Craik Site Index

A prosopography, placeography, orgography, and bibliography populated by Craik's letters.

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         <titleStmt>
            <title>Digital Dinah Craik Site Index</title>
         </titleStmt>
         <publicationStmt>
            <authority>University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. May 2016.</authority>
            <availability>
               <licence target="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/"><p>The Creative
                     Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA
                     4.0) License applies to this document.</p>
                  <p>The license was added on <date when="2016-05-25">25 May
                  2016.</date></p></licence>
            </availability>
         </publicationStmt>
         <sourceDesc>
            <p>This prosopography has been populated from the letters of Dinah Craik. Information
               about each person comes from Craik's correspondence and the Oxford Dictionary of
               National Biography.</p>
         </sourceDesc>
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      <body>

         <div type="DigitalCraikTeam">
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="BourrierKaren">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bourrier</surname>
                     <forename>Karen</forename>
                     <roleName>Project Director</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Karen Bourrier is an assistant professor at the University of
                     Calgary. Her interests include Victorian studies, disability studies, and the
                     digital humanities.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ParkerJanice">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Parker</surname>
                     <forename>Janice</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Janice Parker is a PhD candidate at the University of
                     Calgary.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FukushimaKailey">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Fukushima</surname>
                     <forename>Kailey</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Kailey Fukushima is a Digitization Assistant at the University of
                     Calgary. She holds a BA (Hons) in English, 2016.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JacobiKelsey">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Jacobi</surname>
                     <forename>Kelsey</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GivogueStevensonLecia">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Givogue Stevenson</surname>
                     <forename>Lecia</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AndersonHannah">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Anderson</surname>
                     <forename>Hannah</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>

         <div type="PastEditors">
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="EllsworthAaron">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Ellsworth</surname>
                     <forename>Aaron</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Aaron Ellsworth is an MA student at the University of Calgary.
                     His research interests include comics, semiology, and narratology.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CarterJaclyn">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Carter</surname>
                     <forename>Jaclyn</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Jaclyn Carter is a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CunninghamSidney">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cunningham</surname>
                     <forename>Sidney</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Sidney Cunningham is an MA student at the University of Calgary.
                     His specialization is in contemporary transgender literature, as well as early
                     modern literature.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AlemanKeilaKarinne">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Aleman</surname>
                     <forename>Keila Karinne</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary </affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Keila Karinne Aleman is a PhD candidate and teaching assistant at
                     the University of Calgary. Her research is on gender in popular culture,
                     comics, and manga.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RuddyPippa">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Ruddy</surname>
                     <forename>Pippa</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Pippa Ruddy is a Master's student at the University of Calgary.
                     Her interests include affect theory, performance/performativity studies, and
                     intersectional feminism.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RahmanZainub">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Rahman</surname>
                     <forename>Zainub</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Rahman Zainub is an MA student at the University of
                     Calgary.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FoxKerryLeigh">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Fox</surname>
                     <forename>Kerry-Leigh</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Kerry-Leigh Fox is an MA student at the University of Calgary.
                     Her interests include Victorian literature, Vernon Lee, queer studies, gender
                     studies, and creative writing.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BestWill">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Best</surname>
                     <forename>Will</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KentSarah">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Kent</surname>
                     <forename>Sarah</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>

         <div type="Pets">
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="Christopher">
                  <persName>Christopher</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Christopher appears to be one of Dinah's
                     cats from her time at <placeName ref="#Wildwood">Wildwood.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Blackie">
                  <persName>Blackie</persName>
                  <note type="bio">Blackie was the Craiks' cat at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse"
                        >Corner House.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pixie">
                  <persName>Pixie</persName>
                  <note type="bio">Pixie was the Craiks' horse at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse"
                        >Corner House.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Songbird">
                  <persName>Songbird</persName>
                  <note type="bio">Songbird was a horse of Dinah Craik's at the <placeName
                        ref="#CornerHouse">Corner House.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Nell">
                  <persName>Nell</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Nell was Thomas Mulock Jr.'s beloved
                     horse.</note>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>

         <div type="HistoricalPeople">
            <head>Historical People</head>
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="DMC" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Craik</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Dinah</forename>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1826"/>
                  <death when="1887"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <event type="marriage" when="1865">
                     <label>Marriage</label>
                     <desc><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Maria Mulock</persName> married <persName
                           ref="#GeorgeCraik">George Lillie Craik.</persName></desc>
                  </event>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ScottWalter" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Scott</surname>
                     <forename>Walter</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AldenHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Alden</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">Henry Alden was an editor at <title corresp="#HarpersMagazine"
                        >Harper's magazine.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PhayreJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Phayre</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">John Phayre was a clerk at <title corresp="#Harpers"
                        >Harper's.</title> See
                     https://archive.org/stream/houseofharpercen00harp/houseofharpercen00harp_djvu.txt</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CairdMrsEdward" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Caird</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">Mrs. Edward Caird was married to the Master of Balliol, Dr.
                     Caird. See
                     http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/3rd-june-1916/15/the-late-mrs-edward-caird
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OsgoodJames">
                  <persName><surname>Osgood</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Ripleh</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">James Ripley Osgood was the editor of the Atlantic and possibly
                     Our Young Folks.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LowSampson" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Low</surname>
                     <forename>Sampson</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1797"/>
                  <death when="1886"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Sampson Low was the London literary agent
                     and correspondent for the American publisher <orgName ref="#Harpers"
                        >Harper's.</orgName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockTom" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Mellard</forename>
                     <addName>Tom</addName>
                     <genName>Jr.</genName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1827-11-18"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Tom Mulock was Dinah's younger
                     brother.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockThomas" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Samuel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1789"/>
                  <death when="1869-08-11"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Thomas Mulock was Dinah's father.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockDinah" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Mulock</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Mellard</surname>
                     <forename>Dinah</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1794-04-23"/>
                  <death when="1845-10-03"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah (Mellard) Mulock was Dinah (Mulock)
                     Craik's mother</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockBen" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Benjamin</forename>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <addName>Ben</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1829-06-18"/>
                  <death when="1863"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Engineer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Ben Mulock was Dinah's youngest
                     brother.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1801"/>
                  <death when="1879-12-25"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Jane Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal
                     aunts who lived in <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockEmily" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Emily</forename>
                     <surname>Mulock</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1801"/>
                  <death when="1885-06-02"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Emily Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal
                     aunts who lived in <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockEliza" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <addName>Eliza</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1787"/>
                  <death when="1866-09-07"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Eliza Mulock was the eldest of Dinah's
                     paternal aunts living at <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockFrances" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Frances</forename>
                     <addName>Fanny</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1807"/>
                  <death when="1882"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Fanny Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal
                     aunts living at <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockAnn" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                     <addName>Anne</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1806"/>
                  <death when="1894-12-01"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Fanny Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal
                     aunts living at <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockAlicia" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Hoblyn</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Alicia</forename>
                     <forename>Bonne</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1812"/>
                  <death when="1896-06-26"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Alicia Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal
                     aunts who lived in <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName> She married
                        <persName ref="#HoblynFrancis">Francis Parker Hoblyn</persName>, a surgeon,
                     in <date when="1864">1864</date>.</note>
                  <!-- JP: source for date of death: probate -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ReadeMary" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Reade</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Mellard</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1790-07-06"/>
                  <death when="1866"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mary Reade was Dinah's maternal aunt.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HallSamuelCarter" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hall</surname>
                     <forename>Samuel</forename>
                     <forename>Carter</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1800"/>
                  <death when="1889"/>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Samuel Carter Hall was the editor of
                        <title>New Monthly Magazine</title> and the <title ref="#ArtJournal">Art
                        Journal.</title> He married <persName ref="#AnnaMariaHall">Anna Maria
                        Fielding</persName> in <date when="1824">1824.</date></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HallAnnaMaria" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Hall</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Fielding</surname>
                     <forename>Anna</forename>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1800"/>
                  <death when="1881"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Irish</nationality>
                  <affiliation from="1852" to="1853" role="editor"><title>Sharpe's London
                        Magazine</title></affiliation>
                  <affiliation from="1861" to="1868" role="editor"><title>St James's
                        Magazine</title></affiliation>
                  <residence>The Rosery, Old Brompton</residence>
                  <event type="marriage" when="1824">
                     <label>Marriage</label>
                     <desc><persName ref="#AnnaMariaHall">Anna Maria Fielding</persName> married
                           <persName ref="#SamuelCarterHall">Samuel Carter Hall</persName>.</desc>
                  </event>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Anna Maria Hall was an Irish-born writer
                     and editor. She lived in England with her husband <persName
                        ref="#HallSamuelCarter">Samuel Carter Hall.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersAnnie" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Miers</surname>
                     <forename>Anne</forename>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <addName>Annie</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1828"/>
                  <death when="1898"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Annie Miers was a close friend of Dinah's
                     who attended her wedding to <persName ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName> and
                     who, along with <persName ref="#WolleyEmily">Emily Wolley</persName>, was one
                     of the two executors of Dinah's estate.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersEllen" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Miers</surname>
                     <surname type="married">MacGregor</surname>
                     <forename>Ellen</forename>
                     <forename>Emily</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1858"/>
                  <death when="1951"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Brazilian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Ellen, an English subject born in Brazil,
                     was the niece of <persName ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie Miers</persName> and a young
                     friend of Dinah's. Dinah attended her wedding to Archibald Grey MacGregor on
                        <date when="1887">24 September 1887</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersEdward" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Miers</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1851"/>
                  <death when="1930"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Brazilian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Edward, an English subject born in Brazil,
                     was the nephew of Dinah's close friend <persName ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie
                        Miers</persName>. Edward's father was <persName ref="#MiersFrancis">Francis
                        Miers</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersHarry" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Miers</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                     <addName>Harry</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1858"/>
                  <death when="1942"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Brazilian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Harry, an English subject born in Brazil,
                     was the nephew of Dinah's close friend <persName ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie
                        Miers</persName>. Harry's father was <persName ref="#MiersFrancis">Francis
                        Miers</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersFrancis" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Miers</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1822"/>
                  <death/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">
                     <!-- KF: I have deleted Janice's note here because it was a word-by-word repeat of "MiersHarry" (must have been a mistake!) The persName and the birth and death dates are also the same as the "MiersHarry" xml:id. I assume this is the Francis Miers who was an engineer and was born in Brazil in 1822 (source: Janice's doc "Miers family notes" in dropbox).  -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersKatie" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Miers</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Fry</surname>
                     <forename>Catherine</forename>
                     <forename>Emily</forename>
                     <addName>Katie</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1856-05-29"/>
                  <death when="1933-08-01"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Brazilian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Katie, an English subject born in Brazil,
                     was the niece of Dinah's close friend <persName ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie
                        Miers</persName>. Katie's father was <persName ref="#MiersFrancis">Francis
                        Miers</persName>. She married Edward Sydney Fry in Bromley in <date
                        when="1886">1886</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersAnnieE" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Miers</surname>
                     <forename>Annie</forename>
                     <forename>Esther</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1854"/>
                  <death when="1942-02-14"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Brazilian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Annie, an English subject born in Brazil,
                     was the niece of Dinah's close friend <persName ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie
                        Miers</persName>. Annie's father was <persName ref="#MiersFrancis">Francis
                        Miers</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersJulia" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Miers</surname>
                     <forename>Julia</forename>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1865"/>
                  <death when="1843-08-20"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Julia was the niece of Dinah's close friend
                        <persName ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie Miers</persName>. Julia's father was
                        <persName ref="#MiersFrancis">Francis Miers</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JenningsFelicia" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Jennings</surname>
                     <forename>Felicia</forename>
                     <forename>Hanmer</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1832-08-30"/>
                  <death when="1911-10-09"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Felicia Jennings was a friend <persName
                        ref="#MiersAnnie">Annie Miers</persName> and companion to Annie's brother
                        <persName ref="#MiersFrancis">Francis's</persName> mother-in-law for many
                     years after she was widowed.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MarstonWestland" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Marston</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Westland</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1819"/>
                  <death when="1890"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Westland Marston was a playwright. Dinah
                     was very close to their entire family throughout the 1850s and beyond, often
                     spending Christmas with them. Ben may have been engaged to one of the
                     girls.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MarstonEleanor" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Marston</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Potts</surname>
                     <forename>Eleanor</forename>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <!--<birth when="1807/8">-->
                  <death when="1870"/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Eleanor Marston was married to <persName
                        ref="#MarstonWestland">Westland Marston.</persName> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MarstonPhilipBourke" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Marston</surname>
                     <forename>Philip</forename>
                     <forename>Bourke</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1850-08-13"/>
                  <death when="1887-02-14"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Philip Marston was the third child of
                     Dinah's close friends <persName ref="#MarstonWestland">John Westland
                        Marston</persName> and <persName ref="MarstonEleanor">Eleanor
                        Marston</persName>. Dinah Craik was his godmother. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JamesMaria" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>James</surname><forename>Maria</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Maria James was a friend of Dinah's from
                     her days in Camden.</note>
               </person>
               <person/>
               <person xml:id="GaskellElizabeth">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Gaskell</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Elizabeth Gaskell was a novelist and
                     acquaintance of Dinah Craik's.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellSydney">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Dobell</surname>
                     <forename>Sydney</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1824"/>
                  <death when="1874"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation>Spasmodic Poets</affiliation>
                  <!-- http://www.unz.org/Pub/BookmanUK-1927jan-00207 Bookman article on Sydney -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellClarence" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Dobell</surname>
                     <forename>Clarence</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1836"/>
                  <death when="1917"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Clarence Dobell and his wife <persName
                        ref="#DobellEmily">Emily</persName>were close friends of Dinah's. Clarence
                     illustrated Dinah's <date when="1860">1860</date> collection <title
                        ref="#OurYear">Our Year</title> and painted a portrait of Dinah.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellEmily" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Dobell</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Duffield</surname>
                     <forename>Emily</forename>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1847"/>
                  <death when="1921"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Emily was the wife of <persName
                        ref="#DobellClarence">Clarence Dobell</persName>. Her sister married
                        <persName ref="#CraikHenry">Henry Craik.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellWalter" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Walter</forename>
                     <surname>Dobell</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Walter Dobell was the son of <persName
                        ref="#DobellClarence">Clarence</persName> and <persName ref="#DobellEmily"
                        >Emily Dobell</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellEva" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Dobell</surname>
                     <forename>Eveline</forename>
                     <forename>Jessie</forename>
                     <addName>Eva</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1876-01-30"/>
                  <death when="1963-09-03"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Eva was the young daughter of Dinah's good
                     friends <persName ref="#DobellClarence">Clarence</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#DobellEmily">Emily</persName> Dobell and the niece of poet <persName
                        ref="#DobellSydney">Sydney Dobell.</persName> Eva also became a poet and is
                     known for her WWI poetry.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RiviereBriton" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Riviere</surname>
                     <forename>Briton</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <affiliation>Oxford University</affiliation>
                  <affiliation>Royal Academy</affiliation>
                  <affiliation>Good Words</affiliation>
                  <event type="marriage" when="1867-08-06">
                     <label>Marriage</label>
                     <desc><persName ref="#MaryDobell">Mary Alice Dobell</persName> married
                           <persName ref="#BritonRiviere">Briton Riviere</persName>.</desc>
                  </event>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellMary" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Dobell</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Riviere</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Alice</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <residence>Detmore House</residence>
                  <event type="marriage" when="1867-08-06">
                     <label>Marriage</label>
                     <desc><persName ref="#MaryDobell">Mary Alice Dobell</persName> married
                           <persName ref="#BritonRiviere">Briton Riviere</persName>.</desc>
                  </event>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JollyEllen" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Jolly</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Dobell</surname>
                     <forename>Ellen</forename>
                     <addName>Mrs. Paul Jolly</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JollyPaulSr" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Jolly</surname>
                     <forename>Paul</forename>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DobellNora" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellJohn" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellJulietta" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Dobell</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Thompson</surname>
                     <forename>Julietta</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note>Julietta Dobell was the matriarch of <orgName ref="#Dobell">the Dobell
                        clan</orgName>. Ursula March in Craik's novel <title
                        ref="#JohnHalifaxGentleman">John Halifax, Gentleman</title> may have been
                     based on her.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrysdaleLady" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Drysdale</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Copeland
                        <!-- surname of first (deceased) husband --></surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Pew</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <roleName>Lady</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1787"/>
                  <death when="1887"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <affiliation>Moor Park</affiliation>
                  <note type="bio">J. Miriam Benn, "Drysdale George (1824-1904)," ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LaneMary" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Lane</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Drysdale</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1823"/>
                  <death when="1891"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LaneEdward" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Lane</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                     <forename>Wickstead</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1822"/>
                  <death when="1891"/>
                  <occupation>Doctor</occupation>
                  <affiliation>Moor Park</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrysdaleCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Drysdale</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1828" notAfter="1829"/>
                  <death when="1907"/>
                  <occupation>Doctor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation>Trinity College, Cambridge</affiliation>
                  <affiliation>University College, London</affiliation>
                  <affiliation>University of St Andrews</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrysdaleGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Drysdale</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1824"/>
                  <death when="1904"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Doctor</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation>Glasgow University</affiliation>
                  <affiliation>Moor Park</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacreadyWilliamCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Macready</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Dinah knew Macready in her youth from her
                     time in London. According to Aleyn Lyell Reade her father got into a huge fight
                     with Macready.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HolmanHunt" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hunt</surname>
                     <forename>Holman</forename>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1827"/>
                  <death when="1910"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation ref="#PRB">Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WaughFanny" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Waugh</surname>
                     <forename type="married">Hunt</forename>
                     <addName>Fanny</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Fanny (Waugh) Hunt was William Holman
                     Hunt's first wife. <!-- KB: not sure if Craik knew her well. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WaughEdith" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Waugh</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Hunt</surname>
                     <forename>Edith</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Edith Waugh was William Holman Hunt's
                     second wife and the sister of his first wife Fanny Waugh. Dinah Craik
                     chaperoned her to Switzerland for her marriage to Holman Hunt in <date
                        when="1875">1875</date> when the Deceased Wife's Sister Act made such a
                     marriage illegal.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HuntGladysHolman" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hunt</surname>
                     <forename>Gladys</forename>
                     <forename>Millais</forename>
                     <forename>Mulock</forename>
                     <forename>Holman</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Dinah's goddaughter and the first child of
                        <persName ref="#EdithWaugh">Edith Waugh</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#HolmanHunt">Holman Hunt</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BlackettHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Henry</forename>
                     <surname>Blackett</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1825"/>
                  <death when="1871"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation><orgName ref="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and
                     Blackett</orgName></affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BrightJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>John</forename>
                     <surname>Bright</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1811"/>
                  <death when="1889"/>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GladstoneWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Ewart</forename>
                     <surname>Gladstone</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1809"/>
                  <death when="1898"/>
                  <occupation>Prime Minister</occupation>
                  <occupation>Prime Minister</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BensonEdward" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Edward</forename>
                     <forename>White</forename>
                     <surname>Benson</surname>
                     <roleName>Archbishop</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1829"/>
                  <death when="1896"/>
                  <occupation from="1883" to="1896">Archbishop of Canterbury</occupation>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TempleFrederick" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <surname>Temple</surname>
                     <roleName>Archbishop</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1821"/>
                  <death when="1902"/>
                  <occupation from="1897" to="1902">Archbishop of Canterbury</occupation>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacmillanAlexander" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Macmillan</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1818-10-03"/>
                  <death when="1896-01-26"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</affiliation>
                  <note resp="#AndersonHannah">Alexander Macmillan was the younger of the Macmillan
                     brothers.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacmillanDaniel" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Macmillan</surname>
                     <forename>Daniel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1813-09-13"/>
                  <death when="1857-06-26"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</affiliation>
                  <note resp="#AndersonHannah">Daniel Macmillan was the elder of the Macmillan
                     brothers, who established a small bookshop and publishing house at <placeName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Aldersgate">57 Aldersgate Street</placeName>in <date
                        when="1842">1842</date>. He died of tuberculosis, leaving the company and
                     his family to his brother <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander"
                        >Alexander.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GuizotFrancois" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Guizot</surname>
                     <forename>François</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1787"/>
                  <death when="1874"/>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>French</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah translated works by François Guizot
                     and his daughter <persName ref="#DeWittHenrietteGuizot">Henriette Guizot de
                        Witt.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DeWittHenriette" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Guizot</surname>
                     <surname type="married"><nameLink>de</nameLink> Witt</surname>
                     <forename>Henriette</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1829"/>
                  <death when="1908"/>
                  <occupation>Author</occupation>
                  <nationality>French</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah translated works by Henriette
                     Guizot de Witt and her father <persName ref="#GuizotFrançois">François
                        Guizot.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DoreGustave" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Dore</surname><forename>Gustave</forename></persName>
                  <birth> </birth>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ShawRichardNorman" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Shaw</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <forename>Norman</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1831"/>
                  <death when="1912"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Architect</occupation>
                  <affiliation ref="#RoyalAcademy">Royal Academy</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChapmanFrederic" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Chapman</surname>
                     <forename>Frederic</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1823"/>
                  <death when="1895"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChapmanClara" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Chapman</surname>
                     <forename>Clara</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <death when="1866"/>
               </person>

