The history of Doctor. John Faustus compyled in verse, very pleasant and delightful. [London?] 1696

This edition of _The history of Doctor. John Faustus compyled in verse, very pleasant and delightful. [London?] 1696 (Wing H2118)_ was produced by students in Kristen Abbott Bennett's and Scott Hamlin's Spring 2018 "Rogue's Progress" learning community at Stonehill College. As of May 1, 2018, this version has not yet been reviewed by instructors or gone through a final round of editing. For more information about this project, please see www.kitmarlowe.org.

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                <title>The History of Doctor John Faustus</title>
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                    <resp>Author<date when-custom="1696"/></resp>
                    <name>Anonymous</name>
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                    <name>Taylor Long</name>
                    <name>Emily Rosano</name>
                    <name>Brendan Murphy</name>
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                <respStmt>
                    <resp>Primary editor</resp>
                    <name>Kristen Abbott Bennett</name>
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                    Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin
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                <date>2018</date>
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                <bibl>Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm.</bibl>
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            <div type="section" style = "font-weight: bold">
                <fw type = "header" style = "text-align:center;"><add rend= "handwritten">34</add></fw>
                <figure>
                    <figDesc> A decorative printer's ornament is here </figDesc>
                </figure>
                <head style="text-align: center;"> TO the READER </head> 
                <lg type = "epistle" style = "font-type:italics;">
                <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">R</hi>Eader, I would not have you think,</l>
                <l>That I intend to waſte my ink,</l> 
                <l>While <persName style = "font-type:normal;">Fauſtus </persName> ſtory I rehearſe</l>
                <l>And do write his life in versſe </l>
                <l>For ſeing <persName style = "font-type:normal;">Fryer Bacons</persName> ſtory,</l>
                <l>(In whom <placeName style = "font-type:normal;">Oxford</placeName> ſtill may glory)</l>
                <l>For want of better pen comes forth,</l>
                <l>Compos’d in Ryme of no great worth:</l>
                <l>I cal’d my Muſe to task and pen’d </l> 
                <l><persName style = "font-type:normal;"> Fauſtus </persName>life, and death, and end:</l>
                <l>And when it cometh forth in print,</l>
                <l>If you like it not, the devil'is is in’t.</l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l><foreign xml:lang="la">Veni <hi style = "text-align:center;">Vide,</hi><hi style = "text-align:right;text-indet:2em"> Fuge.</hi></foreign></l>
                    <l><hi style = "font-type:italic">Come <hi style = "text-align:center;">See, </hi><hi style = "text-align:right;text-indent1em;"><supplied reason = "faded-ink" resp = "contr_TlONG">and hate</supplied></hi></hi></l>
                    <l>Doctor <persName style = "text-align:center;">Fauſtus</persName><hi style = "text-align:right;">wretched <supplied reason = "faded-ink" resp = "contr_TLONG">fiste.</supplied></hi></l> 
                </lg>
                    <fw type = "catchword" style = "text-align:right;" >CHAP.</fw>
                <pb/>
            </div>
               <div type = "chapter">
                   <fw type = "header" style = "text-align:center;"><add rend= "handwritten">35</add></fw>
                   <figure>
                       <figDesc> A decorative printer's ornament is here </figDesc>
                   </figure>
                   <head style = "text-align:center; font-style:italic;">CHAP I.</head> 
                   <lg type = "epigraph" style = "font-type:italic;">
                       <l style = "text-indent:4em;"> Of Doctor <persName style = "font-type:normal;">Fauſtus </persName> birth.</l>
                       <l style = "text-indent:8em;">And how he gave his heart</l>
                       <l style = "text-indent:4em;">To leave off fair Divinity,</l> 
                       <l style = "text-indent:8em;">To ſtudy the black Art.</l>
                   </lg>             
                   <lg>
                       <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">M</hi>Y Muſe, alift me now, for I intend</l>
                       <l>To write the life &amp; death &amp; featful end</l>
                       <l>Oſ  Doctor <persName> Faustus </persName> , whoſe ill gotten name,</l>
                       <l>May well compare with <persName style = "font-type:italc;"> Fryer Bacons </persName> Fame.</l>
                       <l><persName style = "font-type:ialic;"> Fauſtus </persName>was born at <placeName style = "font-type:italic;"> Rhodes </placeName>, which Town <supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp = "contr_TLONG">dor</supplied></l>
                       <l>Within a province of fair <placeName style = "font-type:italic;"> Germany </placeName>:</l>
                       <l>His Father was a husband man, did live</l>
                       <l>On what the earth to him did freely give:</l>
                       <l>Yet he at <placeName style = "font-type:italic;"> Wittenberg </placeName> an Uncle had,</l>
                       <l>Who toke young <persName style = "font-type:italics;"> Fauſtus </persName>, being but a Lad,</l>
                       <l>And ſent him to the Univerſity,</l>
                       <l>That he might ſtudy there Divinity:</l>
                       <l>But he did quickly there addict his heart:</l>
                       <l>To leave fair ſtudies for the foul black Art</l>
                       <l>Thus he in ſecret ſtudied conjuration,</l>
                       <l>Yet being found by acts and diſputation</l>
                       <l>To be well learned, they did all agree</l>
                       <l>To make him Doctor of Divinity:</l>
                   <fw type = "signature">A2<supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp = "contr_TLONG">r</supplied></fw>
                   <pb/>
                       <!-- Begin Emily Rosano Encoding -->
                <fw type="header" style="text-align:center; font-style:italic">The History of <add rend="handwritten">36</add></fw>
                    <l><supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">B</supplied>ut having once obtained that high degree</l> 
                    <l>He ill deſerved it, as you ſhal ſee,</l>
                    <l>For now my pen doth tremble for to tell,</l> 
                    <l>How like a devil from all grace he fell,</l> 
                    <l>For now his contemplation he did bend</l>
                    <l>To Negromancy, and much time did ſpend</l>
                    <l>In caſting figures, making incantations,</l> 
                    <l>With all the wicked helps of conjurations,</l> 
                    <l>Leaving thoſe ſtudies which are moſt divine,</l> 
                    <l>And to theſe helliſh arts he did incline:</l> 
                    <l>I therefore here have drawn his life, that you</l> 
                    <l>May learn ſuch wicked courſes to eſchew:</l> 
                    <l>That we thus ſeeing him ruled by the devil,</l> 
                    <l>May pray to be delivered from ſuch evil,</l> 
                </lg>
               </div>  
            <div type="chapter">
                <head style="text-align:center">CHAP. II,</head>
                <lg type="epigraph"> 
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 5em">How Doctor <persName style="font-style: normal">Fauſtus</persName> conjur'd up,</l> 
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 8.5em">from out a globe of fire,</l> 
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 6em">The ſpirit <persName style="font-style:normal">Mephoſtophiles</persName>,</l>
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 8.5em">that came like to a frier.</l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0">N</hi>ow <persName style="font-style: italic">Fauſtus</persName> purpoſing alone to try</l> 
                    <l>The power of this his Magick myſtery</l> 
                    <l><supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">He</supplied> did repair unto a little wood,</l> 
                    <l><supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">An</supplied>d not far off from <hi style="font-style:italic">wittenberg</hi> it ſtood:</l> 
                    <l><supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">T</supplied>here he did make a circle with his wand,</l> 
                    <l><supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">An</supplied>d thus with charms his ſpirit did command,</l> 
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l style="text-indent: 6em"><persName>Mephoſtophiles</persName>, <hi style="font-style: italic">I ſay,</hi></l>
                    <l style="font-style: italic; text-indent: 6.5em"> quickly riſe, and come away:</l>
                    <fw type="catchword">By</fw>
                    <fw type="signature"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_EROSA">A2v</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
                </lg>
                <fw type="header" style="font-style:italic">Doctor <persName>John Fauſtus</persName>.<add rend="handwritten">37</add></fw>
                <lg>
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 5em">By <persName style="font-style: normal">Lucifer</persName> I charge the here,</l> 
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 5.5em">that thou forthwith do appear.</l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l>With this a murmure in the woods was heard</l>
                    <l>That Doctor <persName style="font-style:italic">Fauſtus</persName> was himſelf afear'd:</l> 
                    <l>The wood with lightning ſeemed on a flame,</l> 
                    <l>And loudeſt thunder terror did procliam,</l> 
                    <l>Till Doctor <persName style="font-style:italic">Fauſtus</persName> in his Magick robe,</l> 
                    <l>Lookin about him ſpy'd a fiery globe;</l> 
                    <l>And at the laſt from this ſame globe a fire;</l> 
                    <l>The Spirit came in likeneſs of a Fryer:</l> 
                    <l>Who lightly round about the circle ran,</l> 
                    <l>And thus to ſpeak to <persName style="font-style:italic">Faustus</persName> he began:</l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 5em"><persName style="font-style:normal">Fauſtus</persName>, ſayeth he, I now am come,</l>
                    <l style="font-style:italic; text-indent: 7em">Speak thy will, and it is done.</l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l>When <persName style="font-style: italic">Mephoſtopiles</persName> did thus kindly greet hi<supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">m</supplied></l>
                    <l>Then Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic">Fauſtus</persName> bid the ſpirit meet hi<supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">m</supplied></l>
                    <l>The next day at his houſe; the ſpirit did cóſe<supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">r</supplied></l>
                    <l>And back again then Doctor <persName style="font-style:italic">Fauſtus</persName> went.</l>
                </lg>        
            </div>
            <div type="chapter">
                <head style="text-align: center">CHAP. III.</head>
                <lg type="epigraph">
                    <l style="font-style: italic; text-indent: 5em">How Doctor <persName style="font-style: noraml">Fauſtus</persName> made</l>
                    <l style="font-style: italic; text-indent: 7em">a contract firm, not good, </l>
                    <l style="font-style: italic; text-indent: 5em">To ſerve the Devil, which </l>
                    <l style="font-style: italic; text-indent: 7em">he wrote with his own blood </l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0:">T</hi>He time appointed, in a bluſtring day, </l>
                    <l>The ſpirit came to him, and thus did ſ<supplied reason="scan-cropped" resp="contr_EROSA">ay</supplied></l>
                <fw type="signature">A3<supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_EROSA">r</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                    <!-- BEgin Brendan Murphy Encoding -->
                    <fw type="header" style="text-algin:center; font-style:italic">The History of <add rend="handwritten">38</add></fw> 
                        <l>A <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> am ready now,</l>            
                        <l>And thus to be your vaffal I do vow:</l>           
                        <l>Entreating you that you would let me know</l>              
                        <l>What is your pleaſore that call me fo?</l>          
                        <l>Fauſtus here with ſome queſtions did propones</l>               
                        <l>Which <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> did ſoon expone.</l>  
                        <l>At laſt the matter did begin to frame,</l>
                        <l>And to theſe friendly articles they came,</l>             
                        <l>That Doctor <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> ſhould a ſpirit be</l>              
                        <l>Both in his outward ſhape and quality :</l>               
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped" resp="contr_BMURP">W</supplied>hat he ſhould be inviſible to all,</l>              
                        <l>And <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> ready at his call,</l> 
                        <l>And whatſoeever he did once command,</l>
                        <l>That he ſhould bring it quickly to his hand,</l>
                        <l>And that he ſhould at any time appear,</l>              
                        <l>When once the voice of <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> he did hear.</l>               
                        <l>Thus <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> did this black agreement make,</l>                
                        <l>While that the <hi>ſp’rit</hi> did for his maſters take</l>              
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped" resp="contr_BMURP">T</supplied> heſe ſad conditions, which would even ſear</l>               
                        <l>A render hearred Chriſtian for to hear,</l>               
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped" resp="contr_BMURP">H</supplied>imself to his Lord <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucifer</persName> ſhould give,</l>               
                        <l>That Doctor <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> while he now did live,</l>                 
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped" resp="contr_BMURP">A</supplied>nd for to make the contract firm, not good,</l>                
                        <l>He did agree to write it with his blood;</l>                 
                        <l>Which in a Sawcer on the fire he ſet,</l>                
                        <l><supplied reason="broken-type" resp="contr_BMURP">He</supplied> in the ſame his wicked blood did heat.</l>               
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped" resp="contr_BMURP">A</supplied> and wrote there with that he would always be</l>               
                        <l>foe unto all Chriſtianity.</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped" resp="contr_BMURP">T</supplied>heſe ſad conditions when that you do read.</l>
                    </lg>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">I</fw> 
                    <fw type="signature"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_BMURP">A3v</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
                    <fw type="header" style="text-algin:center; font-style:italic"><add rend="handwritten">39</add> Doctor <persName>John Fauſtus</persName></fw>
                    <lg>
                        <l>I know that it will make your heart to bleed:</l>
                        <l>Yet wretched <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> made himſelf the band,</l>
                        <l>And thereupon did ſet his deſperate hand,</l>
                        <l>And to theſe covenants he gave conſent,</l>
                        <l>Which after, though too late he did repent,</l>
                        <l>But being ſeal’d, he doth the ſame deliver</l>
                        <l>To <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> to keep it ever.</l>
                        <l>Thus by degrees he added ſin to ſin.</l>
                        <l>And now the practiſe he did firſt begin.</l>  
                    </lg> 
            </div>
            <div type="chapter" style="font-weight:bold;">
                <head style="text-algin:center;">CHAP. IV</head>
                <lg type="epigraph" style="text-indent: 9em; font-type:italic;"> 
                    <l>How <persName>Fauſtus</persName> firſt began,</l>
                    <l>His cunning to affay;</l>
                    <l>And how his ſpirit did</l>
                    <l>In every thing obey.</l> 
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">I</hi>T happened now that <persName style="font-style:italic">Fauſtus</persName> in the end</l>
                    <l>The devil with the queſtion did offend : ( frame</l>
                    <l>Which was that he Would know how God did</l>
                    <l>The world &amp; all things Which it doth contain</l>
                    <l>But <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucifer</persName> not able this to tell,</l>
                    <l>Because himſelf from his creation fell,</l>
                    <l>Was with the Doctor very much diſpleas’d,</l>
                    <l>Nor could his anger quickly be appeas’d,</l>
                    <l>And therefore <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucifer</persName> to increaſe his fear,</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;">ug’y ſhape to <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> did appear,</l>
                    <l>Wit<supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_BMURP">h</supplied> other of his black infernal rou<supplied reason="broken-type">s</supplied>,</l>
                    <l>Who in an antick manner danc’d about,</l>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-algin:right">Her</fw>
                    <fw type="signature">A4<supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_BMURP">r</supplied></fw> 
                    <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: left;">8</fw><fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-style: italic;">The History of</fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"><add rend="handwritten">40</add></fw>
                <pb/>
                        <l>Hereat poor<fw style="font-style: italic;">Doctor</fw> <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> was amaz’d,</l>
                        <l>And yet upon their hideous forms he gaz’d;</l>
                        <l>Thinking theſe troups of fury now were come</l>
                        <l>To fetch him thence before his glaſs were run,</l>
                        <l>Or ere his twenty-four years did expire ;</l>
                        <l>During which time the ſpirit, like a Fryer,</l>
                        <l>Carrying a little bell within his hand,</l>
                        <l>Was bound to be ſtill ready at command ;</l>
                        <l>But afterward, when theſe ſame years did end,</l>
                        <l>Then <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> ſhould on <persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer</persName> attend.</l>
                        <l>And now this fearful ſudden operation,</l>
                        <l>Did fill his heart with grief and contrition :</l>
                        <l>But when <supplied reason="unclear">thus</supplied><persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer</persName> perceiv’d his ſadneſs ;</l>
                        <l>He laughed out then for very gladneſs.</l>
                        <l><persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> ſaid he know well perceive,</l>
                        <l>That thou our firſt agreement would deceive,</l>
                        <l>Yet I would have you know it is in vain :</l>
                        <l>For no repentance can you purge again.</l>
                        <l>Beſide you know &amp; there with ſhewed his band,</l>
                        <l>That to theſe covenants you have ſet your</l>
                        <l>And for to make this obligation good, (hand</l>
                        <l>Your ſelf hath write it with your own blood:</l>
                        <l>Be quyet then in mind, and take your reſt,</l>
                        <l>For thou ere long muſt be great <persName style="font-style: italic;">Pluto’s</persName> gueſt :</l>
                        <l>In the mean time to recreat thy leaſure,</l>
                        <l>Sit down &amp;I wil ſhow thee some new pleaſure.</l>
                        <l>So <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> and the devil together ſate,</l>
                        <l>But ſtill he thought his company too hot.</l>
                        <l>Then <persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer</persName> did other fiends command</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right">For</fw>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A4v</supplied></fw>  
                        <pb/>
                        <!--Zoe Smith-->
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-style: italic;">Doctor
                            <persName>John Faustus</persName></fw>
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"><add rend="handwritten">41</add></fw>
                        <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;"> 9</fw>
                        <l>For to appear, who ſtraightway were at hand,</l>
                        <l>Firſt came in <persName style="font-style: italic;">Belial</persName> like to
                            a Bear,</l>
                        <l>With flaming eyes, and ſhaggy rugged hair,</l>
                        <l>Then <persName style="font-style: italic;">Belzebub </persName> came flying
                            in with wings </l>
                        <l>Whoſe mouth was filled with a pair of ſtings,</l>
                        <l>Then came <persName style="font-style: italic;">Aſteroth</persName> of coal
                            black hew,</l>
                        <l>And after him ſerpents tail he drew.</l>
                        <l>Then <persName style="font-style: italic;">Chanigaſto</persName> lightly
                            skipped in,</l>
                        <l>Who was attyred in a hedge-hogs skin,</l>
                        <l>At laſt came <persName style="font-style: italic;">Anobis</persName>like to a
                            dog,</l>
                        <l>And in his body ſhaped like a hog.</l>
                        <l>Theſe ugly Maskers did themſelves advance,</l>
                        <l>And in ſtrange meaſures did begin to dance.</l>
                        <l>And as they did their ſeveral changes make,</l>
                        <l>Their threatning forks’ gainſt <persName style="font-style: italic;"
                            >Faustus</persName> they did</l>
                        <l>As if they meant at him to run a tilt, (ſhake</l>
                        <l>That <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> thought his
                            blood ſhould then be</l>
                        <l><persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer </persName> ſeeing <persName
                            style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> thus diſmaid, (ſpilt.</l>
                        <l>Began to cheer him up, and thus he ſaid,</l>
                        <l><persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName>, how doſt thou like
                            his nimble ſport?</l>
                        <l>For with this company thou muſt reſort</l>
                        <l>But <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> ſweating,
                            thought it was hot wea</l>
                        <l>Being afraid to ſee them altogether; (ther,</l>
                        <l>And did intreat his devilſhip that he</l>
                        <l>Would ſend away his fearful company;</l>
                        <l>At which great <persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer</persName>
                            diſmiſs’d them all,</l>
                        <l>Excepting even of the principal,</l>
                        <l>Now <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> having gotten
                            breath again,</l>
                        <l>Did ask for <persName style="font-style: italic;">Mephostophiles</persName>
                            by name;</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;"> which</fw>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied
                            reason="omitted-in-original"> A5r</supplied></fw>
                        <pb/>      
                        <!--Bridget Dwyer-->
                        <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align:left;">10</fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align:center; font-style:italic;"> The History of </fw><fw type="header" style="text-align:right;"><add rend= "handwritten">42</add></fw>
                        <l>Which having ſpoken as he did deſire,</l>
                        <l>Came <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mephostophiles</persName> like to a
                            Fryer:</l>
                        <l>Then <persName style="font-style:italic;">Faustus</persName> to entreat his ſp’rit begun,</l>
                        <l>That he ſhould teach him as himſelf had done</l>
                        <l>How to transform himſelf in any ſhape,</l>
                        <l>Either of dog, or lyon, cat, or ape,</l>
                        <l>With this great <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucifer</persName> gave him a book,</l>
                        <l>On Which this <persName style="font-style:italic;">Faustus</persName> did no
                            ſooner looks</l>
                        <l>But he to divers  forms himſelf did change,</l> 
                        <l>And throgh an hundred varied ſhapes did range</l>
                        <l>Sometimes like to a dragon, hog, or worm,</l>
                        <l>Then to a bat he would himſelf transformn :</l>
                        <l>But at the laſt being changed to a man,</l>
                        <l>To ſport himſelf great <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucifer</persName> began,</l>
                        <l>And ſent a ſwarm of Bees, which to ſting ſell</l>
                        <l>Poor <persName style="font-style:italic;">Faustus</persName>, that he thought himſelf in <placeName>hell,</placeName></l>
                        <l>And to his ſpirit then he cry’d for wo;</l>
                        <l>While <persName style="font-style:italic;">Lucifer</persName> went laughing thence, Ho, ho.</l>
                        <l>And having left tormented <persName style="font-style:italic;">Faustus</persName>
                            there.</l>
                        <l>As ſoon as he was gone, the day grew clear,</l>
                        <l>And ſweetest Muſick was to him convey’d</l>
                        <l>Which cheared up his heart, though much diſ</l>
                        <l>maid.</l>     
                    </lg> 
            </div>
           
