuments, At Weſtminſter his formall tale to ſay, 10 And alſo him with Puppets repreſents, and alſo him which with the Ape doth play Though all his poetrre be like to this, Amongst the Poets numbred is.
In Priſcum 31 VVhhen Priſcus raiſde from low to high eſtate. Rode through the ſtreete in pompous iollitie, Caius his poore famillier friende of late, be-ſpake him thus, Sir now you know not me: Tis likely friende (quoth Priſcus) to be ſo, 5 For at this time my felfe I do not know.
In Brunum 32 Brunus which thinkes him ſelfe a faire ſweet youth is Thirtie nine yeeres of age at leaſt: Yet was he neuer to confeſſe the truth, but a dry ſtarueling when he was at beſt. This gull was ſick of ſhew his night cap fine, 5 and his wrought Pillow onerſpred with lawne: but hath bin well fince his griefes cauſe hath line, At Trollups by ſaint Clements church in pawne.
C2v
In Francum 33 When Francus comes to ſollace with his whoore He ſends for rods and ſtrips himſelſe ſtark naked: For his luſt ſleepes, and will not riſe before, by whipping of the wench it be awaked. I ennui him not, but wiſh he had the powre, 5 To make me ſelfe his wench but one halfe houre
In Caſtorem 34 Ofſpeaking well, why do we learne the skill, Hoping thereby honor and wealth to gaine. Sith rayling Caſtor doth by ſpeaking ill, Oppinion of much wit, and golde obtaine.
In Septimum 35 Septimus liues, and is like Garlicke feene, for though his head be white, his blade is greene. This olde mad coult deſerues a Martires praiſe, For he was burned in Queen Maries dayes.
3 C3r
Of Tobacco 36 Homer of Moly, and Nepenthe fings, Moly the Gods moſt ſoueraigne hearbe diuine. Nepenthe Hekens drinke with gladnes brings, harts griefe expells, & doth the wits refine. but this our age an other worlde hath founde, 5 frõ whēce an hearb of heauēly power is brought, Moly is not ſo ſoueraigne for a wounde. nor hath Nepenthe ſo great wonders wrought. It is Tobacco, whoſe ſweet ſubſtanciall fume, The helliſh torment of the Teeth doth eafe 10 By drawing downe,& drying vp the rume, The mother and the nurſ of ech diſeaſe. it is Tobacco which doth colde expell, and cleeres the obſtructions of the arteries, and ſurfets threathning death digefteth well, 15 decocting all the ſtomacks crudities. It is Tobacco which hath power to clarifie, The clowdie miſtes before dim eies appearing, It is Tobacco which hath power to rarefie, (ring, The thick groſe humor which doth ſtop the hea- 20 The wraſting Hectick and the quartaine feuer, which doth of Phiſick make a mockerie: The gowt it cures,& helps il breaths for euer, Weather the caufe in Teeth of ſtomacke be. And C3v And though ill breaths, were by it but confounded 25 Yet that medicine it doth far excell, Which by ſir Thomas Moore hath bin propoũded. For this is thought a gentleman-like ſmell, O that I were one of thieſe mountie bankes, which praiſe their oyles, & pouders which they ſel 30 my cuſtomers would giue me coyne with thankes I for this ware, forſooth a Tale would tell, Yet would I vſe none of theſe tea mes before, I would but ſay, that it the pox wil cure: This were inough, without diſcourſing more, 35 All our braue gallants in the towne t’alure,
In Craſſum 37> Craſſus his lies are not pernitious lies, But pleaſant fictions, hurtfull vnto none: But to himſelfe, for no man counts him wiſe, To tell for truth, that which for falſe is knowne. he ſweares that Caunt is threeſcore miles about, 5 and that the bridge at Paris on the Seine, is the of ſuch thicknes, lēgth & breadth, throghout that ſixſcore arches can it ſcarſe ſuſtaine He ſwears he ſaw ſo great a dead mans ſcull, At Canterbury digde out of the grounde: 10 That C4r That woulde containe of wheat, three buſhels ful And that in Kent, are twentie yeomen founde, Of which the pooreſt euery yeere diſpendes, Fiue thouſand pound theſe & v. thouſand moe, So oft he hath recited to his friendes, 15 that now himſelfe, perſwades himſelfe tis ſo: But why doth Craſſus tel his lies ſo rife, Of bridges, Townes, and things that haue no life. He is a lawyer, and doth wel eſpie, That for ſuch lies an action will not lie. 20
In philonem 38 Philo the lawyer and the fortune teller, The ſchoolemaiſter, the midwife & the bawde, The conjurer, the buyer and the ſeller, Of painting which with breathing wil be thawde. doth practiſe Phiſicke, & his credite growes, 5 as doth the ballade-ſingers auditorie. which hath at Tēple bar his ſtanding choſe, and to the vnlger ſings an ale-houſe ſtorie. Firſt ſtandes a Porter, then an Oyſter wife, Doth ſtint her crie, & ſtay her ſteps to heare him, 10 Then comes a cutpurfe ready with a Knife, and then a cuntrey Client paſſeth neere him, There ſtāds the Cunſtable, there ſtāds the whore And harkning to the ſong mark not ech other. There C4v There by the Serieant ſtandes the debtor poore, 15 and doth no more miſtrust him then his brother: Thus Orpheus o ſuch hearers giueth Muſique, And Philo to much Patients giueth phiſicke.
