The history of Doctor John Faustus compiled in verse, very pleasant and delightfull 1664

This edition of _The history of Doctor John Faustus compiled in verse, very pleasant and delightfull_ Printed by E. Cotes, and are to be sold by Charles Tyus at the Three Bibles on London-Bridge, 1664 (Wing H2117) was transcribed and encoded by students in Kristen Abbott Bennett's and Scott Hamlin's Spring 2018 "Rogues Progress" class at Stonehill College. Please note that this edition represents the class's initial submission and has not been thoroughly proofed and edited by instructors and student editorial assistants. We are on track to finalize this edition over the course of the Fall 2018 semester. For more information about this project, please see www.kitmarlowe.org.

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                <title> Fragment from Cotes A0 to A7R </title>
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                    <name><forename><!-- E --></forename> <surname><!-- Cotes. --></surname></name>
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                    <resp>Encoder<date when="2017"/></resp>
                    <name>Justin Weitbrecht</name>
                    <name>Tonino Sarandrea</name>
                    <name>Abby Ballou</name>
                    <name>Justin Boure</name>
                    <name>Nick Ramirez</name>
                    <name>Rachel Maher</name>
                    <name>Julia Carolan</name>
                    <name>Robert Coleman</name>
                    <name>Liam Hilderbrand</name>
                    <name>Colin O'Donnell</name>
                </respStmt>
                <respStmt>
                    <resp>Primary editor</resp>
                    <name>Kristen Abbott Bennett</name>
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                    Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin
                </publisher>
                <date>2018</date>
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                <bibl>Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm.</bibl>
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           <div type="section" >
               
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               <lg style="font-style: italic;"  >
               <l> To the Reader </l> 
               <l> <hi style="font-size: 150%;">R</hi>EADER, I would not have you think, </l>
               <l>that I tend to waſte my ink, </l>
               <l>While <persName> Fauſtus</persName> Story I reherſe,</l>  
               <l>And here do write his life in verſe, </l>
               <l>For ſeeing <persName> Fryer Bacons</persName> Story,</l> 
               <l>(In whom  Oxford  ſtill may glory) </l>
               <l>For want of better pen comes forth, </l>
               <l>Compos’d in Rhyme of no great worth:</l> 
               <l>I calt’d my Muſe to task, and pend  </l>
               <l><persName> Fauſtus</persName> life, and death; and end.</l>  
               <l>And when it cometh forth in print,</l>  
               <l>If you like it not, the Devil’s in’t.</l> </lg> 
               <lg>
               <l><foreign xml:lang="la"><hi style="text-align: left;">Veni</hi><hi style="text-align: center;">Vide</hi><hi style="text-align: right;">Fuge.</hi></foreign></l>
               <l><foreign><hi style="text-align: left;">Come</hi><hi style="text-align: center;">See</hi><hi style="text-align: right;"> and hate,.</hi></foreign></l>
                <l><foreign><hi style="text-align: left;">Doctor </hi><hi style="text-align: center;"><persName>Fauſtus</persName></hi><hi style="text-align: right;"> wretched state.</hi></foreign></l>
                     </lg> 
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               <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_JWEIT">A0</supplied></fw>
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                </div>
                 <div type="chapter" style="font-weight:bold;">
                     <head style="text-align: center;"> CHAP I </head>
           <lg style="text-indent: 2em:"> <l>Of Doctor <persName>Fauſtus</persName> birth,</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 3em:"> And how he gave his heart</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 2em:">To leave off fair D vinity,</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 3em:">To ſtudy the black Art. </l></lg>
                         
                     <lg><l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem
                         0">M</hi>y muse aſſiſt me now, for I intend </l>
                    <l>To write the life &amp; death, and fearful end </l>
                         <l>Of  Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus,</persName> whoſe ill gotten name</l>
                         <l>May well compare with <persName> Fryer Bacon’s </persName> fame.</l>
                         <l><persName style=" font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus,</persName> was born at <placeName style=" font-weight: normal;">Rhodes</placeName>, whuich town doth lye</l>
                         <l>Within a Province of fair <placeName style=" font-weight: normal;"> Germany </placeName> ;</l>
                    <l>His father was a Dusbandman, did libe</l>
                    <l>On what the earth to him did freely gibe;</l>
                         <l>Let be at <placeName style="font-weight: normal;"> Wittenberg </placeName> an unkle bad,</l>
                         <l> Who took young <persName  style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus </persName> being but a lad,</l>
                    <l>And ſent him to the University,</l>
                    <l>That he might ſtudy there Divinity.</l>
                    <l>But he did quickly there addict his heart,</l>
                    <l>To leave fair ſtudies for the foul black Art.</l> 
                    <l>Thus he in ſecret ſtudied conjuration,</l>
                    <l>Yet being found byacts and diſputation,</l>
                    <l> To be well learned, they did all agree,</l>
                    <l>To make him Doctor of Divinity.</l> 
                    <l>But having once obtain’d that high degree,</l>
                    <l>He ill deſerved it, as you ſhall ſee</l> </lg> 
                     <l><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">For</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_JWEIT">A2r</supplied></fw></l>
                    <pb/>
                     
                     <fw type= "header" style="text-align: center;"> The hiſtory of</fw>
                    
                    <l>For now my pen doth tremble for to tell,</l>
                    <l>Now like a Devil from all grace he fell.</l>
                    <l>For now his contemplation he did bend,</l> 
                    <l>To negromancy and much time did ſpend,</l>
                    <l>In caſting figures, making Inchantations;</l>
                    <l>With all the wicked helps of Conjurations,</l>
                    <l>Leading thoſe ſtudies which are moſt divine,</l>
                    <l>And to theſe hellith Arts he did incline.</l>
                    <l>I therefore here have drawn his life, that you</l>
                    <l>May learn ſuch wicked courſes to eſchem;</l>
                    <l>That me thus ſeeing him ruled by the Devil,</l>
                    <l>May pray to be deliber’d from all ſuch evil.</l>
                     </div>
            
                   <div type="chapter" style="font-weight: bold;">
                       <head style="text-align: center;"> CHAP II </head>
                    <lg style="font-weight:normal; text-indent: 3em:"> <l>How Doctor <persName style= "font-style: italic;"> Fauſtus </persName>conjur’d up</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 4em:">From out a Globe of fire,</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 3em:">The ſpirit <persName style= "font-style: italic;"> Mephoſtophiles </persName>,</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 4em:">That came like to a Fryer.</l></lg>
                    
                       <lg><l>Now <persName style="font-weight:normal;"> Fauſtus </persName> purpoſing alone to try,</l>
                    <l>The power of this his Magick miſtery,</l>
                    <l>He did repair unto a little Wood,</l>
                           <l>And not far off from<placeName style="font-weight:normal;"> Wittenberg</placeName> it ſtood;</l>
                    <l>Where he did make a circle with his wand,</l> 
                    <l>And thus with charms his ſpirit did command</l></lg>
                    
                    <lg style="font-weight:normal; text-indent: 3em:"> <l><persName style= "font-style: italic;"> Mephoſophiles</persName>  I ſay,</l> 
                    <l style= "text-indent: 4em:">Quickly riſe and come away;</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 3em:">By <persName style= "font-style: italic;"> Lucifer </persName>  I charge thee here,</l>
                    <l style= "text-indent: 4em:">That thou forthwith do appear. </l></lg>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">With</fw>
                       <l> <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">With</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_JWEIT">A2v</supplied></fw> </l>
                   </div>   
                       