            <div type="chapter" style="font-weight: bold;"><head style="text-align:center;" >CHAP. V.</head>
                <lg type="epigraph" style="font-style: italic; text-align:center;">
                    <l>How Doctor <persName>Faustus</persName></l>
                    <l style= "text-indent:1em;">was carried through the air,</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent:1em;">That he might view the world,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;">the Sky and Planets fair.</l>
                </lg>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A5v</supplied></fw>
                <pb/>
                <!--Haley Riley-->
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: left;" ><add rend="handwritten">43</add></fw><fw type="header" style= "text-align: center;">Doctor<persName style="font-style: italic;">John Faustus</persName> </fw><fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">11</fw>                
                <lg>
                    <l> <fw style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0.2rem 1rem 0;">A</fw>S <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> lay one day upon his bed,</l>
                    <l>While divers fancies came into his head,</l>
                    <l>He did begin to vex himſelf, that Art</l>
                    <l>Could not the ſecrets of the <placeName>Heavens</placeName> impart:</l>
                    <l>For he had noted that their obſervations</l>
                    <l>Were not confirm’d by certain demonſtrations,</l>
                    <l>Judging of things as Authors were inclin’d,</l>
                    <l>But yet in knowledge all of them were blind,</l>
                    <l>And thus while in his bed he muſing lyes,</l>
                    <l>A ſudden fearful wind began to riſe,</l>
                    <l>That with the force thereof his houſe did rock,</l>
                    <l>And all the doors, as if they had no lock,</l>
                    <l>Did open fly, and then a voice he heard,</l>
                    <l>Which bid him riſe and not to be afraid,</l>
                    <l>And he ſhould ſee the ſum of his deſire,</l>
                    <l>And to the ſtarry region ſhould aſpire,</l>
                    <l>And there the wonders of the world behold,</l>
                    <l>The earth, the ſea, and all that they infold:</l>
                    <l>And then unto the airy region fly,</l>
                    <l>And ſee the Meteors both cold and dry.</l>
                    <l> <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> at this ſame news was much refreſht.</l>
                    <l>And thought himſelf in the diſcovery bleſt:</l>
                    <l>For thus the devil at the firſt began. (man.</l>
                    <l>When he with hope of knowledge tempted</l>
                    <l> <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> now whom ambition did inflame,</l>
                    <l>Did anſwer to the ſpirit back again:</l>
                    <l>The wonders of the world I ſain would ſee,</l>
                    <l>Which if thou faithfully wilt ſhow to me,</l>
                    <l>Promiſe here that I will go with thee.</l>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">which</fw>
                    <fw type="signature" style="{text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A6r</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
                    <!--Madison Ward-->
                    <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: left;">12</fw> <fw type= "header" style="text-align: center;"></fw><fw style="font-style:italic;"> The History of</fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"><add rend="handwritten">44</add></fw>
                    <l> Which word once ſpoke he did ſtraight way</l>
                    <l>A wagó, which two fiery dragons drew, (view</l>
                    <l> And then the voice to him did ſay,</l>
                    <l> Get up with  me, and let us both away.</l>
                    <l> Thus mounted on the wagon, forth they went</l>
                    <l> To view the world and upper firmament: </l>
                    <l>  Amd as they thus did travel through the air,</l>
                    <l>  His <persName style="font-style: italic;"> Mephoſtophiles</persName> did to him repair:</l>
                    <l>  And ſitting in the Chariot hard by him, </l>
                    <l> To pleaſe his maſter, he this ſong did ſing. </l>
                </lg>
                <lg style="font-style: italic;text-align:center;"><l> <hi style="float:left;font-size:150%">C</hi>ome you ſpirits mouns</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent:3em;"> Upon your numble wings,</l>
                    <l> And your chieſeſt nots</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;"> Be ſure that you do ſing, </l>
                    <l> While my <persName>Faustus</persName> here and I</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;">ſwiſtly wander through the skie.</l></lg>
                <lg style="font-style: italic;text-align:center;"><l>He will travel over mountains,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;"> Over Park, and over Pale,</l>
                    <l> Over Cities, and Steeples,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;"> Over hills, and over dale:</l>
                    <l> While my <persName>Faustus</persName> here and I</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;"> ſwiftly wander through the skies</l></lg>
                <lg style="font-style: italic;text-align:center;"><l>Then we will to S’ea again,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;" > And there laugh when we do hear</l>
                    <l> How the Mariners exclaim</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;"> When a ſudden ſtorm they fear,</l>
                    <fw type="catchword" style= "text-align: right;">While</fw>
                    <fw type="signature" style= "text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A6v</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>
                    <!-- Kat Clavette, Zoe Smith, Bridget Dwyer, Haley Riley, and Madison Ward-->
                    <fw type="header" style= "text-align:center;font-style:italic">Doctor <persName>John Faustus</persName></fw> 
                    <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"><add rend="handwritten">45</add></fw><fw type="header" style="text-align:right;">13</fw>
                    <l>While my <persName>Fauſtus</persName> here and I,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;" >ſwiftly wander through the skie.</l></lg>
                <lg style="font-style: italic;text-align:center;"><l><persName>Fauſtus</persName> thon ſhalt now be told</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;">What thy ſelf did most deſire:</l>
                    <l>How the ſtars about are roll’d,</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;">ſome are lover, ſome are higher:</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:1em;">All this ſhalt thou view, while I</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:2em;"> Wander with thee through the skie.</l></lg>
                <lg><l><fw style="float:left;font-size:150%">T</fw>he ſong thus done which <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName> pleaſed</l>
                    <l>He did intreat his ſpirit now to tell (well,</l>
                    <l>The ſeveral Regions which they paſſed by,</l>
                    <l>Which <persName style="font-style:italic;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> did not deny</l>
                    <l>Yonder, faith he, you ſee on your left hand</l>
                    <l><placeName style="font-style:italic;">Muſcovia</placeName>,<placeName style="font-style:italic;">Durſſia</placeName>, and the <placeName style="font-style:italic;">Saxons</placeName> land:</l>
                    <l>On the right hand, beſides us here doth ly</l>
                    <l><placeName style="font-style:italic;">Europe</placeName>, <placeName style="font-style:italic;">Aſia</placeName>,the mid-land ſea, with <placeName style="font-style:italic;">Greece</placeName> and</l> 
                    <l style="text-indent:5em;"> <placeName style="font-style:italic;">Hungary</placeName>,</l></lg>
                <lg><l>Look yonder Is the hot and torrid zone,</l>
                    <l>And <fw style="font-style:italic;">Charles-wain</fw> unto the Sea-man known:</l>
                    <l>Yonder is <fw style="font-style:italic;">Urſa Major</fw>, which is but the fame</l>
                    <l>With that which we call the <fw style="font-style:italic;">Charles-wain,</fw></l>
                    <l>Thus did he point him out each conſtellation,</l>
                    <l>While <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName>ſtrucken was with admiration</l>
                    <l>And having ſhown him all the earth at laſt</l>
                    <l>Upon his bed again he <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName>] caſt,</l>
                    <l>Whereas he thought on what before he ſaw,</l>
                    <l>And how the ſtars were govern’d by their la<supplied reason="scan-cropped">w</supplied> </l>
                <fw type="catchword" style= "text-align: right;">And</fw>
                <fw type="signature" style= "text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A7r</supplied></fw>
                    <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: left;">6</fw><fw type= "header" style="text-align: center;">The Hiſtory of</fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"> <add rend= "handwritten" > 48</add ></fw>
                        <l>Thus the Knights malice <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> did defeat,</l>
                        <l> And all that heard it laugh’d at this conceir,</l> 
                        <l><hi style="2em"></hi> Another time this <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> did repair.</l> 
                        <l>Like to a Horſe-courſer to a conutrey fair:</l>
                        <l>And having pac’d his horſe about a while,</l>
                        <l> A chip-man came to him which made him</l>
                        <l><hi style="3em">ſmile</hi></l>
                    </lg> 
                    <lg>
                        <l>And askt his price, which <persName style="font-style: italic;"> Fauſtus</persName> did unfold</l> 
                        <l>And ſo his horſe for fourty dollars ſold,</l> 
                        <l>And charged him, whateſoever did beside,</l> 
                        <l>That he into the water ſhould not ride; </l>
                        <l>But the horſe-courſer, wondering at his word,</l>
                        <l>As he went home did ride into a ford, </l>
                        <l>And ſtraight his horſe did vaniſh quit away,</l>
                        <l>For he no more his horſe or ſaddle ſaw: </l>
                        <l>But there was left upon a wad of ſtraw. </l>
                        <l>The Horſe-courſer went back into his Inne,</l>
                        <l>And to enquire for <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> did begin:</l> 
                        <l>And finding him there ſleeping on a bed,</l>
                        <l>He did begin to pluck him by the leg,</l>
                        <l>That he did pluck it off: then <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> cry’d,</l> 
                        <l>With open throat that he had murther’d him,</l> 
                        <l>Whereat the Horſe courſer did now begin</l>
                        <l>To ask for Mercy and away he went,</l>
                        <l>And for to loſe his money was content.</l>
                        <l><hi style="2em">It</hi> hap’ned <persName style="font-style: italic;">Doctor Fauſtus</persName> on a day.</l>
                        <l>Met with a clown that drove a load of hay,</l>
                        <l>And asked him what he ſhould give, in ſcoff,</l>
                        <l> That he might eat his belly full thereof:</l>
                    </lg>
                    <fw type="catchword" style= "text-align:right;">The</fw>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">A<supplied reason="omitted-in-original">8v</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/>       
                    