In Fuſcum 39 Fuſeus is free, and hath the worlde at will, Yet in the course of the life the he doth leade: hees like a horſe which turning rounde a mill, doth alwaies in the ſeife ſame circle treade: Firſt he doth rise at x. and at eleuen 5 He goes to Gilles, where he doth eate til one, Then ſees he a play till ſixe, & ſups at ſeauen, And after ſupper, ſtraight to bed is gone. and there til renne next day he doth reamine, and then he dines, then ſees a commedie: 10 and then he ſuppes, & goes to bed againe, Thus rounde he runs without varetie: Saue that, ſometimes he comes not to the play, But falls into a whoore house on the way.
D1r
In Afrum 40 The ſmell feaſt after, Trauailes to the Burſe Twice euery day the flying newes to heare, which when he hath no money in his purſe, To richmens Tables he doth often beare: He tels how Gronigen is taken in, 5 by the braue conduct of illuſtrious Vere: and hoe the ſpainiſh forces Breſt would win. but that they do Victorious Norris feare. No ſooner is a ſhip at Sea ſurpriſde, but ſtraight he learnes the newes & doth diſcloſe 10 faire written in a ſcrowle he that the names, (it, of all the widowes which the plague hath made. and perſons, Times & places, ſtill he frames, To euery Tale, the better to perſwade: We cal him Fame, for that the wide-mouth ſlaue, 15 will eate as faſt as he wil vtter lies For Fame is ſaide an hundreth mouthes to haue, And he eates more than woulde fiue ſcore ſuffice.
In D1v
In paulum 41 By lawful mart, & by vnlawful ſtealth, Paules in ſpite of enuie fortunate Deriues out of the Oceans of much wealth, as he may well maintaine a Lordes eſtate. But on the lande a little gulfe there is, 5 wherein he drowneth all the wealth of his.
In Licum 42 Lycus which lately is to Venice gone, Shall if he do returne, gaine 3 for one: But x to one, his knowledg and his wit, vvil not be bettered or increaſde a vvhit.
In Publium 43 Publius ſtudent at the common lavv, oft leaues his bookes, & for his recreation: To Paris garden doth himſelf Withdravve, Where he is rauiſht vvith ſuch delectation as dovvne amongſt the Beares & dogges he goes, 5 vvere vvhilſt he skipping cries to head, To head. His satten doublet & his veluet hoſe, Are all vvith ſpittle from aboue be-ſpread. 2 D2r When he is like a Fathers cuntrey hall, ſtinking vvith dogges,& muted all vvith haukes, 10 And rightly too on him this filth doth fall, Which for ſuch filthie ſpots his bookes forſake, Leauing olde Ployden, Dier &, Brooke alone, To ſee olde Harry Hunkes & Sacariſon.
In Silliam 44 When I this propofition had defended, A covvarde cannot be an honeſt man, Thou Silla ſeemeſt foorthvvith to be offended And holdes the contrarie & ſvveres he can. But when I tel thee that he will forſake 5 His deareſt friend, in perill of his life, Thou then art changde & ſaist thou disſt miſtake, Yet I thinke oft, & thinke I thinke aright, Thy argument argues thou wilt not fight.
In Dacum 45 Dacus with ſome good collour & pretence, Tearmes his loues beautie ſilent eloquence: For ſhe doth lay more collours face, Then euer Tullie vſde hig ſpeech to grace.
In D2v
In Marcum 46 Why doſt thou Marcus in thy miſerie, Raile & blaſpheme, & call the heauens vn-kinde, The heauens draw no Kindeneſſe vnto thee, Thou haſt the heauens ſo litle in thy minde, For in thy life thou neuer vſeſt prayer, 5 But at primero, to encounter faire.
