Syr. P. S. His Astrophel and Stella. Prefatory Epistles by Thomas Newman and Thomas Nashe, London, 1591.

This is a mini-edition of Thomas Newman's and Thomas Nashe's prefatory epistles to this first, unauthorized (pirated?) edition of Sidney's sonnet sequence, "Astrophel & Stella." KMP Project Assistant Andrew Jeromski transcribed and encoded the text. Project Director Kristen Abbott Bennett is Guest Editor. Publication Date: August 2 2020.

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                <title>Syr P.S. His Astrophel and Stella. Wherein the excellence of sweete Poesie is concluded. To the end of which are added sundry rare sonnets of diverse Noble men and Gentlemen.<title>"Prefatory Epistles by Thomas Newman and Thomas Nashe"</title></title>
                
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                    <name ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_JERO1">Andrew Jeromski</name>
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                    <name ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_JERO1">Andrew Jeromski</name>
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                <resp>Guest editor</resp>
                <name ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_BENN1">Kristen Abbott Bennett</name>
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                    <date>2020</date>
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                    <bibl><publisher>Thomas Newman</publisher><pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                        <date>1591</date>
                        Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm available on the Early English Books Online Database. Copyright 2019, ProQuest
                        <idno type="STC">STC 22537<!-- Copy from Huntington --></idno>
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        <body>  
           <div type="preface">
           <figure><figDesc>Woodcut Printer's Ornament</figDesc></figure>
               <head type="subhead" style="text-align: center;">
                    <figure><figDesc>Fleuron</figDesc></figure><hi style="font-size: 200%;">To the worſhipfull and his very</hi><lb/>
                    good Freende, Ma. <persName style="font-style:italic;">Frauncis Flower</persName> Eſ<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                    <hi style="font-size: .75">quire, increaſe of all content.</hi><lb/></head>
               <p><s>I<seg type="decorInit"><hi
                                style="float: left; font-size: 10rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0.2rem 1rem 0;"
                                >T</hi></seg> was my fortune (right wor<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                        <hi style="text-indent: 11ems"/>shipfull) not many daies ſince,<lb/>
                        <hi style="text-indent: 11ems"/>to light vpon the famous de<lb
                            style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                        <hi style="text-indent: 11ems"/>uice of <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                            ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ASTR1"
                            >Aſtrophel</persName> and <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                            ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_STEL1">Stella</persName>,<lb/>
                        <hi style="text-indent: 11ems"/>which carrying the generall<lb/>
                        commendation of all men of iudgement, and<lb/> being reported to be one of
                        the rareſt things<lb/> that euer and Englishman ſet abroach, I haue<lb/>
                        thought good to publish it vnder your name,<lb/> both for I know the
                        excellencie of your wor<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> ships conceipt, aboue
                        all other to be ſuch, as<lb/> is onely fit to diſcerne of all matters of
                        wit, as<lb/> alſo for the credite and countenaunce your<lb/> patronage may
                        giue to ſuch a worke. Accept<lb/> of it I beſeech you, as the firſt fruites
                        of my<lb/> affection, which deſires to approue it ſelfe<lb/> in all dutie
                        vnto you: and though the Argu<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> ment perhaps may
                        ſeeme too light for your<lb/></s></p>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">A.ii.<supplied reason="missing-in-original">r</supplied></fw><fw type="catchword" style="float: right;">graue</fw>
                <pb/>
               <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-size: 200%">The Epiſtle.</hi></fw><lb/>
                <p><s>graue viewe, yet conſidering the worthiness<lb/> of the Author, I hope you
                        will entertaine it<lb/> accordingly. For my part, I haue beene very<lb/>
                        carefull in the Printing of it, and where as be<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                        ing ſpred abroade in written Coppies, it had<lb/> gathered much corruption
                        by ill Writers: I<lb/> haue vſed their helpe and aduice in correc<lb
                            style="hyphen-in-word"/> ting &amp; reſtoring it to his firſt dignitie,
                        that I<lb/> knowe were of skill and experience in thoſe<lb/> matters. And
                        the rather was I moued to ſette<lb/> it forth, becauſe I thought it pittie
                        aniething<lb/> proceeding from ſo rare a man, should bee<lb/> obſcured, or
                        that his fame should not ſtill be<lb/> nourisht in his works, whom the works
                        with<lb/> one vnited griefe bewailed. Thus crauing</s><lb/> pardon for my
                    bold attempt, &amp; deſiring the<lb/> continuance of your worshippes fauour
                    vnto<lb/> mee, I ende.<lb/></p>
               <p><hi style="text-align:center"><hi style="font-size: 200%">Yours alwaies to be</hi></hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="text-align:right">commaunded.</hi><lb/>                
                   <persName style="font-style:italic;" ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_NEWM1"><hi style="text-align:float-right;"><hi style="font-size: .75">Tho: Newman.</hi></hi></persName></p><lb/>
                        </div>
            <pb/>
        <div type="preface">
                <head type="subhead" style="center">
                 Somewhat to reade for them<lb/>
                <hi style="font style; italic"><hi style="font-size: .75">that liſt.</hi></hi></head><lb/>
                <p><s><foreign xml:lang="la"><seg style="decorInit">T</seg><hi
                                style="font style; italic">Empus adeſt plauſus aurea pompa
                                venit</hi></foreign>, ſo endes the<lb/>
                        <hi style="indent: 4ems;"/>Sceane of Idiots, and enter <persName
                            style="font-style:italic;"
                            ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ASTR1"
                            >Aſtrophel</persName> in pompe.</s><lb/>
                    <hi style="indent: 4ems;"/>Gentlemen that haue ſeene a thouſand lines of folly,<lb/>
                    <hi style="indent: 4ems;"/>drawn forth<foreign xml:lang="la"><hi
                            style="font-style:italic;">ex puncto impudentiæ</hi></foreign>, &amp;
                    two famous<lb/> Mountains to goe to the conception of one Mouſe, that<lb/> haue
                    had your eares deafned with the eccho of Fames bra<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                    ſen towres, when only they haue been toucht with a leaden<lb/> pen, that haue
                    ſeene <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_FAUN1">Pan</persName> ſitting
                    in his bower of delights, &amp;<lb/> a number of <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MIDA1">Midaſſes</persName> to