                    <fw type='header'>Doctor <persName>John <hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi>.</persName></fw> <fw style="text-align: right;" type="pageNum">17</fw>
                    <lg><l>The Clown did tell him that he ſhould</l>
                        <l>For his three farthings eat  <choice resp="cont_WWING"><abbr>ev‘n</abbr><expan>even</expan></choice> what he would</l>
                        <l>It was agreed, and Doctor <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName> ſet</l>
                        <l>Himſelf to eat, and all his teeth did whet</l>
                        <l>That the poor clown was ſory, and did Grutch</l>
                        <l>To ſee that <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName> did eat up ſo much :</l>
                        <l>For <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName> did the Countrey-man ſo blind,</l>
                        <l>He could not ſee the hay was left behind,</l>
                        <l>And therefore did intreat him very fair,</l>
                        <l>That <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName>would his load of hay yet ſpare,</l>
                        <l>Here at <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName> laughing went away,</l>
                        <l> And afterward the Clown had all his hay.</l></lg>
                    
                    <lg><l style="text-indent: 2em;"> Doctor <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName>coming on a time</l>
                        <l>Unto a <placeName>Tavern</placeName>, which did ſell good wine,</l> 
                        <l>He found a company of drunkards there</l> 
                        <l>Merrily drinking and ſo loud they were,</l> 
                        <l>That doctor<persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName>, who this noiſe did hate ,</l> 
                        <l>Hearing them all thus loudly ſing and prate :</l>
                        <l>At laſt <choice resp="cont_WWING"><abbr>whé</abbr><expan>when</expan></choice>they their words had newly ſpokè</l>
                        <l>He then conjured that their mouths ſtood open </l>
                        <l>And this they gaping ſtood another at one another, </l>
                        <l>Not one was able for to ſpeak to th’ other.</l>
                        <l>In this amazed manner forth they came, </l>
                        <l>And then they all did ſhut their mouths again. </l>
                        <l>And hereby <persName><hi style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</hi></persName> Art was much expreſt,</l>
                        <l>And all the Town did laugh at this new jeſt.</l></lg>
                    
                    <lg><l style="text-indent: 2em;">Once Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName>
                        did his friends invite,</l>
                        <l>Who Scholars were unto a ſupper light:</l> 
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">And</fw>
                        <fw type="signature"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="cont_WWING">B1r</supplied></fw>
                        <pb/>
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align:left;">18</fw><fw type="header" style="text-align:center;">The Hiſtory of</fw><fw type="header" style="text-align:right;"><add rend="handwritten"></add>50</fw>
                        <l>And afterward he did intreat each gueſt</l> 
                        <l>(Meaning thereby to make a merry jeſt)</l>
                        <l>That they would take the pains with him to go</l>
                        <l>To a wine celler which he would them ſhow:</l>
                        <l>They all conſented and not long they ſtay’d,</l>
                        <l>To the Biſhops cellar they were all convey’d</l>
                        <l>There <persName>Fauſtus</persName> and the Scholars merry were,</l>
                        <l>But now the Butler put them in a fear,</l> 
                        <l>Who coming haſtily to draw ſome drink,</l> 
                        <l>The Butler ſeeing them, did ſtraightway think</l>
                        <l>They had been thieves, and ſo aloud did cry</l> 
                        <l>For help: but <hi style="font-style: italic;"><persName>Fauſtus</persName></hi> ſtill’d him by and by.</l>
                        <l>By the hair of the head he carry’d him,</l> 
                        <l>Who now for fear to tremble did begin,</l> 
                        <l>Untill unto a lopped tree he came</l>
                        <l>And there he leſt the Butler on the fame;</l>
                        <l>And all the night, which was both ſharp &amp; cold</l>
                        <l>With both his hands he by the tree did hold:</l>
                        <l>Till in the morning when he did eſpy</l>
                        <l>The ſhepherds, he aloud to them did cry</l> 
                        <l>who wondered much what man that ſhould</l>
                        <l>who had thus climed onſo high a tree. <hi style="font-style: italic;">The</hi></l>
                        <l>But when this news unto the Biſhop came,</l> 
                        <l>The Biſhop did go out to ſee the ſame, <hi style="font-style: italic;">ther</hi></l>
                        <l>And asked him how that he was brought thi</l>
                        <l>The Butler that with cold did quake &amp; quiver,</l>
                        <l>Did anſwer, that he certain thieves had found</l>
                        <l>In his wine cellar who were drinking round,</l> 
                        <l>And by the hair of the head they did him</l>
                        <l style="text-indent: 4em;">bring,</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">And</fw>
                        <fw type="signature"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp = "contr_DHASK">B1v</supplied></fw>  
                        <pb/>
                        <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">19</fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"> <add rend="handwritten">51</add></fw><fw type= "header" style= "text-align: center;"> <persName style="font-style: italic;">Doctor John Fauſtus</persName></fw>
                        