Meditations of Gull. 47 See yonder melancholie gentleman, Which hoode-winked with his hat, alone doth fit, Thinke what he thinkes & tell me if you can, VVhat great affaires troubles his litle wit. he thinkes not of the war twixt France & ſpaine5 VVhether it be for Europs good or ill, Nor whether the Empire can itſelfe maintaine, Againſt the the Turkiſh power encroching ſtil. Nor what great Towne in all the nether landes, The ſtarres determine to beſiege this ſpring 10 Nor how the ſcottiſh pollicie now ſtandes, Nor what becomes of ths hiſt mutining. But he doth feriouflie bethinke him whether Of the guld people he be more eſteemde, For his long cloake, or his great blacke feather, 15 By which each gull is now a gallant deemde. 3 D2v Or of a Iourney he deliberates, To Paris garden cocke-pit or the play: Or how to ſteale a dogge he meditates, Or what he he ſhall vnto his miſtris ſay: 20 Yet with theſe Thoughts he thinks himſelfe moſt To be of Counſell with a King for wit. (fit
Ad Muſam 48. Peace idle muſe,, haue done, for it is time, Since Lowſie Ponticus enfues my fame, And ſweares the better ſort are much to blame To make me ſo wel knowne for ill rime Yet Bankes his horſe is better known then he, 5 ſo are the Cammels & the weſterne hog, And ſo is Lepidus hie printed dogge. why doth not Ponticus thier fames enuie. Beſides this muſe of mine,& the black fether. grew both together freſh in eſtimation, 10 and both growne ſtale, were caſt away togither: What fame is this that ſcarſe laſts out of faſhion. Onely this laſt in credit doth remaine, That frõ henceforth, ech baſtard caſt forth rime Which doth but fauour of a libel vaine. 15 Shal call me father, and be thought my crime, So dull & with ſo litle fence endude, Is my groſe headed iudge the multitude.
FINNIS. I,D. D3v
IGNOTO. I loue thee not for ſacred chaſtstie, who loues for that nor for thy ſprightly wit: I loue thee not for thy ſweete modeſtie, Which makes thee in perfections throane to ſit. I loue thee not for thy inchaunting eye, Thy beautie rauiſhing perfection: I loue thee nor for vnchaſt luxurie, Nor for thy bodies faire proportion. I loue thee not for that my ſoule doth daunce, And leap with peaſure when thoſe lips of thine: giue Muſicall and gracefull vtterance, To ſome (by thee made happie) poets line. I loue thee not for voice or ſlender ſmall, But wilt thou know wherefore faire ſweet for all. Faith(wench) I cannot court thy ſprightly eyes, wich the baſe Viall places betweene my Thighes I cannot liſpe, nor to ſome Fiddle ſing, Nor run vpon a high ſtrecht Minikin. I cannot whine in puling Elegies, Intombing Cupid with ſad obſsquies. D4r I am not faſhioned for theſe amorous times, To court thy beutie with laſciuious rimes. I cannot dally, caper, daunce and ſing, Oyling my ſaint with ſupple ſonneting. I cannot croſſe my armes, or ſigh ay me, 5 Ay me Forlorne egregious Fopperie. I cannot buſſthy fill, play with thy hayre, Swearing by loue, Thou art moſt debonaire. not I by Cock, but ſhall tel rhee roundly, ſoũdly harke in thine eare, zounds I can ( ) thee. 10 Sweet wench I loue thee, yet I will not ſue, Or ſhew my loue as muskie Courtiers doe, Ile not carouſe health to honor thee, In this ſame bezi drunken curtefie. and when als quaſde, eate vp my bowſing glaſſe. 5 In glory tt I am thy feruile aſſe. nor will I weare a rotten burbon locke. as ſome ſworne peſant to a female ſmock. wel featurde laſſe, Thou knoweſt I loue the deere Yet for thy ſake I will not bore mine eare 10 To hang thy durtie ſilken ſhootires there. nor for thy loue will I once gnaſh a brick, Or ſome pied collours in by bonnet ſtiche. but by the chaps of hell to do thee good, Ile freely ſpend my Thriſe decocted bloud. 15
FINIS. D4v

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Epigrammes Author John Davies Encoder Anthony Adamcewicz Encoder Seamus Bruno Encoder Jacqueline Davis Encoder Julianna Fitzpatrick Encoder Malana Manchanda Encoder Joseph McNamara Encoder Lindsey Morrissette Encoder Ethan Vidyarthy Encoder Michael Herlihy Encoder Jessica Massey Encoder Morgan Silva Encoder Brooke Doehler Encoder Stacey Sarto Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2017

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John Davies Epigrammes and Elegies. By I.D. and C.M. At Middleborough. ,1599 STC 6350 Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm accessed via the Early English Books Online database.
EPIGRAMMES and ELEGIES. By I.D. and C.M.
Printers Ornament
At Middleborough
Epigrammata prima. Ad Musam, FLie merry Muſe vnto that merry towne, where thou mayſt playes, reuels, and triumphes, The houſe of fame, & Theatre of renowne, (ſee VVhere all good wits & ſpirits loue to be. Fallin betwene their hands, that loue & praiſe thee and be to them a laughter and a ieſt: but as for them which ſcorning ſhall approue thee, Diſdayne their wits, and thinke thyne owne the beſt. But if thou finde any ſo groſe and dull, That thinke I do to priuat Taxing leane: Bid him go hang, for he is but a gull, And knowes not what an Epigramme does meane. Which Taxeth vnder a particular name, A generall vice which merits publique blame.