               <person xml:id="BrowningElizabethBarrett" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Browning</surname><surname type="maiden"
                        >Barrett</surname><forename>Elizabeth</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1806"/>
                  <death when="1861"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BrowningRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Browning</surname><forename>Robert</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1812"/>
                  <death when="1889"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BulwerLyttonEdward">
                  <persName><surname>Bulwer</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                     <forename>Lytton</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1803"/>
                  <death when="1873"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HerfordLaura" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Herford</surname>
                     <forename>Laura</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio">Laura Herford, the first woman to be admitted to the <orgName
                        ref="#RoyalAcademy">Royal Academy</orgName>, was a close friend of Dinah
                     Craik's. She was aunt to the illustrator <persName ref="#AllinghamHelen">Helen
                        Allingham</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AllinghamHelen" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Allingham</surname><surname type="maiden"
                        >Paterson</surname><forename>Helen</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1848"/>
                  <death when="1926"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <event type="marriage" when="1874">
                     <label>Marriage</label>
                     <desc><persName ref="#AllinghamWilliam">William Allingham</persName> married
                           <persName ref="#AllinghamHelen">Helen Allingham</persName>.</desc>
                  </event>
                  <note type="bio">Artist Helen Allingham illustrated Craik's work. She was niece to
                     the artist <persName ref="#HerfordLaura">Laura Herford</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AllinghamWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Allingham</surname><forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1824"/>
                  <death when="1889"/>
                  <occupation>Author</occupation>
                  <nationality>Irish</nationality>
                  <event type="marriage" when="1874">
                     <label>Marriage</label>
                     <desc><persName ref="#AllinghamWilliam">William Allingham</persName> married
                           <persName ref="#AllinghamHelen">Helen Allingham</persName>.</desc>
                  </event>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MillaisJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Millais</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Everett</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1829"/>
                  <death when="1896"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation ref="#PRB">Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LeightonFrederick" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Leighton</surname>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>Baron</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1830"/>
                  <death when="1896"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <occupation from="1878" to="1896">President of the <orgName ref="#RoyalAcademy"
                        >Royal Academy</orgName></occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissFanny">
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Miss Fanny was a servant in the Craiks'
                     first household as a married couple, <placeName ref="#UpperTooting">Upper
                        Tooting</placeName>. See Letter to Miss Rankin in the Parrish Collection,
                     Princeton.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonJosephNoel">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Paton</surname>
                     <forename>Joseph</forename>
                     <forename>Noel</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1821"/>
                  <death when="1901"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation>Royal Academy</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonMaggie" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Gourlay</surname>
                     <surname>Paton</surname>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                     <addName>Maggie</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death when="1900"/>
                  <residence>33 George Square, Edinburgh</residence>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Lillie</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <occupation>Accountant</occupation>
                  <affiliation>Macmillan</affiliation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio">George Craik was Dinah's husband.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1846"/>
                  <death when="1927"/>
                  <occupation>Civil Servant</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Henry Craik was <persName ref="#CraikGeorge"
                        >George</persName>'s younger brother. He married <persName
                        ref="#DobellEmily">Emily Dobell (née Duffield)'s sister.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">William Craik was <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName>'s younger brother.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikJames" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <roleName>Reverend</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1802"/>
                  <death when="1870"/>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio">Reverend James Craik was the father of Dinah's husband <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName>. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikMargaret" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Craik</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Grieve</surname>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1806"/>
                  <death when="1883"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio">Margaret Craik was Dinah's mother-in-law.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename></persName>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Jane Craik was <persName ref="#CraikGeorge"
                        >George</persName>'s older sister.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikMaggie" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                     <addName>Maggie</addName></persName>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Maggie Craik was <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName>'s older sister.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikJanie" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                     <addName>Janie</addName></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Janie Craik was the wife of <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName>'s younger brother <persName
                        ref="#CraikWilliam">William</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikGeorgiana" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>Georgiana</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1831"/>
                  <death when="1895"/>
                  <occupation>Author</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio">Georgiana Craik was a cousin of Dinah's husband, who Dinah knew
                     well beforehand. She was born in Brompton, London, but lived in Ireland.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikGeorgeLillieSr" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Craik</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Lillie</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1798"/>
                  <death when="1866"/>
                  <occupation>Author</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation>University of St Andrews</affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">George Lillie Craik was the author of
                        <title>The New Zealanders</title>, which Dinah read as a child. He was the
                     father of Georgiana Craik and the uncle of Dinah's husband, also George Lillie
                     Craik. He took up a post in Ireland.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CraikDorothy" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Craik</surname>
                     <surname>Pilkington</surname>
                     <forename>Dorothy</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dorothy Craik was Dinah's adopted
                     daughter.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PilkingtonAlexander" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Pilkington</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>McDonnell</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1863-05-17"/>
                  <death when="1930-01-30"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note resp="ParkerJanice">Alexander Pilkington was the first husband of Dinah's
                     daughter <persName ref="#CraikDorothy">Dorothy</persName>. The pair married in
                        <date when="1887">1887</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonFrederickNoel" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Paton</surname>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <forename>Noel</forename>
                     <forename>Waller</forename>
                     <forename>Ferrier</forename>
                     <addName>Fred</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1861"/>
                  <death when="1914"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <occupation>Explorer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Frederick Noel-Paton was the son of the
                     Craik's good friends the <orgName ref="#Paton">Noel-Patons</orgName>.
                     <!-- JP: source for dates: findagrave.com ALSO ADD WHICH WORKS OF DINAH'S HE ILLUSTRATED -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonMona" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Paton</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Kidston</surname>
                     <forename>Mona</forename>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                     <forename>Noel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1860-06-30"/>
                  <death when="1930-01-02"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Mona Paton was the eldest daughter of Noel
                     and Margaret Paton. She had a difficult adolescence, and came to stay with the
                     Craik's every spring for several years.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KidstonJack" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Kidston</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Wallace</forename>
                     <addName>Jack</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1851-03-22"/>
                  <death when="1926-06-20"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="BourrierKaren">Jack Kidston was husband to <persName
                        ref="#PatonMona">Mona Paton</persName>, and Vicar of Hampton Poyle, near
                     Oxford. Initially the couple was very happy but the marriage struggled when
                     Mona became a Theosophist, though the two remained married.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonDolly" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Cross</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Paton</surname>
                     <forename>Caroline</forename>
                     <forename>Aimile</forename>
                     <forename>Robertson</forename>
                     <forename>Noel</forename>
                     <addName>Dolly</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1870"/>
                  <death when="1947"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Caroline Aimlie Cross, called Dolly, was the
                     daughter of the Craiks' good friends the <orgName ref="#Paton"
                        >Noel-Patons</orgName>.</note>
                  <!-- source for dates: findagrave.com -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonLora" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="maiden">Paton</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Moncrieff</surname>
                     <forename>Hamilton</forename>
                     <forename>Lorane</forename>
                     <forename>Noel</forename>
                     <addName>Lora</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1868"/>
                  <death when="1921"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Lora Paton was the daughter of the Craiks'
                     good friends the <orgName ref="#Paton">Noel-Patons</orgName>.</note>
                  <!-- source for dates: findagrave.com -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CockerellOlive" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cockerell</surname>
                     <forename>Olive</forename>
                     <forename>Juliet</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1868-09-13"/>
                  <death when="1910-07-24"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <occupation>Author</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Olive Cockerell lived with the Craiks as a
                     companion for Dorothy in the 1870s. Her brother was <persName
                        ref="#CockerellSydney">Sydney Cockerell</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#HillOctavia">Octavia Hill</persName> was her godmother.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CockerellSydney" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cockerell</surname>
                     <forename>Sydney</forename>
                     <forename>Carlyle</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1867-07-16"/>
                  <death when="1962-05-01"/>
                  <occupation>Curator</occupation>
                  <affiliation>Fitzwilliam Museum</affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Sydney Cockerell, a book collector and
                     museum curator, was a friend of Dinah's. He was brother to <persName
                        ref="#CockerellOlive">Olive. ODNB.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CockerellSydneyJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cockerell</surname>
                     <forename>Sydney</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1842"/>
                  <death when="1877"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Sydney John Cockerell was <persName
                        ref="#CockerellSydney">Sydney Carlyle</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#CockerellOlive">Olive Cockerell</persName>'s father.<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CockerellAlice" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Cockerell</surname>
                     <forename>Alice</forename>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <death when="1900"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Alice Elizabeth Cockerell was <persName
                        ref="#CockerellSydney">Sydney Carlyle</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#CockerellOlive">Olive Cockerell</persName>'s mother.<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CockerellCharles">
                  <persName><surname>Cockerell</surname><forename>Charles</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1755"/>
                  <death when="1837"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AndersonStewart" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Henderson</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Stewart</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1863"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Stewart Henderson, misnamed by Dinah in a
                     letter as "Stewart Anderson," was an acquaintance of Dinah's. Stewart was in a
                     secret relationship with <persName ref="#MeoCarmela">Carmela
                     Meo.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BrahamLeonora" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="stage">Braham</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Abraham</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Barnes</surname>
                     <forename>Leonora</forename>
                     <forename>Lucy</forename>
                     <addName>Lily</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1853"/>
                  <death when="1931"/>
                  <occupation>Actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Musician</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Leonora Braham was a Soprano famous for
                     several Gilbert and Sullivan roles, mentored by Craik, who tried to get her out
                     of acting.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BarnesFrederick" sex="1">
                  <persName/>
                  <birth> </birth>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Actor?</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio">Frederick Barnes was the husband of Lily Barnes, who committed
                     suicide.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissRankin" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Rankin</surname>
                     <forename/>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Miss Rankin was a friend of Dinah's from
                     Wemyss Bay. A directory lists a Miss Rankin of Rothesay in 1857. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissNair" sex="2">
                  <persName>Miss W. Nair</persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Miss Nair appears to be a friend of Dinah's
                     from Wemyss Bay.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Boyd" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Boyd</surname>
                     <forename/>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Boyd ppears to be a friend of Craik's from
                     Wemyss Bay, and an organist.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ThomsonAndrew" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Thomson</surname>
                     <forename>Andrew</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Education</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Andrew Thomson was a professor and friend
                     of Dinah's from Wemyss Bay.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Davidson" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Davidson</surname>
                     <forename/>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Davidson appears to be a friend of Craik's
                     from Wemyss Bay.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Annie" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Annie</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Annie was a domestic servant who followed
                     the Craiks from <placeName ref="#Glasgow">Glasgow</placeName> to <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName>, only to be married back in <placeName
                        ref="#Glasgow">Glasgow</placeName> soon after.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Oxland" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Oxland</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Education</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren"><persName ref="#Oxland">Miss
                        Oxland</persName> was <persName ref="#CraikDorothy">Dorothy</persName> and
                        <persName ref="#CockerellOlive">Olive's</persName> governess.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Arnold" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Arnold</forename>
                     <surname/>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren"><persName ref="#Arnold">Arnold</persName>,
                     an acquaintance at <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah's</persName> Mulock Aunt's house
                     in <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath</placeName>, appears to have been married to
                        <persName ref="#Gertrude">Gertrude</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Gertrude" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Gertrude</forename>
                     <surname/>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren"><persName ref="#Gertrude"
                        >Gertrude</persName>, an acquaintance at Craik's Mulock Aunt's house in
                        <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath</placeName>, appears to be married to <persName
                        ref="#Arnold">Arnold</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Holland" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename/>
                     <surname>Holland</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Holland was an acquaintance of the Craiks,
                     possibly a neighbour at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                        House</placeName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Smith" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename/>
                     <surname>Smith</surname>
                     <roleName>Doctor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Smith was an acquaintance of the Craiks,
                     possibly a neighbour at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                        House</placeName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BewleyNed" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bewley</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                     <forename>Dawson</forename>
                     <addName>Ned</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1868-07-09"/>
                  <death when="1927-01-12"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Ned Bewley was a young acquaintance of the
                        <orgName ref="#Craik">Craiks</orgName>. He was a distant relative of Dinah's
                     and the son of Sir Edmund Thomas Bewley (1807–1908), who wrote the book "The
                     Family of Mulock."</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BewleyMay" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Bewley</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Louisa</forename>
                     <addName>May</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1871-06-03"/>
                  <death when="1883-12-30"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">May Bewley was a young acquaintance of the
                        <orgName ref="#Craik">Craiks</orgName> and the daughter of Sir Edmund Thomas
                     Bewley (1807–1908), who wrote the book "The Family of Mulock."</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Orrinsmith" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename/>
                     <surname>Orrinsmith</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Orrinsmith was an acquaintance of the
                     Craiks, possibly a neighbour at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                        House</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PaynJames" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <surname>Payn</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">James Payn was a novelist and editor of the
                        <title ref="#Cornhill">Cornhill Magazine</title> from 1883 to 1896.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MeoCarmela">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Meo</surname>
                     <forename>Carmela</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Musician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Carmela Meo was a young Italian girl whom Dinah met in 1885. She
                     took up a subscription among her friends to have her placed at the <orgName
                        ref="#RoyalCollegeMusic"> Royal College of Music</orgName>. The relationship
                     ended poorly two years later when Carmela determined to marry a young man Dinah
                     found unsuitable.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MeoLuigi" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Meo</surname>
                     <forename>Luigi</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1855"/>
                  <death when="1935"/>
                  <nationality>Italian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Luigi Meo, a violinist and older brother of
                        <persName ref="#MeoCarmela">Carmela</persName>, was an acquaintance of
                     Dinah's. He married widow <persName ref="#HendersonJemima">Jemima Henderson
                     </persName>in <date when="1884">1884</date>; Jemima's son <persName
                        ref="#AndersonStewart"/>Stewart was in a secret relationship with <persName
                        ref="#MeoCarmela">Carmela</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WolleyH" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Wolley</surname>
                     <forename>H. F.</forename>
                     <roleName>Reverend</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio">Reverend Wolley was the Vicar of Shortlands Vicarage, Bromley,
                     Kent. He and his wife were close friends of the Craiks</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WolleyEmily" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Wolley</surname>
                     <forename>Emily</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Mrs. Wolley was the wife of <persName ref="#WolleyH">Reverend
                        Wolley</persName> and a close friend of the Craiks.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LewesHarold">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Harold</forename>
                     <surname>Lewes</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">Henry Lewes was an acquaintance of Dinah's while she lived in the
                        <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner House</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PikeConnie" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Pike</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Constance</forename>
                     <addName>Connie</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1858"/>
                  <death when="1937"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mary Constance Pike was a young person and
                     friend of Dinah's during her years at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                        House</placeName>. She was the eldest sister of <persName ref="#PikeBel"
                        >Bel</persName> and <persName ref="#PikeAda">Ada</persName>. Connstance Pike
                     married Charles Thomas in 1891 and had two daughters, Constance Dinah and
                     Margaret Isabel.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PikeAda" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Pike</surname>
                     <forename>Ada</forename>
                     <forename>Violet</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1865"/>
                  <death when="1933"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Ada Pike was a young person and friend of
                     Dinah's during her years at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                        House</placeName>. Youngest sister of <persName ref="#PikeConnie"
                        >Connie</persName><persName ref="#PikeBel">Bel</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PikeBel" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Pike</surname>
                     <forename>Isabel</forename>
                     <addName>Bel</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1860"/>
                  <death when="1946"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Bel Pike was a young person and friend of
                     Dinah's during her years at the <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                        House</placeName>. She was the middle sister of <persName ref="#PikeConnie"
                        >Connie</persName><persName ref="#PikeAda">Ada Pike</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bradway">
                  <persName><surname>Bradway</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio">Mrs. Bradway was a seamstress who worked for the Craiks in the
                     1880s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Grubb">
                  <persName><surname>Grubb</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio">Miss Grubb seems to be the Craiks hatmaker in the 1880s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="EastlakeMiss">
                  <persName><surname>Eastlake</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1865"/>
                  <death when="1899"/>
                  <note type="bio">Miss Eastlake was a popular English actress and a leading lady in
                     Wilson Barrett's company. She started her own theater company, which went
                     bankrupt. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BarrettWilson">
                  <persName><forename>Wilson</forename>
                     <surname>Barrett</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1846"/>
                  <death when="1904"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Wilson Barrett was an actor and playwright
                     whom Dinah Craik struck up a correspondence with late in life. Barrett and Miss
                     Eastlake performed in Lord Lytton's classical drama <title>Junius, or the
                        Household Gods</title>, at the <placeName ref="#PrincessTheatre">Princess's
                        Theatre</placeName>, London, in February 1886. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TennysonAlfred">
                  <persName><surname>Tennyson</surname>
                     <forename>Alfred</forename>
                     <roleName>Lord</roleName></persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Lord Alfred Tennyson was a popular
                     English poet.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TennysonHallam">
                  <persName><surname>Tennyson</surname>
                     <forename>Hallam</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio">Hallam Tennyson was Lord Alfred Tennyson's son, named for his
                     friend Arthur Hallam.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AddeyHenryMarkinfield" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Addey</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>Markinfield</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1818"/>
                  <death when="1910"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <affiliation from="1845" to="1849">Employee of <orgName ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman
                        and Hall</orgName>.</affiliation>
                  <affiliation from="1849" to="1852">Partner in publishing company <orgName
                        ref="#CundallAddey">Cundall &amp; Addey</orgName>.</affiliation>
                  <affiliation from="1852" to="1857">Proprietor of <orgName ref="#AddeyCo">Addey
                        &amp; Co</orgName>.</affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Addey was a publisher of children's
                     literature. <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName> published "<title
                        ref="#Hero">A Hero</title>" with <orgName ref="#AddeyCo">Addey &amp;
                        Co</orgName> and also wrote for <orgName ref="#AddeyCo">Addey &amp;
                        Co</orgName>'s children's periodical <title ref="#Charm">The
                     Charm</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChapmanEdward" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Chapman</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1804"/>
                  <death when="1880"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation from="1830" to="1864">Partner in publishing company <orgName
                        ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</orgName></affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Edward Chapman founded <orgName
                        ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</orgName> with <persName
                        ref="#HallWilliam">William Hall</persName> and worked with the company until
                     his retirement in <date when="1864">1864.</date></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CundallJoseph" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Cundall</surname>
                     <forename>Joseph</forename>
                     <addName type="pseudonym">Stephen Percy</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1818-09-22"/>
                  <death when="1895-01-10"/>
                  <occupation>Photographer, Author &amp; Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation from="1849" to="1868">Partner in publishing company <orgName
                        ref="#CundallAddey">Cundall &amp; Addey</orgName>.</affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Cundall was a successful photographer
                     and a publisher of children's literature. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HallWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hall</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1800" notAfter="1802">Between 1800 and 1802</birth>
                  <death when="1847">1847</death>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation from="1830" to="1847">Partner in publishing company <orgName
                        ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</orgName></affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Hall founded <orgName
                        ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</orgName> with <persName
                        ref="#ChapmanEdward">Edward Chapman</persName> and worked with the company
                     until his sudden death in <date when="1847">1847.</date></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HerveyThomasKibble" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hervey</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Kibble</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1799-02-11"/>
                  <death when="1859-02-17"/>
                  <occupation>Poet</occupation>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <affiliation from="1846-05-23" to="1853">Editor of <title ref="Athenaeum">the
                        Athenaeum</title></affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Thomas Kibble Hervey was a poet, critic,
                     and journalist who contributed to and later edited the popular periodical
                        <title ref="Athenaeum">the Athenaeum</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HowittMary" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Howitt</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Botham</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1799-03-12"/>
                  <death when="1888-01-30"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mary Howitt was a popular Victorian
                     writer who published both independently and collaboratively with her husband
                        <persName ref="#HowittWilliam">William Howitt</persName>. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HowittWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Howitt</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1792-12-18"/>
                  <death when="1879-03-03"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <affiliation from="1847" to="1848">Proprietor of <title ref="HowittsJournal"
                        >Howitt's Journal</title></affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Howitt was a popular Victorian
                     writer who published both independently and collaboratively with his wife
                        <persName ref="#HowittMary">Mary Howitt</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MorrisJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Morris</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Burden</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1839-10-19"/>
                  <death when="1914-01-26"/>
                  <occupation>Embroiderer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Artist's Model</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <affiliation>Pre-Rafaelite Brotherhood</affiliation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Morris was a skilled embroiderer who
                     bound some of <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName>'s books. She was a
                     model and muse for both her husband <persName ref="#MorrisWilliam">William
                        Morris</persName>, and <persName ref="#RosettiDanteGabriel">Dante Gabriel
                        Rosetti.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MorrisWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Morris</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1834-03-24"/>
                  <death when="1896-10-03"/>
                  <occupation>Designer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <affiliation>Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood</affiliation>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Morris was a British poet, novelist, and
                     textile designer.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MorrisMrs" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Morris</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Mrs. Morris was an acquaintance of
                        <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik's</persName> in the early 1850s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChisholmMrs" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Chisholm</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#BourrierKaren">Mrs. Chisholm was an acquaintance of
                        <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik's</persName> in the <date from="1850"
                        to="1855">early 1850s.</date></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OliphantMargaret" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Oliphant</surname>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                     <forename>Oliphant</forename>
                     <forename>Wilson</forename>
                     <addName>Mrs. Oliphant</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1828-04-04"/>
                  <death when="1897-06-25"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Oliphant was a best-selling
                     Victorian novelist and a life long friend of <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah
                        Craik</persName>'s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonAllanPark">
                  <persName><surname>Paton</surname>
                     <forename>Allan</forename>
                     <forename>Park</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Librarian</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Allan Park Paton was best known for
                     editing the Hamnet Shakespeare, published between <date notBefore="1877"
                        notAfter="1879">1877 and 1879</date>. He worked at the <placeName
                        ref="#Greenock">Greenock</placeName> Library, Watt Monument.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RosettiDanteGabriel" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Rossetti</surname>
                     <forename>Dante</forename>
                     <forename>Gabriel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1828-05-12"/>
                  <death when="1882-04-09"/>
                  <occupation>Painter</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Italian</nationality>
                  <affiliation>Pre-Rafaelite Brotherhood</affiliation>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dante Gabriel Rossetti was a famous poet and a
                     painter of the Pre-Rafaelite brotherhood.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissAdams" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Adams</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Musician</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Miss Adams was a composer. She delivered
                     a song to Dinah by mail sometime <date notBefore="1859" notAfter="1865">between
                        1859 and 1865</date>.<lb/>
                     <!-- "Sir G. MacFarren on English Music," <hi rend="italic">Musical Standard</hi>
                        (London, UK), June 7, 1884. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsBrougham" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Brougham</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Brougham was a friend of <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName> and <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah
                        Craik</persName>'s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BrowningPen" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Browning</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <forename>Wiedeman</forename>
                     <forename>Barrett</forename>
                     <addName>Pen</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1849-03-09"/>
                  <death when="1912-07-08"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Pen Browning was the son of <persName
                        ref="#BrowningRobert">Robert Browning</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#BrowningElizabethBarrett">Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName> ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- De L. Ryals, Clyde, "Browning Robert (1812-1889)," ODNB. -->
                     <!-- "Obituary: Mr. Barrett Browning," <hi rend="italics">Times</hi> (London, UK), Jul. 09, 1912. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChalmersThomas" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Chalmers</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1780-03-17"/>
                  <death when="1847-05-31"/>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Reverend Dr. Thomas Chalmers served as