                    admire his miſerable hornpipes,<lb/> let not your ſurfeted ſight, new come frō ſuch puppetplay,<lb/> think ſcorne to turn aſide into
                    this Theater of pleaſure, for<lb/> here you ſhal find a paper ſtage ſtreud with
                    pearle, an arti<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> ficial heau'n to ouerſhadow the faire
                    frame, &amp; chriſtal wals<lb/> to encounter your curious eyes, whiles the
                    tragicommody<lb/> of loue is performed by ſtarlight. The chiefe Actor here is<lb/>
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MELP1">Melpomene</persName>,
                    whoſe dusky robes dipt in the ynke of teares, as<lb/> yet ſeeme to drop when I
                    view them neere. The argument<lb/> cruell chaſtitie, the Prologue hope, the
                    Epilogue diſpaire,<lb/>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style:italic;">videte queſo et linguis
                        animisque fauete</foreign>. And here peraduen<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                    ture, my witles youth may be taxt with a margent note of<lb/> preſumption, for
                    offering to put vp any motion of applauſe<lb/> in the behalfe of ſo excellent a
                    Poet, (the leaſt ſillable of<lb/> whoſe name ſounded in the eares of iudgement,
                    is able to<lb/> giue the meaneſt line he writes a dowry of immortality) yet<lb/>
                    thoſe that obſerue how iewels oftetimes com to their hands<lb/> that know not
                    their value, &amp; that the cockſcombes of our<lb/> daies, like <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_AESO1">Eſops</persName> Cock,
                    had rather haue a Barly kernell wrapt<lb/> vp in a Ballet, then they wil dig for
                    the welth of wit in any<lb/> ground that they know not, I hope wil alſo hold me
                        excu<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> ſed, though I open the gate to his glory,
                    &amp; inuite idle eares<lb/> to the admiration of his melancholy.<lb/></p>
                <p>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style: italic;"><hi
                            style="text-align: center;">Quid petitur ſacris niſi tantum fama
                            poetis</hi></foreign>.<lb/></p>
                <p>
                    <hi style="indent:2 ems;"/>Which although it be oftentimes impriſoned in
                    Ladyes<lb/> casks, &amp; the preſident bookes of ſuch as cannot ſee without<lb/>
                    another mans ſpectacles, yet at length it breaks foorth in<lb/> ſpight of his
                    keepers, and vſeth ſome priuate penne (in<lb/> ſteed of a picklock) to procure
                    his violent enlargement.<lb/></p>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center;">A.3.</fw><fw type="catchword" style="text-align:float-right;">The</fw><pb/>
            <fw type="header" style="text-align:center;"><hi style="font-size: 200%;">Somewhat to reade</hi></fw>
                <p>
                    <s>The Sunne for a time, may maske his golden head in a<lb/> cloud: yet in the
                        end, the thicke vaile doth vaniſh, and his<lb/> embelliſhed blandiſhment
                        appeares. Long hath Aſtro</s><lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> phel (Englands
                    Sunne) withheld the beames of his ſpirite,<lb/> from the common <sic>veiw</sic>
                    of our darke ſence, and night hath<lb/> houered over the gardens of the nine
                    Siſters, while <hi style="font-style:italic">Ignis</hi><lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic">fatuus</hi>, and groſſe fatty flames (ſuch as
                    commonly ariſe out<lb/> of Dunghilles) haue tooke occaſion in the middeſt e<lb
                        style="hyphen-in-word"/> clipſe of his ſhining perfections, to wander
                    abroade with<lb/> a wiſpe of paper at their tailes like Hobgoblins, and
                    leade<lb/> men vp and downe in a circle of abſurditie a whole weeke,<lb/> and
                    neuer know where they are. But nowe that cloude of<lb/> ſorrow is diſſolued,
                    which fierie Loue, exhaled from his<lb/> dewie haire, and affection hath
                    vnburthened the labouring<lb/> ſtreames of her wombe, in the lowe ceſterne of
                    his graue:<lb/> the night hath reſigned her iettie throne vnto <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_LUCI1">Lucifer</persName>,
                    and<lb/> cleere daylight poſſeſſeth the skie that was dimmed; wher<lb
                        style="hyphen-in-word"/> fore breake of your daunce you Fayries and Elues,
                    and<lb/> from the fieldes with the torne carcaſes of your Timbrils,<lb/> for
                    your kingdome is expired. Put out your ruſh candles,<lb/> you Poets and Rimers,
                    and bequeath your crazed quater<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> zayns to the
                    Chaundlers, for loe, here he cometh that hath<lb/>
                    <sic>broek</sic> your legs. <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_APOL1">Apollo</persName> hath
                    reſigned his Iuory Harp vnto<lb/>
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ASTR1">Aſtrophel</persName>,
                    &amp; he like <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MERC1">Mercury</persName>,
                    muſt lull you a ſleep with his<lb/> muſicke. Sleepe <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ARGO1">Argus</persName>,
                    ſleep Ignorance, ſleep Impudence,<lb/> for <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_MERC1">Mercury</persName>
                    hath <persName style="font-style:italic;">Io</persName>, &amp; onely <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_IOIO1">Io</persName><hi
                        style="font-style:italic">Pæan</hi> belongeth to <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ASTR1">Aſtro</persName></p>
                <p><persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ASTR1">phel</persName>. Deare
                        <persName style="font-style:italic"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ASTR1">Aſtrophel</persName>,
                    that in the aſhes of thy Loue, liueſt<lb/> againe like the <hi
                        style="font-style">Phoenix</hi>; ô might thy bodie (as thy name)<lb/> liue
                    againe likewiſe, here amongſt vs: but the earth, the<lb/> mother of mortalitie,
                    hath ſnacht thee too ſoone into her<lb/> chilled colde armes, and will not let
                    thee by any meanes, be<lb/> drawne from her deadly imbrace; and thy diuine
                    Soule,<lb/> carried on an Angels wings to heauen, is inſtalled in <persName
                        style="font-style:italic"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_merc1">Her<lb
                            style="hyphen-in-word"/> mes</persName> place, ſole <foreign
                        xml:lang="la" style="font-style:italic;">prolocutor</foreign> to the Gods.
                    Therefore mayeſt<lb/> thou neuer returne from the <placeName
                        style="font-style:italic;">Eliſian</placeName> fieldes like <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ORPH1"
                    >Orpheus</persName>,<lb/> therefore muſt we euer mourne for our <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ORPH1"
                    >Orpheus</persName>.<lb/></p>
                <p>
                    <hi style="indent:4 ems;"/>Fayne would a ſeconde ſpring of paſſion heere
                    ſpende<lb/> it ſelfe on his ſweet remembrance: but Religion that rebu<lb
                        style="hyphen-in-word"/></p>
               <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:float-right;">keth</fw><pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-size: 200%;">for them that liſt.</hi></fw>
                <p>