Of ​A3r
Of a Gull. OFt in my laughing rimes, I name a gull, But this new terme will many queſtions breede Therefore at firſt I will expreſſe at full, Who is a true and perfect gull indeede. A gull is he, who feares a veluet gowne, and when a wench is braue, dares not ſpeake to her: A gull is he which trauerſeth the towne, and is for marriage knowne a common wooer. A gull is he, which while he prowdlie weares, a ſiluer hilted Rapier by his ſide: Indures the lyes, and knockes about the eares, Whiſt in his ſheath, his ſleeping ſword doth bide. A gull is he which weares good hanſome cloathes, And ſtandes in preſence ſtroaking vp his hayre: and filles vp his vnperfect ſpeech with othes. but ſpeakesnot one wiſe word throughout the yeere But to define a gull in termes preciſe, A gull is he which ſemes, and is not wiſe.
In ​ A3v
In Fauſtum 7 Fauſtus not lord, nor knight, nor wiſe, nor olde, To euery place about the towne doth ride, He rides into the fields, Playes to beholde, He rides to Powles, he rides to th’ordinarie, He rides vnto the houſe of bawderie too. Thither his horſse ſo often doth him carry, That ſhortlie he wil quite forget to go.
In Katum 1 Kate being pleaſde, wiſht that her pleaſure coulde, Indure as long as a buſfe ierkin would. Content thee Kate, although thy pleaſure waſteth, Thy pleaſures place like a buffe ierkin laſteth: For no buffe ierkin hath bin oftner worne, Nor hath more ſcrapings or more dresſings born.
In Librum 9 Liber doth vaunt how chaſtely he hath liude, Since he hath bin in towne 7 yeeres and more, For that he fweares he hath foure onely fwiude, A maide, a wife, a widow and a whoore: Then Liber thou haſt ſwiude all women kinde, For a fift ſort I know thou canſt not finde.
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In Medonem 10 Great Captaine Medon weares a chaine of golde, which at fiue hundred crownes is valued; For that it was his graundſires chainƏ of olde, when great king Henry Bulleigne conquered. and weare it Medon, for it may enſue, that thou by vertue of his Maſſie ehaine, a ſtronger towne than Bulloigne maiſt ſubdue, Yf wiſemens ſawes be not reputed vaine, For what ſaide Phillip king of Macedon ? There is no Caſtle ſo wel fortified, But if an Aſſe laden with gold comes on, The guarde wil ſtoope, and gates flie open wide.
In Gellam 10 Gella, if thou doft loue thy ſelfe, take heede, left thou my rimes, vnto thy louer reade, For ſtraight thou grinſt,& then thy louer reeth, Thy canker-eaten gums, and rotten teeth.
In Quintum 12 Quintus his wit infuſed into his braine, Miſlikes the place, and fled into his feete, and the e it wanders vp and down the ſtreetes, Dabled in the durt, and ſoaked in the raine. Doubtleſſe his wit inrendes not to aſpire, Which leaues his head to trauell in the mire.
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In Seuerum 13 The puritane Seuerus oft doth reade, this text that doth pronounce vaine ſpeech a ſinne, That thing defiles a man that doth proceede From out the mouth, not that which enters in. Hence is it, that we ſeldome heare him ſweare, and thereof like a Phariſie he vaunts, but he deuoures more Capons in a yeare, Then would ſuffice a hundreth proteſtants. And ſooth thoſe ſectaries are gluttons all, Aſwell the threed-bare Cobler as the knight, For thoſe poore ſlaues which haue not wherewithal Feede on the rich, til they deuoure them quite. And ſo like Pharoes kine, they eate vp cleane, Thoſe that be fat, yet ſtill themſelues be leane.
In Leucam 14 Leuca in preſence once a fart did let, Some langht a little, ſhe forſooke the place: and madde with ſhame, did eke her gloue forget, which ſhe returned to fetch with baſhfull grace: And when ſhe would haue ſaid, my gloue My fart (qd ſhe) which did more laughter moue. 2 B2r
In Macrum 15 Thou canſt not ſpeake yet Macer, for to ſpeake, is to diſtinguiſh ſoundes ſignificant, Thou with harſh noyſe the ayre doſt rudely breake, But what thou vttereſt common ſence dnth want: Halfe Engliſh wordes, with fuſtian tearms among Much like the burthen of a Northerne ſong.
In Fauſtum 16 That youth ſaith Fauſtus, hath a Lyon ſeene, Who from a Dycing houſe comes monieleſſe, but when he loſt his hayre, where had he beene, I doubt me had ſeene a Lyoneſſe.
In Coſmum17 Coſmus hath more diſcourſing in his head, then loue, when Pallas iſſued from his braine, and ſtill he ſtriues to be deliuered, Of all his thoughtes at once, but al in vaine. For as we ſee at all the play houſe dores, when ended is the play. the daunce, and fong: A thouſand townſmən, gentlemen, & whores B2v Porters & ſeruing-men togither throng, ſo thoughts of drinking, thriuing, wenching, war And borrowing money, raging in his minde, To įſſue all at once ſo forwarde are, As none at all can perfect paſſage finde.