                     <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold">
                           <!-- Tonino Sarandrea -->
                           <fw type="header" style="font-weight: normal"> Doctor<persName style="font-style:italic;"> John Faustus</persName></fw>
                           <lg><l>With this a murmure in the mood was heard,</l> 
                               <l>That Doctor <persName style="font-style: normal;"> Fauſtus</persName> grew himself afeard;</l> 
                               <l> The mood with lighting seemed on a flame, </l>
                               <l> And lounder thunder, terroɾ did proclaim: </l>
                               <l> Till Doctoɽ <persName style="font-style: normal;"> Fauſtus </persName>in his magick robe </l>
                               <l>Looking about him, spy'd a <supplied reason="broken-type"> fiery</supplied> Globe;</l> 
                               <l>And at the laſt from this time ſame Globe of Fire,</l>
                               <l> The ſpirit came in likeneſs of a Fryer;</l> 
                               <l> Who lightly round about the circle ran, </l>
                               <l> And thus to ſpeak to <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Fauſtus</persName> he began;</l> </lg>
                           <lg><l><persName style="font-style: italic; text-indent: 2em;">Fauſtus</persName> (ſaies he) I now am come,</l> 
                               <l> Speak thy will, and it is done.</l> </lg>
                           <lg style="text-indent: 2em"> <l>When <persName style="font-weight: normal;"> Mephoſtophiles </persName> did thus kindly greet him,</l>
                               <l>Then Doctoɽ <persName style="font-style: normal;"> Fauſtus</persName> bid the Spirit meet him</l> 
                               <l> The next gap at his houſe; the ſpirit did content,</l> 
                               <l> And back again then Doctoɽ <persName style="font-weight:normal;"> Fauſtus</persName> ment.</l> </lg>
                       </div>
            <div type="chapter" style="font-weight: bold">
                           <head> CHAP III </head>
                           <lg style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal"> <l>How Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName>  made</l> 
                               <l>a Contract firm, not good,</l>
                               <l>To ſerve the Devil, which</l> 
                               <l>he writ with his own blood.</l>  </lg>
                           <lg><l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem
                               0">T</hi> he time appointed, in a bliſstering day,</l> 
                               <l>The ſpirit came to him, and thus did ſay: </l> 
                               <l> <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Mephiſophiles </persName> am ready now, </l>
                               <l> And thus to be your Vassal I do bow;</l>
                               <l>Entreating you that you would let me know </l> 
                               <l>  What is your pleaſure that you call me so.</l> </lg>
                           <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;"> Faustus</fw> <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A3r</supplied></fw>
                           <pb/>
                           <fw type="header" style="text align: center;"> The Hiſtory of</fw>
                           <lg><l> <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus </persName>here with come queſtions did propund,</l>
                               <l>Which <persName style="font-weight: normal;" >Mephoſtophiles </persName> did ſoon expound.</l>
                               <l>At laſt the matter did begin to frame,</l> 
                               <l> And to theſe friendly articles they came:</l> 
                               <l>That Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;" > Fauſtus</persName> should a <hi>S</hi>pirit be,</l> 
                               <l>Both in his outward ſhape and quality;</l> 
                               <l> That he ſhould be inbiſible to all, </l>
                               <l> And <persName style="font-weight: normal;"> Mephoſtophiles </persName> ready at his call.</l>  
                               <l>And <supplied reason="scan-unclear">?</supplied> he did once command, </l>
                               <l>That be should bring it quickly to his hand:</l> 
                               <l>And that he should at any time appear, </l>
                               <l>When once the boice of<persName style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus</persName> he did hear.</l>
                               <l>Thus <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> did this black agreement make,</l> 
                               <l> While that the <hi>S</hi>pirit did for him matter take, </l>
                               <l>Theſe sad conditions, which would even fear </l>
                               <l>A tender hearted Chriſstian for to hear; </l>
                               <l>That Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> while he now did live</l> 
                               <l> Himſelf to his Lord<persName style="font-weight: normal;"> Lucifer</persName> should give,</l> 
                               <l>And for to make the contract firm, not good,</l> 
                               <l>He did agree to write it with his blood;</l> 
                               <l>Which in a saucer on the fire he ſet,</l> 
                               <l>  He in the ſame his wicked blood did heat; </l>
                               <l>And write therewith that he would alwayes be</l> 
                               <l>  A foe unto all Chriſtianity. </l>
                               <l> Theſe ſad conditions when that you do read,</l> 
                               <l>I know that it will make your heart to bleed.</l> 
                               <l> Yet wretched<persName style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus</persName> made himself the band,</l> 
                               <l> And thereunto did let his deſperate hand: </l>
                               <l> And to theſe covenants he gave conſent,</l> 
                               <l> Which after (though too late) he did repent:</l></lg>
                           <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">But</fw> <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original">A3v</supplied></fw>
                           <pb/>
                       </div>
                           <!-- Abby Ballou-->
                           <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                               <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">Doctor<hi style="font-style: italic;"> John Fauſtus.</hi></fw>
                               <l>But being ſeal’d, be doth the ſame deliver</l>
                               <l>To <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Mephoſtophiles</persName>, to keep it ever.</l>
                               <l>Thus by degrees he added ſinne, to ſinne;</l>
                               <l>And now the practiſe he did firſt begin.</l>
                           </div>
                           <div type="chapter" style="font-weight: normal;">   
                               <head style="text-align: center;">CHAP. IV.</head>
                           </div>
                           <div type="epigram" style="font-weight: normal;">   
                               <l style="margin-left: 2.5em;">How <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> firſt began</l>
                               <l style="margin-left: 3.5em;">his cunning to aſſay:</l>
                               <l style="margin-left: 2.5em;">And how his Spirit did</l>
                               <l style="margin-left: 3.5em;">in every thing obey</l>
                           </div> 
                           <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                               <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">I</hi>T happened now that <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> in the end</l>
                               <l style="margin-left: 2em;">The devil with a queſtion did offend, (frame</l>
                               <l>Which was, that he would know how God did</l>
                               <l>The world &amp; all things which it doth contain.</l>
                               <l>But <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> not able this to tell,</l>
                               <l>Becauſe himſelf from his creation fell;</l>
                               <l>Was with the Doctor very much diſpleaſd,</l>
                               <l>Nor could his anger quickly be appear'd:</l>
                               <l>And therefore <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> to increaſe his fear,</l>
                               <l>In ugly ſhape to <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> did appear,</l>
                               <l>With other of his black infernal rout,</l>
                               <l>Who in an antick manner danc’d about.</l>
                               <l>Here at poor Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> was amaz’d,</l>
                               <l>And yet upon their hideous forms he gaz’d:</l>
                               <l>Thinking thoſe troops of fury now were come,</l>
                               <l>To fetch him thence before his glaſs were run,</l>
                               <l>Or ere his twenty four years did expire:</l>
                               <l>During which time the Spirit like a Fryer</l>
                               <l><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">Carry</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_ABALL">A4r</supplied></fw></l>
                               <pb/>
                               <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">The Hiſtory of</fw>
                               <l>Carrying a little bell within his hand,</l>
                               <l>Was bound to be ſtill ready at command.</l>
                               <l>But afterward when thoſe ſame years did end,</l>
                               <l>Then <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> ſhould on <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> attend.</l>
                               <l>And now this fearfull ſuddain operation,</l>
                               <l>Did fill his heart with grief and contrition:</l>
                               <l>But when that <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> perceiv’d his ſadneſs,</l>
                               <l>He laughed out for very gladneſs.</l>
                               <l><persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> ſayes be, I do now well perceive</l>
                               <l>That you our first agreement would deceive;</l>
                               <l>Yet I would have you know it is in vain,</l>
                               <l>For no repentance can you purge again.</l>
                               <l>Beſides, you know (&amp; therwith ſhew’d his band)</l>
                               <l>That to theſe <choice><abbr>covenãts</abbr><expan>covenants</expan></choice> you have ſet your <choice><abbr>hãd</abbr><expan>hand</expan></choice>.</l>
                               <l>And for to make this Obligation good,</l>
                               <l>Your ſelf hath written it with your own blood:</l>
                               <l>Be quiet then in mind and take your reſt,</l>
                               <l>For thou ere long muſt be great <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Pluto’s</persName> gueſt:</l>
                               <l>In the meantime to recreate thy leaſure,</l> 
                               <l>Sit down and I wil ſhow thee ſome new plea=</l>
                               <l>So <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> and the Devil together fate, <hi style="text-indent: 1em;">(ſure:</hi></l>
                               <l>But ſtill he thought his company too hot.</l> 
                               <l>Then <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> did other Fiends command</l>
                               <l>For to appear, who ſtraightway were at hand:</l>
                               <l>Firſt came in <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Belial</persName> like to a Bear,</l> 
                               <l>With flaming eyes, and ſhaggy rugged hair,</l> 
                               <l>Then <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Belzebob</persName> came flying in with wings,</l>
                               <l>Whoſe mouth was filled with a pair of ſtings;</l>
                               <l>Then came <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Afteroth</persName> of cold black hue,</l>
                               <l>And after him a Serpents tail he drew</l>
                               <l><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">Then</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_ABALL">A4v</supplied></fw></l>
                               <pb/>
                               <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">Doctor<hi style="font-style: italic;"> John Fauſtus.</hi></fw>
                               <l>The <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Chanigafto</persName> lightly skipped in,</l> 
                               <l>Who was attired in a Hedgehogs skin,</l>
                               <l>At laſt came <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Anobis</persName> like to a Dogge,</l>
                               <l>And his body ſhaped like a Dogge:</l>
                               <l>Theſe ugly Maskers did themselves advance;</l> 
                               <l>And in ſtrange meaſures did begin to dance.</l>
                               <l>And as they did their ſeveral changes make,</l>
                               <l>Their threatening forks 'gainſt <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> they did</l>
                               <l>As if they meant at him to run a Tilt, (ſhake;</l>
                               <l>That <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> thought his blood ſhould then be</l>
                               <l><persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> ſeeing <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> this diſmaid,<hi style="text-indent: 3em;">(ſpilt.</hi> </l>
                               <l>Began to cheer him up, and thus he ſaid:</l>
                               <l><persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName>, How doſt thou like this nimble ſport,</l>
                               <l>For with this company thou muſt conſort.</l>
                               <l>But <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> ſweating thought it was hot wea=</l>
                               <l>Being afraid to ſee them all together: <hi style="text-indent: 1em;">(ther,</hi></l>
                               <l>And did intreat his Devilſhip that be</l>
                               <l>Would ſend away his fearfull company:</l>
                               <l>At which great <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> diſmiſs’d them all,</l>
                               <l>Excepting ſeaven of the principal.</l>
                               <l>Now <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> having gotten breath again,</l>
                               <l>Did ask for <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> by name;</l>
                               <l>Which having ſpoken as he did deſire,</l>
                               <l>Came <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> like to a Fryer:</l>
                               <l>Then <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> to entreat his ſpirit begun,</l>
                               <l>That he would teach him (as himſelf had done)</l>
                               <l>How to transform himſelf to any ſhape,</l>
                               <l>Either of Dog, or Lion, Cat, or Ape.</l>
                               <l>With this great <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> gave him a book,</l>
                               <l>On which this <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> did no ſooner look,</l>
                               <l><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">But</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_ABALL">A5r</supplied></fw></l>
                               <pb/>
                           </div>
            <!-- Justin Boure -->
           
                    <div type= "fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">The History of</fw>
                        <l>But he to divers forms himſelf did change,</l>
                        <l>And through a bundr. various ſhapes did ráge.</l>
                        <l>Sometimes like in a dragon, bog, or worm,</l>
                        <l>Then to a bat he would himſelf transform:</l>
                        <l>But at the laſt being changed to a man,</l>
                        <l>To ſport himſelf great <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> began,</l>
                        <l>And to his spirit then he cry’d for woe,</l>
                        <l>While <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> went laughing thence, Ho, Ho.</l>
                        <l>And having left tormented <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> there,</l>
                        <l>As ſoon as he to is gone, the day grew clear:</l>
                        <l>And ſweeteſt muſick was to him convay’d,</l>
                        <l>Which cheared up his heart, though much diſ-</l>
                        <l style="text-align: right;">(maid.</l>
                    </div>
                    <div type= "chapter" style="font-weight: normal;">
                        <head>CHAP. V.</head>
                    </div>
                    <div type="epigram" style="font-weight: normal;">
                        <l style="margin-left:2.5em;">How Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus.</persName></l> 
                        <l style="margin-left:3.5em;">was carried through the air,</l>
                        <l style="margin-left:2.5em;">That he might view the world,</l>
                        <l style="margin-left:3.5em;">the skie and planets fair.</l>
                    </div>
                    <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                        <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0; font-weight: normal;">A</hi>s <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> lay one day upon his bed,</l>
                        <l style="margin-left:2em;">Whiles divers fancies came into his head;</l>
                        <l>He did begin to vex himself, that Art</l>
                        <l>Could not the ſecrets of the heavens impart:</l>
                        <l>For he had noted that their obſervations,</l>
                        <l>Were not confirm’d by certain̄ demōnſtrations,</l>
                        <l>Judging of things as Authors were inclind</l>
                        <l>But yet in knowledge all of them were blinde.</l>
                        <l><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">And</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_JBOUR">A5v</supplied></fw></l>
                        <pb/>  
                    </div>
                    <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                        <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">Doctor<persName style="font-style: italic;">John Faustus</persName></fw>
                        <lg>
                            <l>And thus while in his bed be muſing lyes,</l>
                            <l>A ſuddath fearful wind began to riſe,</l>
                            <l>That with the force thereof his houſe did rock,</l>
                            <l>And all the doors as if they had no lock</l>
                            <l>Did open flye, and then a voice he heard,</l>
                            <l>Which bid him riſe, and not to be afeard;</l>
                            <l>And he ſhould ſee the ſun of his deſire,</l>
                            <l>And to the ſtarry Region would aſpire, </l>
                            <l>And there the wonders of the world behold,</l>
                            <l>The earth, the sea, and all that they enfold:</l>
                            <l>And then unto the airy region fire,</l>
                            <l>And ſee the Meteors both cold and dire,</l>
                            <l><persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> at this ſame news was much refreſht,</l>
                            <l>And thought himſelf in the diſcovery bleft;</l>
                            <l>For thus the Devil at the firſt began,</l>
                            <l>When he with hope of knowledge tempted man-</l>
                        </lg>
                        <lg>
                            <l><persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> now whom ambition did enflame,</l>
                            <l>Did anſwer to the ſpirit back again;</l>
                            <l>The wonders of the world I fain would ſee,</l>
                            <l>Which if thou faithfully wilt them to me,</l>
                            <l>I promiſe here that I will go with thee:</l>
                        </lg>
                        <lg>
                            <l>Which word once ſpoke, he did ſtraightway</l>
                            <l>A wagon which two fiery dragons drew:(view</l>
                            <l>And then the voice to him did ſay,</l>
                            <l>Get up with me, and let us both away</l>
                            <l>Thus mounted on the wagon forth they went</l>
                            <l>To view the world and upper firmament;</l>
                            <l>And as they thus did travel through the air,</l>
                            <l>His <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> did to him repair;</l>
                            <l><fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">And</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_JBOUR">A6r</supplied></fw></l>
                        </lg>
                    </div>
                        <pb/>
                          
                           <div type="fragment">
                               <!-- Nick Ramirez -->
                               
                               <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">The Hiſtory of</fw>
                               <lg style="font-weight:bold;">
                                   <l>And ſitting in the Chariot hard by him,</l>
                                   <l>To pleaſe his Maſter be this ſong did ſing.</l>
                               </lg>  
                               <lg style="font-weight: normal;"> 
                                   <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">C</hi>Ome you Spirits mount</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> upon your nimble wing,</l>
                                   <l>And be your chiefeſt notes</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> be ſure that you do ſing:</l>
                                   <l>While my <persName style="font-style: italic;">Faustus</persName> here and I,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> ſwiftly wander through the skie.</l>
                               </lg>
                               <lg style="font-weight: normal;">
                                   <l>We will travail over Mountains,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> over park and over pale,</l>
                                   <l>Over Cities and high Steeples,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> over hill and over dale:</l>
                                   <l>While my <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> here and I,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> ſwiftly wander through the skie.</l>
                               </lg>
                               <lg style="font-weight: normal;"> 
                                   <l>Then we will to ſea again,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> and there laugh when we do hear</l>
                                   <l>How the Mariners exclaim</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> when a ſuddain ſtorm they fear:</l>
                                   <l>While my <persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> here and I,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> ſwiftly wander through the skie.</l>
                               </lg>
                               <lg style="font-weight: normal;">
                                   <l><persName style="font-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> thou ſhalt now be told,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> what thy ſelf didſt moſt deſire;</l>
                                   <l>How the Stars about are roll’d,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> ſome are lower, ſome are higher:</l>
                               </lg>
                               <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">All</fw> <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_NRAMI">A6v</supplied></fw>
                               <pb/>
                               