                    <s>keth prophane lamentation, drinkes in the riuers of thoſe diſ<lb
                            style="hyphen-in-word"/> paireful teares, which languorous ruth hath
                        outwelled, &amp; bids<lb/> me looke back to the houſe of honor, where fro
                        one &amp; the ſelfe<lb/> ſame roote of renowne, I ſhal find many goodly
                        branches deri<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> ued, &amp; ſuch as with the
                        ſpreading increaſe of their vertues, may<lb/> ſomwhat ouerſhadow the griefe
                        of his los. Amongſt the which</s><lb/> fayre ſister of <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_APOL1">Phœbus</persName>,
                    &amp; eloquent ſecretary to the Muſes, moſt<lb/> rare <persName
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_PEMB1">Counteſſe of
                            <placeName style="font-style:italic;">Pembroke</placeName></persName>per
                    thou art not to be omitted: whom<lb/> Artes doe adore as a ſecond <persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ATHE1">Minerua</persName>,
                    and our Poets extoll as<lb/> the Patroneſſe of their inuention; for in thee, the
                        <hi style="font-style:italic;">Lesbian</hi><persName
                        style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_SAPP1">Sap<lb
                            style="hyphen-in-word"/> pho</persName> with her lirick Harpe is
                    diſgraced, &amp; the Laurel Garlande<lb/> which thy Brother ſo brauely aduaunſt
                    on his Launce, is ſtill<lb/> kept greene in the <placeName>Temple of<persName
                            style="font-style:italic;"
                            ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_ATHE1"
                        >Pallas</persName></placeName>. Thou only ſacrificeſt thy<lb/> ſoule to
                    contemplation, thou only entertaineſt emptie handed<lb/>
                    <persName style="font-style:italic;"
                        ref="/kit-marlowe/files/personography.xml#pers_HOME1">Homer</persName>,
                    &amp; keepeſt the ſprings of <placeName style="font-style:italic;"
                        >Caſtalia</placeName> from being dryed vp.<lb/> Learning, wiſedom, beautie,
                    and all other ornaments of Nobili<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> tie whatſoeuer,
                    ſeeke to approue themſelves in thy ſight, and<lb/> get a further ſeale of
                    felicity, from the ſmiles of thy fauour.<lb/></p><p>
                    <foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style:italic;"><hi style="text-align:center;"
                                ><s>O Joue digna viro ni Joue nata
                    fores.</s></hi></foreign><lb/></p><p>
                    <hi style="indent:1 em;"/>I feare I ſhall be counted a mercenary flatterer, for
                    mixing<lb/> my thoughts with ſuch figuratiue admiration, but generall re<lb
                        style="hyphen-in-word"/> port that ſurpaſſeth my praiſe, condemneth my
                    rethoricke of<lb/> dulneſſe for ſo colde a commendation. Indeede to ſay the
                    truth,<lb/> my ſtile is ſomewhat heauie gated, and cannot daunce trip and<lb/>
                    goe ſo liuely, with oh my loue, ah my loue, all my loues gone, as<lb/> other
                    Sheepheards that haue been fooles in the Morris time<lb/> out of minde: nor hath
                    my proſe any skill to imitate the Al<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> mond leape
                    verſe, or ſit tabring fiue yeres together nothing but<lb/> to bee, to hee: on a
                    paper drum. Onely I can keepe pace with<lb/> Grauesend barge, and care not if I
                    have water enough, to lande<lb/> my ſhip of fooles with the Tearme, (the tyde, I
                    ſhoulde ſay.)<lb/> Now euery man is not of that minde, for ſome to goe the
                        ligh<lb style="hypen-in-word"/> ter away, will take in their fraught of
                    ſpangled feathers, golden<lb/> Peebles, Straw, Reedes, Bulruſhes, or any thing,
                    and then they<lb/> beare out their fayles as proudly, as if they were baliſted
                    with<lb/> Bulbiefe. Others are ſo hardly beſted for loading, that they are<lb/>
                    faine to retaile the cinders of <placeName style="font-style:italic;"
                        >Troy</placeName>, and the ſhiuers of broken<lb/></p>
                            <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">A.4.</fw><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: float-right;">trunchions</fw>
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;"><hi style="font-size: 200%;">Somewhat to reade</hi></fw><lb/><p>
                    <s>trunchions, to fill vp their boate that elſe ſhould goe empty:<lb/> and if
                        they haue but a pound weight of good Merchandiſe, it<lb/> ſhall be placed at
                        the poope, or pluckt in a thouſande peeces to<lb/> credit their
                            carriage.<s>For my part euery man as he likes, <foreign xml:lang="la"
                                style="font-style:italic;">Mens </foreign></s></s></p>
                <p><s><foreign xml:lang="la" style="font-style:italic;">cuinſque is eſt
                            quisque.</foreign></s> Tis as good to goe in cut fingerd Pumps<lb/> as
                    corke ſhooes, if one were <placeName>Corniſh</placeName> diamonds on his toes.
                    To<lb/> explain it by a more familiar example, an Aſſe is no great ſtate<lb
                        style="hyphen-in-word"/> man in the beaſtes common-wealth, though he weare
                    his eares<lb/>
                    <hi style="font-style:italic;"><sic>vpſenant</sic> muffe</hi>, after the
                        <placeName>Muſcouy</placeName> faſhion, &amp; hange the lip like a<lb/>
                    Capcaſe halfe open, or looke as demurely as a fixpenny browne<lb/> loafe, for he
                    hath ſome imperfections that do keepe him frō the<lb/> comon Councel: yet of
                    many, he is deemed a very vertuous me<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> ber, and one
                    of the honeſteſt ſort of men that are; So that our o<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/>
                    pinion (as <persName style="font-style:italic;">Sextus Empedocus</persName>
                    affirmeth) giues the name of good<lb/> or ill to euery thing. Out of whoſe works
                    (late he tranſlated into<lb/> Engliſh, for the benefit of vnlearned writers) a
                    man might col<lb style="hyphen-in-word"/> lect a whole booke of this argument,
                    which no doubt woulde<lb/> proue a worthy commonwealth matter, and far better
                    than wits<lb/> waxe karnell: much good vvorſhip haue the Author.<lb/></p><p>
                    <hi style="indent:4 ems;"/>Such is this golden age vvherein vve liue, and ſo
                    repleniſht<lb/> vvith golden Aſſes of all ſortes, that if learning had loſt it
                    ſelfe<lb/> in a groue of Genealogies, vvee neede doe no more but ſette an<lb/>
                    olde gooſe ouer halfe a dozen pottle pots, (vvhich are as it vvere<lb/> the
                    egges of inuention) and vvee ſhall haue ſuch a breede of<lb/> bookes within a
                    little vvhile after, as will fill all the vvorld vvith<lb/> the vvilde fovvle of
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Syr P.S. His Astrophel and Stella. Wherein the excellence of sweete Poesie is concluded. To the end of which are added sundry rare sonnets of diverse Noble men and Gentlemen."Prefatory Epistles by Thomas Newman and Thomas Nashe" Printer Thomas Newman Encoder Andrew Jeromski Primary editor Andrew Jeromski Guest editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Programmer Joey Takeda Programmer Martin Holmes Technical Support Scott Hamlin The Kit Marlowe Project 2020