                        <l>and left him in that café they found him in.</l>
                        <l>what ere they were, ſaid he, I do not know; </l>
                        <l>If they were devils, they like men did ſhow.</l>
                    </lg>
                    <lg>
                        <l><hi style="1em">But</hi>‘tis not here my purpoſe to recite.</l>
                        <l>Or all the merry tricks of <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> write,</l>
                        <l>Yet ſome of them I have related here:</l>
                        <l>But now his twenty four years drew near:</l>
                        <l>And though in pleaſure he had ſpent his time,</l>
                        <l>The number of his years did now decline,</l>
                        <l>And all the ſpirits had a great deſire,</l>
                        <l>To ſee when <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> bond would once expire.</l>
                        <l>ſince he was bound by that ſame bloody [ſeroul] </l>
                        <l>At twenty-four years end to give his ſoul </l>
                        <l>To <persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer</persName>: the time now drawing [nigh], </l>
                        <l>You muſt expect to hear his Tragedy. </l>
                    </lg> 
            </div> 
            <div type="chapter">
                <head type="header">CHAP. VII.</head>
                <lg style="font-style: italic;" type="epigraph">
                    <l style="text-indent:1em;">How <persName style="font-style: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> when his time drew nigh.</l>
                    <l style="text-indent:1em;">did make great lamentation: </l>
                    <l style="text-indent:1em;">And to his fellow ſtudents made </l>
                    <l style="text-indent:1em;">his funeral Oration.</l>
                </lg>
                <lg> 
                    <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">T</hi>He glaſs of <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> time being almoſt run </l>
                    <l>Having but one month of his time to </l>
                    <l>He drew into a very penſive mood, come, </l>
                    <l>And now his fault he plainly  underſtood:</l>
                    <l>And</l>
                    
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">B2r</supplied></fw>
                    <pb/> 
                    <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: left;">20</fw><fw type="header" style="texr-align: center;"><hi style="font-style: italic;">The Hiſtory of</hi></fw><fw type="header" style= "text-align: right;"><add rend="handwritten">52</add></fw>
                    
                    <l>And now began to curſe that wretched time,</l>
                    <l>When he to ſtudy Magick did incline.</l>
                    <l>To hopé for mercy now it was too late.</l>
                    <l>Which made him deplore his wicked ſtate</l>
                    <l>And his accuſing conſcience now did tell,</l>
                    <l>There was no way for him but down to hell,</l>
                    <l>And thus in waiting he his time did ſpend,</l>
                    <l>That little time which drew unto an end,</l>
                    <l>Now on the pains of hell he firſt did think;</l>
                    <l>The racks and tortures chains and filthy ſthink;</l>
                    <l>How <persName style="font-style: italic;">Proſerpine</persName> would ſurely laugh to ſee</l>
                    <l>His foul tormented in this miſerie,</l>
                    <l>Then he bethought him on the whips of ſteel,</l>
                    <l>Which he did know his body there ſhould ſee</l>
                    <l>The more he thought, the thoghts increas’d hi</l> 
                    <l>Which made him ſtil unto himſelf cóplain pai</l>
                    <l>While thus he ſpent his time in grief and fear</l>
                    <l>His <persName style="font-style: italic;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> did to him appear,</l>
                    <l>And told him that his years were now expir’d</l>
                    <l>And that his Maſter <persName style="font-style: italic;">Lucifer</persName> deſir’d</l>
                    <l>He would prepare himſelf and make an end,</l>
                    <l>For that his Maſter ſhortly did intend,</l>
                    <l>On ſuch a night, to fetch him down to hell,</l>
                    <l>That with [th’infernal ſpirits he might dwell]</l>
                    <l>When <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> had hard this he grew ſo ſad,</l>
                    <l>That with his forrows he grew almoſt mad.</l>
                    <l>He tumbled on his bed, all reſt he did deſpiſe</l>
                    <l>No quyet ſlumber ever clof’d his eyes;</l>
                    <l>But he was ſtill tormented in his mind, </l>
                
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right">Si</fw>
                <fw type="signature" style= "text-align:center;">B<supplied reason="omitted-in-original">2v</supplied> </fw>
                <pb/>
                    <fw type="header" style="font style: italic;text-align:center;">Doctor
                        <persName>John Fauſtus.</persName><add rend="handwritten">53</add> <fw style="text-align:right;"
                            >21</fw>
                    </fw>
                        <!-- Supplied text from line 43 to line 69 follows EEBO facsimile copy of The History of Doctor John Faustus, printed by E. Cotes, London, 1664 (Wing H2117) -->
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">Si</supplied>n went before, and torture
                            came behind.</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">Y</supplied>et ſo it was, that one that
                            very day</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">O</supplied>n which the devil ſhold fetch
                            him quite away</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">H</supplied>e ſent unto his friends,
                            intreating for his ſake</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">T</supplied>hat of his Banquet they would
                            all partake.</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">A</supplied>s merry Banquet is, it ſoon
                            befell,</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">A</supplied>s afterward in due place I
                            will tell</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">T</supplied>he Students being come, he
                            made them all</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">A</supplied>s welcome as he could when he
                            himſself did</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">In</supplied>to a ſudden dump, nor could
                            he be (fall</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">M</supplied>erry in their ſo beloved
                            company:</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">S</supplied>o calling them into another room,</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">H</supplied>e did unfold to them his
                            fearful doom</l>
                    </lg>
                    
                    <fw type="header"
                        style="font style: italic; text-indent:1em;">Doctor
                        <persName>Fauſtus</persName> his Oration to his </fw>
                    <fw type="header" style="font style: italic; text-indent:2em;">Friends and
                        Fellow-ſtudents.</fw>
                    
                    <lg>
                        <l><fw style="float; left;font-size:5em;">M</fw>Y friends, I muſt begin my
                            Oration,</l>
                        <l><fw style="text-indent:1em">With a confeſſion of my conjuration:</fw></l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">S</supplied>ince all of you do know my
                            firſt beginning.</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">A</supplied>nd how I grew ſtill worſe and
                            worſe in fin.</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">A</supplied>nd unto Magick Arts I was ſo
                            bent, (ning,</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">I</supplied>ſought alwayes to further
                            mine intent,</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">A</supplied>nd leaving better ſtudies did
                            apply</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">M</supplied>y ſelf unto the helliſh
                            myſtery.</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">T</supplied>hus did I live twenty four
                            years and more,</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">W</supplied>ho ſad expiring I muſt now
                            deplore:</l>
                        <l><supplied reason="original-cropped">F</supplied>or ſo it is, to purchaſe my
                            content,</l>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">Which</fw>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text-align:center;">B3R</fw>
                    <pb/>
                    <!--Mackenzie Gomes-->
                        <fw type="header">22  The Hiſtory of <!--54--> </fw>     
                        <!-- Supplied text from lines 43, 44, 53, and 54 follows EEBO facsimile copy of The History of Doctor John Faustus printed by E.Cotes, London, 1664 (wing H2117) -->
                            <l>Which was, when twenty four years once di<supplied reason="original-cropped">d</supplied></l>
                            <l>Which time in conjuration in conjuration I did ſpend. (en<supplied reason="original-cropped">d</supplied></l>
                            <l>The devil ſhould have my body ſcroul:</l>
                            <l>And did confirm it by a bloody ſcroul:</l>
                            <l>And now the diſmal term of years is done,</l>
                            <l>And night beginning, my hour glaſs is run:</l>
                            <l>This night I look that he for me ſhould ſend,</l>
                            <l>And this my life will have a fearful end,</l>
                            <l>And now, my friends this banquet I did mak<supplied reason="original-cropped">e</supplied></l>
                            <l>That I of you my laſt farewel might take,</l>
                            <l>Deſiring pardon where I have offended,</l>
                            <l>Since my laſt act of life cannot be mended,</l>
                            <l>And for thoſe practices which I have wrough<supplied reason="original-cropped">t</supplied></l>
                            <l>By conjuration, and thereby have brought</l>
                            <l>My heavy ſoul to grief and ſad deſpair,</l>
                            <l>My life is written in a writing fair,</l>
                            <l>Which lyes within my ſtudy: ſo that you</l>
                            <l>May learn thereby ſuch courſes to eſchew.</l>
                            <l>And if that <fw style="front-style: italics;" >I</fw> do you my counſel give,</l>
                            <l>And uſe that little time I have to live;</l>
                            <l>Be ſure that you forſake all conjuration,</l>
                            <l>And pray to be delivered from temptation:></l>
                            <l>And let my death a warning be to all,</l>
                            <l>Since by deſire of knowledge I did fall;</l>
                            <l>For now to give my ſpeech a ſad concluſion,</l>
                            <l>This night I muſt expect my own confusſion:</l>
                            <l>And yet, my loving friends, I do requeſt,</l>
                            <l>That you will go to bed, and take your reſt?</l>
                            <l>Let nothing trouble you, nor do not fear,</l>
                        <fw type="signature">B3V</fw>
                        <pb/>       
                    <!-- Jack Fleming-->
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-style: italic;"> Doctor <persName>John Fauſtus</persName></fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align: right;"><add rend="handwritten">55</add></fw> <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: right;">23</fw>
                            <l>If any trembling noiſe you chance to hear,</l>
                            <l>Be ſure you do not riſe out of your bed:</l>
                            <l>But when that I to <persName style="font-style: italic;">Plutoes</persName> court am fled,</l>
                            <l>If that you find my body the nixt day,</l>
                            <l>Be ſure that you to earth do it convey. </l>
                            <l>And ſo, my friends I wiſh you all good reſt:</l>
                            <l>Pray go to bed my ſoul is much oppreſt:</l>
                            <l>When as his friends had heard what he did ſay</l>
                            <l>They counſel'd him that he <persName>toGod</persName> ſhold pray:</l>
                            <l>But <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> felt the weight ſo of his ſin;</l>
                            <l>That how to pray, he knew not to begin,</l>
                            <l>At laſt the ſtudents having pray'd did weep,</l>
                            <l>And after went to bed, but could not ſleep.</l>
                            <l>For <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> in the hall did ſtay alone (groan:</l>
                            <l>Where they might hear how he did ſigh and</l>
                            <l>And ſo with wakeful eyes they did attend,</l>
                            <l>Expecting ſtill to hear hís fearful end.</l>
                            <l>At laſt between the hours of twelf and one.</l>
                            <l>At wind did riſe, the like was never known,</l>
                            <l>It was ſo violent, which when they once did</l>
                            <l>The hoſt &amp; Students both began to fear, (hear</l>
                            <l>For Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> in the hall did ly</l>
                            <l>Whece they might hear his fearful Tragedy</l>
                            <l>For now the hall and upper rooms did ſhake,</l>
                            <l>And they did hear a hiſſing like a ſnake,</l>
                            <l>And then the hall door fiercely did fly open,</l>
                            <l>And <persName style="font-style: italic;"> Fauſtus </persName> murther cry'd which being ſpoken</l>
                            <l>They heard no more, ſo that the Schollars</l>
                            <l>Now Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> is to <placeName>hell</placeName>  convaid, (ſaid,</l>
                            <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">The</fw>
                        