                               <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal;">Doctor <persName style="font-style: italic;">John Fauſtus</persName></fw>
                               <lg style="font-weight: normal;"> 
                                   <l>All this ſhalt thou view, while I,</l>
                                   <l style="text-indent: 2em;"> wander with thee through the skie.</l>
                               </lg>
                               <lg style="font-weight: bold;"> 
                                   <l> <hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">T</hi>He ſong thus done <choice><abbr>wch</abbr><expan>which</expan></choice> <persName>Fauſtus</persName> pleaſed well</l>
                                   <l> He did intreat his Spirit now to tell,</l>
                                   <l>The ſeberal regions <expan resp="contr_NRAMI">which</expan> they paſſed by;</l>
                                   <l>Which <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Mephoſtophiles</persName> did not deny:</l>
                                   <l>Yonder (ſayes he) you ſee your left hand</l>
                                   <l><placeName style="font-weight:normal;">Muſcovia, Ruſſia</placeName>, and the <hi style="font-weight:normal;">Saxons</hi> Land:</l>
                                   <l>On the right hand, beſides us here doth Iye,</l>
                                   <l><placeName style="font-weight:normal;">Europe</placeName>, <placeName style="font-weight:normal;">Aſia</placeName>, the mid-land Sea, with <placeName style="font-weight:normal;">Greece</placeName> and</l>
                                   <l>Look yonder is the hot &amp; torrid zone, <placeName style="font-weight:normal;">(Hungary</placeName>:</l>
                                   <l>And <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Charles Wain</persName> unto the ſea man known.</l>
                                   <l>Yonder is <hi style="font-weight: normal;">Urſa Major</hi>, which is but the ſame</l>
                                   <l>With that which we call the <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Charles Wain</persName>.</l>
                                   <l>Thus did he point him out each conſtellation,</l>
                                   <l>While <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Fauſtus</persName> ſtrucken was with admiration:</l>
                                   <l>And having ſhown him all the earth at laſt,</l>
                                   <l>Upon his bed again be <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Fauſtus</persName> caſt;</l>
                                   <l>Whereas he thought on what before he ſaw,</l>
                                   <l>And how the ſtars were govern’d by their law;</l>
                                   <l>And thereby to ſuch knowledge he did clime,</l>
                                   <l>That none was like to <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Fauſtus</persName> in his time.</l>
                                   <l>And for Aſtrology he was the beſt:</l>
                                   <l>And in his art did far excel the reſt.</l>
                               </lg>
                               <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">CHAP.</fw> <fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_NRAMI">A7r</supplied></fw>
                               <pb/>
                
            </div> 
            
 <!-- Rachel Maher-->
            <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; text-weight: normal; font-size: 150%;">The Hiſtory of</fw>
                <head type="header" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal; font-size: 150%;">CHAP. VI.</head>
                <head type="epigraph" style="text-align: center; font-weight: normal; font-size: 125%;">
                <lg>
                <l>How Doctor <persName style="text-style: italic;">Fauſtus</persName> would,</l>
                <l>ſometime in a pleaſant vain,</l>
                <l>Shew many rare conceits,</l>
                <l>which did increaſe his fame.</l></lg>
                </head>
                <lg><l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;">I</hi>t chanced now that <persName><hi style="font-style: normal;">Fauſtus</hi></persName> on a time</l>
                <l>Did happen with the Emperour to dine,</l>
                <l>Who did intreat that be his Art would them</l>
                <l>That thereby be might <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Alexander </persName> hiem,</l>
                <l>In ſuch a ſhape as he did like on earth:</l>
                <l>And furthermorem for to increaſe his mirth,</l>
                <l>He did intreat him, that he would preſent</l>
                <l>His Paramour which bred his hearts content.</l>
                <l><persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> having heard the Emperor, ſaid no more,</l>
                <l>But opened ſtraight the priby chamber dore,</l>
                <l>And ſraightway in full figure there came forth</l>
                <l>Great <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Alexander</persName> of renowned worth:</l>
                <l>And after him his beautenus Paramour,</l>
                <l>Who made obeyſance to the Emperor;</l>
                <l>Who with kind <persName>Caluratió</persName> thought to greet her,</l>
                <l>But <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> would not ſuffer him to meet her:</l>
                <l>And after through the dore by which they came</l>
                <l>They both of them did baniſh back again;</l>
                <l>Leading the Emperour who did commend</l>
                <l>Great <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> skill, and called him his friend.</l>
                <l>But you ſhall hear of <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> tricks hereafter,</l>
                <l>Who cannot choſe but mode you unto laughter.</l>
                <!-- Line group continues onto next page :) -->
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">This</fw>
                <fw type="signature"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_RMAHE">A7v</supplied></fw>    
                    <pb></pb>
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center; font-size: 125%;">Doctor <persName style="text-style: italic;">John Fauſtus</persName></fw>
                <l>This being done, upon another time</l>
                <l>When Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> did to mirth incline:</l>
                <l>Walking among the Courriers he did ſpye,</l>
                <l>Whereas a Knight did at a Window lye,</l>
                <l>With his head out of the window, ſo that he</l>
                <l>Was fallen faſt aſleep, which <persName style="font-weight: nomal;">Fauſtus</persName> ſoon did leg</l>
                <l>And fitt a pair of Harrs-horns on his head;</l>
                <l>So large, <persName>Acteon</persName> here was better ſpread;</l>
                <l>But when the Knight did happen to awake,</l>
                <l>Seeing his horns his head began to ſhake;</l>
                <l>And thought be could pull in his head again,</l>
                <l>But all his force and ſtribing was in vain:</l>
                <l>And he by no means could bring it to paſs,</l>
                <l>But with his horns be broke the pains of glaſs</l>
                <l>And when the Emperour beheld this fight,</l>
                <l>He and the Courtiers laughed all outright;</l>
                <l>Until that <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> took his horns away,</l>
                <l>With which yͤ Emperor was pleas’d that day</l>
                <l>But no long after this ſame injur’d knight,</l>
                <l>Did purpoſe yͤ his wrongs be this would right</l>
                <l>That meeting Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> on a plain</l>
                <l>He purpos’d he would neber goe home again;</l>
                <l>But then the Buſhes he did arm agen,</l>
                <l>Which came upon the Knight like armed men</l>
                <l>Thus the Knight malice <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> did defeat:</l>
                <l>And all that heard it laughd at this conceit</l>
                </lg>
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">Doctor <persName>John Fauſtus</persName></fw>
                <lg>
                <l style="text-indent: 1em;">Another time this <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> did repair,</l>
                <l>Like to a Horſe-courſer to a Courrier Fair.</l>
                <!--Line group goes onto next page-->
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align:right;">And</fw>
                <fw type="signature"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_RMAHE">A8r</supplied></fw> 
                </lg>
                <pb/>
            </div>
            
            <!-- Julia Carolan-->
            <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                <fw type="header" style="font-weight: normal; text-align: center; text-size: 150%;"> The Hiſtory of</fw>
                <lg> <l> And having pac’d his horſe about a while,</l> 
                    <l>A chapman came to him which made him ſmile, </l>                
                    <l> And askt his price, which <persName><hi style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus </hi> </persName> did unfold: </l>
                    <l>And to his horſe for forty Dollers cold: </l> 
                    <l>And charged him whatſoeber did betide, </l>
                    <l>That be into the water ſhould not ride. </l>
                    <l>But the Horse-courſer wondring at his word, </l> 
                    <l>As he went home did ride into a Ford </l>
                    <l> And ſtraight his Horse did baniſh quite away, </l> 
                    <l> For he no more his Horse or ſaddle ſaw, </l>
                    <l> But there was left upon a wad of Staw. </l>
                    <l> The Horse-courſer went back unto his Inne, </l>                    
                    <l> And to inquire for <hi style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus </hi> did begin; </l>
                    <l> And finding him there ſleeping on a bed, </l>
                    <l> He did begin to pluck him by the legg, </l>
                    <l> <hi style="font-weight:normal;"> That he did pluck it off: thea <hi style="font-style: italic;"> Faſutus </hi> cry d </hi> </l>
                    <l> With open throat, that he had murther’d him: </l>
                    <l> Whereat the Horse-courſer did now begin </l>
                    <l> To ask for mercy and away he went, </l>
                    <l> And for to loſe his money was content </l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;"> It happened Doctor <persName> Fauſtus </persName> on a day </l>
                    <l> Met with a Clown that drobe a load of Day; </l>
                    <l> And asked him what he should gibe in ſcoffe,</l>
                    <l> That he might eat his belly full thereof: </l>
                    <l> The Clown did tell him that he ſhould </l>
                    <l> For his 3 farthings eat then what he would. </l>
                    <l> It was agreed, and Doctor <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus </hi> </persName> ſet </l>
                    <l> Himself to eat, and all his teeth did whet, </l>
                    <l> That the poor clown was ſorty and did grutch </l>
                    <l> To see that <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus </hi> </persName> did eat up ſo much: </l>
                    <!-- Line group conintues on next page-->
                </lg>
                <fw type="signature" style="text-align: right;">For</fw>
                <pb></pb>
                <fw type="header" style="font-weight: normal; text-align: center; text-size: 150%;">Doctor <persName> <hi style="font-style: italic;"> John Fasſtus </hi> </persName></fw>
                <lg>
                    <l> For <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus </hi> </persName> did the Country-man ſo blind, </l>
                    <l> He could not ſee the hay was left behind, </l>
                    <l> And therefore did intreat him bery fair, </l>
                    <l> That <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus </hi> </persName> would his load of hay pet ſpare: </l>
                    <l> Defeat <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</hi> </persName>  laughing went away, </l>
                    <l> And afterward the Clown had all his hay. </l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;"> Doctor <persName> <hi style="font-weight:normal;"> Fauſtus </hi> </persName> coming on a time </l>
                    <l> <supplied reason="unclear"> Into </supplied> a Tabern which did ſell good wine: </l>
                    <l> He found a company of Drunkards there </l>
                    <l> Merrily drinking, and ſo loud they were, </l>
                    <l> That Doctor <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus </hi> </persName> who this noiſe did hate, </l>
                    <l> Hearing them all thus loudly ſing and prate, </l>
                    <l> At last when they their words had newly ſpoke </l>
                    <l>He cõjur’d them all yͤ their mouths ſtood opens </l>
                    <l> And thus they gaping ſtood at one another,</l>   
                    <l>Not one was able for to ſpeak to th’ other:</l>
                    <l>In this amazed manner forth they came,</l>
                    <l>And then they all did ſhut their mouths again </l>
                    <l>And hereby <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;"> Faustus </hi> </persName> art was much expreſt, </l>
                    <l>And all the Town did laugh at this new jeſt. </l>
                </lg>
                <lg>
                    <l style="text-indent: 1em;"> Once Doctor <persName> <hi style="font-weight: normal;"> Fauſtus </hi> </persName> did his friends inbite, </l>
                    <l>Who Scholars were, unto a ſupper bery light: </l>
                    <l>And afterward he did intreat each gueſt </l>
                    <l>(Meaning thereby to break a merry jeſt)</l>
                    <l>That they would take yͤ pains with him to go, </l>
                    <l>To a Wine-celler which he would them ſhow: </l>
                    <l>They all conſented, and not long they ſtaid, </l>
                    <l>To the Biſhops celler they were all <supplied reason="unclear"> convey'd: </supplied></l>
                    <!-- Line group continues onto next page-->
                </lg> 
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">There</fw>
                <pb></pb> 
            </div>
            
            <!-- Robert Coleman-->
            <div>
                <div type="section" style="font-weight: bold;">
                    <fw type="header" style="text align: center;">The History of</fw>
                    <lg><l>There <persName style="font-weight= normal;">Fauſtus</persName> and the Scholars merry were;</l>
                        <l>But now the Butler put them in a fear;</l>
                        <l>Who coming hastily to draw ſome drink,</l>
                        <l>And ſeeing them, did ſtraightway think</l>
                        <l>They had been theebes, and so aloud did cry</l>
                        <l>For help, but <persName style="font-weight= normal;">Faustus</persName> fill'd him by and by;</l>
                        <l>By the hair of the head he carry’d him,</l>
                        <l>Who now with fear to tremble did begin,</l>
                        <l>Utill unto a lopped tree became,</l>
                        <l>And there be left the Butler on the ſame;</l>
                        <l>And all the night which was both ſharp &amp; cold,</l>
                        <l>With both his hands be by the tree did hold;</l>
                        <l>Till in the morning, when he did espy</l>
                        <l>The Shepards, he aloud to them did cry;</l>
                        <l>Who wondered much what mad <abbr>>mã</abbr> that ſhould</l>
                        <l>Who had thus climbed on ſo high a tree: (be</l>
                        <l>But when this news unto the Bishop came,</l>
                        <l>He did himself go out to ſee the ſame;</l>
                        <l>And asked him how <abbr>yͤ</abbr> he was brought thiithe,</l>
                        <l>The butler that with cold did quake &amp; quiber,</l>
                        <l>Did anſwer, that he certain theebes had found,</l>
                        <l>In his Wine cellar who were drinking round;</l>
                        <l>And by the hair of the head they did him bring,</l>
                        <l>And left him in that caſe they found him in:</l>
                        <l>What ere they were (says he) I do not know,</l>
                        <l>If they were devils, they like men did show</l></lg>
                    