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thomas Newman London 1591 Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm available on the Early English Books Online Database. Copyright 2019, ProQuest STC 22537

LEMDO template prototype

Woodcut Printer's Ornament
Fleuron
To the worſhipfull and his very good Freende, Ma. Frauncis Flower Eſ quire, increaſe of all content.

I T was my fortune (right wor shipfull) not many daies ſince, to light vpon the famous de uice of Aſtrophel and Stella, which carrying the generall commendation of all men of iudgement, and being reported to be one of the rareſt things that euer and Englishman ſet abroach, I haue thought good to publish it vnder your name, both for I know the excellencie of your wor ships conceipt, aboue all other to be ſuch, as is onely fit to diſcerne of all matters of wit, as alſo for the credite and countenaunce your patronage may giue to ſuch a worke. Accept of it I beſeech you, as the firſt fruites of my affection, which deſires to approue it ſelfe in all dutie vnto you: and though the Argu ment perhaps may ſeeme too light for your

A.ii.r graue The Epiſtle.

graue viewe, yet conſidering the worthiness of the Author, I hope you will entertaine it accordingly. For my part, I haue beene very carefull in the Printing of it, and where as be ing ſpred abroade in written Coppies, it had gathered much corruption by ill Writers: I haue vſed their helpe and aduice in correc ting & reſtoring it to his firſt dignitie, that I knowe were of skill and experience in thoſe matters. And the rather was I moued to ſette it forth, becauſe I thought it pittie aniething proceeding from ſo rare a man, should bee obſcured, or that his fame should not ſtill be nourisht in his works, whom the works with one vnited griefe bewailed. Thus crauing pardon for my bold attempt, & deſiring the continuance of your worshippes fauour vnto mee, I ende.