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">B4R</fw>
                        <pb/>
                        <fw type="pageNum" style="text-align: left;">24</fw> <fw type="header" style="left"><add rend="handwritten">56</add></fw> <fw type="header" style="text-align:center; font-style:italics;">The History of D. <persName>Fauſtus</persName>.</fw>  
                            <l>The next day when they came into the hall,</l>
                            <l>They might behold a fearful funeral.</l>
                            <l>His blood&amp;brains were ſprinkled on the groũd</l>
                            <l>And ſuch a ſight as might the ſenſe confound,</l>
                            <l>Here lay his teeth, and there his eyes did ly,</l>
                            <l>A ſpectecale of helliſh cruelty. (mourn,</l>
                            <l>Which when his friends beheld, they all did</l>
                            <l>And found his body in the dung hill torn.</l>
                            <l>To which his friends did Chriſtian burial give,</l>
                            <l>Although himſelf did like a devil live,</l>
                            <l>Thus I this Story of his life have penn'd.</l>
                            <l>That we may ſee his life, and hate his end.</l>
                        </lg>
                        <fw style="text-align: center; font-style: italic;"></fw>
                        <figure>
                            <figDesc>printer ornament here </figDesc>
                        </figure>
                        <l>FINIS.</l>
                        <fw style="text-align: center; font-style: italic;"></fw>
                        <figure>
                            <figDesc>printer ornament here </figDesc>
                        </figure>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;">B4V</fw>
                    </div>                             
        </body>
    </text>
</TEI>
The History of Doctor John Faustus Author Anonymous Encoder Taylor Long Emily Rosano Brendan Murphy Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2018