                    <lg><l>But ’tis not here my purpoſe to recite,</l>
                        <l>Do all the merry tricks of <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Fauſtus</persName> write</l>
                        <fw type="catchword" style="text align: right;">Pet</fw>
                        <fw type="signature" style="text align: center;">BV</fw>
                        <pb/>
                        <fw type="header" style="text align: center;">Doctor <hi style="italic;">John Faustus</hi></fw>    
                        <l>Yet ſome of them I have related here:</l>
                        <l>Buy now his 24 years drew near.</l>
                        <l>And though in pleaſure he had ſpent his time,</l>
                        <l>The number of his years did now decline;</l>
                        <l>And all the Spirits had a great deſire,</l>
                        <l>To ſee when <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Faustus</persName> bond would once expire;</l>
                        <l>Since he was bound by <abbr>yͤ</abbr> ſame bloody ſcroul,</l>
                        <l>At twenty four years end to give his ſoul</l>
                        <l>To <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Lucifer</persName> : the time now drawing nigh,</l>
                        <l>You muſt expect to hear his Tragedy.</l></lg>
                </div>
                <div type="chapter" style="font-weight: bold;">  <fw type="header">Chap. VII.</fw>
                    <head type = "epigraph"></head>
                    <l>[How <persName style="font-style:italic;">Fauſtus</persName>, when his time grew nigh,</l>
                    <l>did make great lamentation;</l>
                    <l>And to his fellow Students made</l>
                    <l>his Funeral Oration]</l>
                    <lg><l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0">T</hi>he glaſs of <persName style="font-weight:normal;">Fauſtus</persName> time being almoſt run,</l>
                        <l>Having but one month of his time to come,</l>
                        <l>He drew into a very penſive mood,</l>
                        <l>And now his fault be plainly underſtood</l>
                        <l>And now began to curſe that wretched time,</l>
                        <l>When he to ſtudy Magick did incline.</l>
                        <l>To hope for mercy now it was too late,</l>
                        <l>Which made him to deplore his wicked fate;</l>
                        <l>And his accuſing conſcience now did tell,</l>
                        <l>There was no way for him but down to hell.</l>
                        <l>And thus in waiting he his time did ſpend,</l>
                        <l>That little time which drew unto an end.</l></lg>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text align: right;">Now</fw>
                    <fw type="signature" style="text align: center;">B2R</fw>
                    <pb/>
                </div>
            </div>     
            <!-- Liam Hilderbrand -->
            <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                <fw type="header" style="text align: center;">The Hi∫tory of</fw>
                <l>Now on the pains of <placeName>Hell</placeName> he did think,</l>
                <l>The racks and tortures, chains, and filthy ∫tink,</l>
                <l>Now <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Pro∫erpine</persName> would ∫urely laugh to ∫ee</l>
                <l>His soul tormented in this mi∫ery.</l>
                <l>Then he bethought him on the whips of ∫teel,</l>
                <l>Which he did know his body there ∫hould feel,</l>
                <l>The more he thought, his thoughts increa∫d his</l>
                <l><choice><abbr>Wch</abbr><expan>Which</expan></choice> made him ∫til unto him∫elf cóplain. (pain</l>
                <l>While thus he ∫pent his time in grief &amp; fear,</l>
                <l>His <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Meplio∫tophiles</persName> did to him appear ;</l>
                <l>And told him &amp; his years were now expir’d,</l>
                <l>And that his Ma∫ter <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Lucifer</persName> dehr’d</l>
                <l>He would prepare him∫elf and make an end,</l>
                <l>For that his Ma∫ter ∫orrly did intend,</l>
                <l>On ∫uch a night, to fetch him down to <placeName>hell</placeName>,</l>
                <l>That mith &amp; infernal ∫pirits he might dwell</l>
                <l>When <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Faustus</persName> had heard this, he grew ∫o ∫ad,</l>
                <l>That with his ∫orrow he grew almo∫t mad;</l>
                <l>He tumbled on his bed, all re∫t he did de∫pi∫e,</l>
                <l>No quiet ∫lumber ever clos’d his eyes.</l>
                <l>But he was ∫till tormented in his mind,</l>
                <l>Sin went before, and torture came behind:</l>
                <l>Yee ∫o it was, that on that very day,</l>
                <l>On which &amp; devil ∫hould fetch him quite away,</l>
                <l>He ∫ent unto his friends intreating for his ∫ake</l>
                <l>That of his Banquet they would all partake:</l>
                <l>As merry Banquet is, it ∫oon befell,</l>
                <l>As afterward in due place I will tell.</l>
                <l>The Students being come, he made them all</l>
                <l>As meles as he could, when he him∫elf did fall</l>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text align: right;">Into</fw>
                <pb/>
                <fw type="header" style="text align: center;">Doctor <hi style="font-style: italic;">John Fau∫tus.</hi> </fw>
                <l>Into a ∫udden dump, nor could be be</l>
                <l>Merry in their ∫o beloved company.</l>
                <l>So caling them into another room,</l>
                <l>He did unfold to them his fearful doom.</l>
            </div>
            <div style="font-weight:bold;"> <head type="epigraph">Doctor <hi style="font-style: italic;">Fau∫tus</hi> his Oration to his Friends and fellow Students.</head>
                <l><hi style="float: left; font-size: 5rem; padding: 0.5rem; margin: 0 2rem 1rem 0;"
                    >M</hi> y friends I mu∫t begin my ∫ad Oration,</l>
                <l>With a confe∫∫ion of my Conjuration.</l>
                <l>Since all of you do know my fir∫t beginning,</l>
                <l>And how I grew ∫till more &amp; more in ∫inning,</l>
                <l>And unto Magick arts I was ∫o bent,</l>
                <l>I fought all ways to further my intent.</l>
                <l>And leaving better studies, did apply</l>
                <l>My ∫elf unto that helli∫h mi∫tery.</l>
                <l>Thus did I live twenty four years and more,</l>
                <l>Who∫e ∫ad expiring I mu∫t now deplore:</l>
                <l>For ∫o it is, to purcha∫e my content,</l>
                <l>I to a heavy bargain did con∫ent:</l>
                <l>Which was, when 24 years once did end,</l>
                <l>(Which time in conjuration I did ∫pend)</l>
                <l>The devil ∫hould have my body and my ∫oul,</l>
                <l>And did confirm it by a bloody ∫croul;</l>
                <l>And now the di∫mal term of years is done,</l>
                <l>And night beginning, my hour-gla∫s is run,</l>
                <l>This night I look that he for me ∫hould ∫end,</l>
                <l>And this my life will have a fearfull end:</l>
                <l>And now (my friends) this banquet I did make</l>
                <l>That I of you my la∫t farewell might take;</l>
                <fw type="catchword" style="text align: right;">De∫iring</fw>
                <pb/>
            </div>
             <!-- Colin O'Donnell-->
            <div type="fragment" style="font-weight: bold;">
                <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">The Hiſtory of</fw>
                <lg>
                    <l>Deſiring pardon where I have offended, </l>
                    <l>Since my laſt act of life cannot be mended; </l>
                    <l>And for thoſe practiſes which I have wrought </l>
                    <l>By conjuration, and thereby have brought </l>
                    <l>My heavy ſoul to grief and ſad deſpair, </l>
                    <l>My life is written in a toriting fair, </l>
                    <l>Which lies within my ſtudy: ſo that you </l>
                    <l>May learn thereby ſuch courſes to eſchew. </l>
                    <l>And if that I do you my counſell give, </l>
                    <l>And uſe that little time I have to liue, </l>
                    <l>Be ſure that you forſake all conjuration, </l>
                    <l>And pray to be delivered from temptation: </l>
                    <l>And let my death a warning be to all, </l>
                    <l>Since by deſire of knowledge I did fall :</l>
                    <l>For  now to gibe my ſpeech a ſad conclusion,</l>
                    <l>This night I muſt expect my own confuſion:</l>
                    <l>And yet my loving friends I do requeſt</l>
                    <l>That you will go to bed and take your reſt;</l>
                    <l>Let nothing trouble you, nor do not fear</l>
                    <l>If any rumbling noiſe you chance to hear,</l>
                    <l>Be ſure you do not riſe out of your bed:</l>
                    <l>But when That I to <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Pluto's</persName> court am fled,</l>
                    <l>If that you find my bod, the next day,</l>
                    <l>Be ſure that you to earth do it convey:</l>
                    <l>And ſo my friends I wiſh you all good reſt,</l>
                    <l>Pray go to bed, my ſoul is much oppreſt.( ſay</l>
                    <l style="margin-left: 1em;">When as his friends had heard what he did</l>
                    <l>They counſel’d him that he to <persName>God</persName> ſhould pray:</l>
                    <l>But <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> felt the weight of his ſin</l>
                    <l>That how to pray he knew not to begin:</l>
                    <fw type="catchword" style="text-align: right;">At</fw> <fw  type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_CODON">B3V</supplied></fw>
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                    <fw type="header" style="text-align: center;">Doctor<persName style="font-style: italic;">John Fauſtus</persName></fw>
                    <l>At laſt the Students having pray’d did weep,</l>
                    <l>And after went to bed, but could not ſleep:</l>
                    <l>For <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> in the hall did ſtay alone, ( groan</l>
                    <l>Where they might hear how he did ſigh and</l>
                    <l>And ſo with wakefull eyes they did attend,</l>
                    <l>Expecting ſtill to hear his fearfull end:</l>
                    <l>At laſt between the hours of twelve &amp; one,</l>
                    <l>A wind did riſe, the like was never known,</l>
                    <l>It was ſo violent : which when they once did</l>
                    <l>The Doct &amp; students both began to fear. ( hear</l>
                    <l>For Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> in the hall did lye,</l>
                    <l>When they might hear his fearfull tragedy:</l>
                    <l>For now the hall and upper rooms did ſhake;</l>
                    <l>And they did hear a hiſſing like a snake;</l>
                    <l>And then the hall door fiercely did flye open,</l>
                    <l>And <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> further cry’d, which being ſpoken</l>
                    <l>They heard no more; ſo that yͤ scholars ſaid,</l>
                    <l>Now Doctor <persName style="font-weight: normal;">Fauſtus</persName> is to <placeName>hell</placeName> convey’d.</l>
                    <l>The next day, when they came into yͤ hall,</l>
                    <l>They might behold a fearfull funerail:</l>
                    <l>His blood &amp; brains were ſprinkled on yͤ ground</l>
                    <l>And ſuch a ſight as might the ſight confound;</l>
                    <l>Here lay his teeth, and there his eyes did lye,</l>
                    <l>A ſpectacle of helliſh cruelty; ( mourn</l>
                    <l>Which when his friends beheld they all did</l>
                    <l>And found his body on the dunghill torn;</l>
                    <l>To which his friends did Christian burial give,</l>
                    <l>Although himself did like a Deuil liue,</l>
                    <l>Thus I this ſtory of his life have penn’d,</l>
                    <l>That we may ſee his life, and hate his end.</l>
                </lg> 
                <fw type="catchword" style="text-align right;">FINIS</fw><fw type="signature" style="text-align: center;"><supplied reason="omitted-in-original" resp="contr_CODON">B4R</supplied></fw> 
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        </body>
    </text>
</TEI>
  1. section
  2. To the Reader
  3. VeniVideFuge.
  4. CHAP I
  5. Of Doctor Fauſtus birth,
  6. My muse aſſiſt me now, for I inte…
  7. CHAP II
  8. How Doctor Fauſtus conjur’d up
  9. Now Fauſtus purpoſing alone to …
  10. Mephoſophiles I ſay,
  11. fragment #1
  12. With this a murmure in the mood w…
  13. Fauſtus (ſaies he) I now am come,
  14. When Mephoſtophiles did thus ki…
  15. CHAP III
  16. How Doctor Fauſtus made
  17. T he time appointed, in a bliſste…
  18. Fauſtus here with come queſtions…
  19. fragment #2
  20. CHAP. IV.
  21. epigram #1
  22. fragment #3
  23. fragment #4
  24. CHAP. V.
  25. epigram #2
  26. fragment #5
  27. fragment #6
  28. And thus while in his bed be muſi…
  29. Faustus now whom ambition did enf…
  30. Which word once ſpoke, he did ſtr…
  31. fragment #7
  32. And ſitting in the Chariot hard b…
  33. COme you Spirits mount
  34. We will travail over Mountains,
  35. Then we will to ſea again,
  36. Fauſtus thou ſhalt now be told,
  37. All this ſhalt thou view, while I…
  38. THe ſong thus done wchwhich Fauſ…
  39. CHAP. VI.
  40. It chanced now that Fauſtus on a …
  41. Another time this Fauſtus did rep…
  42. fragment #9
  43. And having pac’d his horſe about…
  44. It happened Doctor Fauſtus on …
  45. For Fauſtus did the Country-…
  46. Doctor Fauſtus coming on a t…
  47. Once Doctor Fauſtus did his …
  48. There Fauſtus and the Scholars…
  49. section
  50. There Fauſtus and the Scholars me…
  51. But ’tis not here my purpoſe to r…
  52. fragment #10
  53. Doctor Fau∫tus his Oration to his Friends and fellow Students.
  54. fragment #11
Fragment from Cotes A0 to A7R Author Encoder Justin Weitbrecht Tonino Sarandrea Abby Ballou Justin Boure Nick Ramirez Rachel Maher Julia Carolan Robert Coleman Liam Hilderbrand Colin O'Donnell Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2018