Yours alwaies to be commaunded. Tho: Newman.

Somewhat to reade for them that liſt.

T Empus adeſt plauſus aurea pompa venit , ſo endes the Sceane of Idiots, and enter Aſtrophel in pompe. Gentlemen that haue ſeene a thouſand lines of folly, drawn forth ex puncto impudentiæ , & two famous Mountains to goe to the conception of one Mouſe, that haue had your eares deafned with the eccho of Fames bra ſen towres, when only they haue been toucht with a leaden pen, that haue ſeene Pan ſitting in his bower of delights, & a number of Midaſſes to admire his miſerable hornpipes, let not your ſurfeted ſight, new come frō ſuch puppetplay, think ſcorne to turn aſide into this Theater of pleaſure, for here you ſhal find a paper ſtage ſtreud with pearle, an arti ficial heau'n to ouerſhadow the faire frame, & chriſtal wals to encounter your curious eyes, whiles the tragicommody of loue is performed by ſtarlight. The chiefe Actor here is Melpomene, whoſe dusky robes dipt in the ynke of teares, as yet ſeeme to drop when I view them neere. The argument cruell chaſtitie, the Prologue hope, the Epilogue diſpaire, videte queſo et linguis animisque fauete. And here peraduen ture, my witles youth may be taxt with a margent note of preſumption, for offering to put vp any motion of applauſe in the behalfe of ſo excellent a Poet, (the leaſt ſillable of whoſe name ſounded in the eares of iudgement, is able to giue the meaneſt line he writes a dowry of immortality) yet thoſe that obſerue how iewels oftetimes com to their hands that know not their value, & that the cockſcombes of our daies, like Eſops Cock, had rather haue a Barly kernell wrapt vp in a Ballet, then they wil dig for the welth of wit in any ground that they know not, I hope wil alſo hold me excu ſed, though I open the gate to his glory, & inuite idle eares to the admiration of his melancholy.

Quid petitur ſacris niſi tantum fama poetis .

Which although it be oftentimes impriſoned in Ladyes casks, & the preſident bookes of ſuch as cannot ſee without another mans ſpectacles, yet at length it breaks foorth in ſpight of his keepers, and vſeth ſome priuate penne (in ſteed of a picklock) to procure his violent enlargement.

A.3. The Somewhat to reade

The Sunne for a time, may maske his golden head in a cloud: yet in the end, the thicke vaile doth vaniſh, and his embelliſhed blandiſhment appeares. Long hath Aſtro phel (Englands Sunne) withheld the beames of his ſpirite, from the common veiw of our darke ſence, and night hath houered over the gardens of the nine Siſters, while Ignis fatuus, and groſſe fatty flames (ſuch as commonly ariſe out of Dunghilles) haue tooke occaſion in the middeſt e clipſe of his ſhining perfections, to wander abroade with a wiſpe of paper at their tailes like Hobgoblins, and leade men vp and downe in a circle of abſurditie a whole weeke, and neuer know where they are. But nowe that cloude of ſorrow is diſſolued, which fierie Loue, exhaled from his dewie haire, and affection hath vnburthened the labouring ſtreames of her wombe, in the lowe ceſterne of his graue: the night hath reſigned her iettie throne vnto Lucifer, and cleere daylight poſſeſſeth the skie that was dimmed; wher fore breake of your daunce you Fayries and Elues, and from the fieldes with the torne carcaſes of your Timbrils, for your kingdome is expired. Put out your ruſh candles, you Poets and Rimers, and bequeath your crazed quater zayns to the Chaundlers, for loe, here he cometh that hath broek your legs. Apollo hath reſigned his Iuory Harp vnto Aſtrophel, & he like Mercury, muſt lull you a ſleep with his muſicke. Sleepe Argus, ſleep Ignorance, ſleep Impudence, for Mercury hath Io, & onely Io Pæan belongeth to Aſtro

phel. Deare Aſtrophel, that in the aſhes of thy Loue, liueſt againe like the Phoenix; ô might thy bodie (as thy name) liue againe likewiſe, here amongſt vs: but the earth, the mother of mortalitie, hath ſnacht thee too ſoone into her chilled colde armes, and will not let thee by any meanes, be drawne from her deadly imbrace; and thy diuine Soule, carried on an Angels wings to heauen, is inſtalled in Her mes place, ſole prolocutor to the Gods. Therefore mayeſt thou neuer returne from the Eliſian fieldes like Orpheus, therefore muſt we euer mourne for our Orpheus.

Fayne would a ſeconde ſpring of paſſion heere ſpende it ſelfe on his ſweet remembrance: but Religion that rebu

keth for them that liſt.

keth prophane lamentation, drinkes in the riuers of thoſe diſ paireful teares, which languorous ruth hath outwelled, & bids me looke back to the houſe of honor, where fro one & the ſelfe ſame roote of renowne, I ſhal find many goodly branches deri ued, & ſuch as with the ſpreading increaſe of their vertues, may ſomwhat ouerſhadow the griefe of his los. Amongſt the which fayre ſister of Phœbus, & eloquent ſecretary to the Muſes, moſt rare Counteſſe of Pembroke per thou art not to be omitted: whom Artes doe adore as a ſecond Minerua, and our Poets extoll as the Patroneſſe of their inuention; for in thee, the Lesbian Sap pho with her lirick Harpe is diſgraced, & the Laurel Garlande which thy Brother ſo brauely aduaunſt on his Launce, is ſtill kept greene in the Temple ofPallas . Thou only ſacrificeſt thy ſoule to contemplation, thou only entertaineſt emptie handed Homer, & keepeſt the ſprings of Caſtalia from being dryed vp. Learning, wiſedom, beautie, and all other ornaments of Nobili tie whatſoeuer, ſeeke to approue themſelves in thy ſight, and get a further ſeale of felicity, from the ſmiles of thy fauour.