                     the leader of the Church of Scotland and later established the Free Church of
                     Scotland. He was an important and well-known religious figure in the nineteenth
                     century. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissChalmers" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Miss Chalmers was a friend of <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName> and <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah
                        Craik</persName>'s, and niece to the <persName ref="#ChalmersThomas"
                        >Reverend Dr. Thomas Chalmers</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CharlesElizabeth" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Charles</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Rundle</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1828-01-02"/>
                  <death when="1896-03-28"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Elizabeth Rundle Charles was a popular
                     Victorian poet and novelist. She lived with her husband in <placeName
                        ref="Hampstead">Hampstead</placeName> from <date when="1851">1851</date>
                     until her death in <date when="1896">1896</date>. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DuplessisGeorges" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Gratet-Duplessis</surname>
                     <forename>Georges</forename>
                     <forename>Victor</forename>
                     <forename>Antoine</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1834-03-19"/>
                  <death when="1899-03-26"/>
                  <occupation>Curator</occupation>
                  <nationality>French</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">George Duplessis was a French curator and
                     art historian who specialized in the art of engraving. An anonymous note on
                     letter PU34 (AM20763) in the Princeton Parrish Collection suggests that Dinah
                     Craik may have helped translate his text "<title
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#WondersofEngraving">The Wonders of Engraving</title>."<lb/>
                     <!-- Sorensen, Lee "[Gratet-]Duplessis, Georges Victor Antoine," <hi rend="italics">Dictionary of Art Historians</hi>. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsField" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Field</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation cert="low">Education</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" cert="low" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Field was an acquaintance
                     of Dinah's who helped her to organize a glee club. Mrs. Field may have been
                     Mrs. Julia Field, the owner and proprietor of the <orgName
                        ref="#CatharineLodge">Catharine Lodge School for Young Ladies</orgName> in
                        <placeName ref="#Brompton">Brompton</placeName>, <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>.<lb/>
                     <!-- Dare, Deirdre and Melissa Hardie, "Appendix II: Biographical Register of Charles Johns's Primary Circle of Colleagues, Friends &amp; Family Mentioned in the Text," <hi rend="italics">A Passion for Nature: 19th-century Naturalism in the Circle of Charles Alexander Johns</hi> (Penzance CON: Patten Press, 2008), 193-194. -->
                     <!-- "Education.— Catherine Lodge," <hi rend="italics">Times</hi> (London, UK), Mar. 5, 1851. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GoldsmidAnnaMaria" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Goldsmid</surname>
                     <forename>Anna</forename>
                     <forename>Maria</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1805-09-17"/>
                  <death when="1889-02-08"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Jewish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Anna Maria Goldsmid was an important
                     figure in the Anglo-Jewish community of the nineteenth century. She devoted
                     most of her adult life to the improvement of Jewish medical and educational
                     institutions in <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrHarry" sex="1">
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Harry appears to have be an early
                     photographer who might have developed photographs of Dinah Craik.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HarperJosephWesley" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Harper</surname>
                     <forename>Joseph</forename>
                     <forename>Wesley</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>American</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Joseph Wesley Harper was a partner in the
                     American publishing firm <orgName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Harpers">Harper &amp;
                        Brothers</orgName>. Joseph Wesley was the third Harper brother and joined
                     the firm in <date when="1823">1823</date>.<lb/>
                     <!-- Stovall, James Glen "Fletcher Harper (31 January 1806-29 May 1877)" <hi rend="italic"
                            >American Magazine Journalists, 1850-1900</hi> 79 (1989): 174-181. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HarperFletcher" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Harper</surname>
                     <forename>Fletcher</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1806-01-31"/>
                  <death when="1877-05-29"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>American</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Fletcher Harper was a partner in the
                     American publishing firm <orgName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Harpers">Harper &amp;
                        Brothers</orgName>. Fletcher was the youngest of the four Harper brothers
                     and joined the firm in <date when="1825">1825</date>.<lb/>
                     <!-- Stovall, James Glen "Fletcher Harper (31 January 1806-29 May 1877)" <hi rend="italic"
                            >American Magazine Journalists, 1850-1900</hi> 79 (1989): 174-181. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HillAmeliaRobertson" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Hill</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Paton</surname>
                     <forename>Amelia</forename>
                     <forename>Robertson</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1821-01-15"/>
                  <death when="1904-07-05"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Amelia Robertson Hill was <persName
                        ref="#PatonJosephNoel">Sir Joseph Noel Paton</persName>'s sister. She is
                     best-known for her work in sculpture, but began her career as a painter. Dinah
                     Craik was one of her sitters <date notBefore="1844" notAfter="1845">c.
                        1844</date>. ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- NPG 2544 and 2544a. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HillDavidOctavius" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hill</surname>
                     <forename>David</forename>
                     <forename>Octavius</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1802-05-20"/>
                  <death when="1870-05-17"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">David Octavius Hill was married to
                        <persName ref="#HillAmeliaRobertson">Amelia Robertson Hill (née
                        Paton)</persName>, a friend of Dinah Craik's. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JesusChrist" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Jesus</forename>
                     <addName>Jesus Christ</addName>
                     <addName>Jesus of Nazareth</addName></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Jesus Christ is one of the central
                     figures of Christianity.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KingsleyCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Kingsley</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1819-06-12"/>
                  <death when="1875-01-23"/>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Education</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Charles Kingsley was a Christian
                     socialist, a university professor, and a celebrated novelist. He and Dinah
                     Craik were literary acquaintances. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KingsleyFanny" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Kingsley</surname>
                     <forename>Frances</forename>
                     <forename>Eliza</forename>
                     <addName>Fanny</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1814"/>
                  <death when="1891-12-12"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Fanny Kingsley was wife to <persName
                        ref="#KingsleyCharles">Charles Kingsley</persName>. She authored her
                     husband's biography after his death in <date when="1875">1875</date>.
                     ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsLongstaff" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Longstaff</surname>
                     <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Longstaff was a friend of Dinah's
                        from <placeName ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh</placeName>.</note>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LovellGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lovell</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1804"/>
                  <death when="1878-05-13"/>
                  <!-- <occupation>Secretary</occupation> -->
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">George William Lovell was a popular
                     Victorian dramatist. He was an early acquaintance of <persName
                        ref="#MulockThomas">Thomas Mulock</persName>'s and a friend of <persName
                        ref="DMC">Dinah Craik</persName>'s. ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- Mitchell, Sally, <hi rend="italics">Dinah Mulock Craik</hi> (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1983), 5. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LovellMaria" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Lovell</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Lacy</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1803-07-15"/>
                  <death when="1877-04-02"/>
                  <occupation>Actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Maria Ann Lovell was an actress turned
                     playwright. She and her husband <persName ref="#LovellGeorge">George
                        Lovell</persName> were friends with <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah
                        Craik</persName> and were also acquainted with her father, <persName
                        ref="#MulockThomas">Thomas Mulock</persName>. ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- Mitchell, Sally, <hi rend="italics">Dinah Mulock Craik</hi> (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1983), 5. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LovellMinna" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Lovell</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                     <addName>Marian</addName>
                     <addName>Minna</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1832-09-06">6 September 1832</birth>
                  <death when="1822-04-29">29 April 1822</death>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Minna Lovell was a friend of Dinah's who
                     lived with her at <placeName ref="#Lynover">Lynover Cottage</placeName>. She
                     was briefly engaged to Dinah's brother <persName ref="#MulockBenjamin"
                        >Benjamin</persName> from around 1860 to 1863.<lb/>
                     <!-- Foster, Shirley, "Dinah Mulock Craik," <hi rend="italics">Victorian Women's Fiction: Marriage, Freedom and the Individual</hi> (New York: Routeledge, 2012), 50. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MarstonCicely" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Marston</surname>
                     <forename>Cicely</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1846"/>
                  <death when="1878"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Cicely Marston was the first child of
                     Dinah's close friends <persName ref="#MarstonWestland">John Westland
                        Marston</persName> and <persName ref="MarstonEleanor">Eleanor
                        Marston</persName>. ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- Latané D. E. Jr. "Marston, John Westland (1819-1890)," ODNB. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MontaguLordRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Montagu</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1825-01-24"/>
                  <death when="1902-05-06"/>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Lord Robert Montagu was a Conservative
                     politician and a religious controversialist. He was a professional acquaintance
                     of <persName ref="#KingsleyCharles">Charles Kingsley</persName>'s. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OShaughnessyArthur" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>O'Shaughnessy</surname>
                     <forename>Arthur</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1844-03-14"/>
                  <death when="1881-01-30"/>
                  <occupation/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Arthur O'Shaughnessy was married to
                     Eleanor Marston, the youngest daughter of Dinah's close friends <persName
                        ref="#MarstonWestland">John Westland Marston</persName> and <persName
                        ref="MarstonEleanor">Eleanor Marston</persName>. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OShaughnessyEleanor" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">O'Shaughnessy</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Marston</surname>
                     <forename>Eleanor</forename>
                     <forename>Kyme</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1848"/>
                  <death when="1879"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Eleanor (Marston) O'Shaughnessy was the
                     second child of Dinah's close friends <persName ref="#MarstonWestland">John
                        Westland Marston</persName> and <persName ref="MarstonEleanor">Eleanor
                        Marston</persName>. ODNB.</note>
                  <!-- Latané D. E. Jr. "Marston, John Westland (1819-1890)," ODNB. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ParkerJohnWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Parker</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1792"/>
                  <death when="1870-05-18"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Parker was the owner and proprietor
                     of the publishing firm <orgName ref="#ParkerAndSon">John W. Parker &amp;
                        Son</orgName>. John W. Parker &amp; Son acquired <title corresp="#Frasers"
                        >Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country</title> in <date when="1847"
                        >1847</date> and published some of Dinah Craik's earliest stories. ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- Mitchell, Sally, "Chronology," <hi rend="italics">Dinah Mulock Craik</hi> (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1983). -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissShirley" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Shirley</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Miss Shirley wrote the lyrics to a piece
                     of music that Dinah had in her possession <date notBefore="1858"
                        notAfter="1860">c. 1859</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TaylorHarry" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Taylor</surname>
                     <forename>Harry</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Harry Taylor was a tenor in Dinah
                     Craik's glee club <date notBefore="1862" notAfter="1863">c.1862</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ThackerayWilliamMakepeace" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Thackeray</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Makepeace</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1811-07-18"/>
                  <death when="1863-12-23"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Makepeace Thackeray was a popular
                     Victorian writer best-known for his satirical novels, including <title
                        corresp="#VanityFair">Vanity Fair</title>. ODNB.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="StewartMichaelShaw" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Shaw-Stewart</surname>
                     <forename>Michael</forename>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1826-11-26"/>
                  <death when="1903-12-10"/>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Sir Michael Shaw Stewart was a British
                     baronet and was a Member of Parliament for <placeName ref="Renfrewshire"
                        >Renfrewshire</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Scotland"
                     >Scotland.</placeName><lb/> "Obituary: Sir Michael Shaw-Stewart," <hi
                        rend="italics">Times</hi> (London, UK), Dec. 11, 1903. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GrosvenorLadyOctavia" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Grosvenor</surname>
                     <forename>Octavia</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1829-09-22"/>
                  <death when="1921-05-29"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Lady Octavia Grosvenor was married to
                        <persName ref="#ShawStewartMichael">Sir Michael Shaw-Stewart</persName>. She
                     was the granddaughter of <persName ref="#LevesonGowerGeorge">George
                        Leveson-Gower</persName>.<lb/> "Obituary: Sir Michael Shaw-Stewart," <hi
                        rend="italics">Times</hi> (London, UK), Dec. 11, 1903. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GowerGeorgeLeveson" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Leveson-Gower</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Granville</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1758-01-09"/>
                  <death when="1833-07-19"/>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Scottish</nationality>
                  <affiliation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">George Leveson-Gower was a wealthy and
                     controversial Anglo-Scottish politician. He was the second Marquess of
                        <placeName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Stafford">Stafford</placeName> and the
                     first Duke of <placeName ref="#Sutherland">Sutherland.</placeName><lb/> ODNB.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AdderleyCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Adderley</surname>
                     <surname>Bowyer</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1814-08-02"/>
                  <death when="1905-03-28"/>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Adderley, first Baron Norton, was the
                     founder of the <orgName ref="#SaltleyReformatory">Saltley
                     Reformatory</orgName>— an industrial school in which Dinah's father <persName
                        ref="#MulockThomas">Thomas Mulock</persName> took a great interest.<lb/>
                     ODNB.<lb/> Mulock Thomas, "Notes re industrial schools: Saltley Reformatory
                     printed Letter to the Earl of Lichfield," 1860-1894, D615/PL/6/26, Records of
                     the Anson Family of Shugborough, Earls of Lichford; Staffordshire County Record
                     Office, Stoke-on-Trent Archive Service.
                     <!-- http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/rd/6a3ac300-7ae0-4ddf-87b4-decc9b335eb7 --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BentleyEdward" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bentley</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1753"/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Edward Bentley was a London publisher and
                     the proprietor of <orgName ref="#Bentley">Bentley &amp; Co.</orgName>
                     ODNB.</note>
                  <!-- Patten, Robert L., "Richard Bentley (1794-1871),"
                            ODNB. <lb/>Anderson, Patricia J. and Jonathan Rose, eds., "Richard
                            Bentley," <hi rend="italics">British Literary Publishing Houses,
                                1820-1880</hi> 106, (Detroit: Gale, 1991), 39-52. DLB 106.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BentleyGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bentley</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1826-06-07"/>
                  <death when="1895-05-29"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">George Bentley was the son of <persName
                        ref="#BentleyRichard">Richard Bentley</persName>. He became a partner in his
                     father's publishing company in <date when="1845">1845</date> and later shared
                     the business with his own son. ODNB. </note>
                  <!--   Anderson, Patricia J. and Jonathan Rose, eds.,
                            "Richard Bentley," <hi rend="italics">British Literary Publishing
                                Houses, 1820-1880</hi> 106, (Detroit: Gale, 1991), 39-52. DLB 106.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BentleyRichard" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bentley</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1794-10-24"/>
                  <death when="1871-11-10"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Richard Bentley was the son of <persName
                        ref="#BentleyEdward">Edward Bentley</persName>. He was a well-known
                     publisher in <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName> throughout his
                     lifetime. ODNB.</note>
                  <!-- Anderson, Patricia J. and
                        Jonathan Rose, eds., "Richard Bentley," <hi rend="italics">British
                            Literary Publishing Houses, 1820-1880</hi> 106, (Detroit: Gale,
                        1991), 39-52. DLB 106. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChambersRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Chambers</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1802-07-10"/>
                  <death when="1871-03-17"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Robert Chambers was a partner in the
                     publishing company <orgName ref="#Chambers">W. &amp; R. Chambers.</orgName>
                     Dinah often visited his residence at <placeName ref="#DouneTerrace">Doune
                        Terrace</placeName> in <placeName ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh's Georgian New
                        Town.</placeName> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChambersWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Chambers</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1800-04-16"/>
                  <death when="1883-05-20"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Chambers was a partner in the
                     publishing company <orgName ref="#Chambers">W. &amp; R. Chambers.</orgName>
                     ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Clara" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Clara</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Clara was presumably one of Dinah's
                     friends from her time at Wildwood. She accompanied Dinah on a journey to
                     Glasgow sometime between <date notBefore="1861" notAfter="1865">1861 and
                        1865</date>.</note>
                  <!-- Clara is mentioned in PU45 in the Princeton Parrish Collection. KB: I'm wondering if she's actually a servant if she's mentioned by first name here.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissCoates" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Coates</surname>
                     <forename>Emily</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Miss Coates was a cousin of <persName
                        ref="#DobellSydney">Sydney Dobell</persName>'s. She lived at <placeName
                        ref="#UpperTerraceLodge">Upper Terrace Lodge</placeName> with her friend
                        <persName ref="#MissJames">Miss Marian James.</persName><lb/> "Donations for
                     the Bow and Poplar Charity Organisation Committees," <hi rend="italics">Reports
                        of the Council and of the District Committees,</hi> (Charity Organisation
                     Society, London, 1887): 22.<lb/> “David Gray’s First Proof-Sheet,” <hi
                        rend="italics">The Irish Monthly</hi> 15, (1887): 425.<lb/> James
                     Hedderwick, ed., “Memoir of the Author,” <hi rend="italics">Poems of David
                        Gray, with Memoirs of His Life</hi>, (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1865):
                     36-37. <lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DickensCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Dickens</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Huffman</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1812-02-07"/>
                  <death when="1870-06-09"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Charles Dickens is English novelist who
                     is still widely read and celebrated in the twenty-first century. He is known
                     for his astute criticisms of Victorian social conditions in novels such as
                        <title>Bleak House</title>. ODNB</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FairholtFrederickWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Fairholt</surname>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1813-07-18"/>
                  <death when="1866-04-03"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Prussian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Frederick William Fairholt was a
                     successful artist and antiquary who regularly contributed to the <title
                        corresp="#ArtJournal">Art Journal</title>. ODNB. <lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="IronsWilliamJosiah" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Irons</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Josiah</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1812-09-12"/>
                  <death when="1883-06-18"/>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Josiah Irons was a Church of
                     England clergyman. Dinah might have encountered him during his residency at St.
                     Paul's Cathedral (<date from="1860" to="1870">1860 to 1870</date>).
                     ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissJames" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>James</surname>
                     <forename>Marian</forename>
                     <forename>Julia</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1830"/>
                  <death when="1910"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Marian James was a friend of Dinah's and
                     an acquaintance of the <orgName ref="#Dobell">Dobell</orgName> family. Miss
                     James lodged at <placeName ref="#UpperTerraceLodge">Upper Terrace
                        Lodge</placeName>, <placeName ref="#HampsteadHeath">Hampstead</placeName>
                     with <persName ref="#MissCoates">Miss Coates</persName>— a cousin of <persName
                        ref="DobellSydney">Sydney Dobell</persName>'s.<lb/> “David Gray’s First
                     Proof-Sheet,” <hi rend="italics">The Irish Monthly</hi> 15, (1887): 425.<lb/>
                     Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, “List of Publications: Sampson Low, Son, and Co,”
                        <hi rend="italics">Right at Last, and Other Tales</hi>, (London: Sampson
                     Low, Son &amp; Co., 1860): 333.<lb/> "A History of West Down, Hindhead GU26
                     6BQ," <hi rend="italics">Grayshott Village Archive,</hi> last modified February
                     6, 2012.<lb/> James Hedderwick, ed., “Memoir of the Author,” <hi rend="italics"
                        >Poems of David Gray, with Memoirs of His Life</hi>, (Boston: Roberts
                     Brothers, 1865): 36-37. <lb/> Marian James, <hi rend="italics">A Lord of the
                        Creation</hi>, (London: Groombridge &amp; Sons, 1857): 1. <lb/> “Miss Marian
                     Julia James, Deceased,” <hi rend="italics">The London Gazette</hi> 28448, (20
                     December, 1910): 9500.<lb/> Samuel Halkett, ed., <hi rend="italics">Dictionary
                        of Anonymous and Pseudononymous English Literature</hi> 3, (New York:
                     Haskell House, 1926-1934): 401. Web.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LoudonJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Loudon</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Webb</surname>
                     <persName>Jane</persName></persName>
                  <birth when="1807"/>
                  <death when="1858"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Loudon was a writer specializing in
                     botany and natural history. She was the first editor of the <title>Ladies'
                        Companion at Home and Abroad</title> from <date from="1849" to="1851">1849
                        to 1851,</date> during which time she became well-known for her work on
                     middle-class women’s publications. Dinah was well-aquainted with Mrs. Loudon
                     when she was living at <placeName ref="#CamdenStreet">Camden Street</placeName>
                     in the 1840s. <lb/> Camilla [Toulmin] Newton Crosland, Landmarks of a Literary
                     Life 1820–1892 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1893), 134.<lb/>Laurel Brake
                     and Marysa Demoor, eds. Dictionary of Nineteenth-century Journalism in Great
                     Britain and Ireland (Gent: Academia P, 2009), 379–340.
                     <!-- https://books.google.ca/books?id=qVrUTUelE6YC&lpg=PP1&dq=Dictionary%20of%20Nineteenth-century%20Journalism%20Laurel%20Brake&pg=PA379#v=onepage&q=Loudon&f=false -->
                     ODNB. <lb/>
                     <!-- Lohrli, Anne, "Agnes Loudon," <hi rend="italics">Dickens Jornals Online</hi>,
                            last modified 1971. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Louis" sex="1">
                  <!-- PU42 in the Princeton Parrish Collection is addressed to Louis --></person>
               <person xml:id="Lutzow" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lützow</surname>
                     <forename>Ludwig</forename>
                     <forename>Adolf</forename>
                     <forename>Wilheim</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1782"/>
                  <death when="1834"/>
                  <nationality>Prussian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Lützow was a Prussian soldier famous for
                     leading the volunteer corps in the War of Liberation.<lb/>"Lützow, Adolf,
                     Baron," <hi rend="italics">The New International Encyclopædia</hi>,
                     1905.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ShakespeareWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Shakespeare</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1564"/>
                  <death when="1616"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Shakespeare is widely regarded as
                     the world's preeminent English dramatist. He is best known for his innovations
                     in theatre and for his re-workings of the English sonnet. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsValentine" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Valentine</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Jewry</surname>
                     <forename>Laura</forename>
                     <forename>Belinda</forename>
                     <forename>Charlotte</forename>
                     <addName>Aunt Louisa</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1815-02-15"/>
                  <death when="1899"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Mrs. Valentine</persName>,
                     otherwise known by her maiden name Laura Jewry or her pseudonym Aunt Louisa,
                     was a writer of children's fiction. <persName>Dinah</persName> introduced her
                     to <orgName ref="ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</orgName> on behalf of her
                     acquaintance <persName ref="#RitchieLeitch">Leitch Ritchie</persName>, <date
                        when="1851" precision="medium">c. 1851.</date><lb/> "Valentine, L. (Laura),
                     1814-1899," <hi rend="italics">Library of Congress Name Authority File,</hi>
                     accessed Aug. 1, 2015. http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81149497.html<lb/>
                     WM. H. Peet, "Laura Jewry, Afterwards Mrs. R. Valentine" <hi rend="italics"
                        >Notes &amp; Queries</hi> 11S-XII, (1915): 266.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WaddingtonRichard" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Waddington</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1833"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Richard Waddington was an acquaintance of
                     Dinah's who attended the <orgName ref="#UniversityOfOxford">University of
                        Oxford</orgName> from <date from="1862" to="1867">1862 to 1867</date>.
                     According to Dinah, he was "a first rate German scholar" with an excellent work
                     ethic.<lb/>Foster, Joseph, <hi rend="italics">Alumni Oxoniensis: The Members of
                        the University of Oxford 1715-1886</hi> 4 (1888): 1478.</note>
                  <!-- Richard is mentioned in PU55 in the Princeton Parrish Collection. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WillsJanet" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Wills</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Chambers</surname>
                     <forename>Janet</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1812"/>
                  <death when="1892"/>
                  <occupation>Musician</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Janet Wills (née Chambers) was the
                     youngest sister of the publishing duo <persName ref="#ChambersWilliam"
                        >William</persName> and <persName ref="#ChambersRobert">Robert
                        Chambers</persName>. She married the successful journalist <persName
                        ref="#WillsWilliamHenry">William Henry Wills</persName> in <date when="1846"
                        >1846</date>. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WillsWilliamHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Wills</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Henry</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1810-01-13"/>
                  <death when="1880-09-01"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Henry Wills was a successful
                     journalist and journal editor. He was one of the original contributers to
                        <title corresp="#Punch">Punch</title> and was an assistant editor for <title
                        corresp="#ChambersMagazine">Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title>.
                     ODNB</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChambersAnne" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Chambers</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Kirkwood</surname>
                     <forename>Anne</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1808"/>
                  <death when="1863"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Anne Chambers was the first wife of the
                     publisher <persName ref="#ChambersRobert">Robert Chambers.</persName>
                     ODNB.</note>
                  <!-- Sondra Miley Cooney, "Chambers, Robert
                        (1802-1871)," ODNB.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChapmanMary" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Chapman</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Whiting</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1820" precision="low"/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mary Chapman was married to the publisher
                        <persName ref="#ChapmanEdward">Edward Chapman</persName> of <orgName
                        ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall.</orgName> ODNB.</note>
                  <!-- Robert L. Patten,
                        "Chapman Edward (1804-1880)," ODNB.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrGuild" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Guild</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Guild was the proprietor of
                        <placeName ref="#RoseCottage">Rose Cottage</placeName> in <placeName
                        ref="#Amberley">Amberley</placeName>. Dinah lodged with the Guild family
                     sometime in the <date notBefore="1854" notAfter="1856">mid 1850</date>s. She
                     wrote the first chapter of <title>John Halifax, Gentleman</title>, there.<lb/>
                     Diana Wall, "People of the Past: Dinah Maria Craik (née Mulock) (1826-1827),"
                        <hi rend="italics">Stroud District Council,</hi> accessed Aug. 1,
                     2015.</note>
                  <!--See PU66 in the Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsGuild" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Guild</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Guild was married to <placeName
                        ref="#MrGuild">Mr. Guild</placeName>, the proprietor of <placeName
                        ref="#RoseCottage">Rose Cottage.</placeName></note>
                  <!--See PU66 in the Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HarrisonLucy" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Harrison</surname>
                     <forename>Lucy</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <!-- See PU74 in the Princeton Parrish Collection -->
                  <!-- The Lucy Harrison that Dinah addresses in PU74 might have been the daughter of Daniel and Anna (Botham) Harrison— elder sister of Mary (Botham) Howitt. -->
                  <!-- See Amy Greener, <hi rend="italics">A Lover of Books: The Life and Literary Papers of Lucy Harrison</hi> (London: J. M. Dent &amp; Sons, 1916). https://archive.org/stream/loverofbookslife00gree#page/n9/mode/2up.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HooperJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Hooper</surname>
                     <surname>Winnard</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1818"/>
                  <death when="1907"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah and Jane Winnard Hooper were
                     friends and fellow writers. Jane was also close with <orgName ref="#Craik">the
                        Craiks</orgName> in <placeName ref="#Glasgow">Glasgow</placeName>.<lb/>
                     Charlotte Mitchell, Ellen Jordan and Helen Schinske, eds., "Jane Margaret
                     (Winnard) Hooper," <hi rend="italics">Letters of Charlotte Mary Yonge
                        (1823-1901),</hi> accessed July 22, 2015.
                     http://www.yongeletters.com/people?person=711 </note>
                  <!--         Dinah Maria Mulock Craik, "Autograph letter signed: place not
                        specified, to [Frederic] Chapman, 1854 Apr. 6.," <hi rend="italics"
                            >Archive Grid</hi>, accessed July 22, 2015.
                        http://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/collection/data/879478539. <!-\- See Morgan24 in the Pierpont Morgan Library Collection-\->
                    John McGivering and John Radcliffe, "Mary Kingsley," <hi
                            rend="italics">The New Readers' Guide to the works of Rudyard
                            Kipling</hi>, last modified Nov. 13, 2009.
                        http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/rg_kingsley1.htm.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KeanCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Kean</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1811-01-18"/>
                  <death when="1868-01-22"/>
                  <occupation>Actor</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Charles Kean was a popular
                     nineteenth-century actor and manager of <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>'s <placeName ref="#PrincessTheatre">Princess's
                        Theatre</placeName>
                     <date from="1850" to="1859">from 1850-1859.</date> He was best-known for his
                     work in Victorian Shakespeare revivals. ODNB.</note>
                  <!--  M. Glen Wilson, "Charles Kean's Production of 'Richard II'," <hi rend="italics"
                            >Educational Theatre Journal</hi> 19, no. 1 (1967): 41-51.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrLamont" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lamont</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Lamont and his wife were friends of
                     Dinah's. She met them while lodging with <persName ref="#PatonAllanPark">Allan
                        Park Paton</persName> at <placeName ref="#Greenock">Greenock</placeName> in
                        <date when="1849">1849.</date></note>
                  <!-- PU73 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsLamont" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Lamont</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Lamont and her husband were friends