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm.
A decorative printer's ornament is here.
To the Reader READER, I would not have you think, that I tend to waſte my ink, While Fauſtus Story I reherſe, And here do write his life in verſe,  5 For ſeeing Fryer Bacons Story, (In whom Oxford ſtill may glory) For want of better pen comes forth, Compos’d in Rhyme of no great worth: I calt’d my Muſe to task, and pend  10 Fauſtus life, and death; and end. And when it cometh forth in print, If you like it not, the Devil’s in’t. Veni Vide Fuge. Come See and hate,. Doctor Fauſtus wretched state.
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A0
A decorative printer's ornament is here.
CHAP I Of Doctor Fauſtus birth, And how he gave his heart To leave off fair D vinity, To ſtudy the black Art. My muse aſſiſt me now, for I intend To write the life & death, and fearful end Of Doctor Fauſtus, whoſe ill gotten name May well compare with Fryer Bacon’s fame. Fauſtus, was born at Rhodes, whuich town doth lye 5 Within a Province of fair Germany ; His father was a Dusbandman, did libe On what the earth to him did freely gibe; Let be at Wittenberg an unkle bad, Who took young Fauſtus being but a lad, 10 And ſent him to the University, That he might ſtudy there Divinity. But he did quickly there addict his heart, To leave fair ſtudies for the foul black Art. Thus he in ſecret ſtudied conjuration, 15 Yet being found byacts and diſputation, To be well learned, they did all agree, To make him Doctor of Divinity. But having once obtain’d that high degree, He ill deſerved it, as you ſhall ſee 20 For A2r The hiſtory of For now my pen doth tremble for to tell, Now like a Devil from all grace he fell. For now his contemplation he did bend, To negromancy and much time did ſpend, In caſting figures, making Inchantations; With all the wicked helps of Conjurations, Leading thoſe ſtudies which are moſt divine, And to theſe hellith Arts he did incline. I therefore here have drawn his life, that you May learn ſuch wicked courſes to eſchem; That me thus ſeeing him ruled by the Devil, May pray to be deliber’d from all ſuch evil.
CHAP II How Doctor Fauſtus conjur’d up From out a Globe of fire, The ſpirit Mephoſtophiles , That came like to a Fryer. Now Fauſtus purpoſing alone to try, The power of this his Magick miſtery, He did repair unto a little Wood, And not far off from Wittenberg it ſtood; Where he did make a circle with his wand, 5 And thus with charms his ſpirit did command Mephoſophiles I ſay, Quickly riſe and come away; By Lucifer I charge thee here, That thou forthwith do appear. With With A2v
Doctor John Faustus With this a murmure in the mood was heard, That Doctor Fauſtus grew himself afeard; The mood with lighting seemed on a flame, And lounder thunder, terroɾ did proclaim: Till Doctoɽ Fauſtus in his magick robe  5 Looking about him, spy'd a fiery Globe; And at the laſt from this time ſame Globe of Fire, The ſpirit came in likeneſs of a Fryer; Who lightly round about the circle ran, And thus to ſpeak to Fauſtus he began; 10 Fauſtus (ſaies he) I now am come, Speak thy will, and it is done. When Mephoſtophiles did thus kindly greet him, Then Doctoɽ Fauſtus bid the Spirit meet him The next gap at his houſe; the ſpirit did content, And back again then Doctoɽ Fauſtus ment.
CHAP III How Doctor Fauſtus made a Contract firm, not good, To ſerve the Devil, which he writ with his own blood. T he time appointed, in a bliſstering day, The ſpirit came to him, and thus did ſay: Mephiſophiles am ready now, And thus to be your Vassal I do bow; Entreating you that you would let me know  5 What is your pleaſure that you call me so. Faustus A3r The Hiſtory of Fauſtus here with come queſtions did propund, Which Mephoſtophiles did ſoon expound. At laſt the matter did begin to frame, And to theſe friendly articles they came: That Doctor Fauſtus should a Spirit be, 5 Both in his outward ſhape and quality; That he ſhould be inbiſible to all, And Mephoſtophiles ready at his call. And ? he did once command, That be should bring it quickly to his hand: 10 And that he should at any time appear, When once the boice of Fauſtus he did hear. Thus Fauſtus did this black agreement make, While that the Spirit did for him matter take, Theſe sad conditions, which would even fear  15 A tender hearted Chriſstian for to hear; That Doctor Fauſtus while he now did live Himſelf to his Lord Lucifer should give, And for to make the contract firm, not good, He did agree to write it with his blood; 20 Which in a saucer on the fire he ſet, He in the ſame his wicked blood did heat; And write therewith that he would alwayes be A foe unto all Chriſtianity. Theſe ſad conditions when that you do read, 25 I know that it will make your heart to bleed. Yet wretched Fauſtus made himself the band, And thereunto did let his deſperate hand: And to theſe covenants he gave conſent, Which after (though too late) he did repent: 30 But A3v
Doctor John Fauſtus. But being ſeal’d, be doth the ſame deliver To Mephoſtophiles, to keep it ever. Thus by degrees he added ſinne, to ſinne; And now the practiſe he did firſt begin.
CHAP. IV.
How Fauſtus firſt began his cunning to aſſay: And how his Spirit did in every thing obey
IT happened now that Faustus in the end The devil with a queſtion did offend, (frame Which was, that he would know how God did The world & all things which it doth contain. But Lucifer not able this to tell, Becauſe himſelf from his creation fell; Was with the Doctor very much diſpleaſd, Nor could his anger quickly be appear'd: And therefore Lucifer to increaſe his fear, In ugly ſhape to Faustus did appear, With other of his black infernal rout, Who in an antick manner danc’d about. Here at poor Doctor Faustus was amaz’d, And yet upon their hideous forms he gaz’d: Thinking thoſe troops of fury now were come, To fetch him thence before his glaſs were run, Or ere his twenty four years did expire: During which time the Spirit like a Fryer Carry A4r The Hiſtory of Carrying a little bell within his hand, Was bound to be ſtill ready at command. But afterward when thoſe ſame years did end, Then Faustus ſhould on Lucifer attend. And now this fearfull ſuddain operation, Did fill his heart with grief and contrition: But when that Lucifer perceiv’d his ſadneſs, He laughed out for very gladneſs. Faustus ſayes be, I do now well perceive That you our first agreement would deceive; Yet I would have you know it is in vain, For no repentance can you purge again. Beſides, you know (& therwith ſhew’d his band) That to theſe covenãts covenants you have ſet your hãd hand . And for to make this Obligation good, Your ſelf hath written it with your own blood: Be quiet then in mind and take your reſt, For thou ere long muſt be great Pluto’s gueſt: In the meantime to recreate thy leaſure, Sit down and I wil ſhow thee ſome new plea= So Faustus and the Devil together fate, (ſure: But ſtill he thought his company too hot. Then Lucifer did other Fiends command For to appear, who ſtraightway were at hand: Firſt came in Belial like to a Bear, With flaming eyes, and ſhaggy rugged hair, Then Belzebob came flying in with wings, Whoſe mouth was filled with a pair of ſtings; Then came Afteroth of cold black hue, And after him a Serpents tail he drew Then A4v Doctor John Fauſtus. The Chanigafto lightly skipped in, Who was attired in a Hedgehogs skin, At laſt came Anobis like to a Dogge, And his body ſhaped like a Dogge: Theſe ugly Maskers did themselves advance; And in ſtrange meaſures did begin to dance. And as they did their ſeveral changes make, Their threatening forks 'gainſt Faustus they did As if they meant at him to run a Tilt, (ſhake; That Faustus thought his blood ſhould then be Lucifer ſeeing Faustus this diſmaid,(ſpilt. Began to cheer him up, and thus he ſaid: Faustus, How doſt thou like this nimble ſport, For with this company thou muſt conſort. But Faustus ſweating thought it was hot wea= Being afraid to ſee them all together: (ther, And did intreat his Devilſhip that be Would ſend away his fearfull company: At which great Lucifer diſmiſs’d them all, Excepting ſeaven of the principal. Now Faustus having gotten breath again, Did ask for Mephoſtophiles by name; Which having ſpoken as he did deſire, Came Mephoſtophiles like to a Fryer: Then Fauſtus to entreat his ſpirit begun, That he would teach him (as himſelf had done) How to transform himſelf to any ſhape, Either of Dog, or Lion, Cat, or Ape. With this great Lucifer gave him a book, On which this Fauſtus did no ſooner look, But A5r
The History of But he to divers forms himſelf did change, And through a bundr. various ſhapes did ráge. Sometimes like in a dragon, bog, or worm, Then to a bat he would himſelf transform: But at the laſt being changed to a man, To ſport himſelf great Lucifer began, And to his spirit then he cry’d for woe, While Lucifer went laughing thence, Ho, Ho. And having left tormented Faustus there, As ſoon as he to is gone, the day grew clear: And ſweeteſt muſick was to him convay’d, Which cheared up his heart, though much diſ- (maid.
CHAP. V.
How Doctor Faustus. was carried through the air, That he might view the world, the skie and planets fair.
As Faustus lay one day upon his bed, Whiles divers fancies came into his head; He did begin to vex himself, that Art Could not the ſecrets of the heavens impart: For he had noted that their obſervations, Were not confirm’d by certain̄ demōnſtrations, Judging of things as Authors were inclind But yet in knowledge all of them were blinde. And A5v
DoctorJohn Faustus And thus while in his bed be muſing lyes, A ſuddath fearful wind began to riſe, That with the force thereof his houſe did rock, And all the doors as if they had no lock Did open flye, and then a voice he heard, 5 Which bid him riſe, and not to be afeard; And he ſhould ſee the ſun of his deſire, And to the ſtarry Region would aſpire, And there the wonders of the world behold, The earth, the sea, and all that they enfold: 10 And then unto the airy region fire, And ſee the Meteors both cold and dire, Faustus at this ſame news was much refreſht, And thought himſelf in the diſcovery bleft; For thus the Devil at the firſt began, 15 When he with hope of knowledge tempted man- Faustus now whom ambition did enflame, Did anſwer to the ſpirit back again; The wonders of the world I fain would ſee, Which if thou faithfully wilt them to me, I promiſe here that I will go with thee: 5 Which word once ſpoke, he did ſtraightway A wagon which two fiery dragons drew:(view And then the voice to him did ſay, Get up with me, and let us both away Thus mounted on the wagon forth they went 5 To view the world and upper firmament; And as they thus did travel through the air, His Mephoſtophiles did to him repair; And A6r
The Hiſtory of And ſitting in the Chariot hard by him, To pleaſe his Maſter be this ſong did ſing. COme you Spirits mount upon your nimble wing, And be your chiefeſt notes be ſure that you do ſing: While my Faustus here and I, 5 ſwiftly wander through the skie. We will travail over Mountains, over park and over pale, Over Cities and high Steeples, over hill and over dale: While my Fauſtus here and I, 5 ſwiftly wander through the skie. Then we will to ſea again, and there laugh when we do hear How the Mariners exclaim when a ſuddain ſtorm they fear: While my Fauſtus here and I, 5 ſwiftly wander through the skie. Fauſtus thou ſhalt now be told, what thy ſelf didſt moſt deſire; How the Stars about are roll’d, ſome are lower, ſome are higher: All A6v Doctor John Fauſtus All this ſhalt thou view, while I, wander with thee through the skie. THe ſong thus done wch which Fauſtus pleaſed well He did intreat his Spirit now to tell, The ſeberal regions which they paſſed by; Which Mephoſtophiles did not deny: Yonder (ſayes he) you ſee your left hand 5 Muſcovia, Ruſſia, and the Saxons Land: On the right hand, beſides us here doth Iye, Europe, Aſia, the mid-land Sea, with Greece and Look yonder is the hot & torrid zone, (Hungary: And Charles Wain unto the ſea man known. 10 Yonder is Urſa Major, which is but the ſame With that which we call the Charles Wain. Thus did he point him out each conſtellation, While Fauſtus ſtrucken was with admiration: And having ſhown him all the earth at laſt, 15 Upon his bed again be Fauſtus caſt; Whereas he thought on what before he ſaw, And how the ſtars were govern’d by their law; And thereby to ſuch knowledge he did clime, That none was like to Fauſtus in his time. 20 And for Aſtrology he was the beſt: And in his art did far excel the reſt. CHAP. A7r