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm.
34
A decorative printer's ornament is here
TO the READER REader, I would not have you think, That I intend to waſte my ink, While Fauſtus ſtory I rehearſe And do write his life in versſe For ſeing Fryer Bacons ſtory, 5 (In whom Oxford ſtill may glory) For want of better pen comes forth, Compos’d in Ryme of no great worth: I cal’d my Muſe to task and pen’d Fauſtus life, and death, and end: 10 And when it cometh forth in print, If you like it not, the devil'is is in’t. Veni Vide, Fuge. Come See, and hate Doctor Fauſtus wretched fiste. CHAP.
35
A decorative printer's ornament is here
CHAP I. Of Doctor Fauſtus birth. And how he gave his heart To leave off fair Divinity, To ſtudy the black Art. MY Muſe, alift me now, for I intend To write the life & death & featful end Oſ Doctor Faustus , whoſe ill gotten name, May well compare with Fryer Bacons Fame. Fauſtus was born at Rhodes , which Town dor 5 Within a province of fair Germany : His Father was a husband man, did live On what the earth to him did freely give: Yet he at Wittenberg an Uncle had, Who toke young Fauſtus , being but a Lad, 10 And ſent him to the Univerſity, That he might ſtudy there Divinity: But he did quickly there addict his heart: To leave fair ſtudies for the foul black Art Thus he in ſecret ſtudied conjuration, 15 Yet being found by acts and diſputation To be well learned, they did all agree To make him Doctor of Divinity: A2r The History of 36 But having once obtained that high degree He ill deſerved it, as you ſhal ſee, 20 For now my pen doth tremble for to tell, How like a devil from all grace he fell, For now his contemplation he did bend To Negromancy, and much time did ſpend In caſting figures, making incantations, 25 With all the wicked helps of conjurations, Leaving thoſe ſtudies which are moſt divine, And to theſe helliſh arts he did incline: I therefore here have drawn his life, that you May learn ſuch wicked courſes to eſchew: 30 That we thus ſeeing him ruled by the devil, May pray to be delivered from ſuch evil,
CHAP. II, How Doctor Fauſtus conjur'd up, from out a globe of fire, The ſpirit Mephoſtophiles, that came like to a frier. Now Fauſtus purpoſing alone to try The power of this his Magick myſtery He did repair unto a little wood, And not far off from wittenberg it ſtood: There he did make a circle with his wand, 5 And thus with charms his ſpirit did command, Mephoſtophiles, I ſay, quickly riſe, and come away: By A2v Doctor John Fauſtus.37 By Lucifer I charge the here, that thou forthwith do appear. With this a murmure in the woods was heard That Doctor Fauſtus was himſelf afear'd: The wood with lightning ſeemed on a flame, And loudeſt thunder terror did procliam, Till Doctor Fauſtus in his Magick robe, 5 Lookin about him ſpy'd a fiery globe; And at the laſt from this ſame globe a fire; The Spirit came in likeneſs of a Fryer: Who lightly round about the circle ran, And thus to ſpeak to Faustus he began: 10 Fauſtus, ſayeth he, I now am come, Speak thy will, and it is done. When Mephoſtopiles did thus kindly greet him Then Doctor Fauſtus bid the ſpirit meet him The next day at his houſe; the ſpirit did cóſer And back again then Doctor Fauſtus went.
CHAP. III. How Doctor Fauſtus made a contract firm, not good,  To ſerve the Devil, which  he wrote with his own blood  THe time appointed, in a bluſtring day,  The ſpirit came to him, and thus did ſay A3r The History of 38 A Mephoſtophiles am ready now, And thus to be your vaffal I do vow: Entreating you that you would let me know 5 What is your pleaſore that call me fo? Fauſtus here with ſome queſtions did propones Which Mephoſtophiles did ſoon expone. At laſt the matter did begin to frame, And to theſe friendly articles they came, 10 That Doctor Fauſtus ſhould a ſpirit be Both in his outward ſhape and quality : What he ſhould be inviſible to all, And Mephoſtophiles ready at his call, And whatſoeever he did once command, 15 That he ſhould bring it quickly to his hand, And that he ſhould at any time appear, When once the voice of Fauſtus he did hear. Thus Fauſtus did this black agreement make, While that the ſp’rit did for his maſters take 20 T heſe ſad conditions, which would even ſear A render hearred Chriſtian for to hear, Himself to his Lord Lucifer ſhould give, That Doctor Fauſtus while he now did live, And for to make the contract firm, not good, 25 He did agree to write it with his blood; Which in a Sawcer on the fire he ſet, He in the ſame his wicked blood did heat. A and wrote there with that he would always be foe unto all Chriſtianity. 30 Theſe ſad conditions when that you do read. I A3v 39 Doctor John Fauſtus I know that it will make your heart to bleed: Yet wretched Fauſtus made himſelf the band, And thereupon did ſet his deſperate hand, And to theſe covenants he gave conſent, Which after, though too late he did repent, 5 But being ſeal’d, he doth the ſame deliver To Mephoſtophiles to keep it ever. Thus by degrees he added ſin to ſin. And now the practiſe he did firſt begin.
CHAP. IV How Fauſtus firſt began, His cunning to affay; And how his ſpirit did In every thing obey. IT happened now that Fauſtus in the end The devil with the queſtion did offend : ( frame Which was that he Would know how God did The world & all things Which it doth contain But Lucifer not able this to tell, 5 Because himſelf from his creation fell, Was with the Doctor very much diſpleas’d, Nor could his anger quickly be appeas’d, And therefore Lucifer to increaſe his fear, ug’y ſhape to Fauſtus did appear, 10 With other of his black infernal rous, Who in an antick manner danc’d about, Her A4r 8 The History of 40 Hereat poorDoctor Faustus was amaz’d, And yet upon their hideous forms he gaz’d; Thinking theſe troups of fury now were come 15 To fetch him thence before his glaſs were run, Or ere his twenty-four years did expire ; During which time the ſpirit, like a Fryer, Carrying a little bell within his hand, Was bound to be ſtill ready at command ; 20 But afterward, when theſe ſame years did end, Then Faustus ſhould on Lucifer attend. And now this fearful ſudden operation, Did fill his heart with grief and contrition : But when thus Lucifer perceiv’d his ſadneſs ; 25 He laughed out then for very gladneſs. Faustus ſaid he know well perceive, That thou our firſt agreement would deceive, Yet I would have you know it is in vain : For no repentance can you purge again. 30 Beſide you know & there with ſhewed his band, That to theſe covenants you have ſet your And for to make this obligation good, (hand Your ſelf hath write it with your own blood: Be quyet then in mind, and take your reſt, 35 For thou ere long muſt be great Pluto’s gueſt : In the mean time to recreat thy leaſure, Sit down &I wil ſhow thee some new pleaſure. So Faustus and the devil together ſate, But ſtill he thought his company too hot. 40 Then Lucifer did other fiends command For A4v Doctor John Faustus 41 9 For to appear, who ſtraightway were at hand, Firſt came in Belial like to a Bear, With flaming eyes, and ſhaggy rugged hair, Then Belzebub came flying in with wings  45 Whoſe mouth was filled with a pair of ſtings, Then came Aſteroth of coal black hew, And after him ſerpents tail he drew. Then Chanigaſto lightly skipped in, Who was attyred in a hedge-hogs skin, 50 At laſt came Anobislike to a dog, And in his body ſhaped like a hog. Theſe ugly Maskers did themſelves advance, And in ſtrange meaſures did begin to dance. And as they did their ſeveral changes make, 55 Their threatning forks’ gainſt Faustus they did As if they meant at him to run a tilt, (ſhake That Faustus thought his blood ſhould then be Lucifer ſeeing Faustus thus diſmaid, (ſpilt. Began to cheer him up, and thus he ſaid, 60 Faustus, how doſt thou like his nimble ſport? For with this company thou muſt reſort But Faustus ſweating, thought it was hot wea Being afraid to ſee them altogether; (ther, And did intreat his devilſhip that he 65 Would ſend away his fearful company; At which great Lucifer diſmiſs’d them all, Excepting even of the principal, Now Faustus having gotten breath again, Did ask for Mephostophiles by name; 70 which A5r 10 The History of 42 Which having ſpoken as he did deſire, Came Mephostophiles like to a Fryer: Then Faustus to entreat his ſp’rit begun, That he ſhould teach him as himſelf had done How to transform himſelf in any ſhape, 75 Either of dog, or lyon, cat, or ape, With this great Lucifer gave him a book, On Which this Faustus did no ſooner looks But he to divers forms himſelf did change, And throgh an hundred varied ſhapes did range 80 Sometimes like to a dragon, hog, or worm, Then to a bat he would himſelf transformn : But at the laſt being changed to a man, To ſport himſelf great Lucifer began, And ſent a ſwarm of Bees, which to ſting ſell 85 Poor Faustus, that he thought himſelf in hell, And to his ſpirit then he cry’d for wo; While Lucifer went laughing thence, Ho, ho. And having left tormented Faustus there. As ſoon as he was gone, the day grew clear, 90 And ſweetest Muſick was to him convey’d Which cheared up his heart, though much diſ maid.
CHAP. V. How Doctor Faustus was carried through the air, That he might view the world, the Sky and Planets fair. A5v 43 DoctorJohn Faustus 11 AS Fauſtus lay one day upon his bed, While divers fancies came into his head, He did begin to vex himſelf, that Art Could not the ſecrets of the Heavens impart: For he had noted that their obſervations 5 Were not confirm’d by certain demonſtrations, Judging of things as Authors were inclin’d, But yet in knowledge all of them were blind, And thus while in his bed he muſing lyes, A ſudden fearful wind began to riſe, 10 That with the force thereof his houſe did rock, And all the doors, as if they had no lock, Did open fly, and then a voice he heard, Which bid him riſe and not to be afraid, And he ſhould ſee the ſum of his deſire, 15 And to the ſtarry region ſhould aſpire, And there the wonders of the world behold, The earth, the ſea, and all that they infold: And then unto the airy region fly, And ſee the Meteors both cold and dry. 20 Fauſtus at this ſame news was much refreſht. And thought himſelf in the diſcovery bleſt: For thus the devil at the firſt began. (man. When he with hope of knowledge tempted Fauſtus now whom ambition did inflame, 25 Did anſwer to the ſpirit back again: The wonders of the world I ſain would ſee, Which if thou faithfully wilt ſhow to me, Promiſe here that I will go with thee. which A6r 12 The History of 44 Which word once ſpoke he did ſtraight way 30 A wagó, which two fiery dragons drew, (view And then the voice to him did ſay, Get up with  me, and let us both away. Thus mounted on the wagon, forth they went To view the world and upper firmament:  35 Amd as they thus did travel through the air, His Mephoſtophiles did to him repair: And ſitting in the Chariot hard by him, To pleaſe his maſter, he this ſong did ſing. Come you ſpirits mouns Upon your numble wings, And your chieſeſt nots Be ſure that you do ſing, While my Faustus here and I 5 ſwiſtly wander through the skie. He will travel over mountains, Over Park, and over Pale, Over Cities, and Steeples, Over hills, and over dale: While my Faustus here and I 5 ſwiftly wander through the skies Then we will to S’ea again, And there laugh when we do hear How the Mariners exclaim When a ſudden ſtorm they fear, While A6v Doctor John Faustus 45 