O Joue digna viro ni Joue nata fores.

I feare I ſhall be counted a mercenary flatterer, for mixing my thoughts with ſuch figuratiue admiration, but generall re port that ſurpaſſeth my praiſe, condemneth my rethoricke of dulneſſe for ſo colde a commendation. Indeede to ſay the truth, my ſtile is ſomewhat heauie gated, and cannot daunce trip and goe ſo liuely, with oh my loue, ah my loue, all my loues gone, as other Sheepheards that haue been fooles in the Morris time out of minde: nor hath my proſe any skill to imitate the Al mond leape verſe, or ſit tabring fiue yeres together nothing but to bee, to hee: on a paper drum. Onely I can keepe pace with Grauesend barge, and care not if I have water enough, to lande my ſhip of fooles with the Tearme, (the tyde, I ſhoulde ſay.) Now euery man is not of that minde, for ſome to goe the ligh ter away, will take in their fraught of ſpangled feathers, golden Peebles, Straw, Reedes, Bulruſhes, or any thing, and then they beare out their fayles as proudly, as if they were baliſted with Bulbiefe. Others are ſo hardly beſted for loading, that they are faine to retaile the cinders of Troy, and the ſhiuers of broken

A.4. trunchions Somewhat to reade

trunchions, to fill vp their boate that elſe ſhould goe empty: and if they haue but a pound weight of good Merchandiſe, it ſhall be placed at the poope, or pluckt in a thouſande peeces to credit their carriage.For my part euery man as he likes, Mens

cuinſque is eſt quisque. Tis as good to goe in cut fingerd Pumps as corke ſhooes, if one were Corniſh diamonds on his toes. To explain it by a more familiar example, an Aſſe is no great ſtate man in the beaſtes common-wealth, though he weare his eares vpſenant muffe, after the Muſcouy faſhion, & hange the lip like a Capcaſe halfe open, or looke as demurely as a fixpenny browne loafe, for he hath ſome imperfections that do keepe him frō the comon Councel: yet of many, he is deemed a very vertuous me ber, and one of the honeſteſt ſort of men that are; So that our o pinion (as Sextus Empedocus affirmeth) giues the name of good or ill to euery thing. Out of whoſe works (late he tranſlated into Engliſh, for the benefit of vnlearned writers) a man might col lect a whole booke of this argument, which no doubt woulde proue a worthy commonwealth matter, and far better than wits waxe karnell: much good vvorſhip haue the Author.

Such is this golden age vvherein vve liue, and ſo repleniſht vvith golden Aſſes of all ſortes, that if learning had loſt it ſelfe in a groue of Genealogies, vvee neede doe no more but ſette an olde gooſe ouer halfe a dozen pottle pots, (vvhich are as it vvere the egges of inuention) and vvee ſhall haue ſuch a breede of bookes within a little vvhile after, as will fill all the vvorld vvith the vvilde fovvle of good vvits; I can tell you this is a harder thing then making golde of quickſiluer, and vvill trouble you more than the Morrall of Æſops Glovv-vvorme, hath troubled our Engliſh Apes, vvho ſtriuing to vvarme themſelues, vvith the flame of the Philoſophers ſtone, haue ſpent all their vvealth in buying bellovves to blovve the falſe fyre. Gentlemen, I feare I haue too much preſumed on your idle leyſure, and beene too bold, to ſtand talking all this vvhile in another mans doore: but novv I vvill leaue you to ſuruey the pleaſures of Paphos, and of fer your ſmiles on the Aulters of Venus.

Yours in all deſire to pleaſe, Tho: Naſhe.

Lucifer Satan

male

Lucifer is the angel created by God, but eventually turns evil and is kicked out of heaven earning the name satan. History

Apollo Apollo Phaebus Phoebus

male

God of the sun, prophecy, and poetry. Perseus Project

Mercury Mercury

male

Roman god of commerce. Ancient History Encyclopedia

Argos Argos Argus Panoptes

male

A giant in Greek mythology who had one hundred eyes and was a servant of Hera. Greek Mythology

Orpheus Orphey Hero

male

Son of Apollo, ancient Greek legendary hero endowed with superhuman musical skills. Ancient History Encyclopedia

Toolbox

Themes:

Syr P.S. His Astrophel and Stella. Wherein the excellence of sweete Poesie is concluded. To the end of which are added sundry rare sonnets of diverse Noble men and Gentlemen."Prefatory Epistles by Thomas Newman and Thomas Nashe" Printer Thomas Newman Encoder Andrew Jeromski Primary editor Andrew Jeromski Guest editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Programmer Joey Takeda Programmer Martin Holmes Technical Support Scott Hamlin The Kit Marlowe Project 2020

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Thomas Newman London 1591 Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm available on the Early English Books Online Database. Copyright 2019, ProQuest STC 22537

LEMDO template prototype

Woodcut Printer's Ornament
Fleuron
To the worſhipfull and his very good Freende, Ma. Frauncis Flower Eſ quire, increaſe of all content.