The Hiſtory of CHAP. VI. How Doctor Fauſtus would, ſometime in a pleaſant vain, Shew many rare conceits, which did increaſe his fame. It chanced now that Fauſtus on a time Did happen with the Emperour to dine, Who did intreat that be his Art would them That thereby be might Alexander hiem, In ſuch a ſhape as he did like on earth: 5 And furthermorem for to increaſe his mirth, He did intreat him, that he would preſent His Paramour which bred his hearts content. Fauſtus having heard the Emperor, ſaid no more, But opened ſtraight the priby chamber dore, 10 And ſraightway in full figure there came forth Great Alexander of renowned worth: And after him his beautenus Paramour, Who made obeyſance to the Emperor; Who with kind Caluratió thought to greet her, 15 But Faustus would not ſuffer him to meet her: And after through the dore by which they came They both of them did baniſh back again; Leading the Emperour who did commend Great Fauſtus skill, and called him his friend. 20 But you ſhall hear of Fauſtus tricks hereafter, Who cannot choſe but mode you unto laughter. This A7v Doctor John Fauſtus This being done, upon another time When Doctor Fauſtus did to mirth incline: Walking among the Courriers he did ſpye, 25 Whereas a Knight did at a Window lye, With his head out of the window, ſo that he Was fallen faſt aſleep, which Fauſtus ſoon did leg And fitt a pair of Harrs-horns on his head; So large, Acteon here was better ſpread; 30 But when the Knight did happen to awake, Seeing his horns his head began to ſhake; And thought be could pull in his head again, But all his force and ſtribing was in vain: And he by no means could bring it to paſs, 35 But with his horns be broke the pains of glaſs And when the Emperour beheld this fight, He and the Courtiers laughed all outright; Until that Fauſtus took his horns away, With which yͤ Emperor was pleas’d that day 40 But no long after this ſame injur’d knight, Did purpoſe yͤ his wrongs be this would right That meeting Doctor Fauſtus on a plain He purpos’d he would neber goe home again; But then the Buſhes he did arm agen, 45 Which came upon the Knight like armed men Thus the Knight malice Fauſtus did defeat: And all that heard it laughd at this conceit Doctor John Fauſtus Another time this Fauſtus did repair, Like to a Horſe-courſer to a Courrier Fair. And A8r
The Hiſtory of And having pac’d his horſe about a while, A chapman came to him which made him ſmile, And askt his price, which Fauſtus did unfold: And to his horſe for forty Dollers cold: And charged him whatſoeber did betide,  5 That be into the water ſhould not ride. But the Horse-courſer wondring at his word, As he went home did ride into a Ford And ſtraight his Horse did baniſh quite away, For he no more his Horse or ſaddle ſaw,  10 But there was left upon a wad of Staw. The Horse-courſer went back unto his Inne, And to inquire for Fauſtus did begin; And finding him there ſleeping on a bed, He did begin to pluck him by the legg,  15 That he did pluck it off: thea Faſutus cry d With open throat, that he had murther’d him: Whereat the Horse-courſer did now begin To ask for mercy and away he went, And for to loſe his money was content  20 It happened Doctor Fauſtus on a day Met with a Clown that drobe a load of Day; And asked him what he should gibe in ſcoffe, That he might eat his belly full thereof: The Clown did tell him that he ſhould  5 For his 3 farthings eat then what he would. It was agreed, and Doctor Fauſtus ſet Himself to eat, and all his teeth did whet, That the poor clown was ſorty and did grutch To see that Fauſtus did eat up ſo much:  10 For Doctor John Fasſtus For Fauſtus did the Country-man ſo blind, He could not ſee the hay was left behind, And therefore did intreat him bery fair, That Fauſtus would his load of hay pet ſpare: Defeat Fauſtus laughing went away,  5 And afterward the Clown had all his hay. Doctor Fauſtus coming on a time Into a Tabern which did ſell good wine: He found a company of Drunkards there Merrily drinking, and ſo loud they were, That Doctor Fauſtus who this noiſe did hate,  5 Hearing them all thus loudly ſing and prate, At last when they their words had newly ſpoke He cõjur’d them all yͤ their mouths ſtood opens And thus they gaping ſtood at one another, Not one was able for to ſpeak to th’ other: 10 In this amazed manner forth they came, And then they all did ſhut their mouths again And hereby Faustus art was much expreſt, And all the Town did laugh at this new jeſt. Once Doctor Fauſtus did his friends inbite, Who Scholars were, unto a ſupper bery light: And afterward he did intreat each gueſt (Meaning thereby to break a merry jeſt) That they would take yͤ pains with him to go,  5 To a Wine-celler which he would them ſhow: They all conſented, and not long they ſtaid, To the Biſhops celler they were all convey'd: There
The History of There Fauſtus and the Scholars merry were; But now the Butler put them in a fear; Who coming hastily to draw ſome drink, And ſeeing them, did ſtraightway think They had been theebes, and so aloud did cry 5 For help, but Faustus fill'd him by and by; By the hair of the head he carry’d him, Who now with fear to tremble did begin, Utill unto a lopped tree became, And there be left the Butler on the ſame; 10 And all the night which was both ſharp & cold, With both his hands be by the tree did hold; Till in the morning, when he did espy The Shepards, he aloud to them did cry; Who wondered much what mad >mã that ſhould 15 Who had thus climbed on ſo high a tree: (be But when this news unto the Bishop came, He did himself go out to ſee the ſame; And asked him how he was brought thiithe, The butler that with cold did quake & quiber, 20 Did anſwer, that he certain theebes had found, In his Wine cellar who were drinking round; And by the hair of the head they did him bring, And left him in that caſe they found him in: What ere they were (says he) I do not know, 25 If they were devils, they like men did show But ’tis not here my purpoſe to recite, Do all the merry tricks of Fauſtus write Pet BV Doctor John Faustus Yet ſome of them I have related here: Buy now his 24 years drew near. And though in pleaſure he had ſpent his time, 5 The number of his years did now decline; And all the Spirits had a great deſire, To ſee when Faustus bond would once expire; Since he was bound by ſame bloody ſcroul, At twenty four years end to give his ſoul 10 To Lucifer : the time now drawing nigh, You muſt expect to hear his Tragedy.
Chap. VII. [How Fauſtus, when his time grew nigh, did make great lamentation; And to his fellow Students made his Funeral Oration] The glaſs of Fauſtus time being almoſt run, Having but one month of his time to come, He drew into a very penſive mood, And now his fault be plainly underſtood And now began to curſe that wretched time, 5 When he to ſtudy Magick did incline. To hope for mercy now it was too late, Which made him to deplore his wicked fate; And his accuſing conſcience now did tell, There was no way for him but down to hell. 10 And thus in waiting he his time did ſpend, That little time which drew unto an end. Now B2R
The Hi∫tory of Now on the pains of Hell he did think, The racks and tortures, chains, and filthy ∫tink, Now Pro∫erpine would ∫urely laugh to ∫ee His soul tormented in this mi∫ery. Then he bethought him on the whips of ∫teel, Which he did know his body there ∫hould feel, The more he thought, his thoughts increa∫d his Wch Which made him ∫til unto him∫elf cóplain. (pain While thus he ∫pent his time in grief & fear, His Meplio∫tophiles did to him appear ; And told him & his years were now expir’d, And that his Ma∫ter Lucifer dehr’d He would prepare him∫elf and make an end, For that his Ma∫ter ∫orrly did intend, On ∫uch a night, to fetch him down to hell, That mith & infernal ∫pirits he might dwell When Faustus had heard this, he grew ∫o ∫ad, That with his ∫orrow he grew almo∫t mad; He tumbled on his bed, all re∫t he did de∫pi∫e, No quiet ∫lumber ever clos’d his eyes. But he was ∫till tormented in his mind, Sin went before, and torture came behind: Yee ∫o it was, that on that very day, On which & devil ∫hould fetch him quite away, He ∫ent unto his friends intreating for his ∫ake That of his Banquet they would all partake: As merry Banquet is, it ∫oon befell, As afterward in due place I will tell. The Students being come, he made them all As meles as he could, when he him∫elf did fall Into Doctor John Fau∫tus. Into a ∫udden dump, nor could be be Merry in their ∫o beloved company. So caling them into another room, He did unfold to them his fearful doom.
Doctor Fau∫tus his Oration to his Friends and fellow Students. M y friends I mu∫t begin my ∫ad Oration, With a confe∫∫ion of my Conjuration. Since all of you do know my fir∫t beginning, And how I grew ∫till more & more in ∫inning, And unto Magick arts I was ∫o bent, I fought all ways to further my intent. And leaving better studies, did apply My ∫elf unto that helli∫h mi∫tery. Thus did I live twenty four years and more, Who∫e ∫ad expiring I mu∫t now deplore: For ∫o it is, to purcha∫e my content, I to a heavy bargain did con∫ent: Which was, when 24 years once did end, (Which time in conjuration I did ∫pend) The devil ∫hould have my body and my ∫oul, And did confirm it by a bloody ∫croul; And now the di∫mal term of years is done, And night beginning, my hour-gla∫s is run, This night I look that he for me ∫hould ∫end, And this my life will have a fearfull end: And now (my friends) this banquet I did make That I of you my la∫t farewell might take; De∫iring
The Hiſtory of Deſiring pardon where I have offended, Since my laſt act of life cannot be mended; And for thoſe practiſes which I have wrought By conjuration, and thereby have brought My heavy ſoul to grief and ſad deſpair,  5 My life is written in a toriting fair, Which lies within my ſtudy: ſo that you May learn thereby ſuch courſes to eſchew. And if that I do you my counſell give, And uſe that little time I have to liue,  10 Be ſure that you forſake all conjuration, And pray to be delivered from temptation: And let my death a warning be to all, Since by deſire of knowledge I did fall : For  now to gibe my ſpeech a ſad conclusion, 15 This night I muſt expect my own confuſion: And yet my loving friends I do requeſt That you will go to bed and take your reſt; Let nothing trouble you, nor do not fear If any rumbling noiſe you chance to hear, 20 Be ſure you do not riſe out of your bed: But when That I to Pluto's court am fled, If that you find my bod, the next day, Be ſure that you to earth do it convey: And ſo my friends I wiſh you all good reſt, 25 Pray go to bed, my ſoul is much oppreſt.( ſay When as his friends had heard what he did They counſel’d him that he to God ſhould pray: But Fauſtus felt the weight of his ſin That how to pray he knew not to begin: 30 At B3V DoctorJohn Fauſtus At laſt the Students having pray’d did weep, And after went to bed, but could not ſleep: For Fauſtus in the hall did ſtay alone, ( groan Where they might hear how he did ſigh and And ſo with wakefull eyes they did attend, 35 Expecting ſtill to hear his fearfull end: At laſt between the hours of twelve & one, A wind did riſe, the like was never known, It was ſo violent : which when they once did The Doct & students both began to fear. ( hear 40 For Doctor Fauſtus in the hall did lye, When they might hear his fearfull tragedy: For now the hall and upper rooms did ſhake; And they did hear a hiſſing like a snake; And then the hall door fiercely did flye open, 45 And Fauſtus further cry’d, which being ſpoken They heard no more; ſo that yͤ scholars ſaid, Now Doctor Fauſtus is to hell convey’d. The next day, when they came into yͤ hall, They might behold a fearfull funerail: 50 His blood & brains were ſprinkled on yͤ ground And ſuch a ſight as might the ſight confound; Here lay his teeth, and there his eyes did lye, A ſpectacle of helliſh cruelty; ( mourn Which when his friends beheld they all did 55 And found his body on the dunghill torn; To which his friends did Christian burial give, Although himself did like a Deuil liue, Thus I this ſtory of his life have penn’d, That we may ſee his life, and hate his end. 60 FINIS B4R