                     of Dinah's. She met them while lodging with <persName ref="#PatonAllanPark"
                        >Allan Park Paton</persName> at <placeName ref="#Greenock"
                        >Greenock</placeName> in <date when="1849">1849.</date></note>
                  <!-- PU73 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LamontTom" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lamont</surname>
                     <forename>Tom</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Tom Lamont was one of <persName
                        ref="#MrLamont">Mr.</persName> and <persName ref="#MrsLamont">Mrs.
                        Lamont</persName>'s two sons.</note>
                  <!-- PU73 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LanziLuigi" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lanzi</surname>
                     <forename>Luigi</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1732-06-14"/>
                  <death when="1810-03-30"/>
                  <occupation>Scholar <!-- Occupation not in codebook --></occupation>
                  <nationality>Italian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Luigi Lanzi was a historian of classical
                     and renaissance Italian art. Dinah appears to have been researching Lanzi and
                     other art historians around <date when="1846">1846.</date><lb/> Shearjashub
                     Spooner, <hi rend="italics">A Biographical History of the Fine Arts</hi> II.— M
                     to Z, (Philadelphia: George Gebbie, 1873).
                     https://archive.org/details/abiographicalhi04spoogoog. <lb/> Sorensen, Lee
                     "Lanzi, Luigi [Antonio] (Abate)," <hi rend="italics">Dictionary of Art
                        Historians,</hi> accessed Aug. 2, 2015.
                     https://dictionaryofarthistorians.org/lanzil.htm.</note>
                  <!-- KB: This research was likely for her story Elisabetta Siriani or for Rembrandt's Sister, which both appeared in Chamber's publications around this time -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MartinFrances" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Martin</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Anne</forename>
                     <forename>Frances</forename>
                     <addName>Fanny</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1829-04-19"/>
                  <death when="1922-03-13"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Education</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Frances (Fanny) Martin was a lifelong
                     friend of Dinah Craik's. They lodged together during the summer of 1850 after
                        <persName ref="#MulockBen">Ben Mulock</persName> left for <placeName
                        ref="#Australia">Australia.</placeName> Frances helped found the College of
                     Women (1874-1967), which was renamed The Frances Martin College after her
                     death. ODNB.</note>
                  <!--     Mitchell, Sally, <hi rend="italics">Dinah Mulock Craik</hi> (Boston:
                            Twayne Publishers, 1983), 10.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacmillanFrances" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Macmillan</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Orridge</surname>
                     <forename>Frances</forename>
                     <forename>Eliza</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1821"/>
                  <death when="1867"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Frances Macmillan was married to the
                     publisher, <persName ref="#MacmillanDaniel">Daniel Macmillan.</persName>
                     ODNB.</note>
                  <!--   Rosemary T. Van Arsdel, "Macmillan family
                            (per. c. 1840-1986)," ODNB.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacmillanCaroline" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Macmillan</surname>
                     <forename>Caroline</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1823"/>
                  <death when="1871"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Caroline Macmillan was married to the
                     publisher, <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Alexander Macmillan.</persName>
                     ODNB.</note>
                  <!--  Rosemary T. Van Arsdel, "Macmillan family
                            (per. c. 1840-1986)," ODNB."Macmillan, Caroline Brimley," <hi rend="italics">Find a Grave,</hi> accessed July 29, 2015. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSln=MacMillan&GSiman=1&GSst=4220& -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="NewbyThomasCautley" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Newby</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Cautley</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1797-12-26"/>
                  <death when="1882-06-14"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Thomas Cautley Newby was a successful
                     English publisher best-known for publishing the first works by Emily and Ann
                     Brontë, <title>Wuthering Heights</title> and <title>Agnes Grey</title>.<lb/>
                     ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OrrWilliamSomerville" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Orr</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Somerville</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death when="1871"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Somerville Orr was the head of
                     the publishing company <orgName ref="#OrrCo">Wm. S. Orr &amp;
                     Co.</orgName><lb/> William Somerville Orr, <hi rend="italics">Orr's Circle of
                        the Sciences,</hi> (London: Wm. S. Orr &amp; Co, 1854).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PilkingtonMatthew" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Pilkington</surname>
                     <forename>Matthew</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1701"/>
                  <death when="1774"/>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <occupation>Scholar <!-- Occupation not in codebook --></occupation>
                  <nationality>Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Matthew Pilkington was an Irish church
                     minister and art historian. Dinah appears to have been researching Pilkington
                     and other Art Historians around <date when="1846">1846.</date><lb/> Shearjashub
                     Spooner, <hi rend="italics">A Biographical History of the Fine Arts</hi> II.— M
                     to Z, (Philadelphia: George Gebbie, 1873).
                     https://archive.org/details/abiographicalhi04spoogoog. <lb/> Sorensen, Lee
                     "Pilkington, Matthew," <hi rend="italics">Dictionary of Art Historians,</hi>
                     accessed Aug. 2, 2015. https://dictionaryofarthistorians.org/pilkingtonm.htm.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ProcterBryanWaller" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Procter</surname>
                     <forename>Bryan</forename>
                     <forename>Waller</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1787-11-21"/>
                  <death when="1874-10-04"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Lawyer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bryan Waller Procter was a
                     nineteenth-century poet and lawyer. He and his wife <persName ref="#MrsProcter"
                        >Anne Procter</persName> were well-known in London for their literary
                     salons.<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsProcter" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Procter</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Skepper</surname>
                     <forename>Anne</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1799"/>
                  <death when="1888"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Anne Skepper Procter was married to the
                     poet and lawyer <persName ref="#ProcterBryanWaller">Bryan Waller
                        Procter.</persName>
                     <date notBefore="1843">From 1843 onwards,</date> she and her husband hosted
                     lively parties and were well-known names in literary <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London.</placeName> ODNB.</note>
                  <!--James Sambrook, "Procter,
                            Bryan Waller (1787-1874)," ODNB. See PU68 in the Princeton Parrish Collection-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="VasariGeorgio" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Vasari</surname>
                     <forename>Georgio</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1511-07-30"/>
                  <death when="1574-06-27"/>
                  <occupation>Scholar</occupation>
                  <nationality>Italian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Georgio Vasari is a famous
                     sixteenth-century art historian. Dinah appears to have been researching Vasari
                     and other art historians around <date when="1846">1846.</date><lb/> Shearjashub
                     Spooner, <hi rend="italics">A Biographical History of the Fine Arts</hi> II.— M
                     to Z, (Philadelphia: George Gebbie, 1873).
                     https://archive.org/details/abiographicalhi04spoogoog. <lb/> Sorensen, Lee
                     "Vasari, Georgio," <hi rend="italics">Dictionary of Art Historians,</hi>
                     accessed Aug. 2, 2015. https://dictionaryofarthistorians.org/vasarig.htm.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BronteCharlotte" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Nicholls</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Brontë</surname>
                     <forename>Charlotte</forename>
                     <addName type="pseudonym">Currer Bell</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1816-04-21"/>
                  <death when="1855-03-31"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Charlotte Brontë is a celebrated novelist
                     of the Victorian period, best known for her novel, <title ref="#JaneEyre">Jane
                        Eyre</title>.<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Harriet" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Ruddock</surname>
                     <forename>Harriet</forename>
                     <forename>L</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <birth when="1861"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Harriet was the laundry maid at the Corner
                     House. Source: 1871, 1881 Census of England.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DyasonJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Dyason</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                     <forename>Frances</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <birth when="1839"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mrs. Dyason was the housekeeper that took
                     care of Dinah's home in <placeName ref="#Dover">Dover.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DyasonLouisa" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Dyason</surname>
                     <forename>Louisa</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1858"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Louisa Dyason was the daughter of <persName
                        ref="#DyasonJane">Jane,</persName> the housekeeper in charge of Dinah's home
                     in <placeName ref="#Dover">Dover.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DyasonMaude" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Dyason</surname>
                     <forename>Maude</forename>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <death when="1872"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Maude Dyason was the daughter of <persName
                        ref="#DyasonJane">Jane,</persName> the housekeeper in charge of Dinah's home
                     in <placeName ref="#Dover">Dover.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockMaria" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Mulock</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Horner</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Sarah</forename></persName>
                  <death when="1841-02-14"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Maria Mulock was Dinah's paternal
                     grandmother.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename></persName>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <death when="1837-04-16"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Robert Mulock was Dinah's paternal
                     grandfather.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FulfordWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Fulford</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1812"/>
                  <death when="1886-06-05"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Major Fulford was the governor of the
                     Stafford County Jail, where <persName ref="#MulockThomas">Thomas
                        Mulock</persName> was imprisoned more than once in the 1850s and 1860s.
                     Fulford was in attendance at <persName ref="#MulockThomas">Thomas
                        Mulock's</persName> funeral in 1869.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ReadeWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Reade</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>James</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1794"/>
                  <death when="1867"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">William Reade was married to Dinah's
                     maternal aunt <persName ref="#ReadeMary">Mary Reade</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ReadeElizabeth" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Lee</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Reade</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <addName>Lizzie</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1829-05-23"/>
                  <death when="1904-10-13"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Elizabeth was Dinah's cousin on the maternal
                     side. Her parents were <persName ref="#ReadeMary">Mary (Mellard)
                        Reade</persName> and <persName ref="#ReadeWilliam">William
                     Reade.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockCharlotte" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Wright</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Charlotte</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1797"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Charlotte was one of Dinah's paternal aunts.
                     She married <persName ref="#WrightGeorge">George Newenham
                     Wright.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WrightGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Wright</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Newenham</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <birth when="1794"/>
                  <death when="1877"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">George Newenham Wright was an Irish writer
                     and clergyman who was married to Dinah's paternal aunt <persName
                        ref="#MulockCharlotte">Charlotte.</persName>ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HillOctavia" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Hill</surname>
                     <forename>Octavia</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1838"/>
                  <death when="1912"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Octavia Hill was a housing and social
                     reformer. She was <persName ref="#CockerellOlive">Olive Cockerell's</persName>
                     godmother. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JollyGertrude" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Jolly</surname>
                     <forename>Gertrude</forename>
                     <forename>Fanny</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1867"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Gertrude was the young daughter of Dinah's
                     friend <persName ref="#JollyEllen">Ellen Jolly.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JollyArnold" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Jolly</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Arnold</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1869"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Arnold was the young son of Dinah's friend
                        <persName ref="#JollyEllen">Ellen Jolly</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JollyPaul" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Jolly</surname>
                     <forename>Paul</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1854"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Paul Jolly was a son of Dinah's friend
                        <persName ref="#JollyEllen">Ellen Jolly.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JollyElenor" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Jolly</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Voss</surname>
                     <forename>Elenor</forename>
                     <forename>Jane</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1858"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Elenor was the daughter-in-law of Dinah's
                     friend <persName ref="#JollyEllen">JollyEllen.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JamiesonJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Jamieson</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">A physician on <placeName ref="#Arran"
                        >Arran</placeName>. Dr. John A. Jamieson was appointed Medical Officer of
                     Health for Arran in 1852. source: Campbell, Thorbjörn. Arran: A History. New
                     York: Birlinn, 2013. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HoblynFrancis" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hoblyn</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                     <forename>Parker</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1817"/>
                  <death when="1896-08-10"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Dr. Francis Hoblyn was a general
                     practitioner and surgeon in Bath who married Dinah's paternal aunt <persName
                        ref="#MulockAlicia">Alicia</persName> in 1864. Ancestry.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SpencerBellJames" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <surname>Spencer-Bell</surname></persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <birth when="1818"/>
                  <death when="1872"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">James Spencer-Bell, formerly James Bell, was
                     a British politician and MP for Guildford from 1853 to 1857. He and his wife,
                        <persName ref="#SpencerBellMaryAnn"/>Mary Ann Spencer, had homes at
                     Marylebone and Fawe Park, Keswick. The <orgName ref="Spencer-Bell"
                        >Spencer-Bells</orgName> were friends of the Craiks. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SpencerBellMaryAnn" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Spencer-Bell</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Spencer</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mary Ann Spencer-Bell was the wife of
                        <persName ref="#SpencerBellJames">James Spencer-Bell</persName>. The
                        <orgName ref="Spencer-Bell">SpencerBell</orgName> were friends of the
                     Craiks. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SpencerBellFrederick" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <addName>Fred</addName>
                     <surname>Spencer-Bell</surname></persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <birth when="1863"/>
                  <death when="1886"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Frederick Spencer-Bell was the son of
                     Dinah's good friends the <orgName ref="#SpencerBell">Spencer-Bells</orgName>.
                     Fred died in a boating accident in 1886. "The Times", Saturday, 11 September
                     1886. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PilkingtonGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Pilkington</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Lawrence</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1865-06-04"/>
                  <death when="1897-12-11"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">George Lawrence Pilkington was <persName
                        ref="#PilkingtonAlexander">Alexander</persName>'s younger brother who went
                     to Africa as a missionary in <date when="1890">1890</date> and is largely
                     credited with the first translation of the Luganda Bible. Dinah's daughter
                        <persName ref="#CraikDorothy">Dorothy</persName> often travelled with George
                     between Ireland and Shortlands. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PilkingtonWilhelmina" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Wilhelmina</forename>
                     <forename>Charity</forename>
                     <addName>Mina</addName>
                     <surname type="married">Pilkington</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">McDonnell</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1832"/>
                  <death when="1902"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mrs. Pilkington was the mother of <persName
                        ref="#PilkingtonAlexander">Alexander</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PilkingtonHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>Mulock</forename>
                     <surname> McDonnell</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1813"/>
                  <death when="1899"/>
                  <nationality>Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Henry Pilkington was the father of <persName
                        ref="#PilkingtonAlexander">Alexander</persName>. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HendersonJemima" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Meo</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Henderson</surname>
                     <forename>Jemima</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1824"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Jemima was the wife of <persName
                        ref="#MeoLuigi">Luigi Meo</persName>, a musician acquaintance of
                     Dinah's.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SpeerCharlton" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Speer</surname>
                     <forename>Charlton</forename>
                     <forename>Templeman</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1859"/>
                  <death when="1921"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Charlton Speer, an acquaintance of the
                     Craiks, was a professor of piano at the Royal Academy of Music.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SpeerAmy" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Speer</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Hallett</surname>
                     <forename>Amy</forename>
                     <forename>Matilda</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1865"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Amy Speer, wife of <persName
                        ref="#SpeerCharlton">Charlton</persName>, was an acquaintance of the
                     Craiks.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="EastlakeMary" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Eastlake</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1856"/>
                  <death when="1911"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mary Eastlake was a British actress.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KendalWH" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Kendal</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Hunter</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1843"/>
                  <death when="1917"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">W.H. Kendal was an actor and theatre
                     manager. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ElliottMartha" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Elliott</surname>
                     <forename>Martha</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1833"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Martha Elliott was a servant of Dinah's
                     aunts in Bath.</note>
                  <!-- JP: In the 1861 Census of England she was 
                   listed as being 28 years of age and a House Servant. In the 1871 Census she was listed as 36 years of age, from Bath, and a Domestic Servant.-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="YongeCharlotte" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Yonge</surname>
                     <forename>Charlotte</forename>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Charlotte Mary Yonge was a novelist and the author of the Heir of
                     Redclyffe. George Craik was her publisher at Macmillan's.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LangrisheAmitia" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Langrishe</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Brown</surname>
                     <forename>Amitia</forename>
                     <forename>Snead</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1853"/>
                  <death when="1941"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mrs. Langrishe lived with her husband
                     Richard, an architect, at Shamrock Lodge, Althone.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KeeneJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Keene</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Wood</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1842"/>
                  <death when="1919"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">John Keene was the <orgName ref="#Craik"
                        >Craiks</orgName> coachman and gardener at <placeName ref="#CornerHouse"
                        >Corner House</placeName> In the 1881 Census of England he is listed as
                     living at the Stables at <placeName ref="#CornerHouse">Corner
                     House</placeName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KeeneEllen" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Keene</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Meadon</surname>
                     <forename>Ellen</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1846"/>
                  <death when="1916"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Ellen Keene was the wife of the <orgName
                        ref="#Craik">Craiks</orgName> coachman and gardener at <placeName
                        ref="#CornerHouse">Corner House</placeName>, <persName ref="#KeeneJohn">John
                        Keene</persName>. In the 1881 Census of England, Ellen is listed as a
                     visitor, with two of her children, at <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah's</persName>
                     home in <placeName ref="#Dover">Dover</placeName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LangdaleArthur" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Artuhur</forename>
                     <surname>Langdale</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Arthur Langdale was the husband of <persName
                        ref="#LangdaleAnnie">Annie Langdale.</persName> The Langdales were friends
                     of the <orgName ref="Craik">Craiks.</orgName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LangdaleAnnie" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Annie</forename>
                     <surname>Langdale</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Annie Langdale was the wife of <persName
                        ref="#LangdaleArthur">Arthur Langdale.</persName> The Langdales were friends
                     of the <orgName ref="Craik">Craiks.</orgName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LadyCaroline" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Georgina</forename>
                     <forename>Caroline</forename>
                     <surname>Legge</surname></persName>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <birth when="1795-05-14"/>
                  <death when="1885-08-11"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Lady Caroline was the daughter of George
                     Legge, the 3rd Earl of Dartmouth.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PhillipsRobertEdward" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Phillips</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1848"/>
                  <death when="1888-02-20"/>
                  <nationality>British</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Dr. Phillips was a homeopathic physician in
                     Bromley, originally trained as an orthodox physician, who treated Dinah in the
                     final months of her life. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GattyMargaret" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Gatty</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Scott</surname>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1809-06-03"/>
                  <death when="1873-10-04"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Gatty was an English writer of
                     children's literature and natural history.<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BellGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bell</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1812-10-12"/>
                  <death when="1890-11-27"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">George Bell was an English publisher and
                     bookseller. <date from="1867" to="1890">From the late 1860s until his death in
                        1890</date>, he was known as an authority on English copyright.<lb/>
                     ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LowellJamesRussell" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lowell</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Russell</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1819-02-22"/>
                  <death when="1891-08-12"/>
                  <nationality>American</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Politician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">James Russell Lowell was a New England
                     poet, critic, and diplomat. Lowell was well-known both in English and American
                     literary circles, and in the latter part of his life, he travelled frequently
                     between the two nations.<lb/> ANB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RuskinJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Ruskin</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1819-02-08"/>
                  <death when="1900-01-20"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">John Ruskin was an influential art and
                     social critic. He is famous for his articulation of gendered "separate spheres"
                     in Victorian society — a model which insists on "male leadership and female
                     care."<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WildeOscar" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Wilde</surname>
                     <forename>Oscar</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1854-10-16"/>
                  <death when="1900-11-30"/>
                  <nationality>Irish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Oscar Wilde was a famous writer of the
                     late Victorian period. He was a central figure in the decadent/aesthetic
                     movement in Victorian literature and is well-known today for works such as <hi
                        rend="italics">The Picture of Dorian Gray</hi> (1890) and <hi rend="italics"
                        >The Importance of Being Earnest</hi> (1895).<lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Metcalf" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Metcalf</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr. Metcalf was a shipowner and an
                     aquaintance of Thomas Mulock Jr.'s. Metcalf was the M.P. for
                        <placeName>Tynemouth</placeName>, near <placeName>North Shields</placeName>
                     where the Kate docked before sailing to <placeName>Cromarty</placeName>. -->
                     <lb/> Aleyn Lyell Reade, "Dinah Mulock and her Father," Notes and Queries (Feb.
                     2, 1924): 79</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TaylorThomas" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Taylor</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <addName>Captain</addName></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Captain Thomas Taylor commanded the Kate
                     – an A1 vessel which sailed from <placeName ref="#Newcastle"
                        >Newcastle</placeName> to <placeName ref="#Cromarty">Cromarty</placeName>
                     and then to <placeName ref="#Quebec">Quebec</placeName> in <date when="1846"
                        >1846</date>. Dinah's younger brother <persName>Thomas Jr.</persName> was
                     articled on the Kate.<lb/> Lucille H. Campey, Fast Sailing and Copper-Bottomed:
                     Aberdeen Sailing Ships and the Emigrant Scots They Carried to Canada, 1774-1855
                     (Toronto: Natural Heritage/Natural History Inc., 2002), 78.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LittleMary" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Mary</forename>
                     <addName>Little Mary</addName></persName>
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Little Mary was one of Dinah's favoured
                     housemaids at Wildwood.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrSpringfield" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Springfield</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Springfield was a friend of Dinah and
                        <persName ref="#MulockBen">Ben Mulock</persName>'s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrWhite" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>White</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mr White was an acquaintance of Dinah's
                     who lived in <placeName ref="#Glasgow">Glasgow.</placeName> His daughter,
                        <persName ref="#MissWhite">Miss White</persName>, seems to have been
                     romantically involved with another of Dinah's friends named <persName
                        ref="#MrSpringfield">Mr. Springfield.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsHerford" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Herford</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Herford was likely the mother of
                     Dinah's close friend, <persName ref="#HerfordLaura">Laura
                     Herford.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HerfordIvan" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Herford</surname>
                     <forename>Ivan</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Ivan was a relative of Dinah's close
                     friend, <persName ref="#HerfordLaura">Laura Herford.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsBlackett" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Blackett</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Blackett was married to <persName
                        ref="#BlackettHenry">Henry Blackett</persName> of the publishing house,
                        <orgName ref="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett.</orgName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsZiepel" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Ziepel</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs Ziepel was the matriarch of <orgName
                        ref="#Ziepel">the Ziepel family.</orgName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SmedleyFrank" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Smedley</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                     <addName>Frank</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1818-10-04"/>
                  <death when="1864-05-01"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Frank E. Smedley was a friend of Dinah's.
                     He was a novelist and was also editor for <title
                        corresp="#SharpesLondonMagazine">Sharpe's London Magazine.</title><lb/>
                     ODNB. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsSmedley" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Smedley</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Smedley was married to <persName
                        ref="#SmedleyFrank">Frank Smedley.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HughesThomas" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hughes</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1822-10-20"/>
                  <death when="1896-03-22"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Thomas Hughes was a writer of children's
                     novels. He was well-known for authoring the bestselling children's novel,
                        <title>Tom Brown's School Days</title> (<date when="1857">1857</date>).<lb/>
                     ODNB. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HughesFrances" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname type="married"
                        >Hughes</surname><forename>Anne</forename><forename>Frances</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1826" cert="low"/>
                  <death when="1910"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Frances Hughes was the wife of the
                     English writer, <persName ref="#HughesThomas">Thomas Hughes.</persName> They
                     married in <date when="1847">1847.</date><lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SmithHarvey" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Smith</surname><forename>Harvey</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsSmith" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Smith</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs Smith might have been Harvey Smith's mother. Little context is given in UCLADM14 except that Harvey Smith is not married to this woman.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrRichards" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Richards</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsRichards" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Richards</surname>
                     <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs Richards was married to <persName
                           ref="#MrRichards">Mr Richards</persName></note></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JackWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Jack</surname><forename>William</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsJack" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Jack</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs Jack was married to <persName
                        ref="#JackWilliam">William Jack</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MayallJoe" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mayall</surname><forename>Joseph</forename><forename>Parkin</forename><addName>Joe</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1839"/>
                  <death when="1906"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Joe Mayall was the second son of the
                     renowned photographer, <persName ref="#MayallJohn">John Mayall.</persName>
                     <persName ref="#MulockBen">Ben Mulock</persName> worked for <persName
                        ref="#MayallJohn">John</persName> and <persName ref="#MayallJoe">Joe
                        Mayall</persName> at their studio in <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>, for about a year <date notBefore="1858" notAfter="1859"
                        >from 1858 to 1859.</date></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MayallJohn">
                  <persName><surname>Mayall</surname><forename>John</forename><forename>Jabez</forename><forename>Edwin</forename><addName>Jabez
                        Meal</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1813-09-17"/>
                  <death when="1901-03-06"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">John Mayall was a successful professional
                     photographer specializing in portraiture and narrative photography. He became a
                     prominent name in England following his work at the Great Exhibition in <date
                        when="1851">1851</date>, and was commissioned to photograph the royal family
                     on several occasions.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="IsbisterWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Isbister</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1838"/>
                  <death when="1916"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">William Isbister was part of the
                     publishing <orgName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#DaldyIsbisterCo">Daldy, Isbister
                        and Co.</orgName> He founded the publishing company <orgName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#StrahanandCo"> with <persName
                           ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#StrahanAlexander">Alexander
                        Strahan</persName>.</orgName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BensonJane" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Benson</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1825"/>
                  <death when="1897-06-16"/>
                  <occupation>Teacher</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Jane Benson was a lifelong friend and
                     colleague of Dinah's good friend <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MartinFrances">Frances Martin</persName>. </note>
               </person>