In Flaccum 18 The falſe knaue Flaccus once a bribe I gaue, The more foole I to bribe ſo falſe a knaue, but he gaue back my bribe, the more foole he, That for my follie, did not couſen me.
In Cineam 19 Thou dogged Cineas hated like a dogge, For ſtill thou grumbleſt like a Maftie dogger comparſt thy ſelfe to nothing but a dogge, Thou faiſt thou art as weary as a dogge. As angry, ſick, & hungry as a dogge, As dull and melancholy as a dogge: As lazie, ſleepie, & as idle as dogge. But why doſt thou compare thee to a dogge In that, for which all men deſpiſe a dogge, I will compare thee better to a dogge. 3 Thou B3r Thou art as faire and comely as a dogge, Thou art as true and honeſt as a dogge, Thou art as kinde and liberall as a dogge, Thou art as wiſe and valiant as a dogge But Cineas, I haue ofe heard thee tell, Thou art as like thy father as may be, Tis like inough, and faith like it well, But I am glad thou art not like to me.
In Gerontem 20 Geron mouldie memorie corrects, Old Holinſhed our famous chronicler, With morrall rules, and pollicie collects, Out of all actions done theiſe foureſcore yeere. accounts the time of euery olde euent, not frō Chriſts birth, nor from the Princesraigne, But from fame other famous accident, Which in mens generall notiſe doth remaine. The ſiege of Bulloigne, and the plaguie ſweat, The going to ſaint Quintines and new hauen. The riſing in the North, The froſt ſo great. That cart-wheele prints on Thames face were ſeene, The fall of money, & burning of Paules ſteeple, The blaſing ſtarre and Spaniardes ouerthrow: By thieſe euents, notorious to the people, He meaſures times, & things forepaſt dosh ſhew. But B3v But moſt of all, he chieſſie reckons by, A priuat chaunce, the death of his curſt wife: This is to him the deareſt memorie, And th’happieſt accident of all his life.
In Marcum 21 When Marcus comes frō Mins, he ſtil doth ſweare By, come a ſeauen, that all is loſt and gone, But thats not true, for he hath loſt his hayre Onely for that, he came too much at one.
In Ciprium 22 The fine youth Ciprius is more tierſe and neate, Then the new garden of the olde Temple is, And ſtil the neweſt faſhion he doth get, And with the time doth chaung from that to this, He weares a hat now of the flat crown-block, The treble ruffes, long cloake, & doublet french: He takes Tobacco, and doth weare a locke, And waſtes more time in dreſſing then a Wench. Yet this new-fangled youth, made for theſe times, Doth aboue all praiſe olde Gaſcoines times.
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In Cineam 23. Whē Cineas comes amōgſt his friends in morning He ſliely lookes who firſt his cap doth moue: Him he ſalutes, the reſt ſo glimly ſcorning, As if for euer they had loſt his loue. I knowing how it doth the humour fit, Of this fond gull to be ſaluted firſt: catch at my cap, but moue it not a whit: Which perceiuing he ſeemes ſo ſpite to burſt. But cineas, why expect you more of me, Then I of you I am as good a man, And better too by many a quallitie For vault, and daunce, & fence & rime I can, You keep a whore at your own charg men tel me Indeede friend (cineas) therein you excell me.
In Gallum 24 Gallus hath bin this Sommer time in Frieſland, And now returned he ſpeakes ſuch warlike words As if I coulde their Engliſh vnderſtand, I feare me they would cut my Throat like ſwordes He talks of counterſcarfes and caſomates, Of parapets, of curteneys and Pallizadojs, Of flankers, Rauelings, gabions he prates, And of falſe brayes, & fallies & ſcaladoſe: But B4v But to require ſuch gulling termes as theſe, With wordes of my profeſſion I replie: I tel of foorching, vouchers, and counterpleas, Of Wichernams, eſſoynes, and champartie. ſo neyther of vs vnderſtanding eyther, We part as wiſe as when we came together.
In Decium 25 Audacious Painters haue nine worthies made, But Poet Decius more audacious farre, Making his miſtres march with men of warre, With title of tenth worthlie doth her lade, Me thinkes that gul did vſe his termes as fit, which termde his loue a Giant for hir wit.
In Gellam 26 If gellas beautie be examined ſhe hath a dull dead eye, a ſaddle noſe, An ill ſhapte face, with morpheu ouerſpread, and rotten Teeth with ſhe in laughing ſhowes. Brieflie ſhe is the filthyeſt wench in Towne, of all that do the art of whooring vfe: But when ſhe hath put on her ſattin gowne, Her out lawne apron, & her veluevt ſhooes. Her C1r Her greene ſilk ſtockings, and her peticoate, Of Taffatie, with golden frindge a-rounde: And is withall perfumed with ciuet hot, which doth her valiant ſtinking breath confounde Yet ſhe with theſe addicions is no more, Then a ſweete, filthe, fine ill fauored whoore.