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Fragment from Cotes A0 to A7R Author Encoder Justin Weitbrecht Tonino Sarandrea Abby Ballou Justin Boure Nick Ramirez Rachel Maher Julia Carolan Robert Coleman Liam Hilderbrand Colin O'Donnell Primary editor Kristen Abbott Bennett Kristen Bennett and Scott Hamlin 2018

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Transcription keyed by students in LC 347A at Stonehill College, under the supervision of Kristen Abbott Bennett and Scott Hamlin. Transcription prepared from a digital surrogate of a microfilm.
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To the Reader READER, I would not have you think, that I tend to waſte my ink, While Fauſtus Story I reherſe, And here do write his life in verſe, For ſeeing Fryer Bacons Story, (In whom Oxford ſtill may glory) For want of better pen comes forth, Compos’d in Rhyme of no great worth: I calt’d my Muſe to task, and pend Fauſtus life, and death; and end. And when it cometh forth in print, If you like it not, the Devil’s in’t. Veni Vide Fuge. Come See and hate,. Doctor Fauſtus wretched state.
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CHAP I Of Doctor Fauſtus birth, And how he gave his heart To leave off fair D vinity, To ſtudy the black Art. My muse aſſiſt me now, for I intend To write the life & death, and fearful end Of Doctor Fauſtus, whoſe ill gotten name May well compare with Fryer Bacon’s fame. Fauſtus, was born at Rhodes, whuich town doth lye Within a Province of fair Germany ; His father was a Dusbandman, did libe On what the earth to him did freely gibe; Let be at Wittenberg an unkle bad, Who took young Fauſtus being but a lad, And ſent him to the University, That he might ſtudy there Divinity. But he did quickly there addict his heart, To leave fair ſtudies for the foul black Art. Thus he in ſecret ſtudied conjuration, Yet being found byacts and diſputation, To be well learned, they did all agree, To make him Doctor of Divinity. But having once obtain’d that high degree, He ill deſerved it, as you ſhall ſee For A2r The hiſtory of For now my pen doth tremble for to tell, Now like a Devil from all grace he fell. For now his contemplation he did bend, To negromancy and much time did ſpend, In caſting figures, making Inchantations; With all the wicked helps of Conjurations, Leading thoſe ſtudies which are moſt divine, And to theſe hellith Arts he did incline. I therefore here have drawn his life, that you May learn ſuch wicked courſes to eſchem; That me thus ſeeing him ruled by the Devil, May pray to be deliber’d from all ſuch evil.
CHAP II How Doctor Fauſtus conjur’d up From out a Globe of fire, The ſpirit Mephoſtophiles , That came like to a Fryer. Now Fauſtus purpoſing alone to try, The power of this his Magick miſtery, He did repair unto a little Wood, And not far off from Wittenberg it ſtood; Where he did make a circle with his wand, And thus with charms his ſpirit did command Mephoſophiles I ſay, Quickly riſe and come away; By Lucifer I charge thee here, That thou forthwith do appear. With With A2v
Doctor John Faustus With this a murmure in the mood was heard, That Doctor Fauſtus grew himself afeard; The mood with lighting seemed on a flame, And lounder thunder, terroɾ did proclaim: Till Doctoɽ Fauſtus in his magick robe Looking about him, spy'd a fiery Globe; And at the laſt from this time ſame Globe of Fire, The ſpirit came in likeneſs of a Fryer; Who lightly round about the circle ran, And thus to ſpeak to Fauſtus he began; Fauſtus (ſaies he) I now am come, Speak thy will, and it is done. When Mephoſtophiles did thus kindly greet him, Then Doctoɽ Fauſtus bid the Spirit meet him The next gap at his houſe; the ſpirit did content, And back again then Doctoɽ Fauſtus ment.
CHAP III How Doctor Fauſtus made a Contract firm, not good, To ſerve the Devil, which he writ with his own blood. T he time appointed, in a bliſstering day, The ſpirit came to him, and thus did ſay: Mephiſophiles am ready now, And thus to be your Vassal I do bow; Entreating you that you would let me know What is your pleaſure that you call me so. Faustus A3r The Hiſtory of Fauſtus here with come queſtions did propund, Which Mephoſtophiles did ſoon expound. At laſt the matter did begin to frame, And to theſe friendly articles they came: That Doctor Fauſtus should a Spirit be, Both in his outward ſhape and quality; That he ſhould be inbiſible to all, And Mephoſtophiles ready at his call. And ? he did once command, That be should bring it quickly to his hand: And that he should at any time appear, When once the boice of Fauſtus he did hear. Thus Fauſtus did this black agreement make, While that the Spirit did for him matter take, Theſe sad conditions, which would even fear A tender hearted Chriſstian for to hear; That Doctor Fauſtus while he now did live Himſelf to his Lord Lucifer should give, And for to make the contract firm, not good, He did agree to write it with his blood; Which in a saucer on the fire he ſet, He in the ſame his wicked blood did heat; And write therewith that he would alwayes be A foe unto all Chriſtianity. Theſe ſad conditions when that you do read, I know that it will make your heart to bleed. Yet wretched Fauſtus made himself the band, And thereunto did let his deſperate hand: And to theſe covenants he gave conſent, Which after (though too late) he did repent: But A3v
Doctor John Fauſtus. But being ſeal’d, be doth the ſame deliver To Mephoſtophiles, to keep it ever. Thus by degrees he added ſinne, to ſinne; And now the practiſe he did firſt begin.
CHAP. IV.
How Fauſtus firſt began his cunning to aſſay: And how his Spirit did in every thing obey
IT happened now that Faustus in the end The devil with a queſtion did offend, (frame Which was, that he would know how God did The world & all things which it doth contain. But Lucifer not able this to tell, Becauſe himſelf from his creation fell; Was with the Doctor very much diſpleaſd, Nor could his anger quickly be appear'd: And therefore Lucifer to increaſe his fear, In ugly ſhape to Faustus did appear, With other of his black infernal rout, Who in an antick manner danc’d about. Here at poor Doctor Faustus was amaz’d, And yet upon their hideous forms he gaz’d: Thinking thoſe troops of fury now were come, To fetch him thence before his glaſs were run, Or ere his twenty four years did expire: During which time the Spirit like a Fryer Carry A4r The Hiſtory of Carrying a little bell within his hand, Was bound to be ſtill ready at command. But afterward when thoſe ſame years did end, Then Faustus ſhould on Lucifer attend. And now this fearfull ſuddain operation, Did fill his heart with grief and contrition: But when that Lucifer perceiv’d his ſadneſs, He laughed out for very gladneſs. Faustus ſayes be, I do now well perceive That you our first agreement would deceive; Yet I would have you know it is in vain, For no repentance can you purge again. Beſides, you know (& therwith ſhew’d his band) That to theſe covenãts covenants you have ſet your hãd hand . And for to make this Obligation good, Your ſelf hath written it with your own blood: Be quiet then in mind and take your reſt, For thou ere long muſt be great Pluto’s gueſt: In the meantime to recreate thy leaſure, Sit down and I wil ſhow thee ſome new plea= So Faustus and the Devil together fate, (ſure: But ſtill he thought his company too hot. Then Lucifer did other Fiends command For to appear, who ſtraightway were at hand: Firſt came in Belial like to a Bear, With flaming eyes, and ſhaggy rugged hair, Then Belzebob came flying in with wings, Whoſe mouth was filled with a pair of ſtings; Then came Afteroth of cold black hue, And after him a Serpents tail he drew Then A4v Doctor John Fauſtus. The Chanigafto lightly skipped in, Who was attired in a Hedgehogs skin, At laſt came Anobis like to a Dogge, And his body ſhaped like a Dogge: Theſe ugly Maskers did themselves advance; And in ſtrange meaſures did begin to dance. And as they did their ſeveral changes make, Their threatening forks 'gainſt Faustus they did As if they meant at him to run a Tilt, (ſhake; That Faustus thought his blood ſhould then be Lucifer ſeeing Faustus this diſmaid,(ſpilt. Began to cheer him up, and thus he ſaid: Faustus, How doſt thou like this nimble ſport, For with this company thou muſt conſort. But Faustus ſweating thought it was hot wea= Being afraid to ſee them all together: (ther, And did intreat his Devilſhip that be Would ſend away his fearfull company: At which great Lucifer diſmiſs’d them all, Excepting ſeaven of the principal. Now Faustus having gotten breath again, Did ask for Mephoſtophiles by name; Which having ſpoken as he did deſire, Came Mephoſtophiles like to a Fryer: Then Fauſtus to entreat his ſpirit begun, That he would teach him (as himſelf had done) How to transform himſelf to any ſhape, Either of Dog, or Lion, Cat, or Ape. With this great Lucifer gave him a book, On which this Fauſtus did no ſooner look, But A5r
The History of But he to divers forms himſelf did change, And through a bundr. various ſhapes did ráge. Sometimes like in a dragon, bog, or worm, Then to a bat he would himſelf transform: But at the laſt being changed to a man, To ſport himſelf great Lucifer began, And to his spirit then he cry’d for woe, While Lucifer went laughing thence, Ho, Ho. And having left tormented Faustus there, As ſoon as he to is gone, the day grew clear: And ſweeteſt muſick was to him convay’d, Which cheared up his heart, though much diſ- (maid.
CHAP. V.
How Doctor Faustus. was carried through the air, That he might view the world, the skie and planets fair.
As Faustus lay one day upon his bed, Whiles divers fancies came into his head; He did begin to vex himself, that Art Could not the ſecrets of the heavens impart: For he had noted that their obſervations, Were not confirm’d by certain̄ demōnſtrations, Judging of things as Authors were inclind But yet in knowledge all of them were blinde. And A5v
DoctorJohn Faustus And thus while in his bed be muſing lyes, A ſuddath fearful wind began to riſe, That with the force thereof his houſe did rock, And all the doors as if they had no lock Did open flye, and then a voice he heard, Which bid him riſe, and not to be afeard; And he ſhould ſee the ſun of his deſire, And to the ſtarry Region would aſpire, And there the wonders of the world behold, The earth, the sea, and all that they enfold: And then unto the airy region fire, And ſee the Meteors both cold and dire, Faustus at this ſame news was much refreſht, And thought himſelf in the diſcovery bleft; For thus the Devil at the firſt began, When he with hope of knowledge tempted man- Faustus now whom ambition did enflame, Did anſwer to the ſpirit back again; The wonders of the world I fain would ſee, Which if thou faithfully wilt them to me, I promiſe here that I will go with thee: Which word once ſpoke, he did ſtraightway A wagon which two fiery dragons drew:(view And then the voice to him did ſay, Get up with me, and let us both away Thus mounted on the wagon forth they went To view the world and upper firmament; And as they thus did travel through the air, His Mephoſtophiles did to him repair; And A6r
The Hiſtory of And ſitting in the Chariot hard by him, To pleaſe his Maſter be this ſong did ſing. COme you Spirits mount upon your nimble wing, And be your chiefeſt notes be ſure that you do ſing: While my Faustus here and I, ſwiftly wander through the skie. We will travail over Mountains, over park and over pale, Over Cities and high Steeples, over hill and over dale: While my Fauſtus here and I, ſwiftly wander through the skie. Then we will to ſea again, and there laugh when we do hear How the Mariners exclaim when a ſuddain ſtorm they fear: While my Fauſtus here and I, ſwiftly wander through the skie. Fauſtus thou ſhalt now be told, what thy ſelf didſt moſt deſire; How the Stars about are roll’d, ſome are lower, ſome are higher: All A6v Doctor John Fauſtus All this ſhalt thou view, while I, wander with thee through the skie. THe ſong thus done wch which Fauſtus pleaſed well He did intreat his Spirit now to tell, The ſeberal regions which they paſſed by; Which Mephoſtophiles did not deny: Yonder (ſayes he) you ſee your left hand Muſcovia, Ruſſia, and the Saxons Land: On the right hand, beſides us here doth Iye, Europe, Aſia, the mid-land Sea, with Greece and Look yonder is the hot & torrid zone, (Hungary: And Charles Wain unto the ſea man known. Yonder is Urſa Major, which is but the ſame With that which we call the Charles Wain. Thus did he point him out each conſtellation, While Fauſtus ſtrucken was with admiration: And having ſhown him all the earth at laſt, Upon his bed again be Fauſtus caſt; Whereas he thought on what before he ſaw, And how the ſtars were govern’d by their law; And thereby to ſuch knowledge he did clime, That none was like to Fauſtus in his time. And for Aſtrology he was the beſt: And in his art did far excel the reſt. CHAP. A7r