13 While my Fauſtus here and I, 5 ſwiftly wander through the skie. Fauſtus thon ſhalt now be told What thy ſelf did most deſire: How the ſtars about are roll’d, ſome are lover, ſome are higher: All this ſhalt thou view, while I 5 Wander with thee through the skie. The ſong thus done which Fauſtus pleaſed He did intreat his ſpirit now to tell (well, The ſeveral Regions which they paſſed by, Which Mephoſtophiles did not deny Yonder, faith he, you ſee on your left hand 5 Muſcovia,Durſſia, and the Saxons land: On the right hand, beſides us here doth ly Europe, Aſia,the mid-land ſea, with Greece and Hungary, Look yonder Is the hot and torrid zone, And Charles-wain unto the Sea-man known: Yonder is Urſa Major, which is but the fame With that which we call the Charles-wain, Thus did he point him out each conſtellation, 5 While Fauſtusſtrucken was with admiration And having ſhown him all the earth at laſt Upon his bed again he Fauſtus] caſt, Whereas he thought on what before he ſaw, And how the ſtars were govern’d by their law  10 And A7r 6 The Hiſtory of 48 Thus the Knights malice Fauſtus did defeat, And all that heard it laugh’d at this conceir, Another time this Fauſtus did repair. Like to a Horſe-courſer to a conutrey fair: And having pac’d his horſe about a while, 15 A chip-man came to him which made him ſmile And askt his price, which Fauſtus did unfold And ſo his horſe for fourty dollars ſold, And charged him, whateſoever did beside, That he into the water ſhould not ride; But the horſe-courſer, wondering at his word, 5 As he went home did ride into a ford, And ſtraight his horſe did vaniſh quit away, For he no more his horſe or ſaddle ſaw: But there was left upon a wad of ſtraw. The Horſe-courſer went back into his Inne, 10 And to enquire for Fauſtus did begin: And finding him there ſleeping on a bed, He did begin to pluck him by the leg, That he did pluck it off: then Fauſtus cry’d, With open throat that he had murther’d him, 15 Whereat the Horſe courſer did now begin To ask for Mercy and away he went, And for to loſe his money was content. It hap’ned Doctor Fauſtus on a day. Met with a clown that drove a load of hay, 20 And asked him what he ſhould give, in ſcoff, That he might eat his belly full thereof: The A8v Doctor John Faustus. 17 The Clown did tell him that he ſhould For his three farthings eat ev‘n even what he would It was agreed, and Doctor Faustus ſet Himſelf to eat, and all his teeth did whet That the poor clown was ſory, and did Grutch 5 To ſee that Faustus did eat up ſo much : For Faustus did the Countrey-man ſo blind, He could not ſee the hay was left behind, And therefore did intreat him very fair, That Faustus would his load of hay yet ſpare, 10 Here at Faustus laughing went away, And afterward the Clown had all his hay. Doctor Faustus coming on a time Unto a Tavern, which did ſell good wine, He found a company of drunkards there Merrily drinking and ſo loud they were, That doctor Faustus , who this noiſe did hate , 5 Hearing them all thus loudly ſing and prate : At laſt whé when they their words had newly ſpokè He then conjured that their mouths ſtood open And this they gaping ſtood another at one another, Not one was able for to ſpeak to th’ other. 10 In this amazed manner forth they came, And then they all did ſhut their mouths again. And hereby Faustus Art was much expreſt, And all the Town did laugh at this new jeſt. Once Doctor Faustus did his friends invite, Who Scholars were unto a ſupper light: And B1r 18 The Hiſtory of 50 And afterward he did intreat each gueſt (Meaning thereby to make a merry jeſt) That they would take the pains with him to go 5 To a wine celler which he would them ſhow: They all conſented and not long they ſtay’d, To the Biſhops cellar they were all convey’d There Fauſtus and the Scholars merry were, But now the Butler put them in a fear, 10 Who coming haſtily to draw ſome drink, The Butler ſeeing them, did ſtraightway think They had been thieves, and ſo aloud did cry For help: but Fauſtus ſtill’d him by and by. By the hair of the head he carry’d him, 15 Who now for fear to tremble did begin, Untill unto a lopped tree he came And there he leſt the Butler on the fame; And all the night, which was both ſharp & cold With both his hands he by the tree did hold: 20 Till in the morning when he did eſpy The ſhepherds, he aloud to them did cry who wondered much what man that ſhould who had thus climed onſo high a tree. The But when this news unto the Biſhop came, 25 The Biſhop did go out to ſee the ſame, ther And asked him how that he was brought thi The Butler that with cold did quake & quiver, Did anſwer, that he certain thieves had found In his wine cellar who were drinking round, 30 And by the hair of the head they did him bring, And B1v 19 51 Doctor John Fauſtus and left him in that café they found him in. what ere they were, ſaid he, I do not know; If they were devils, they like men did ſhow. 35 But‘tis not here my purpoſe to recite. Or all the merry tricks of Fauſtus write, Yet ſome of them I have related here: But now his twenty four years drew near: And though in pleaſure he had ſpent his time, 5 The number of his years did now decline, And all the ſpirits had a great deſire, To ſee when Fauſtus bond would once expire. ſince he was bound by that ſame bloody [ſeroul] At twenty-four years end to give his ſoul  10 To Lucifer: the time now drawing [nigh], You muſt expect to hear his Tragedy.
CHAP. VII. How Fauſtus when his time drew nigh. did make great lamentation: And to his fellow ſtudents made his funeral Oration. THe glaſs of Fauſtus time being almoſt run Having but one month of his time to He drew into a very penſive mood, come, And now his fault he plainly underſtood: And 5 B2r 20 The Hiſtory of 52 And now began to curſe that wretched time, When he to ſtudy Magick did incline. To hopé for mercy now it was too late. Which made him deplore his wicked ſtate And his accuſing conſcience now did tell, 10 There was no way for him but down to hell, And thus in waiting he his time did ſpend, That little time which drew unto an end, Now on the pains of hell he firſt did think; The racks and tortures chains and filthy ſthink; 15 How Proſerpine would ſurely laugh to ſee His foul tormented in this miſerie, Then he bethought him on the whips of ſteel, Which he did know his body there ſhould ſee The more he thought, the thoghts increas’d hi 20 Which made him ſtil unto himſelf cóplain pai While thus he ſpent his time in grief and fear His Mephoſtophiles did to him appear, And told him that his years were now expir’d And that his Maſter Lucifer deſir’d 25 He would prepare himſelf and make an end, For that his Maſter ſhortly did intend, On ſuch a night, to fetch him down to hell, That with [th’infernal ſpirits he might dwell] When Fauſtus had hard this he grew ſo ſad, 30 That with his forrows he grew almoſt mad. He tumbled on his bed, all reſt he did deſpiſe No quyet ſlumber ever clof’d his eyes; But he was ſtill tormented in his mind, Si B2v Doctor John Fauſtus. 53 21 Sin went before, and torture came behind. 35 Yet ſo it was, that one that very day On which the devil ſhold fetch him quite away He ſent unto his friends, intreating for his ſake That of his Banquet they would all partake. As merry Banquet is, it ſoon befell, 40 As afterward in due place I will tell The Students being come, he made them all As welcome as he could when he himſself did Into a ſudden dump, nor could he be (fall Merry in their ſo beloved company: 45 So calling them into another room, He did unfold to them his fearful doom Doctor Fauſtus his Oration to his Friends and Fellow-ſtudents. MY friends, I muſt begin my Oration, With a confeſſion of my conjuration: Since all of you do know my firſt beginning. And how I grew ſtill worſe and worſe in fin. And unto Magick Arts I was ſo bent, (ning, 5 Iſought alwayes to further mine intent, And leaving better ſtudies did apply My ſelf unto the helliſh myſtery. Thus did I live twenty four years and more, Who ſad expiring I muſt now deplore: 10 For ſo it is, to purchaſe my content, Which B3R 22 The Hiſtory of Which was, when twenty four years once did Which time in conjuration in conjuration I did ſpend. (end The devil ſhould have my body ſcroul: And did confirm it by a bloody ſcroul: 15 And now the diſmal term of years is done, And night beginning, my hour glaſs is run: This night I look that he for me ſhould ſend, And this my life will have a fearful end, And now, my friends this banquet I did make 20 That I of you my laſt farewel might take, Deſiring pardon where I have offended, Since my laſt act of life cannot be mended, And for thoſe practices which I have wrought By conjuration, and thereby have brought 25 My heavy ſoul to grief and ſad deſpair, My life is written in a writing fair, Which lyes within my ſtudy: ſo that you May learn thereby ſuch courſes to eſchew. And if that I do you my counſel give, 30 And uſe that little time I have to live; Be ſure that you forſake all conjuration, And pray to be delivered from temptation:> And let my death a warning be to all, Since by deſire of knowledge I did fall; 35 For now to give my ſpeech a ſad concluſion, This night I muſt expect my own confusſion: And yet, my loving friends, I do requeſt, That you will go to bed, and take your reſt? Let nothing trouble you, nor do not fear, 40 B3V Doctor John Fauſtus 55 23 If any trembling noiſe you chance to hear, Be ſure you do not riſe out of your bed: But when that I to Plutoes court am fled, If that you find my body the nixt day, Be ſure that you to earth do it convey.  45 And ſo, my friends I wiſh you all good reſt: Pray go to bed my ſoul is much oppreſt: When as his friends had heard what he did ſay They counſel'd him that he toGod ſhold pray: But Fauſtus felt the weight ſo of his ſin; 50 That how to pray, he knew not to begin, At laſt the ſtudents having pray'd did weep, And after went to bed, but could not ſleep. For Fauſtus in the hall did ſtay alone (groan: Where they might hear how he did ſigh and 55 And ſo with wakeful eyes they did attend, Expecting ſtill to hear hís fearful end. At laſt between the hours of twelf and one. At wind did riſe, the like was never known, It was ſo violent, which when they once did 60 The hoſt & Students both began to fear, (hear For Doctor Fauſtus in the hall did ly Whece they might hear his fearful Tragedy For now the hall and upper rooms did ſhake, And they did hear a hiſſing like a ſnake, 65 And then the hall door fiercely did fly open, And Fauſtus murther cry'd which being ſpoken They heard no more, ſo that the Schollars Now Doctor Fauſtus is to hell convaid, (ſaid, The B4R 24 56 The History of D. Fauſtus. The next day when they came into the hall, 70 They might behold a fearful funeral. His blood&brains were ſprinkled on the groũd And ſuch a ſight as might the ſenſe confound, Here lay his teeth, and there his eyes did ly, A ſpectecale of helliſh cruelty. (mourn, 75 Which when his friends beheld, they all did And found his body in the dung hill torn. To which his friends did Chriſtian burial give, Although himſelf did like a devil live, Thus I this Story of his life have penn'd. 80 That we may ſee his life, and hate his end.
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The History of Doctor John Faustus Author Anonymous Encoder Taylor Long Emily Rosano Brendan Murphy Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2018