In Sillam 27 Silla is often challenged to the fielde, To answere like a gentleman his foes, But when doth he his only anſwere yeelde, That he hath liuings & faire landes to loſe. Silla, if none but beggars valiant were, The king of ſpaine woulde put vs all in feare.
In Sillam 28 Who dares affirme that Silla dare not fight? when I dare ſweare he dares aduenture more, Then the moſt braue, moſt all daring wight: That euer armes with reſollucion bore. He that dare touch the moſt vnholſome whoore, That euer was retired into the ſpittle: and dares caourt wenches ſtanding at a dore, The porcion of his wit being paſſing litle. He C1v He that dares giue his deereſt friendes offeuces, which other valiant fooles do feare to do: and when a feuer doth confounde his fences, dare eate raw biefe, & drinke ſtrong wine thereto. He that dares take Tobacco on the ſtage, dares man a whore at noon-day throgh the ſtreet dares daunce in Powles, & in this formall age, dares ſay & do what euer is vnmeete. Whom feare of ſhame coulde neuer yet affright, Who dares affirme that Silla dares not fight?
In Haywodum 29 Haywood which in Epigrams did excell, Is now put down fince my light muſe aroſe: As buckets are put downe into a well, Or as a ſchoole-boy putteth downe his hoſe.
In Dacum 30 Amongſt the Poets Dacus numbred is, Yet could he neuer make an engliſh rime, but ſome proſe ſpeeches I haue hearde of his, which haue bin ſpoken man a dundreth time. The man that keepes the Eliphant hath one, wherein he tels the wonders of the beaſt 3 An C1v An other Bankes pronounced long agoe, when he his curtalls qualities expreſt: He firſt taught him that keepes the monuments, At Weſtminſter his formall tale to ſay, And alſo him with Puppets repreſents, and alſo him which with the Ape doth play Though all his poetrre be like to this, Amongst the Poets numbred is.
In Priſcum 31 VVhhen Priſcus raiſde from low to high eſtate. Rode through the ſtreete in pompous iollitie, Caius his poore famillier friende of late, be-ſpake him thus, Sir now you know not me: Tis likely friende (quoth Priſcus) to be ſo, For at this time my felfe I do not know.
In Brunum 32 Brunus which thinkes him ſelfe a faire ſweet youth is Thirtie nine yeeres of age at leaſt: Yet was he neuer to confeſſe the truth, but a dry ſtarueling when he was at beſt. This gull was ſick of ſhew his night cap fine, and his wrought Pillow onerſpred with lawne: but hath bin well fince his griefes cauſe hath line, At Trollups by ſaint Clements church in pawne.
C2v
In Francum 33 When Francus comes to ſollace with his whoore He ſends for rods and ſtrips himſelſe ſtark naked: For his luſt ſleepes, and will not riſe before, by whipping of the wench it be awaked. I ennui him not, but wiſh he had the powre, To make me ſelfe his wench but one halfe houre
In Caſtorem 34 Ofſpeaking well, why do we learne the skill, Hoping thereby honor and wealth to gaine. Sith rayling Caſtor doth by ſpeaking ill, Oppinion of much wit, and golde obtaine.
In Septimum 35 Septimus liues, and is like Garlicke feene, for though his head be white, his blade is greene. This olde mad coult deſerues a Martires praiſe, For he was burned in Queen Maries dayes.
3 C3r
Of Tobacco 36 Homer of Moly, and Nepenthe fings, Moly the Gods moſt ſoueraigne hearbe diuine. Nepenthe Hekens drinke with gladnes brings, harts griefe expells, & doth the wits refine. but this our age an other worlde hath founde, frõ whēce an hearb of heauēly power is brought, Moly is not ſo ſoueraigne for a wounde. nor hath Nepenthe ſo great wonders wrought. It is Tobacco, whoſe ſweet ſubſtanciall fume, The helliſh torment of the Teeth doth eafe By drawing downe,& drying vp the rume, The mother and the nurſ of ech diſeaſe. it is Tobacco which doth colde expell, and cleeres the obſtructions of the arteries, and ſurfets threathning death digefteth well, decocting all the ſtomacks crudities. It is Tobacco which hath power to clarifie, The clowdie miſtes before dim eies appearing, It is Tobacco which hath power to rarefie, (ring, The thick groſe humor which doth ſtop the hea- The wraſting Hectick and the quartaine feuer, which doth of Phiſick make a mockerie: The gowt it cures,& helps il breaths for euer, Weather the caufe in Teeth of ſtomacke be. And C3v And though ill breaths, were by it but confounded Yet that medicine it doth far excell, Which by ſir Thomas Moore hath bin propoũded. For this is thought a gentleman-like ſmell, O that I were one of thieſe mountie bankes, which praiſe their oyles, & pouders which they ſel my cuſtomers would giue me coyne with thankes I for this ware, forſooth a Tale would tell, Yet would I vſe none of theſe tea mes before, I would but ſay, that it the pox wil cure: This were inough, without diſcourſing more, All our braue gallants in the towne t’alure,
In Craſſum 37> Craſſus his lies are not pernitious lies, But pleaſant fictions, hurtfull vnto none: But to himſelfe, for no man counts him wiſe, To tell for truth, that which for falſe is knowne. he ſweares that Caunt is threeſcore miles about, and that the bridge at Paris on the Seine, is the of ſuch thicknes, lēgth & breadth, throghout that ſixſcore arches can it ſcarſe ſuſtaine He ſwears he ſaw ſo great a dead mans ſcull, At Canterbury digde out of the grounde: That C4r That woulde containe of wheat, three buſhels ful And that in Kent, are twentie yeomen founde, Of which the pooreſt euery yeere diſpendes, Fiue thouſand pound theſe & v. thouſand moe, So oft he hath recited to his friendes, that now himſelfe, perſwades himſelfe tis ſo: But why doth Craſſus tel his lies ſo rife, Of bridges, Townes, and things that haue no life. He is a lawyer, and doth wel eſpie, That for ſuch lies an action will not lie.