The Hiſtory of CHAP. VI. How Doctor Fauſtus would, ſometime in a pleaſant vain, Shew many rare conceits, which did increaſe his fame. It chanced now that Fauſtus on a time Did happen with the Emperour to dine, Who did intreat that be his Art would them That thereby be might Alexander hiem, In ſuch a ſhape as he did like on earth: And furthermorem for to increaſe his mirth, He did intreat him, that he would preſent His Paramour which bred his hearts content. Fauſtus having heard the Emperor, ſaid no more, But opened ſtraight the priby chamber dore, And ſraightway in full figure there came forth Great Alexander of renowned worth: And after him his beautenus Paramour, Who made obeyſance to the Emperor; Who with kind Caluratió thought to greet her, But Faustus would not ſuffer him to meet her: And after through the dore by which they came They both of them did baniſh back again; Leading the Emperour who did commend Great Fauſtus skill, and called him his friend. But you ſhall hear of Fauſtus tricks hereafter, Who cannot choſe but mode you unto laughter. This A7v Doctor John Fauſtus This being done, upon another time When Doctor Fauſtus did to mirth incline: Walking among the Courriers he did ſpye, Whereas a Knight did at a Window lye, With his head out of the window, ſo that he Was fallen faſt aſleep, which Fauſtus ſoon did leg And fitt a pair of Harrs-horns on his head; So large, Acteon here was better ſpread; But when the Knight did happen to awake, Seeing his horns his head began to ſhake; And thought be could pull in his head again, But all his force and ſtribing was in vain: And he by no means could bring it to paſs, But with his horns be broke the pains of glaſs And when the Emperour beheld this fight, He and the Courtiers laughed all outright; Until that Fauſtus took his horns away, With which yͤ Emperor was pleas’d that day But no long after this ſame injur’d knight, Did purpoſe yͤ his wrongs be this would right That meeting Doctor Fauſtus on a plain He purpos’d he would neber goe home again; But then the Buſhes he did arm agen, Which came upon the Knight like armed men Thus the Knight malice Fauſtus did defeat: And all that heard it laughd at this conceit Doctor John Fauſtus Another time this Fauſtus did repair, Like to a Horſe-courſer to a Courrier Fair. And A8r
The Hiſtory of And having pac’d his horſe about a while, A chapman came to him which made him ſmile, And askt his price, which Fauſtus did unfold: And to his horſe for forty Dollers cold: And charged him whatſoeber did betide, That be into the water ſhould not ride. But the Horse-courſer wondring at his word, As he went home did ride into a Ford And ſtraight his Horse did baniſh quite away, For he no more his Horse or ſaddle ſaw, But there was left upon a wad of Staw. The Horse-courſer went back unto his Inne, And to inquire for Fauſtus did begin; And finding him there ſleeping on a bed, He did begin to pluck him by the legg, That he did pluck it off: thea Faſutus cry d With open throat, that he had murther’d him: Whereat the Horse-courſer did now begin To ask for mercy and away he went, And for to loſe his money was content It happened Doctor Fauſtus on a day Met with a Clown that drobe a load of Day; And asked him what he should gibe in ſcoffe, That he might eat his belly full thereof: The Clown did tell him that he ſhould For his 3 farthings eat then what he would. It was agreed, and Doctor Fauſtus ſet Himself to eat, and all his teeth did whet, That the poor clown was ſorty and did grutch To see that Fauſtus did eat up ſo much: For Doctor John Fasſtus For Fauſtus did the Country-man ſo blind, He could not ſee the hay was left behind, And therefore did intreat him bery fair, That Fauſtus would his load of hay pet ſpare: Defeat Fauſtus laughing went away, And afterward the Clown had all his hay. Doctor Fauſtus coming on a time Into a Tabern which did ſell good wine: He found a company of Drunkards there Merrily drinking, and ſo loud they were, That Doctor Fauſtus who this noiſe did hate, Hearing them all thus loudly ſing and prate, At last when they their words had newly ſpoke He cõjur’d them all yͤ their mouths ſtood opens And thus they gaping ſtood at one another, Not one was able for to ſpeak to th’ other: In this amazed manner forth they came, And then they all did ſhut their mouths again And hereby Faustus art was much expreſt, And all the Town did laugh at this new jeſt. Once Doctor Fauſtus did his friends inbite, Who Scholars were, unto a ſupper bery light: And afterward he did intreat each gueſt (Meaning thereby to break a merry jeſt) That they would take yͤ pains with him to go, To a Wine-celler which he would them ſhow: They all conſented, and not long they ſtaid, To the Biſhops celler they were all convey'd: There
The History of There Fauſtus and the Scholars merry were; But now the Butler put them in a fear; Who coming hastily to draw ſome drink, And ſeeing them, did ſtraightway think They had been theebes, and so aloud did cry For help, but Faustus fill'd him by and by; By the hair of the head he carry’d him, Who now with fear to tremble did begin, Utill unto a lopped tree became, And there be left the Butler on the ſame; And all the night which was both ſharp & cold, With both his hands be by the tree did hold; Till in the morning, when he did espy The Shepards, he aloud to them did cry; Who wondered much what mad >mã that ſhould Who had thus climbed on ſo high a tree: (be But when this news unto the Bishop came, He did himself go out to ſee the ſame; And asked him how he was brought thiithe, The butler that with cold did quake & quiber, Did anſwer, that he certain theebes had found, In his Wine cellar who were drinking round; And by the hair of the head they did him bring, And left him in that caſe they found him in: What ere they were (says he) I do not know, If they were devils, they like men did show But ’tis not here my purpoſe to recite, Do all the merry tricks of Fauſtus write Pet BV Doctor John Faustus Yet ſome of them I have related here: Buy now his 24 years drew near. And though in pleaſure he had ſpent his time, The number of his years did now decline; And all the Spirits had a great deſire, To ſee when Faustus bond would once expire; Since he was bound by ſame bloody ſcroul, At twenty four years end to give his ſoul To Lucifer : the time now drawing nigh, You muſt expect to hear his Tragedy.
Chap. VII. [How Fauſtus, when his time grew nigh, did make great lamentation; And to his fellow Students made his Funeral Oration] The glaſs of Fauſtus time being almoſt run, Having but one month of his time to come, He drew into a very penſive mood, And now his fault be plainly underſtood And now began to curſe that wretched time, When he to ſtudy Magick did incline. To hope for mercy now it was too late, Which made him to deplore his wicked fate; And his accuſing conſcience now did tell, There was no way for him but down to hell. And thus in waiting he his time did ſpend, That little time which drew unto an end. Now B2R
The Hi∫tory of Now on the pains of Hell he did think, The racks and tortures, chains, and filthy ∫tink, Now Pro∫erpine would ∫urely laugh to ∫ee His soul tormented in this mi∫ery. Then he bethought him on the whips of ∫teel, Which he did know his body there ∫hould feel, The more he thought, his thoughts increa∫d his Wch Which made him ∫til unto him∫elf cóplain. (pain While thus he ∫pent his time in grief & fear, His Meplio∫tophiles did to him appear ; And told him & his years were now expir’d, And that his Ma∫ter Lucifer dehr’d He would prepare him∫elf and make an end, For that his Ma∫ter ∫orrly did intend, On ∫uch a night, to fetch him down to hell, That mith & infernal ∫pirits he might dwell When Faustus had heard this, he grew ∫o ∫ad, That with his ∫orrow he grew almo∫t mad; He tumbled on his bed, all re∫t he did de∫pi∫e, No quiet ∫lumber ever clos’d his eyes. But he was ∫till tormented in his mind, Sin went before, and torture came behind: Yee ∫o it was, that on that very day, On which & devil ∫hould fetch him quite away, He ∫ent unto his friends intreating for his ∫ake That of his Banquet they would all partake: As merry Banquet is, it ∫oon befell, As afterward in due place I will tell. The Students being come, he made them all As meles as he could, when he him∫elf did fall Into Doctor John Fau∫tus. Into a ∫udden dump, nor could be be Merry in their ∫o beloved company. So caling them into another room, He did unfold to them his fearful doom.
Doctor Fau∫tus his Oration to his Friends and fellow Students. M y friends I mu∫t begin my ∫ad Oration, With a confe∫∫ion of my Conjuration. Since all of you do know my fir∫t beginning, And how I grew ∫till more & more in ∫inning, And unto Magick arts I was ∫o bent, I fought all ways to further my intent. And leaving better studies, did apply My ∫elf unto that helli∫h mi∫tery. Thus did I live twenty four years and more, Who∫e ∫ad expiring I mu∫t now deplore: For ∫o it is, to purcha∫e my content, I to a heavy bargain did con∫ent: Which was, when 24 years once did end, (Which time in conjuration I did ∫pend) The devil ∫hould have my body and my ∫oul, And did confirm it by a bloody ∫croul; And now the di∫mal term of years is done, And night beginning, my hour-gla∫s is run, This night I look that he for me ∫hould ∫end, And this my life will have a fearfull end: And now (my friends) this banquet I did make That I of you my la∫t farewell might take; De∫iring
The Hiſtory of Deſiring pardon where I have offended, Since my laſt act of life cannot be mended; And for thoſe practiſes which I have wrought By conjuration, and thereby have brought My heavy ſoul to grief and ſad deſpair, My life is written in a toriting fair, Which lies within my ſtudy: ſo that you May learn thereby ſuch courſes to eſchew. And if that I do you my counſell give, And uſe that little time I have to liue, Be ſure that you forſake all conjuration, And pray to be delivered from temptation: And let my death a warning be to all, Since by deſire of knowledge I did fall : For  now to gibe my ſpeech a ſad conclusion, This night I muſt expect my own confuſion: And yet my loving friends I do requeſt That you will go to bed and take your reſt; Let nothing trouble you, nor do not fear If any rumbling noiſe you chance to hear, Be ſure you do not riſe out of your bed: But when That I to Pluto's court am fled, If that you find my bod, the next day, Be ſure that you to earth do it convey: And ſo my friends I wiſh you all good reſt, Pray go to bed, my ſoul is much oppreſt.( ſay When as his friends had heard what he did They counſel’d him that he to God ſhould pray: But Fauſtus felt the weight of his ſin That how to pray he knew not to begin: At B3V DoctorJohn Fauſtus At laſt the Students having pray’d did weep, And after went to bed, but could not ſleep: For Fauſtus in the hall did ſtay alone, ( groan Where they might hear how he did ſigh and And ſo with wakefull eyes they did attend, Expecting ſtill to hear his fearfull end: At laſt between the hours of twelve & one, A wind did riſe, the like was never known, It was ſo violent : which when they once did The Doct & students both began to fear. ( hear For Doctor Fauſtus in the hall did lye, When they might hear his fearfull tragedy: For now the hall and upper rooms did ſhake; And they did hear a hiſſing like a snake; And then the hall door fiercely did flye open, And Fauſtus further cry’d, which being ſpoken They heard no more; ſo that yͤ scholars ſaid, Now Doctor Fauſtus is to hell convey’d. The next day, when they came into yͤ hall, They might behold a fearfull funerail: His blood & brains were ſprinkled on yͤ ground And ſuch a ſight as might the ſight confound; Here lay his teeth, and there his eyes did lye, A ſpectacle of helliſh cruelty; ( mourn Which when his friends beheld they all did And found his body on the dunghill torn; To which his friends did Christian burial give, Although himself did like a Deuil liue, Thus I this ſtory of his life have penn’d, That we may ſee his life, and hate his end. FINIS B4R