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm.
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TO the READER REader, I would not have you think, That I intend to waſte my ink, While Fauſtus ſtory I rehearſe And do write his life in versſe For ſeing Fryer Bacons ſtory, (In whom Oxford ſtill may glory) For want of better pen comes forth, Compos’d in Ryme of no great worth: I cal’d my Muſe to task and pen’d Fauſtus life, and death, and end: And when it cometh forth in print, If you like it not, the devil'is is in’t. Veni Vide, Fuge. Come See, and hate Doctor Fauſtus wretched fiste. CHAP.
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CHAP I. Of Doctor Fauſtus birth. And how he gave his heart To leave off fair Divinity, To ſtudy the black Art. MY Muſe, alift me now, for I intend To write the life & death & featful end Oſ Doctor Faustus , whoſe ill gotten name, May well compare with Fryer Bacons Fame. Fauſtus was born at Rhodes , which Town dor Within a province of fair Germany : His Father was a husband man, did live On what the earth to him did freely give: Yet he at Wittenberg an Uncle had, Who toke young Fauſtus , being but a Lad, And ſent him to the Univerſity, That he might ſtudy there Divinity: But he did quickly there addict his heart: To leave fair ſtudies for the foul black Art Thus he in ſecret ſtudied conjuration, Yet being found by acts and diſputation To be well learned, they did all agree To make him Doctor of Divinity: A2r The History of 36 But having once obtained that high degree He ill deſerved it, as you ſhal ſee, For now my pen doth tremble for to tell, How like a devil from all grace he fell, For now his contemplation he did bend To Negromancy, and much time did ſpend In caſting figures, making incantations, With all the wicked helps of conjurations, Leaving thoſe ſtudies which are moſt divine, And to theſe helliſh arts he did incline: I therefore here have drawn his life, that you May learn ſuch wicked courſes to eſchew: That we thus ſeeing him ruled by the devil, May pray to be delivered from ſuch evil,
CHAP. II, How Doctor Fauſtus conjur'd up, from out a globe of fire, The ſpirit Mephoſtophiles, that came like to a frier. Now Fauſtus purpoſing alone to try The power of this his Magick myſtery He did repair unto a little wood, And not far off from wittenberg it ſtood: There he did make a circle with his wand, And thus with charms his ſpirit did command, Mephoſtophiles, I ſay, quickly riſe, and come away: By A2v Doctor John Fauſtus.37 By Lucifer I charge the here, that thou forthwith do appear. With this a murmure in the woods was heard That Doctor Fauſtus was himſelf afear'd: The wood with lightning ſeemed on a flame, And loudeſt thunder terror did procliam, Till Doctor Fauſtus in his Magick robe, Lookin about him ſpy'd a fiery globe; And at the laſt from this ſame globe a fire; The Spirit came in likeneſs of a Fryer: Who lightly round about the circle ran, And thus to ſpeak to Faustus he began: Fauſtus, ſayeth he, I now am come, Speak thy will, and it is done. When Mephoſtopiles did thus kindly greet him Then Doctor Fauſtus bid the ſpirit meet him The next day at his houſe; the ſpirit did cóſer And back again then Doctor Fauſtus went.
CHAP. III. How Doctor Fauſtus made a contract firm, not good,  To ſerve the Devil, which  he wrote with his own blood  THe time appointed, in a bluſtring day,  The ſpirit came to him, and thus did ſay A3r The History of 38 A Mephoſtophiles am ready now, And thus to be your vaffal I do vow: Entreating you that you would let me know What is your pleaſore that call me fo? Fauſtus here with ſome queſtions did propones Which Mephoſtophiles did ſoon expone. At laſt the matter did begin to frame, And to theſe friendly articles they came, That Doctor Fauſtus ſhould a ſpirit be Both in his outward ſhape and quality : What he ſhould be inviſible to all, And Mephoſtophiles ready at his call, And whatſoeever he did once command, That he ſhould bring it quickly to his hand, And that he ſhould at any time appear, When once the voice of Fauſtus he did hear. Thus Fauſtus did this black agreement make, While that the ſp’rit did for his maſters take T heſe ſad conditions, which would even ſear A render hearred Chriſtian for to hear, Himself to his Lord Lucifer ſhould give, That Doctor Fauſtus while he now did live, And for to make the contract firm, not good, He did agree to write it with his blood; Which in a Sawcer on the fire he ſet, He in the ſame his wicked blood did heat. A and wrote there with that he would always be foe unto all Chriſtianity. Theſe ſad conditions when that you do read. I A3v 39 Doctor John Fauſtus I know that it will make your heart to bleed: Yet wretched Fauſtus made himſelf the band, And thereupon did ſet his deſperate hand, And to theſe covenants he gave conſent, Which after, though too late he did repent, But being ſeal’d, he doth the ſame deliver To Mephoſtophiles to keep it ever. Thus by degrees he added ſin to ſin. And now the practiſe he did firſt begin.
CHAP. IV How Fauſtus firſt began, His cunning to affay; And how his ſpirit did In every thing obey. IT happened now that Fauſtus in the end The devil with the queſtion did offend : ( frame Which was that he Would know how God did The world & all things Which it doth contain But Lucifer not able this to tell, Because himſelf from his creation fell, Was with the Doctor very much diſpleas’d, Nor could his anger quickly be appeas’d, And therefore Lucifer to increaſe his fear, ug’y ſhape to Fauſtus did appear, With other of his black infernal rous, Who in an antick manner danc’d about, Her A4r 8 The History of 40 Hereat poorDoctor Faustus was amaz’d, And yet upon their hideous forms he gaz’d; Thinking theſe troups of fury now were come To fetch him thence before his glaſs were run, Or ere his twenty-four years did expire ; During which time the ſpirit, like a Fryer, Carrying a little bell within his hand, Was bound to be ſtill ready at command ; But afterward, when theſe ſame years did end, Then Faustus ſhould on Lucifer attend. And now this fearful ſudden operation, Did fill his heart with grief and contrition : But when thus Lucifer perceiv’d his ſadneſs ; He laughed out then for very gladneſs. Faustus ſaid he know well perceive, That thou our firſt agreement would deceive, Yet I would have you know it is in vain : For no repentance can you purge again. Beſide you know & there with ſhewed his band, That to theſe covenants you have ſet your And for to make this obligation good, (hand Your ſelf hath write it with your own blood: Be quyet then in mind, and take your reſt, For thou ere long muſt be great Pluto’s gueſt : In the mean time to recreat thy leaſure, Sit down &I wil ſhow thee some new pleaſure. So Faustus and the devil together ſate, But ſtill he thought his company too hot. Then Lucifer did other fiends command For A4v Doctor John Faustus 41 9 For to appear, who ſtraightway were at hand, Firſt came in Belial like to a Bear, With flaming eyes, and ſhaggy rugged hair, Then Belzebub came flying in with wings Whoſe mouth was filled with a pair of ſtings, Then came Aſteroth of coal black hew, And after him ſerpents tail he drew. Then Chanigaſto lightly skipped in, Who was attyred in a hedge-hogs skin, At laſt came Anobislike to a dog, And in his body ſhaped like a hog. Theſe ugly Maskers did themſelves advance, And in ſtrange meaſures did begin to dance. And as they did their ſeveral changes make, Their threatning forks’ gainſt Faustus they did As if they meant at him to run a tilt, (ſhake That Faustus thought his blood ſhould then be Lucifer ſeeing Faustus thus diſmaid, (ſpilt. Began to cheer him up, and thus he ſaid, Faustus, how doſt thou like his nimble ſport? For with this company thou muſt reſort But Faustus ſweating, thought it was hot wea Being afraid to ſee them altogether; (ther, And did intreat his devilſhip that he Would ſend away his fearful company; At which great Lucifer diſmiſs’d them all, Excepting even of the principal, Now Faustus having gotten breath again, Did ask for Mephostophiles by name; which A5r 10 The History of 42 Which having ſpoken as he did deſire, Came Mephostophiles like to a Fryer: Then Faustus to entreat his ſp’rit begun, That he ſhould teach him as himſelf had done How to transform himſelf in any ſhape, Either of dog, or lyon, cat, or ape, With this great Lucifer gave him a book, On Which this Faustus did no ſooner looks But he to divers forms himſelf did change, And throgh an hundred varied ſhapes did range Sometimes like to a dragon, hog, or worm, Then to a bat he would himſelf transformn : But at the laſt being changed to a man, To ſport himſelf great Lucifer began, And ſent a ſwarm of Bees, which to ſting ſell Poor Faustus, that he thought himſelf in hell, And to his ſpirit then he cry’d for wo; While Lucifer went laughing thence, Ho, ho. And having left tormented Faustus there. As ſoon as he was gone, the day grew clear, And ſweetest Muſick was to him convey’d Which cheared up his heart, though much diſ maid.
CHAP. V. How Doctor Faustus was carried through the air, That he might view the world, the Sky and Planets fair. A5v 43 DoctorJohn Faustus 11 AS Fauſtus lay one day upon his bed, While divers fancies came into his head, He did begin to vex himſelf, that Art Could not the ſecrets of the Heavens impart: For he had noted that their obſervations Were not confirm’d by certain demonſtrations, Judging of things as Authors were inclin’d, But yet in knowledge all of them were blind, And thus while in his bed he muſing lyes, A ſudden fearful wind began to riſe, That with the force thereof his houſe did rock, And all the doors, as if they had no lock, Did open fly, and then a voice he heard, Which bid him riſe and not to be afraid, And he ſhould ſee the ſum of his deſire, And to the ſtarry region ſhould aſpire, And there the wonders of the world behold, The earth, the ſea, and all that they infold: And then unto the airy region fly, And ſee the Meteors both cold and dry. Fauſtus at this ſame news was much refreſht. And thought himſelf in the diſcovery bleſt: For thus the devil at the firſt began. (man. When he with hope of knowledge tempted Fauſtus now whom ambition did inflame, Did anſwer to the ſpirit back again: The wonders of the world I ſain would ſee, Which if thou faithfully wilt ſhow to me, Promiſe here that I will go with thee. which A6r 12 The History of 44 Which word once ſpoke he did ſtraight way A wagó, which two fiery dragons drew, (view And then the voice to him did ſay, Get up with  me, and let us both away. Thus mounted on the wagon, forth they went To view the world and upper firmament: Amd as they thus did travel through the air, His Mephoſtophiles did to him repair: And ſitting in the Chariot hard by him, To pleaſe his maſter, he this ſong did ſing. Come you ſpirits mouns Upon your numble wings, And your chieſeſt nots Be ſure that you do ſing, While my Faustus here and I ſwiſtly wander through the skie. He will travel over mountains, Over Park, and over Pale, Over Cities, and Steeples, Over hills, and over dale: While my Faustus here and I ſwiftly wander through the skies Then we will to S’ea again, And there laugh when we do hear How the Mariners exclaim When a ſudden ſtorm they fear, While A6v Doctor John Faustus 45 13 While my Fauſtus here and I, ſwiftly wander through the skie. Fauſtus thon ſhalt now be told What thy ſelf did most deſire: How the ſtars about are roll’d, ſome are lover, ſome are higher: All this ſhalt thou view, while I Wander with thee through the skie. The ſong thus done which Fauſtus pleaſed He did intreat his ſpirit now to tell (well, The ſeveral Regions which they paſſed by, Which Mephoſtophiles did not deny Yonder, faith he, you ſee on your left hand Muſcovia,Durſſia, and the Saxons land: On the right hand, beſides us here doth ly Europe, Aſia,the mid-land ſea, with Greece and Hungary, Look yonder Is the hot and torrid zone, And Charles-wain unto the Sea-man known: Yonder is Urſa Major, which is but the fame With that which we call the Charles-wain, Thus did he point him out each conſtellation, While Fauſtusſtrucken was with admiration And having ſhown him all the earth at laſt Upon his bed again he Fauſtus] caſt, Whereas he thought on what before he ſaw, And how the ſtars were govern’d by their law And A7r 6 The Hiſtory of 48 Thus the Knights malice Fauſtus did defeat, And all that heard it laugh’d at this conceir, Another time this Fauſtus did repair. Like to a Horſe-courſer to a conutrey fair: And having pac’d his horſe about a while, A chip-man came to him which made him ſmile And askt his price, which Fauſtus did unfold And ſo his horſe for fourty dollars ſold, And charged him, whateſoever did beside, That he into the water ſhould not ride; But the horſe-courſer, wondering at his word, As he went home did ride into a ford, And ſtraight his horſe did vaniſh quit away, For he no more his horſe or ſaddle ſaw: But there was left upon a wad of ſtraw. The Horſe-courſer went back into his Inne, And to enquire for Fauſtus did begin: And finding him there ſleeping on a bed, He did begin to pluck him by the leg, That he did pluck it off: then Fauſtus cry’d, With open throat that he had murther’d him, Whereat the Horſe courſer did now begin To ask for Mercy and away he went, And for to loſe his money was content. It hap’ned Doctor Fauſtus on a day. Met with a clown that drove a load of hay, And asked him what he ſhould give, in ſcoff, That he might eat his belly full thereof: The A8v Doctor John Faustus. 17 The Clown did tell him that he ſhould For his three farthings eat ev‘n even what he would It was agreed, and Doctor Faustus ſet Himſelf to eat, and all his teeth did whet That the poor clown was ſory, and did Grutch To ſee that Faustus did eat up ſo much : For Faustus did the Countrey-man ſo blind, He could not ſee the hay was left behind, And therefore did intreat him very fair, That Faustus would his load of hay yet ſpare, Here at Faustus laughing went away, And afterward the Clown had all his hay. Doctor Faustus coming on a time Unto a Tavern, which did ſell good wine, He found a company of drunkards there Merrily drinking and ſo loud they were, That doctor Faustus , who this noiſe did hate , Hearing them all thus loudly ſing and prate : At laſt whé when they their words had newly ſpokè He then conjured that their mouths ſtood open And this they gaping ſtood another at one another, Not one was able for to ſpeak to th’ other. In this amazed manner forth they came, And then they all did ſhut their mouths again. And hereby Faustus Art was much expreſt, And all the Town did laugh at this new jeſt. Once Doctor Faustus did his friends invite, Who Scholars were unto a ſupper light: And B1r 18 The Hiſtory of 50 And afterward he did intreat each gueſt (Meaning thereby to make a merry jeſt) That they would take the pains with him to go To a wine celler which he would them ſhow: They all conſented and not long they ſtay’d, To the Biſhops cellar they were all convey’d There Fauſtus and the Scholars merry were, But now the Butler put them in a fear, Who coming haſtily to draw ſome drink, The Butler ſeeing them, did ſtraightway think They had been thieves, and ſo aloud did cry For help: but Fauſtus ſtill’d him by and by. By the hair of the head he carry’d him, Who now for fear to tremble did begin, Untill unto a lopped tree he came And there he leſt the Butler on the fame; And all the night, which was both ſharp & cold With both his hands he by the tree did hold: Till in the morning when he did eſpy The ſhepherds, he aloud to them did cry who wondered much what man that ſhould who had thus climed onſo high a tree. The But when this news unto the Biſhop came, The Biſhop did go out to ſee the ſame, ther And asked him how that he was brought thi The Butler that with cold did quake & quiver, Did anſwer, that he certain thieves had found In his wine cellar who were drinking round, And by the hair of the head they did him bring, And B1v 19 51 Doctor John Fauſtus and left him in that café they found him in. what ere they were, ſaid he, I do not know; If they were devils, they like men did ſhow. But‘tis not here my purpoſe to recite. Or all the merry tricks of Fauſtus write, Yet ſome of them I have related here: But now his twenty four years drew near: And though in pleaſure he had ſpent his time, The number of his years did now decline, And all the ſpirits had a great deſire, To ſee when Fauſtus bond would once expire. ſince he was bound by that ſame bloody [ſeroul] At twenty-four years end to give his ſoul To Lucifer: the time now drawing [nigh], You muſt expect to hear his Tragedy.
CHAP. VII. How Fauſtus when his time drew nigh. did make great lamentation: And to his fellow ſtudents made his funeral Oration. THe glaſs of Fauſtus time being almoſt run Having but one month of his time to He drew into a very penſive mood, come, And now his fault he plainly underſtood: And B2r 20 The Hiſtory of 52 And now began to curſe that wretched time, When he to ſtudy Magick did incline. To hopé for mercy now it was too late. Which made him deplore his wicked ſtate And his accuſing conſcience now did tell, There was no way for him but down to hell, And thus in waiting he his time did ſpend, That little time which drew unto an end, Now on the pains of hell he firſt did think; The racks and tortures chains and filthy ſthink; How Proſerpine would ſurely laugh to ſee His foul tormented in this miſerie, Then he bethought him on the whips of ſteel, Which he did know his body there ſhould ſee The more he thought, the thoghts increas’d hi Which made him ſtil unto himſelf cóplain pai While thus he ſpent his time in grief and fear His Mephoſtophiles did to him appear, And told him that his years were now expir’d And that his Maſter Lucifer deſir’d He would prepare himſelf and make an end, For that his Maſter ſhortly did intend, On ſuch a night, to fetch him down to hell, That with [th’infernal ſpirits he might dwell] When Fauſtus had hard this he grew ſo ſad, That with his forrows he grew almoſt mad. He tumbled on his bed, all reſt he did deſpiſe No quyet ſlumber ever clof’d his eyes; But he was ſtill tormented in his mind, Si B2v Doctor John Fauſtus. 53 21 Sin went before, and torture came behind. Yet ſo it was, that one that very day On which the devil ſhold fetch him quite away He ſent unto his friends, intreating for his ſake That of his Banquet they would all partake. As merry Banquet is, it ſoon befell, As afterward in due place I will tell The Students being come, he made them all As welcome as he could when he himſself did Into a ſudden dump, nor could he be (fall Merry in their ſo beloved company: So calling them into another room, He did unfold to them his fearful doom Doctor Fauſtus his Oration to his Friends and Fellow-ſtudents. MY friends, I muſt begin my Oration, With a confeſſion of my conjuration: Since all of you do know my firſt beginning. And how I grew ſtill worſe and worſe in fin. And unto Magick Arts I was ſo bent, (ning, Iſought alwayes to further mine intent, And leaving better ſtudies did apply My ſelf unto the helliſh myſtery. Thus did I live twenty four years and more, Who ſad expiring I muſt now deplore: For ſo it is, to purchaſe my content, Which B3R 22 The Hiſtory of Which was, when twenty four years once did Which time in conjuration in conjuration I did ſpend. (end The devil ſhould have my body ſcroul: And did confirm it by a bloody ſcroul: And now the diſmal term of years is done, And night beginning, my hour glaſs is run: This night I look that he for me ſhould ſend, And this my life will have a fearful end, And now, my friends this banquet I did make That I of you my laſt farewel might take, Deſiring pardon where I have offended, Since my laſt act of life cannot be mended, And for thoſe practices which I have wrought By conjuration, and thereby have brought My heavy ſoul to grief and ſad deſpair, My life is written in a writing fair, Which lyes within my ſtudy: ſo that you May learn thereby ſuch courſes to eſchew. And if that I do you my counſel give, And uſe that little time I have to live; Be ſure that you forſake all conjuration, And pray to be delivered from temptation:> And let my death a warning be to all, Since by deſire of knowledge I did fall; For now to give my ſpeech a ſad concluſion, This night I muſt expect my own confusſion: And yet, my loving friends, I do requeſt, That you will go to bed, and take your reſt? Let nothing trouble you, nor do not fear, B3V Doctor John Fauſtus 55 23 If any trembling noiſe you chance to hear, Be ſure you do not riſe out of your bed: But when that I to Plutoes court am fled, If that you find my body the nixt day, Be ſure that you to earth do it convey. And ſo, my friends I wiſh you all good reſt: Pray go to bed my ſoul is much oppreſt: When as his friends had heard what he did ſay They counſel'd him that he toGod ſhold pray: But Fauſtus felt the weight ſo of his ſin; That how to pray, he knew not to begin, At laſt the ſtudents having pray'd did weep, And after went to bed, but could not ſleep. For Fauſtus in the hall did ſtay alone (groan: Where they might hear how he did ſigh and And ſo with wakeful eyes they did attend, Expecting ſtill to hear hís fearful end. At laſt between the hours of twelf and one. At wind did riſe, the like was never known, It was ſo violent, which when they once did The hoſt & Students both began to fear, (hear For Doctor Fauſtus in the hall did ly Whece they might hear his fearful Tragedy For now the hall and upper rooms did ſhake, And they did hear a hiſſing like a ſnake, And then the hall door fiercely did fly open, And Fauſtus murther cry'd which being ſpoken They heard no more, ſo that the Schollars Now Doctor Fauſtus is to hell convaid, (ſaid, The B4R 24 56 The History of D. Fauſtus. The next day when they came into the hall, They might behold a fearful funeral. His blood&brains were ſprinkled on the groũd And ſuch a ſight as might the ſenſe confound, Here lay his teeth, and there his eyes did ly, A ſpectecale of helliſh cruelty. (mourn, Which when his friends beheld, they all did And found his body in the dung hill torn. To which his friends did Chriſtian burial give, Although himſelf did like a devil live, Thus I this Story of his life have penn'd. That we may ſee his life, and hate his end.
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FINIS.
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