I T was my fortune (right wor shipfull) not many daies ſince, to light vpon the famous de uice of Aſtrophel and Stella, which carrying the generall commendation of all men of iudgement, and being reported to be one of the rareſt things that euer and Englishman ſet abroach, I haue thought good to publish it vnder your name, both for I know the excellencie of your wor ships conceipt, aboue all other to be ſuch, as is onely fit to diſcerne of all matters of wit, as alſo for the credite and countenaunce your patronage may giue to ſuch a worke. Accept of it I beſeech you, as the firſt fruites of my affection, which deſires to approue it ſelfe in all dutie vnto you: and though the Argu ment perhaps may ſeeme too light for your

A.ii.r graue The Epiſtle.

graue viewe, yet conſidering the worthiness of the Author, I hope you will entertaine it accordingly. For my part, I haue beene very carefull in the Printing of it, and where as be ing ſpred abroade in written Coppies, it had gathered much corruption by ill Writers: I haue vſed their helpe and aduice in correc ting & reſtoring it to his firſt dignitie, that I knowe were of skill and experience in thoſe matters. And the rather was I moued to ſette it forth, becauſe I thought it pittie aniething proceeding from ſo rare a man, should bee obſcured, or that his fame should not ſtill be nourisht in his works, whom the works with one vnited griefe bewailed. Thus crauing pardon for my bold attempt, & deſiring the continuance of your worshippes fauour vnto mee, I ende.

Yours alwaies to be commaunded. Tho: Newman.

Somewhat to reade for them that liſt.

T Empus adeſt plauſus aurea pompa venit , ſo endes the Sceane of Idiots, and enter Aſtrophel in pompe. Gentlemen that haue ſeene a thouſand lines of folly, drawn forth ex puncto impudentiæ , & two famous Mountains to goe to the conception of one Mouſe, that haue had your eares deafned with the eccho of Fames bra ſen towres, when only they haue been toucht with a leaden pen, that haue ſeene Pan ſitting in his bower of delights, & a number of Midaſſes to admire his miſerable hornpipes, let not your ſurfeted ſight, new come frō ſuch puppetplay, think ſcorne to turn aſide into this Theater of pleaſure, for here you ſhal find a paper ſtage ſtreud with pearle, an arti ficial heau'n to ouerſhadow the faire frame, & chriſtal wals to encounter your curious eyes, whiles the tragicommody of loue is performed by ſtarlight. The chiefe Actor here is Melpomene, whoſe dusky robes dipt in the ynke of teares, as yet ſeeme to drop when I view them neere. The argument cruell chaſtitie, the Prologue hope, the Epilogue diſpaire, videte queſo et linguis animisque fauete. And here peraduen ture, my witles youth may be taxt with a margent note of preſumption, for offering to put vp any motion of applauſe in the behalfe of ſo excellent a Poet, (the leaſt ſillable of whoſe name ſounded in the eares of iudgement, is able to giue the meaneſt line he writes a dowry of immortality) yet thoſe that obſerue how iewels oftetimes com to their hands that know not their value, & that the cockſcombes of our daies, like Eſops Cock, had rather haue a Barly kernell wrapt vp in a Ballet, then they wil dig for the welth of wit in any ground that they know not, I hope wil alſo hold me excu ſed, though I open the gate to his glory, & inuite idle eares to the admiration of his melancholy.

Quid petitur ſacris niſi tantum fama poetis .

Which although it be oftentimes impriſoned in Ladyes casks, & the preſident bookes of ſuch as cannot ſee without another mans ſpectacles, yet at length it breaks foorth in ſpight of his keepers, and vſeth ſome priuate penne (in ſteed of a picklock) to procure his violent enlargement.

A.3. The Somewhat to reade

The Sunne for a time, may maske his golden head in a cloud: yet in the end, the thicke vaile doth vaniſh, and his embelliſhed blandiſhment appeares. Long hath Aſtro phel (Englands Sunne) withheld the beames of his ſpirite, from the common veiw of our darke ſence, and night hath houered over the gardens of the nine Siſters, while Ignis fatuus, and groſſe fatty flames (ſuch as commonly ariſe out of Dunghilles) haue tooke occaſion in the middeſt e clipſe of his ſhining perfections, to wander abroade with a wiſpe of paper at their tailes like Hobgoblins, and leade men vp and downe in a circle of abſurditie a whole weeke, and neuer know where they are. But nowe that cloude of ſorrow is diſſolued, which fierie Loue, exhaled from his dewie haire, and affection hath vnburthened the labouring ſtreames of her wombe, in the lowe ceſterne of his graue: the night hath reſigned her iettie throne vnto Lucifer, and cleere daylight poſſeſſeth the skie that was dimmed; wher fore breake of your daunce you Fayries and Elues, and from the fieldes with the torne carcaſes of your Timbrils, for your kingdome is expired. Put out your ruſh candles, you Poets and Rimers, and bequeath your crazed quater zayns to the Chaundlers, for loe, here he cometh that hath broek your legs. Apollo hath reſigned his Iuory Harp vnto Aſtrophel, & he like Mercury, muſt lull you a ſleep with his muſicke. Sleepe Argus, ſleep Ignorance, ſleep Impudence, for Mercury hath Io, & onely Io Pæan belongeth to Aſtro

phel. Deare Aſtrophel, that in the aſhes of thy Loue, liueſt againe like the Phoenix; ô might thy bodie (as thy name) liue againe likewiſe, here amongſt vs: but the earth, the mother of mortalitie, hath ſnacht thee too ſoone into her chilled colde armes, and will not let thee by any meanes, be drawne from her deadly imbrace; and thy diuine Soule, carried on an Angels wings to heauen, is inſtalled in Her mes place, ſole prolocutor to the Gods. Therefore mayeſt thou neuer returne from the Eliſian fieldes like Orpheus, therefore muſt we euer mourne for our Orpheus.