In philonem 38 Philo the lawyer and the fortune teller, The ſchoolemaiſter, the midwife & the bawde, The conjurer, the buyer and the ſeller, Of painting which with breathing wil be thawde. doth practiſe Phiſicke, & his credite growes, as doth the ballade-ſingers auditorie. which hath at Tēple bar his ſtanding choſe, and to the vnlger ſings an ale-houſe ſtorie. Firſt ſtandes a Porter, then an Oyſter wife, Doth ſtint her crie, & ſtay her ſteps to heare him, Then comes a cutpurfe ready with a Knife, and then a cuntrey Client paſſeth neere him, There ſtāds the Cunſtable, there ſtāds the whore And harkning to the ſong mark not ech other. There C4v There by the Serieant ſtandes the debtor poore, and doth no more miſtrust him then his brother: Thus Orpheus o ſuch hearers giueth Muſique, And Philo to much Patients giueth phiſicke.
In Fuſcum 39 Fuſeus is free, and hath the worlde at will, Yet in the course of the life the he doth leade: hees like a horſe which turning rounde a mill, doth alwaies in the ſeife ſame circle treade: Firſt he doth rise at x. and at eleuen He goes to Gilles, where he doth eate til one, Then ſees he a play till ſixe, & ſups at ſeauen, And after ſupper, ſtraight to bed is gone. and there til renne next day he doth reamine, and then he dines, then ſees a commedie: and then he ſuppes, & goes to bed againe, Thus rounde he runs without varetie: Saue that, ſometimes he comes not to the play, But falls into a whoore house on the way.
D1r
In Afrum 40 The ſmell feaſt after, Trauailes to the Burſe Twice euery day the flying newes to heare, which when he hath no money in his purſe, To richmens Tables he doth often beare: He tels how Gronigen is taken in, by the braue conduct of illuſtrious Vere: and hoe the ſpainiſh forces Breſt would win. but that they do Victorious Norris feare. No ſooner is a ſhip at Sea ſurpriſde, but ſtraight he learnes the newes & doth diſcloſe faire written in a ſcrowle he that the names, (it, of all the widowes which the plague hath made. and perſons, Times & places, ſtill he frames, To euery Tale, the better to perſwade: We cal him Fame, for that the wide-mouth ſlaue, will eate as faſt as he wil vtter lies For Fame is ſaide an hundreth mouthes to haue, And he eates more than woulde fiue ſcore ſuffice.
In D1v
In paulum 41 By lawful mart, & by vnlawful ſtealth, Paules in ſpite of enuie fortunate Deriues out of the Oceans of much wealth, as he may well maintaine a Lordes eſtate. But on the lande a little gulfe there is, wherein he drowneth all the wealth of his.
In Licum 42 Lycus which lately is to Venice gone, Shall if he do returne, gaine 3 for one: But x to one, his knowledg and his wit, vvil not be bettered or increaſde a vvhit.
In Publium 43 Publius ſtudent at the common lavv, oft leaues his bookes, & for his recreation: To Paris garden doth himſelf Withdravve, Where he is rauiſht vvith ſuch delectation as dovvne amongſt the Beares & dogges he goes, vvere vvhilſt he skipping cries to head, To head. His satten doublet & his veluet hoſe, Are all vvith ſpittle from aboue be-ſpread. 2 D2r When he is like a Fathers cuntrey hall, ſtinking vvith dogges,& muted all vvith haukes, And rightly too on him this filth doth fall, Which for ſuch filthie ſpots his bookes forſake, Leauing olde Ployden, Dier &, Brooke alone, To ſee olde Harry Hunkes & Sacariſon.