               <person xml:id="VignolesCharles">
                  <persName><surname>Vignoles</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>Blacker</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1793-05-31"/>
                  <death when="1875-11-17"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Civil Engineer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Charles Blacker Vignoles was an influential
                     railway engineer who <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MulockBenjamin"
                        >Ben</persName> worked with on the Bahia and San Francisco Railway in
                     Brazil. ODNB</note>
               </person>

               <person xml:id="WaughBenjamin">
                  <persName><surname>Waugh</surname>
                     <forename>Benjamin</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1839-02-20"/>
                  <death when="1908-03-11"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Social Reformer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Benjamin Waugh was a social reformer devoted
                     to protecting the rights of children. He was editor of <title
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#SundayMagazine">The Sunday Magazine</title>, a
                     religious periodical in which Dinah published articles, from 1874 to 1896.
                     ODNB</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FieldsAnnie" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Fields</surname>
                     <forename>Annie</forename>
                     <forename>Adams</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1834-06-06"/>
                  <death when="1915-01-05"/>
                  <nationality>American</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Annie Adams Fields was an American writer
                     married to <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#FieldsJames">Frances
                        Martin</persName>. Gollin, Rita K. Annie Adams Fields: Woman of Letters.
                     University of Massachusetts Press, 2002.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FieldsJames" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Fields</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Adams</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1817-12-31"/>
                  <death when="1881-04-24"/>
                  <nationality>American</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">James Thomas Fields was an American writer
                     and publisher with <orgName corresp="#TicknorFields">Ticknor &amp;
                        Fields</orgName>. He was married to <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#FieldsAnnie">Annie Fields</persName>. American
                     National Biography Online. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RitchieLeitch" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Ritchie</surname>
                     <forename>Duncan</forename>
                     <forename>Leith</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1797-06-12"/>
                  <death when="1865-01-14"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>journalist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Leitch Ritchie was a Scottish novelist and
                     journalist. ODNB. Ancestry. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ouida" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>de la Ramée</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Louise</forename>
                     <addName>Ouida</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1839-01-01"/>
                  <death when="1908-01-25"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>French</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#AndersonHannah">Ouida was a popular late-Victorian
                     novelist whose work often featured adultery and continental settings. She is
                     best known for her novel <title corresp="#UnderTwoFlags">Under Two
                        Flags</title>. Dinah compared the moral tone of her work unfavourably to her
                     own.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="StrahanAlexander" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Strahan</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1833"/>
                  <death when="1918"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Alexander Strahan</persName>
                     founded <orgName ref="#GoodWords">Good Words</orgName>, a journal which
                        <persName>Dinah</persName> often published in.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacleodDonald" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Macleod</surname>
                     <forename>Donald</forename>
                     <roleName>Reverend</roleName>
                     <roleName>Doctor</roleName></persName>
                  <birth when="1831-03-18"/>
                  <death when="1916-02-11"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Minister of the Church of Scotland</occupation>
                  <occupation>Magazine Editor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Rev. Dr. Donald Macleod took over as editor
                     of <title ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#GoodWords">Good Words</title> after the death
                     of his older brother <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MacleodNorman">Norman
                        Macleod</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacleodNorman" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Macleod</surname>
                     <forename>Norman</forename>
                     <roleName>Reverend</roleName>
                     <roleName>Doctor</roleName></persName>
                  <birth when="1812-06-03"/>
                  <death when="1872-06-16"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Minister of the Church of Scotland</occupation>
                  <occupation>Magazine Editor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Rev. Dr. Norman Macleod was editor of <title
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#GoodWords">Good Words</title> from its inception in
                     1860 until his death in 1872, when his brother <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MacleodDonald">Donald Macleod</persName> became
                     editor of the magazine. ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CorbettThomas" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Corbett</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1822-03-23"/>
                  <death when="1880-04-01"/>
                  <occupation>Merchant</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey">Thomas Corbett was a <placeName
                        ref="#Glasgow">Glasgow</placeName>merchant also known as a philanthropist
                     who founded many Cooking Depots.</note>
                  <!-- Mentioned in letter PU209. Kelsey Jacobi-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CorbettArchibald" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Corbett</surname>
                     <forename>Archibald</forename>
                     <forename>Cameron</forename>
                     <roleName>First Baron Rowallan</roleName></persName>
                  <birth when="1856-05-23"/>
                  <death when="1933-03-19"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey">Archibald Corbett was the son of <persName
                        ref="#CorbettThomas">Thomas Corbett</persName>. He also knew <persName
                        ref="AndersonAlexander">Alexander Anderson</persName> and they travelled in
                     Europe together. Archibald became a politician later in life. </note>
                  <!-- Mentioned in letter PU209.Kelsey Jacobi -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SandozJules" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Sandoz</surname>
                     <forename>Jules</forename>
                     <forename>M.</forename></persName>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <!-- Mentioned in letter PU208.Kelsey Jacobi-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AndersonAlexander" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Anderson</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                     <addName>Surfaceman</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1845-05-30"/>
                  <death when="1909-07-11"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey"> Alexander Anderson was a poet who wrote
                     under the pseudonym Surfaceman. When he was younger, in 1862, he became a
                     platelayer for the Glasgow and South-Western Railway Company when Dinah
                     recommended him to <persName ref="#IsbisterWilliam">William Isbister</persName>
                     as she felt he was talented and should move to literary work. </note>
                  <!-- Dinah mentions him in letter PU209. Kelsey Jacobi -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MeadeElizabeth" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Toulmin Smith</surname>
                     <surname>Meade</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <forename>Thomasina</forename>
                     <addName>L.T. Meade</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1844-06-05"/>
                  <death when="1914-10-26"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey">Elizabeth Meade was a children's writer and
                     novelist who wrote as L.T. Meade, and is best known as a writer for older
                     girls. Some of her work also appeared in <title corresp="SundayMagazine">Sunday
                        Magazine</title>, a publication Dinah also wrote for.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MassonDavid" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Masson</surname><forename>David</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1822-12-07"/>
                  <death when="1907-10-06"/>
                  <nationality>Scotland</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>David Masson</persName> was a
                     biographer as well as an editor with the publishing firm <orgName
                        ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co.</orgName>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah</persName> corresponded with him while working as a
                     copy-editor for <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan.</orgName><lb/> ODNB.<lb/>
                     Jack M. Downs, "David Masson, Belles Lettres, and a Victorian Theory of the
                     Novel," Victorian Literature and Culture 43 (2015): 1-21,
                     doi:10.1017/S106015031400031X.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BlakeWilliam" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Blake</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1757-11-28"/>
                  <death when="1827-08-12"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>William Blake</persName> was an
                     engraver and poet of the Romantic era. His work gained popularity with
                     Victorian audiences following the publication of <persName
                        ref="#GilchristAlexander">Alexander Gilchrist</persName>'s <title
                        corresp="#LifeofWilliamBlake">Life of William Blake</title> in <date
                        when="1863">1863.</date><lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GilchristAlexander">
                  <persName><surname>Gilchrist</surname><forename>Alexander</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1828-04-28"/>
                  <death when="1861-11-30"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Alexander Gilchrist</persName>
                     was a Victorian biographer best known for writing the first biography of
                        <persName ref="#BlakeWilliam">William Blake.</persName>
                     <title corresp="#LifeofWilliamBlake">The Life of William Blake</title> was
                     published in 1863 after Gilchrist's death.<lb/> ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!--See https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=6HdAAAAAYAAJ&rdid=book-6HdAAAAAYAAJ&rdot=1 -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrChermside" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Chermside</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <forename>Seymour</forename>
                     <forename>Conway</forename>
                     <roleName>Reverend</roleName></persName>
                  <birth when="1823"/>
                  <death when="1867-07-30"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Clergyman</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Reverend Richard S.C.
                        Chermside</persName> was a novelist whose works Dinah reviewed for
                     publication by <orgName ref="#MacmillanCo">Macmillan</orgName>
                     <date when="1860" precision="high">c.
                     1860.</date><!--KF: See Ancestry.com --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsChermside" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Chermside</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Dawson</surname>
                     <forename>Emily</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1831"/>
                  <death when="1897-11-20"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Mrs Emily Chermside</persName>
                     was married to the novelist <persName ref="#MrChermside">Richard S.C.
                        Chermside</persName><!--KF: See Ancestry.com --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CupplesGeorge" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Cupples</surname><forename>George</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <birth when="1822"/>
                  <death when="1891"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>George Cupples</persName> was a Scottish
                     writer who specialized in nautical novels. <persName>Dinah</persName> reviewed
                     his novel <title ref="#HerbertsPrize">Herbert's Prize</title> for publication
                     by <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan.</orgName><lb/> "George Cupples Author
                     Information," <title>The Circulating Library: a Database of Victorian Fiction,
                        1837-1901,</title> Web. <!--http://www.victorianresearch.org/atcl/show_author.php?aid=55-->
                     <lb/> "The Author of 'the Green Hand'," <title>Book News: an Illustrated
                        Magazine of Literature and Books</title> volume 9 (1890-1891): 452-453, Web.
                     <!--https://books.google.ca/books?id=M2xPAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA452&lpg=PA452&dq=George+Cupples+novelist&source=bl&ots=kMFto1mqH9&sig=S1mRpqJYAVx6Bwzg4oepEByKfvc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj8__2i_ZfSAhVC7WMKHcWIBl4Q6AEIPzAH#v=onepage&q=George%20Cupples%20novelist&f=false--></note>