Fayne would a ſeconde ſpring of paſſion heere ſpende it ſelfe on his ſweet remembrance: but Religion that rebu

keth for them that liſt.

keth prophane lamentation, drinkes in the riuers of thoſe diſ paireful teares, which languorous ruth hath outwelled, & bids me looke back to the houſe of honor, where fro one & the ſelfe ſame roote of renowne, I ſhal find many goodly branches deri ued, & ſuch as with the ſpreading increaſe of their vertues, may ſomwhat ouerſhadow the griefe of his los. Amongſt the which fayre ſister of Phœbus, & eloquent ſecretary to the Muſes, moſt rare Counteſſe of Pembroke per thou art not to be omitted: whom Artes doe adore as a ſecond Minerua, and our Poets extoll as the Patroneſſe of their inuention; for in thee, the Lesbian Sap pho with her lirick Harpe is diſgraced, & the Laurel Garlande which thy Brother ſo brauely aduaunſt on his Launce, is ſtill kept greene in the Temple ofPallas . Thou only ſacrificeſt thy ſoule to contemplation, thou only entertaineſt emptie handed Homer, & keepeſt the ſprings of Caſtalia from being dryed vp. Learning, wiſedom, beautie, and all other ornaments of Nobili tie whatſoeuer, ſeeke to approue themſelves in thy ſight, and get a further ſeale of felicity, from the ſmiles of thy fauour.

O Joue digna viro ni Joue nata fores.

I feare I ſhall be counted a mercenary flatterer, for mixing my thoughts with ſuch figuratiue admiration, but generall re port that ſurpaſſeth my praiſe, condemneth my rethoricke of dulneſſe for ſo colde a commendation. Indeede to ſay the truth, my ſtile is ſomewhat heauie gated, and cannot daunce trip and goe ſo liuely, with oh my loue, ah my loue, all my loues gone, as other Sheepheards that haue been fooles in the Morris time out of minde: nor hath my proſe any skill to imitate the Al mond leape verſe, or ſit tabring fiue yeres together nothing but to bee, to hee: on a paper drum. Onely I can keepe pace with Grauesend barge, and care not if I have water enough, to lande my ſhip of fooles with the Tearme, (the tyde, I ſhoulde ſay.) Now euery man is not of that minde, for ſome to goe the ligh ter away, will take in their fraught of ſpangled feathers, golden Peebles, Straw, Reedes, Bulruſhes, or any thing, and then they beare out their fayles as proudly, as if they were baliſted with Bulbiefe. Others are ſo hardly beſted for loading, that they are faine to retaile the cinders of Troy, and the ſhiuers of broken

A.4. trunchions Somewhat to reade

trunchions, to fill vp their boate that elſe ſhould goe empty: and if they haue but a pound weight of good Merchandiſe, it ſhall be placed at the poope, or pluckt in a thouſande peeces to credit their carriage.For my part euery man as he likes, Mens

cuinſque is eſt quisque. Tis as good to goe in cut fingerd Pumps as corke ſhooes, if one were Corniſh diamonds on his toes. To explain it by a more familiar example, an Aſſe is no great ſtate man in the beaſtes common-wealth, though he weare his eares vpſenant muffe, after the Muſcouy faſhion, & hange the lip like a Capcaſe halfe open, or looke as demurely as a fixpenny browne loafe, for he hath ſome imperfections that do keepe him frō the comon Councel: yet of many, he is deemed a very vertuous me ber, and one of the honeſteſt ſort of men that are; So that our o pinion (as Sextus Empedocus affirmeth) giues the name of good or ill to euery thing. Out of whoſe works (late he tranſlated into Engliſh, for the benefit of vnlearned writers) a man might col lect a whole booke of this argument, which no doubt woulde proue a worthy commonwealth matter, and far better than wits waxe karnell: much good vvorſhip haue the Author.

Such is this golden age vvherein vve liue, and ſo repleniſht vvith golden Aſſes of all ſortes, that if learning had loſt it ſelfe in a groue of Genealogies, vvee neede doe no more but ſette an olde gooſe ouer halfe a dozen pottle pots, (vvhich are as it vvere the egges of inuention) and vvee ſhall haue ſuch a breede of bookes within a little vvhile after, as will fill all the vvorld vvith the vvilde fovvle of good vvits; I can tell you this is a harder thing then making golde of quickſiluer, and vvill trouble you more than the Morrall of Æſops Glovv-vvorme, hath troubled our Engliſh Apes, vvho ſtriuing to vvarme themſelues, vvith the flame of the Philoſophers ſtone, haue ſpent all their vvealth in buying bellovves to blovve the falſe fyre. Gentlemen, I feare I haue too much preſumed on your idle leyſure, and beene too bold, to ſtand talking all this vvhile in another mans doore: but novv I vvill leaue you to ſuruey the pleaſures of Paphos, and of fer your ſmiles on the Aulters of Venus.

Yours in all deſire to pleaſe, Tho: Naſhe.