In Silliam 44 When I this propofition had defended, A covvarde cannot be an honeſt man, Thou Silla ſeemeſt foorthvvith to be offended And holdes the contrarie & ſvveres he can. But when I tel thee that he will forſake His deareſt friend, in perill of his life, Thou then art changde & ſaist thou disſt miſtake, Yet I thinke oft, & thinke I thinke aright, Thy argument argues thou wilt not fight.
In Dacum 45 Dacus with ſome good collour & pretence, Tearmes his loues beautie ſilent eloquence: For ſhe doth lay more collours face, Then euer Tullie vſde hig ſpeech to grace.
In D2v
In Marcum 46 Why doſt thou Marcus in thy miſerie, Raile & blaſpheme, & call the heauens vn-kinde, The heauens draw no Kindeneſſe vnto thee, Thou haſt the heauens ſo litle in thy minde, For in thy life thou neuer vſeſt prayer, But at primero, to encounter faire.
Meditations of Gull. 47 See yonder melancholie gentleman, Which hoode-winked with his hat, alone doth fit, Thinke what he thinkes & tell me if you can, VVhat great affaires troubles his litle wit. he thinkes not of the war twixt France & ſpaine, VVhether it be for Europs good or ill, Nor whether the Empire can itſelfe maintaine, Againſt the the Turkiſh power encroching ſtil. Nor what great Towne in all the nether landes, The ſtarres determine to beſiege this ſpring Nor how the ſcottiſh pollicie now ſtandes, Nor what becomes of ths hiſt mutining. But he doth feriouflie bethinke him whether Of the guld people he be more eſteemde, For his long cloake, or his great blacke feather, By which each gull is now a gallant deemde. 3 D2v Or of a Iourney he deliberates, To Paris garden cocke-pit or the play: Or how to ſteale a dogge he meditates, Or what he he ſhall vnto his miſtris ſay: Yet with theſe Thoughts he thinks himſelfe moſt To be of Counſell with a King for wit. (fit
Ad Muſam 48. Peace idle muſe,, haue done, for it is time, Since Lowſie Ponticus enfues my fame, And ſweares the better ſort are much to blame To make me ſo wel knowne for ill rime Yet Bankes his horſe is better known then he, ſo are the Cammels & the weſterne hog, And ſo is Lepidus hie printed dogge. why doth not Ponticus thier fames enuie. Beſides this muſe of mine,& the black fether. grew both together freſh in eſtimation, and both growne ſtale, were caſt away togither: What fame is this that ſcarſe laſts out of faſhion. Onely this laſt in credit doth remaine, That frõ henceforth, ech baſtard caſt forth rime Which doth but fauour of a libel vaine. Shal call me father, and be thought my crime, So dull & with ſo litle fence endude, Is my groſe headed iudge the multitude.
FINNIS. I,D. D3v
IGNOTO. I loue thee not for ſacred chaſtstie, who loues for that nor for thy ſprightly wit: I loue thee not for thy ſweete modeſtie, Which makes thee in perfections throane to ſit. I loue thee not for thy inchaunting eye, Thy beautie rauiſhing perfection: I loue thee nor for vnchaſt luxurie, Nor for thy bodies faire proportion. I loue thee not for that my ſoule doth daunce, And leap with peaſure when thoſe lips of thine: giue Muſicall and gracefull vtterance, To ſome (by thee made happie) poets line. I loue thee not for voice or ſlender ſmall, But wilt thou know wherefore faire ſweet for all. Faith(wench) I cannot court thy ſprightly eyes, wich the baſe Viall places betweene my Thighes I cannot liſpe, nor to ſome Fiddle ſing, Nor run vpon a high ſtrecht Minikin. I cannot whine in puling Elegies, Intombing Cupid with ſad obſsquies. D4r I am not faſhioned for theſe amorous times, To court thy beutie with laſciuious rimes. I cannot dally, caper, daunce and ſing, Oyling my ſaint with ſupple ſonneting. I cannot croſſe my armes, or ſigh ay me, Ay me Forlorne egregious Fopperie. I cannot buſſthy fill, play with thy hayre, Swearing by loue, Thou art moſt debonaire. not I by Cock, but ſhall tel rhee roundly, ſoũdly harke in thine eare, zounds I can ( ) thee. Sweet wench I loue thee, yet I will not ſue, Or ſhew my loue as muskie Courtiers doe, Ile not carouſe health to honor thee, In this ſame bezi drunken curtefie. and when als quaſde, eate vp my bowſing glaſſe. In glory tt I am thy feruile aſſe. nor will I weare a rotten burbon locke. as ſome ſworne peſant to a female ſmock. wel featurde laſſe, Thou knoweſt I loue the deere Yet for thy ſake I will not bore mine eare To hang thy durtie ſilken ſhootires there. nor for thy loue will I once gnaſh a brick, Or ſome pied collours in by bonnet ſtiche. but by the chaps of hell to do thee good, Ile freely ſpend my Thriſe decocted bloud.
FINIS. D4v