               </person>
               <person xml:id="CunninghamAllan" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Cunningham</surname><forename>Allan</forename><addName>Hidallan</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1784-12-07"/>
                  <death when="1842-10-29"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio"><persName>Allan Cunningham</persName> was a Romantic poet and
                     songwriter. <persName>Dinah</persName> advised <persName
                        ref="#GilchristAlexander">Alexander Gilchrist</persName> to cut a section
                     about <persName>Cunningham</persName> and his publishing relationships from the
                        <title corresp="#LifeofWilliamBlake">biography of William
                     Blake.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BaynePeter" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bayne</surname><forename>Peter</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1830-10-18"/>
                  <death when="1883-10-17"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Peter Bayne</persName> was a
                     Scottish journalist who, <date from="1860" to="1862">from 1860 to 1862</date>,
                     also worked as the editor of <title corresp="#Dial">The Dial.</title>
                     <lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CromekRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Cromek</surname><forename>Robert</forename><forename>Hartley</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1770"/>
                  <death when="1812"/>
                  <occupation>Artist</occupation>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey" type="bio"><persName>Robert Cromeck</persName> was
                     an engraver, editor, and art dealer who worked closely with <persName
                        ref="#BlakeWilliam">William Blake.</persName></note>
               </person>

               <!-- Here, the list of personal relationships start, right now focusing on family relations -->
               <listRelation type="personal">
                  <!--Marriages-->
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#JollyEllen #JollyPaul"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#HallSamuelCarter #HallAnnaMaria"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#DMC #CraikGeorge"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#CraikDorothy #PilkingtonAlexander"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#AllinghamHelen #AllinghamWilliam"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#BarnesFrederick #BrahamLeonora"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#HolmanHunt #WaughFanny"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#HolmanHunt #WaughEdith"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#LaneMary #LaneEdward"/>
                  <relation name="spouse" mutual="#PatonMaggie #PatonJosep"/>
                  <!-- Aunts and Uncles -->
                  <relation name="aunt" active="#ReadeMary" passive="#DMC"/>
                  <relation name="aunt" active="#HerfordLaura" passive="#AllinghamHelen"/>
                  <relation name="aunt" active="#WaughFanny" passive="#HuntGladysHolman"/>
                  <!--Siblings-->
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#DMC #MulockTom #MulockBen"/>
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#WaughEdith #WaughFanny"/>
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#CockerellOlive #CockerellSydney"/>
                  <relation name="sibling"
                     mutual="#DobellSydney #DobellClarence #DobellNora #JollyEllen"/>
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#DrysdaleGeorge #DrysdaleCharles #LaneMary"/>
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#MacmillanDaniel #MacmillanAlexander"/>
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#CraikGeorge #CraikHenry"/>
                  <relation name="sibling" mutual="#LaneMary #DrysdaleGeorge #DrysdaleCharles"/>
                  <!-- Parents and Children -->
                  <relation type="personal" name="child" active="#DMC #MulockBen #MulockTom"
                     passive="#MulockThomas #MulockDinah"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#DrysdaleGeorge #DrysdaleCharles"
                     passive="#DrysdaleLady"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#HuntGladysHolman"
                     passive="#HolmanHunt #WaughEdith"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#CraikGeorgiana" passive="#CraikGeorgeLillieSr"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#MarstonPhilipBourke"
                     passive="#MarstonWestland #MarstonEleanor"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#CraikHenry #CraikGeorge"
                     passive="#JamesCraik #CraikMargaret"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#DeWittHenriette" passive="#GuizotFrancois"/>
                  <relation name="child" active="#DrysdaleCharles #DrysdaleGeorge #LaneMary"
                     passive="#DrysdaleLady"/>
               </listRelation>
               <!-- Here, the list of social or professional relationships start, focusing on publishers and illustrators-->
               <listRelation type="social">
                  <relation name="publisher" active="#HenryBlackett" passive="#DMC"/>
                  <relation name="publisher" active="#AlexanderMacmillan" passive="#DMC #HenryCraik"/>
                  <relation name="publisher" active="#FredericChapman" passive="#DMC"/>
               </listRelation>
            </listPerson>
         </div>

         <div type="FictionalCharacters">
            <head>Fictional Characters</head>
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="OgilvieEleanor" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Ogilvie</surname>
                     <forename>Eleanor</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">The orphaned Eleanor Ogilvie is a primary
                     character in Dinah's <date when="1849">1849</date> novel <title
                        corresp="#Ogilvies">The Ogilvies.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OgilvieKatharine" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Ogilvie</surname>
                     <forename>Katharine</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Katharine Ogilvie is a primary character
                     in Dinah's <date when="1849">1849</date> novel <title corresp="#Ogilvies">The
                        Ogilvies.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WychnorPhilip" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Wychnor</surname>
                     <forename>Philip</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Philip Wychnor is a primary character in
                     Dinah's <date when="1849">1849</date> novel <title corresp="#Ogilvies">The
                        Ogilvies.</title> He is the love interest of <persName ref="#OgilvieEleanor"
                        >Eleanor Ogilvie.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PennythorneLeigh" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Pennythorne</surname>
                     <forename>Leigh</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Leigh Pennythorne is a secondary
                     character in Dinah's <date when="1849">1849</date> novel, <title
                        corresp="#Ogilvies">The Ogilvies.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KingLear" sex="1">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">King Lear is the titular character in a
                     Shakespearean play.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LocksleyNed" sex="1">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Ned Locksley</persName> is a
                     fictional character in <persName ref="#MrChermside">Mr. Chermside's</persName>
                     novel, <title corresp="NedLocksley">Ned Locksley.</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Herbert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mansfield</surname><forename>Herbert</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Herbert Mansfield</persName> is
                     a fictional character from <title corresp="#MoorCottage">The Moor
                        Cottage</title> by <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MissBlyth">Miss
                        Blyth.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Mabel" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Eversley</surname><forename>Mabel</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Mabel</persName> is a fictional
                     character from <title corresp="#MoorCottage">The Moor Cottage</title> by
                        <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MissBlyth">Miss Blyth.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Millicent" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Millicent</forename></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Millicent</persName> is a
                     fictional character from <title corresp="#MoorCottage">The Moor Cottage</title>
                     by <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MissBlyth">Miss Blyth.</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jackson" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Jackson</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Captain Jackson</persName> is a
                     fictional character from <title corresp="#MoorCottage">The Moor Cottage</title>
                     by <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MissBlyth">Miss Blyth.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LadyS" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Lady S.</persName> is a
                     fictional character in <title corresp="#NedLocksley">Ned Locksley</title> by
                        <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MrChermside">Mr.
                     Chermside.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BarrySarah" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Barry</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Herron</surname>
                     <forename>Sarah</forename>
                     <forename>Douglas</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1832-04-10"/>
                  <death when="1926-09-01"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mrs. Barry was the wife of <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#BarryTress">Sir Francis Tress Barry</persName>, a
                     wealthy merchant. The Barrys were friends of the Craiks, and lived in Beckenham
                     at the Clock House in 1872 before moving to a mansion in Clewer sometime before
                     1876. </note>
               </person>

               <person xml:id="BarryTress" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Barry</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                     <forename>Tress</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName></persName>
                  <birth when="1825-06-08"/>
                  <death when="1907-02-28"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>merchant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Sir Francis Tress Barry was a wealthy
                     English merchant who, along with his wife <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#BarrySarah">Sarah</persName>, were friends with the
                     Craiks. The Barrys lived in Beckenham at the Clock House in 1872 before moving
                     to a mansion in Clewer sometime before 1876. </note>
               </person>

               <person xml:id="NewlandsJames" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Newlands</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1813"/>
                  <death when="1871"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">James Newlands was a Scottish engineer and
                     architect who <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MulockBen">Ben</persName>
                     worked with in <placeName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Liverpool"/>Liverpool.
                  </note>
               </person>

               <person xml:id="GayleardChristopher" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Gayleard</surname>
                     <forename>Christopher</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1836"/>
                  <death when="1896"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <nationality>Jamaica</nationality>
                  <occupation>physician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Christopher Gayleard was a physician from
                     Jamaica who was educated in England and was surgeon for the Bahia railway. He
                     and <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MulockBen">Ben</persName> became friend
                     when Ben worked on the Bahia Railway. Dr. Gayleard was with Ben in Swansea
                     during the last few months of Ben's life, and visited Dinah in the 1880s.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MottAlbert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mott</surname>
                     <forename>Albert</forename>
                     <forename>Julius</forename>
                     <addName>A. J. Barrowcliffe</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1822"/>
                  <death when="1899-06-13"/>
                  <occupation>Wine Merchant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="ParkerJanice">Albert was a friend of Dinah's. He married
                        <persName ref="#MottClara">Clara Dobell</persName>, sister of <persName
                        ref="#DobellClarence">Clarence Dobell</persName>, a close friend of Dinah's.
                     Albert wrote non-fiction pieces under his own name, and used the pseudonym A.
                     J. Barrowcliffe to publish three novels. Sutherland, John. The Longman
                     Companion to Victorian fiction. Routledge, 2014.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MottGrey" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mott</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>Grey</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1832-05-27"/>
                  <death when="1905-11-07"/>
                  <occupation>engineer</occupation>
                  <occupation/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="ParkerJanice">Grey Mott was the younger brother of Dinah's
                     friend <persName ref="#MottAlbert">Albert Mott</persName>, sister of <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#DobellClarence">Clarence Dobell</persName>, a close
                     friend of Dinah's. Albert wrote non-fiction pieces under his own name, and used
                     the pseudonym A. J. Barrowcliffe to publish three novels. Sutherland, John. The
                     Longman Companion to Victorian fiction. Routledge, 2014.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CaptainAtkinson" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Atkinson</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1850-01-06"/>
                  <death when="1887-07-31"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Captain Atkinson died in battle in
                        <placeName ref="#Burma">Burma</placeName>. <!-- Dorothy28 UCLA -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WesternMrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Western</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Atkinson</surname>
                     <forename>Emily</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1843-12-04"/>
                  <death when="1928-03-21"/>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Irish</nationality>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WesternIsabel" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Western</surname>
                     <forename>Isabel</forename>
                     <forename>Caroline</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1867-09-19"/>
                  <death when="1949-10-06"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TuemanAllen" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Thomson</surname>
                     <forename>Allen</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1809-04-02"/>
                  <death when="1884-03-21"/>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <occupation>Physician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="ParkerJanice"><persName>Allen Thomson</persName> was a
                     well-known Scottish anatomist, embryologist, and professor. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BarnesHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Barnes </surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>Burr</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1845-12-14"/>
                  <death when="1911-01-12"/>
                  <nationality>American</nationality>
                  <occupation>Editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Henry Burr Barnes was editor of the
                     Interantional Review from 1874 to 1879, and a partner in his father's A. S.
                     Barnes publishing firm.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Daldy" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Daldy</surname>
                     <forename>Frederic</forename>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <addName>Frederick</addName></persName>
                  <birth when="1825"/>
                  <death when="1905-02-05"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">F. R. Daldy was a publisher who was part of
                        <orgName ref="#DaldyIsbisterCo"> Daldy, Isbister and Co.</orgName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacmillanFrederick" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Macmillan</surname><forename>Frederick</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1850-10-05"/>
                  <death when="1936"/>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Frederick Macmillan</persName>
                     was a son of <persName ref="#MacmillanDaniel">Daniel</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#MacmillanFrances">Frances Macmillan</persName>. He worked at the
                        <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</orgName>'s Cambridge branch with his
                     cousin <persName ref="#BowesRobert">Robert Bowes</persName> before moving to
                     the <placeName ref="#NewYork">New York</placeName> branch in <date when="1871"
                        >1871.</date> In <date when="1876">1876</date> he returned to <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName> to become a partner in the firm.<lb/>
                     ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BowesRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bowes</surname><forename>Robert</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1835-08-22"/>
                  <death when="1919-02-09"/>
                  <nationality>British</nationality>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <note resp="CraikSiteIndex.xml#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Robert Bowes</persName>
                     was a nephew of <persName ref="#MacmillanDaniel">Daniel</persName> and
                        <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Alexander Macmillan's.</persName> He
                     worked for <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</orgName>'s <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName> branch at <placeName ref="#HenriettaStreet"
                        >Henrietta Street</placeName>
                     <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co.</orgName> from <date when="1846"
                        >1846</date> until <date when="1863">1863</date> and then moved to manage
                     the <placeName ref="#Cambridge">Cambridge</placeName> location. <lb/>
                     ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RosettiChristina" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Rossetti</surname>
                     <forename>Christina</forename>
                     <forename>Georgina</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1830-12-05"/>
                  <death when="1894-12-29"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Anglo-Italian</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="JacobiKelsey">Christina Rossetti was a poet who published
                     in <title corresp="#MacmillansMagazine">Macmillan's Magazine</title>. She is
                     well-known for her poem <title corresp="#GoblinMarket">Goblin Market</title>
                     published in <date when="1862">1862</date>. She was the sister of <persName
                        ref="#RosettiDanteGabriel">Dante Gabriel Rossetti</persName> and had
                     connections with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="KingsleyHenry" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Kingsley</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1830-01-02"/>
                  <death when="1876-05-24"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="JacobiKelsey">Henry Kingsley was a novelist and essayist,
                     who tried to seek a fortune in the Australian goldfields, but returned to
                     England after little financial success and turned to writing.<persName
                        ref="#KingsleyCharles">Charles Kingsley</persName> was his brother.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="VidalMary" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Vidal</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Theresa</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1815-07-25"/>
                  <death when="1873-11-19"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey">Mary Vidal was a novelist who was especially
                     known for her Australian fiction, as she lived for some time in Australia. One
                     of her more well-known works was <title corresp="#Bengala">Bengala, or, Some
                        Time Ago</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SmithAlexander" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Smith</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1829-12-31"/>
                  <death when="1867-01-05"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>Socttish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey">Alexander Smith was a poet and essayist who
                     wrote for publications such as <title corresp="#MacmillansMagazine">Macmillan's
                        Magazine</title> and <title ref="#GoodWords">Good Words.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GilbertElizabeth" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Gilbert</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <forename>Margaretta</forename>
                     <forename>Maria</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1826-08-07"/>
                  <death when="1885-02-07"/>
                  <occupation>Social Reformer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#JacobiKelsey">Elizabeth Gilbert was a campaigner for blind
                     people, as she herself was blinded at a young age due to a severe case of
                     scarlet fever. She supported many organziations that helped the blind, and also
                     founded what became the <orgName ref="#BlindAssociation">Association for
                        Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind.</orgName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Baleson" sex="2">
                  <note resp="#AndersonHannah">"Mrs. Baleson of John's" is mentioned as an
                     acquaintance of <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah's</persName> who lives in <placeName
                        ref="#Cambridge">Cambridge.</placeName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsDickinson" sex="2">
                  <note resp="AndersonHannah">Mrs. Dickinson seems to have been a fan of <persName
                        ref="#DMC">Dinah's.</persName> She had a missing son.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hungerford" sex="1">
                  <note resp="AndersonHannah">Hungerford is a possibly fictional Captain written
                     about by <persName ref="Bluth">Bluth</persName>, whose poetry was edited by
                        <persName ref="DMC">Craik.</persName></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GarnettRichard" sex="1">
                  <birth when="1835-02-27"/>
                  <death when="1906-04-13"/>
                  <note resp="AndersonHannah">Richard Garnett was a British librarian and author. He
                     helped <persName ref="DMC">Dinah</persName> with her work on fairy
                     tales.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JebbHG">
                  <note resp="AndersonHannah">H.G. Jebb was the author of <title
                        ref="OutoftheDepths">Out of the Depths.</title></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="EdwynMartin" sex="1">
                  <note type="bio" resp="CraikSiteIndex.xml#GivogueStevensonLecia">Edwyn Martin was
                     a daily tutor. He was quite ill, and asked <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#DMC">Dinah</persName> for a loan in <date
                        when="1859">1859</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MudieCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Mudie</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>Edward</forename></persName>
                  <birth when="1818"/>
                  <death when="1890"/>
                  <occupation>Publisher</occupation>
                  <occupation>Businessman</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="GivogueStevensonLecia">Charles Edward Mudie was the founder
                     of a circulating library, which by the mid-century had over 25,000 subscribers.
                     It became one of the major distributors of fiction in Britain.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PerraultCharles" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Perrault</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1628-01-12"/>
                  <death when="1703-05-16"/>
                  <occupation>Lawyer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>French</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="GivogueStevensonLecia">Charles Perrault worked as a
                     secretary at <orgName ref="#InscriptionsBellesLettres">Academy of Inscriptions
                        and Belles-Lettres</orgName> and held many other positions. Perrault is best
                     known for his writing in the fairy tale genre; his works include <title>"Le
                        Petit Chaperon Rouge" (Little Red Riding Hood")</title>, <title>"La Belle au
                        bois dormant"</title> (Sleeping Beauty), and <title>"Cendrillon"</title>
                     (Cinderella).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WilsonJanet" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Wilson</surname>
                     <forename>Janet</forename>
                     <forename>Macmillan</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth/>
                  <death/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality>Scottish</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="FukushimaKailey"><persName>Janet Wilson</persName> was
                     sister to <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Daniel</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Alexander Macmillan.</persName> She was a
                     housekeeper for <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Alexander</persName> in
                        <date when="1833">1833</date> and for <persName ref="#MacmillanDaniel"
                        >Daniel</persName> in <date when="1840">1840</date>, but had to return to
                        <placeName ref="#Scotland">Scotland</placeName> both times for financial
                     reasons. <date notBefore="1850-07">By July 1850</date>,
                        <persName>Janet</persName> was married to a <persName>Mr. Wilson</persName>
                     and lived in <placeName>Stewarton,</placeName>
                     <placeName ref="#Scotland">Scotland.</placeName><lb/> Charles L. Graves, Life
                     and Letters of Alexander Macmillan (Macmillan and Co), 44-60. <!--https://archive.org/stream/lifelettersofale00gravuoft/lifelettersofale00gravuoft_djvu.txt-->
                     <!--KF: In letters from c. 1859, Dinah often refers to Alexander's sister. At first, it seemed like she meant Daniel's wife, but later she actually refers to Frances as his sister-in-law. I wonder if Janet might have come over from Scotland to help manage the "blended family" after Daniel's death in 1857. Unconfirmed. -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BackhouseDinah" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Backhouse</surname>
                     <forename>Dinah</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1832"/>
                  <death when="1910"/>
                  <occupation>Gentlewoman</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note type="bio" resp="FukushimaKailey"><persName>Dinah Backhouse</persName> was a
                     friend of <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah</persName>'s who lived in the <placeName
                        ref="#LakesDistrict">Lakes District.</placeName> She was born in <placeName
                        ref="#Rydal">Rydal</placeName>, <placeName>Westmorland</placeName> and
                     married <persName>John Backhouse.</persName><lb/> Ancestry. <lb/> DMC Diary,
                     September 4 – 10, 1887 (Works 21), Dinah Maria Mulock Craik Collection, Harry
                     Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. </note>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>

         <div type="StubEntriesPeople">
            <!-- The following are all stub entries to be defined/researched and developed -->
            <head>Stub Entries for Historical People</head>
            <listPerson>
               <person xml:id="LongfellowHenryWadsworth" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="SewellElizabeth" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="ParrHarriet" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <addName>Holme Lee</addName>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="FitzgeraldMrs" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="HollandMrs" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsJerrold" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="Annette" sex="2">
                  <!-- PU45 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ArchibaldLou" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Archibald</surname>
                     <addName>Lou</addName>
                     <!-- KF: forename might be Louise or Louisa? -->
                  </persName>
                  <!-- PU43 Princeton Parrish Collection. Lou is somehow connected to Anna Maria and Samuel Carter Hall. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Arlice" sex="1">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Arlice seems to have been one of Dinah's
                     servants at Wildwood.</note>
                  <!-- PU45 Princeton Parrish Collection. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrBarret" sex="1">
                  <!-- PU45 Princeton Parrish Collection. Lives in Glasgow. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Betty" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Betty was one of the three young girls to
                     whom Dinah dedicated "<title corresp="#HowToWinLove">How to Win Love, or
                        Rhoda's Lesson</title>."<lb/>
                     <!-- PU38 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Frances" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Frances was one of the three young girls
                     to whom Dinah dedicated "<title corresp="#HowToWinLove">How to Win Love, or
                        Rhoda's Lesson</title>."<lb/>
                     <!-- PU38 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jeannie" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Jeannie was one of the three young girls
                     to whom Dinah dedicated "<title corresp="#HowToWinLove">How to Win Love, or
                        Rhoda's Lesson</title>."<lb/>
                     <!-- PU38 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsLaing" sex="2">
                  <!-- PU41 Princeton Parrish Collection is addressed to Mrs. Laing. She is also mentioned in PU53. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrLaing" sex="2">
                  <!-- PU53 Princeton Parrish Collection is addressed to Mr. Laing -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Willie" sex="1">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Willie was likely one of Dinah's servants
                     at Wildwood.</note>
                  <!-- PU45 Princeton Parrish Collection. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Marion" sex="2">
                  <!-- PU56 Princeton Parrish Collection -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrWallis" sex="1">
                  <!-- PU62 Princeton Parrish Collection-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissRodick" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MissWilkinson" sex="2">
                  <!-- PU64 Princeton Parrish Collection-->
                  <!-- KF: Miss Wilkinson might be Miss Sarah Wilkinson. See Finding Aid for Mulock Family Papers: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt0k4003cw/entire_text/ -->
                  <!-- KB: this is likely correct, the Miss Wilkinson who was friends with Dinah in the Corner House days and helped her adopt Dorothy -->
               </person>

               <person xml:id="MrWalton" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsWalton" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsWylie" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsLinos" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Linos appears to be a music
                     instructor who helped with Dinah Craik's glee club <date notBefore="1862"
                        notAfter="1863">c. 1862</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissMarchall" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MissMeugius" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Meugius</surname>
                     <addName>N.R.E.M.</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">This name is noted by an unknown hand on
                     letter PU34 in the Princeton Parrish Collection. Miss Meugius is said to be a
                     friend of <persName ref="#MissMarchall">Miss Marchall</persName>'s and an
                     aspiring translator.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsRankine" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Rankine</surname>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <!-- KF: These are all stub entries from the UCLA letters. They still need to be researched/developed. Some might need to be combined with other entries, so I have listed which letter each entry appears in.  -->
               <person xml:id="MulockFrancis" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Mulock</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1853"/>
                  <death when="1886"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Dinah had a letter from Mrs. Mulock around
                     August 1887 in which she mentions her son Francis is dead. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PikeKate" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Kate</forename>
                     <surname>Pike</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Kate and her sister <persName
                        ref="#PikeLily">Lily</persName> are cousins of the <orgName ref="#Pike"
                        >Pike</orgName> sisters. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PikeLily" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Lily</forename>
                     <surname>Pike</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Lily and her sister <persName
                        ref="#PikeKate">Kate</persName> are cousins of the <orgName ref="#Pike"
                        >Pike</orgName> sisters. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsHomfray" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Homfray</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">In one of Dinah's letters, she mentions Mrs.
                     Homfray will give them an address to stay in Rome. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BarrowIda" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Ida</forename>
                     <surname>Barrow</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Ida was a friend of the Craiks. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Emma" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Emma</forename>
                     <surname/>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Emma seems to have been a servant of
                     Dinah's.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CromwellOliver" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cromwell</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DeCervantesMiguel" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>De Cervantes</surname>
                     <forename>Miguel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Miguel de Cervantes was a seventeenth-century
                     Spanish writer.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Eunice" sex="2">
                  <persName>Eunice</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Referred to as Aunt Eunice</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jamie"/>
               <person xml:id="Adam" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsScott" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MissMcDounell" sex="2">
                  <persName>Miss McDounell</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Miss McDounell owned a horse that Dinah once
                     planned to borrow.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HooperMaggie" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Maggie Hooper lived in Shortlands,
                     Kent.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrPhillips" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="Jessie" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Jessie was a young servant of the Craiks in
                     the 1880s in the Corner House.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Katie" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Katie was a servant of the Craiks in the
                     1880s.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CoxMrs" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MissParker" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MissHavford" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="David" sex="1">
                  <!-- JP: The French painter-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MarieAntoinette" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="DybeenMrs" sex="2">
                  <occupation>Servant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Mrs. Dybeen was the housekeeper at Dinah
                     Craik's cottage in Dover.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CanningGeorge" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.8-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrB" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.15-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrP" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.15-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissP" sex="2">
                  <!--UCLA10.19-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrH" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrMuskett" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.18-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsMuskett" sex="2">
                  <!--UCLA10.18-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Mary" sex="2">
                  <!--UCLA10.15-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrWallinger" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.8-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ThynneJohnAlexander" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Thynne</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                     <addName>Marques of Bath</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HornerRichard" sex="1">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Richard Horner was Dinah's great-uncle.
                     He was the brother of Dinah's grandmother, <persName ref="#MulockMaria">Maria
                        (Horner) Mulock.</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MulockHarriet" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey"> According to Dinah's aunt <persName
                        ref="#MulockAlicia">Alicia</persName>, Harriet Mulock was the sister of
                     Dinah's paternal grandfather, <persName ref="#MulockRobert">Robert
                        Mulock.</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <!-- JP: The following 6 Dobells are from a geneaology website, haven't run into them in the letters so much  http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Dobell-Family-Tree-23 -->
               <person xml:id="DobellEdmund" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellIsabella" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellClara" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellClerma" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellHorace" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="DobellCyrus" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="LordRaglan" sex="1">
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bessie" sex="2">
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsKirkess" sex="2">
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsDunsmeath" sex="2">
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Alice" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy01, 31 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hermione" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy01 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissOxlade" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy02 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PikeWilliam" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy03 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RankinJessie" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy03, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 29 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Is this the same person as xml:id="MissRankin"? or is it the same as xml:id="Jessie"? (i.e. friend at Wemyss Bay or servant at the Corner House?) -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CarrComyns" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy04 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rose" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy04, 23, 33 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsBradbury" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy04 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ShawMiss" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MacdougallMiss" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RankinMrs" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RankinMr" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RankinSarah" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HoddartMiss" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hunter" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Katherine" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05, 06, 07, 21, 26 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same person as xml:id="MiersKatherine" and xml:id="Kath." -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bertha" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy05, 15, 16, 23, 29 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PatonDonaldNoel" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy06 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jeanie" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy07, 13 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Could Jeanie be the same "Jeannie" that Dinah dedicated _How to Win Love, or, Rhoda's Lesson_ to? -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Emmie" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy09, 19, 28 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsDobbs" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SwanCameron" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy10 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsMulock" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Mulock was the mother of <persName
                        ref="#MulockFrancis">Francis Mulock.</persName>
                     <!-- Dorothy12 UCLA -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsWhite" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy12 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissStoddart" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy13, 14, 15, 25, 26 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissEade" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy13 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersSusan" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy13 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissAtkinson" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy14 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsMacdonald" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy14 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrFullarton" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy14 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Margery" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy15 and 16 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Charlie" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy15 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissAlderman" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy16 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HarrisKatherine" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy16, 25, 27 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same as xml:id="Katherine" and xml:id="Kath." -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="StoddartMary" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy16 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same as xml:id="MissStoddart." -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrMartin" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy17, 25 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsReed" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy17 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissReed" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy17 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissAllen" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy17, 24 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Poosa">
                  <!-- Dorothy17 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Keene">
                  <!-- Dorothy17 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same as xml:id="KeeneJohn"? She refers to this person by last name only. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsKennedy" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy18 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Russell" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy18 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kath" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy19, 24 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: A nickname. This might be the same as xml:id="Katherine"? and xml:id="MiersKatherine." -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LewinHarold" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy19 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LewinEdith" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy19, 21 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsAnderson" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy19 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AndersonMary" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy19, 25 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="QueenElizabethI" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy19 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SpringettHerbert" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jumbo">
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HolmesSophia" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jennie" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SandsRoland" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SandsLily" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissSands" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsParsons" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsVizard" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Beethoven" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsWarner" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy24 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Poussie">
                  <!-- Dorothy24 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same nickname as xml:id="Poosa" or maybe related somehow?-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsWarren" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy24 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="SirRichard" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy24 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Eliza" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ParkerJanice">Eliza was one of Dinah's servants.
                     <!-- Dorothy25 UCLA -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrAnderson" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy25 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsHarris" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy25 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ColvilHelen" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy25, 27 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Mayday">
                  <!-- Dorothy25, 27 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Mayday is likely a nickname. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Daisy" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lily" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same person as xml:id="SandsLily" or xml:id="PikeLily." -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ColgateDorothy" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AingerAlfred" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BrownRichard" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Barnes">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Dinah refers to Barnes by last name only -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wellstead">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Dinah refers to Wellstead by last name only -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ferris">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Dinah refers to Ferris by last name only -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PhillipsRobert" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GeneralGordon" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="TennysonEmily" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Lady Tennyson was married to <persName
                        ref="#TennysonAlfred">Alfred Lord Tennyson.</persName>
                     <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsAlston" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy28 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissWhite" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy28 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissCox" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy28 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrSkinner" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy28 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AtkinsonFred" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy28 UCLA -->
               </person>

               <person xml:id="MrCockerell" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy29 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Janie" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy29 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Marjery" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy29 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Idol">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Referred to as "a figure in a dream." Perhaps a reference to God. It might be better to remove this entry and not code "Idol" at all. -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MorleyJohn" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PilkingtonHenryMulock">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Charlotte" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy31 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jim" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy31 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BramstonJohn" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DavidJacques-Louis" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sarah" sex="2">
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Sarah was the cook for <orgName
                        ref="#MacmillanFamily">the Macmillan's.</orgName>
                     <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsLane" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: This might be the same Mrs. Lane as xml:id="LaneMary"? -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissLane" sex="2">
                  <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DukeOfCambridge" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy33 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="NewdigateEdward" sex="1">
                  <!-- Dorothy33 UCLA -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissScott" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Scott</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mentioned in PU83. Envelope in
                            PU82.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissCooke" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Cooke</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mentioned in PU84.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsBarnett" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Barnett</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mentioned in PU85.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissSmith" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Smith</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mentioned in PU88.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Maxwell" sex="1">
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mentioned in PU89.</note>-->
               </person>
               <!-- KF: The following 3 Stub Entries are from UCLATM01 -->
               <person xml:id="MrsBrown" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Brown</surname></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mrs. Brown was an acquaintance of the
                     Mulock family. She lived in <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName> It
                     seems that she helped to care for <persName>Thomas Mulock Jr.</persName>'s
                     horse, <persName>Nell</persName>, while he was at away at sea.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bob" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename cert="medium">Robert</forename>
                     <addName>Bob</addName></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bob seems to have been a friend of the Mulocks. He likely lived in London. In UCLATM01 (1846), Thomas Mulcok Jr. asks his brother Ben to "remember him to Bob and Thompson."</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Thompson" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Thompson</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Thompson seems to have been a friend of the Mulocks. He likely lived in London. In UCLATM01 (1846), Thomas Mulcok Jr. asks his brother Ben to "remember him to Bob and Thompson."</note>-->
               </person>
               <!--KF: The Following 22 Stub Entries are from UCLADM25 -->
               <person xml:id="MrsAllen" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MissHorne" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MacphersonRobert" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="DomPedroII" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="MrSankey" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="ReadeThomasMellard" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="LeeWilliam" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="LeeMuriel" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MottClara" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsMott" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="ParkerEmma" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="BestWilliamThomas" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="DowieAnnie" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="TaylorAlfred" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsAlfred" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="Greg" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="Sophia" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="LovellWilliam" sex="1"/>
               <person xml:id="MrsLovellWilliam" sex="2"/>
               <!--KF: Change this xml id when we find out her given name-->
               <person xml:id="MrsStewartAndrew" sex="2"/>
               <!--KF: Change this xml id when we find out her given name-->
               <person xml:id="MrWarren" sex="1"/>
               <!-- KF: The following stub entries are from UCLADM14 -->
               <person xml:id="MissMontgomery" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Montgomery</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsMelver" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Melver</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PearsonLauren" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Pearson</surname><forename>Lauren</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsEarl" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Earl</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AdamsWBridges" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Adams</surname><forename>Bridges</forename></persName>
                  <!--<note type="bio" resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah mentions "a squabble at Mr. W. Bridges Adams" in UCLADM14. I have yet to find sources that verify the existence of a relationship, but it seems like she must be referring to the writer and railway engineer, William Bridges Adams. Adams lived in London and was a partner in Hobson &amp; Co. coaches.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissGarden" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Garden</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsHartwell" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Hartwell</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissThomson" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Thomson</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissHill" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Hill</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsGow" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Gow</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsGuelph" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Guelph</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BewesRobert" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Bewes</surname><forename>Robert</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Easton" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Easton</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="June" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>June</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Phillipe" sex="2">
                  <persName><forename>Phillipe</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="George" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>George</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="William" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>William</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrLewes" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Lewes</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Travis" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Travis</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Nicholay" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Nicholay</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Linton" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Linton</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsMiers" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Miers</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrMiers" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Miers</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hockin" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Hockin</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DrStorrar" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Storrar</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrWistan" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Wistan</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="EstellFanny" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Estell</surname><forename>Fanny</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HenstrallPenelope" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Henstrall</surname><forename>Penelope</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrZiepel" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Ziepel</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MontgomeryHugh" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Montgomery</surname><forename>Hugh</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MiersJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Miers</surname><forename>John</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrGale" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Gale</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrWatson" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Watson</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrMatthew" sex="1">
                  <persName><forename>Matthew</forename></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsHowlett" sex="2"/>
               <person xml:id="MrClay" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Clay</surname></persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissBlyth" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Blyth</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Popham</forename>
                     <addName>May Beverley</addName>
                     <!--KF: May Beverley is a diminuative of Miss Blyth's first name and her place of birth (Beverley, Yorkshire).-->
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1831"/>
                  <death when="1915"/>
                  <occupation>Writer</occupation>
                  <nationality>English</nationality>
                  <note resp="CraikSiteIndex.xml#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Miss Blyth (pseud. May
                        Beverley)</persName> was a writer who primarly produced literature for young
                     people. Dinah read and reviewed her works when she was working as a publisher's
                     reader for <title corresp="#MacmillansMagazine">Macmillan Magazine</title>
                     <date when="1860" precision="high">c. 1860.</date><lb/> "Mary Popham Blyth:
                     Author Information," Circulating Library, Web.
                     <!--http://www.victorianresearch.org/atcl/show_author.php?aid=2129-->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrsRivers" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname type="married">Rivers</surname></persName>
                  <!-- Mentioned in Berg 20. Kelsey Jacobi -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MissBrimely" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>Brimely</surname></persName>
                  <!-- Mentioned in Berg 20. Kelsey Jacobi -->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="AllenHarriet" sex="2">
                  <!--<note resp="AndersonHannah">A visitor of <persName ref="DMC"
                            >Craik's</persName>in <date when="1860-02">February 1860</date></note>
                </person>--></person>
               <person xml:id="MrsAleck" sex="2">
                  <!--<note resp="AndersonHannah">Referenced as a friend of <persName
                            ref="AllenHarriet">Harriet Allen.</persName></note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MrStirling" sex="1">
                  <!--<note resp="AndersonHannah">Mentioned in a <date when="1860-02"
                            >February 1860</date>letter close; sending a "prize-man"?</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Manche" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Manché</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note resp="FukushimaKailey"><persName>Manché</persName> was a writer of children's fairy tales. Presumably French.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MadameDAubrey" sex="2">
                  <persName><surname>D'Aubrey</surname></persName>
                  <!--<note resp="FukushimaKailey"><persName>Madame D'Aubrey</persName> was a writer of fairy tales. Dinah thought her tales were unsuitable for children.</note>-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="NicholJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName><surname>Nichol</surname><forename>John</forename></persName>
                  <!--<note resp="FukushimaKailey"><persName>Madame D'Aubrey</persName> was a writer of fairy tales. Dinah thought her tales were unsuitable for children.</note>-->
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>

         <div type="Organizations">
            <head>Organizations</head>
            <listOrg>
               <!-- Publishers -->
               <org xml:id="Bentley" type="publisher">
                  <orgName notAfter="1829">Bentley &amp; Co</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1829" to="1832">Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1832" to="1871">Richard Bentley</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1871" to="1898">Richard Bentley &amp; Son</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName ref="#BentleyEdward">Edward
                        Bentley</persName>, his son <persName ref="#BentleyRichard"
                        >Richard</persName> and his grand-son <persName ref="#BentleyGeorge"
                        >George</persName> were three generations of publishers based out of
                        <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName> The name Bentley is best-known
                     for Richard Bentley's periodical "<title corresp="#BentleysMiscellany"
                        >Bentley's Miscellany</title>" which was edited by <persName
                        ref="#DickensCharles">Charles Dickens.</persName><lb/>Anderson, Patricia J.
                     and Jonathan Rose, eds., "Richard Bentley," <hi rend="italics">British Literary
                        Publishing Houses, 1820-1880</hi> 106, (Detroit: Gale, 1991), 39-52. DLB
                     106.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="OrrCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName><choice>
                        <abbr>Wm.</abbr>
                        <expan>William</expan>
                     </choice> S. Orr &amp; Co</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Wm. S. Orr &amp; Co was a <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>-based publisher run by <persName
                        ref="#OrrWilliamSomerville">William Somerville Orr.</persName><lb/>
                     ODNB.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="TCNewby" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>T.C. Newby</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">T.C. Newby was a <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName> publishing company run by <persName
                        ref="#NewbyThomasCautley">Thomas Cautley Newby.</persName><lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Chambers" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>W. &amp; R. Chambers</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Chambers was a publishing company located in
                        <placeName ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh.</placeName></note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="CadellCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Cadell &amp; Co</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Cadell &amp; Co was a Scottish publishing company
                     located in <placeName ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh</placeName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="DaldyIsbisterCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Daldy Isbister &amp; Co</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Daldy Isbister &amp; Co was a publishing company
                     located in <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName></note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HallVirtueCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Arthur Hall, Virtue &amp; Co</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Arthus Hall, Virtue &amp; Co was an English
                     publishing company founded <date notBefore="1847" notAfter="1849">c.
                        1848</date>.<lb/> Boase, G. C., "Virtue James Sprent (1829-1892)," ODNB.
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HodgsonGraves" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Hodgson &amp; Graves</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Hodgson &amp; Graves was an English publishing
                     company located at 6 <placeName ref="#PallMall">Pall Mall</placeName>,
                        <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="ParkerAndSon" type="publisher">
                  <orgName from="1832" to="1843">John W. Parker</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1843" to="1848">John W. Parker &amp; Sons</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1848" to="1860">John W. Parker &amp; Son</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1860" to="1863">Parker, Son, and Bourn</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">John W. Parker &amp; Son (and all its iterations)
                     was a publishing company located in central <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London.</placeName><lb/> ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- KF: the xml:id is named after the firm's most active publishing period -->
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Bell">
                  <orgName notAfter="1855">George Bell</orgName>
                  <orgName from="1855" to="1873">Bell and Daldy</orgName>
                  <orgName notBefore="1873">George Bell and Sons</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">George Bell, Bell and Daldy, and George Bell and
                     Sons were all <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName> publishing companies
                     owned or partially owned by <persName ref="#BellGeorge">George
                     Bell.</persName><lb/> ODNB.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="WilliamsNorgate" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Williams &amp; Norgate</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><orgName>Williams &amp; Norgate</orgName> were
                     publishers with offices in <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName> and
                        <placeName ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh.</placeName> They specialized in
                     scientific literature.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="SampsonLowAndCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Sampson Low, Son and Company</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><orgName>Sampson Low, Son and Company</orgName> was
                     a publishing office originally located on <placeName ref="#FleetStreet">Fleet
                        Street</placeName>. It was founded by the well-known bookseller <persName
                        ref="#LowSampson">Sampson Low</persName> and his eldest son in <date
                        when="1848">1848.</date> ODNB.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="PhillipsSampsonCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Phillips, Sampson and Co.</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><orgName>Phillips, Sampson and Co.</orgName> was a
                     publishing firm based out of <placeName ref="#Boston">Boston.</placeName> They
                     were the founders and original publishers of <title corresp="#AtlanticMonthly"
                        >the Atlantic Monthly.</title></note>
               </org>

               <!-- Families -->
               <org xml:id="MacmillanFamily" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Macmillans</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Macmillans were the family members of <persName
                        ref="#MacmillanDaniel">Daniel</persName> and <persName
                        ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Alexander Macmillan</persName>, founders of the
                        <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</orgName> publishing house. For a list
                     of the brothers' respective spouses and children, consult the ODNB entry
                     "Macmillan Family."</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Craik" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Craiks</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Craiks were Dinah's husband <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George</persName>'s family.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Singleton" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Singletons</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Singletons were friends of Dinah's while she
                     lived at <placeName ref="#HampsteadHeath">Hampstead Heath</placeName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Marston" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Marstons</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah was very close with the Marston family
                     throughout the 1850s and beyond. She was godmother to the family's youngest
                     child, <persName ref="#MarstonPhilipBourke">Philip Bourke
                     Marston</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HolmanHunts" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Holman-Hunts</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Allingham" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Allinghams</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Reade" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Reades</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="MulockAunts" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Mulock Aunts</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah's paternal aunts Jane, Emily, Eliza, Frances,
                     Ann, and Eliza Mulock lived at <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Garden" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Gardens</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Mudie" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Mudies</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Ziepel" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Ziepels</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Stoddar" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Stoddars</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Estell" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Estells</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Adams" type="family">
                  <orgName>The Adams</orgName>
               </org>

               <!-- Other types of organizations -->
               <org xml:id="StationersCompany" type="guild">
                  <orgName>The Stationers' Company</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Stationers' Company was a Guild of Stationers in
                     the city of <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName> At its conception, the
                     Guild was comprised of those who worked in the trade of manuscript books (i.e.
                     copiers, limners, and booksellers) but came to include printers in the early
                     sixteenth century. The Stationers' Company owned a building in <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName> called <placeName ref="#StationersHall"
                        >Stationers' Hall.</placeName><lb/>"The Hall &amp; Heritage," <hi
                        rend="italics">The Stationers' Company</hi>, accessed Aug. 3, 2015.
                     https://stationers.org/the-hall-heritage.html.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BenRhydding" type="hospital">
                  <orgName>Ben Rhydding</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Ben Rhydding was a medical centre near Leeds known
                     for its physicians' expertise in Hydro-Therapeutics. Dinah sent her brother
                        <persName ref="#MulockBen">Ben</persName> to Ben Rhydding after he had a
                     "nervous dyspeptic attack".<lb/>"Ben Rhydding," <hi rend="italics">Medical
                        Times and Gazette Advertiser</hi> 3, no. 1124 (June 22, 1872): 181 and
                     246.<lb/></note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="CatharineLodge" type="school">
                  <orgName>Catharine Lodge School for Young Ladies</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Established in <date when="1851">1851</date>, the
                     Catharine Lodge School for Young Ladies was a boarding and day school that
                     prepared middle-class girls to be good governesses and wives.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="MertonCollege" type="school">
                  <orgName>Merton College</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Established in <date when="1264">1264</date>, Merton
                     College was one of the first constituent colleges of the <orgName
                        ref="#UniversityOfOxford">University of Oxford.</orgName><lb/> "The history
                     of Merton," <hi rend="italics">Merton College: Oxford</hi>, accessed July 14,
                     2015, http://www.merton.ox.ac.uk/about/history-merton. </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="SaltleyReformatory" type="school">
                  <orgName>Saltley Reformatory</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Established in <date when="1852">1852</date>, The
                     Saltley Reformatory was a boy's industrial school located in central <placeName
                        ref="#Birmingham">Birmingham.</placeName> Its goal was to train juvenile
                     offenders in the trades so as to mould them into productive members of society
                     and prevent them from falling into a life of crime. <lb/> ODNB. <lb/>Barnett,
                     Mary G. "D— The First Reformatory School Acts," <hi rend="italics">Young
                        Delinquents: A Study of Reformatory and Industrial Schools,</hi> (New York,
                     E. P. Dutton &amp; Co., 1913): 20-22.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="UniversityOfOxford" type="school">
                  <orgName>University of Oxford</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The University of Oxford is the oldest university in
                     the English speaking world. It is said to have been founded in <placeName
                        ref="#Oxford">Oxford</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England</placeName> the last decade of the eleventh century, <date
                        notBefore="1090" notAfter="1100">c. 1096.</date><lb/> "Introduction and
                     History," <hi rend="italics">University of Oxford</hi>, accessed July 14, 2015,
                     http://www.ox.ac.uk/about/organisation/history.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="UniversityofCambridge">
                  <orgName>University of Cambridge</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="FischbacherandSandoz" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Fischbacher and Sandoz</orgName>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">Fischbacher and Sandoz was a publishing firm in
                        <placeName ref="#Paris">Paris,</placeName> and also had branch houses in
                        <placeName ref="#Neuchatel">Neuchatel</placeName> and <placeName
                        ref="#Geneva">Geneva.</placeName></note>
                  <!-- Mentioned in letter PU208.Kelsey Jacobi-->
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BlindAssociation">
                  <orgName>Association for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind</orgName>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey"> The Association for Promoting the General Welfare of
                     the Blind was founded by <persName ref="#GilbertElizabeth">Elizabeth
                        Gilbert</persName> first as a private undertaking in <date when="1854"
                        >1854</date> and it grew into an association in <date when="1856"
                        >1856</date>. Its purpose was to give blind people employment and train them
                     in industrial occupations.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BrothersGrimm" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Grimm Brothers</orgName>
                  <note resp="#GivogueStevensonLecia">The Brothers Grimm comprised of brothers
                        <persName>Jacob</persName> and <persName>Wilhelm Grimm</persName>. During
                     the 1800s they collected and publsihed folklore tales. The brothers became
                     well-known storytellers of folk tales and popularized stories such as
                        <title>"Cinderella"</title>, <title>"The Frog Prince"</title>, and
                        <title>"Sleeping Beauty"</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="InscriptionsBellesLettres">
                  <orgName><foreign xml:lang="fr">Académie des Inscriptions et
                        Belles-Lettres</foreign></orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The <orgName><foreign xml:lang="fr">Académie des
                           Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres</foreign></orgName> is a French society
                     for the support and promotion of the humanities. It was founded in <date
                        when="1663">1663.</date></note>
               </org>
            </listOrg>
         </div>

         <div type="StubEntriesOrganizations">
            <!-- The following are all stub entries to be defined/researched and developed -->
            <head>Stub Entries Organizations</head>
            <listOrg>
               <!-- Publishers -->
               <org xml:id="AddeyCo" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Addey &amp; Co</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="CundallAddey" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Cundall &amp; Addey</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="SimsMcIntyre" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Sims &amp; McIntyre</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Tauchnitz" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Tauchnitz</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BradburyEvans" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Bradbury &amp; Evans</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Macmillan" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Macmillan</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HurstBlackett" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Hurst and Blackett</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="ChapmanHall" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Chapman and Hall</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Harpers" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Harper Brothers</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Hachette" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Hachette</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="SmithElder" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Smith Elder &amp; Co</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="TicknorFields" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Ticknor and Fields</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HoughtonMifflin" type="publisher">
                  <orgName>Houghton Mifflin</orgName>
               </org>

               <!-- Families -->
               <org xml:id="Dobell" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Paton" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Christy" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Lovell" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Chenery" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Stubbs" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Barrow" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Playne" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Holmes" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Pike" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Alston" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Western" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Pilkington" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Collet" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Harris" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Miers" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Lewin" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Swan" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Walker" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Price" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Davies" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="SpencerBell" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Stewart" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Lubbock" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Tennyson" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Anderson" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Marling" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Bewley" type="family"/>
               <org xml:id="Lawrence" type="family"/>

               <!-- Other types of organizations -->
               <org xml:id="Bancroft">
                  <orgName>Bancroft School</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="StMarysHospital">
                  <orgName>St Mary's Hospital</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="RoyalCollegeMusic">
                  <orgName>The Royal College of Music</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="SpasmodicPoets">
                  <orgName>Spasmodic Poets</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="PRB">
                  <orgName>Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="RoyalAcademy">
                  <orgName>Royal Academy</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="CoventGarden">
                  <orgName>Covent Garden</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="EastLondonChildrensHospital">
                  <orgName>East London Children's Hospital</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="RLF">
                  <orgName>Royal Literary Fund</orgName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><orgName>The Royal Literary Fund</orgName> is an
                     organized scheme of assistance for writers in financial difficulty. It was
                     established in the late eighteenth-century and is based in <placeName
                        ref="#London">London.</placeName>
                     <lb/> Bradford A. Booth, "Trollope and the Royal Literary Fund," Nineteenth
                     Century Fiction 7.3 (December 1952): 208-216, doi: 10.2307/3044361.<lb/> "About
                     the RLF," Royal Literary Fund, https://www.rlf.org.uk/.</note>
               </org>
            </listOrg>
         </div>

         <div type="HistoricalPlaces">
            <head>Placeography</head>
            <listPlace>
               <place xml:id="CornerHouse">
                  <placeName>the Corner House</placeName>
                  <note>The Corner House was Dinah's most important residence, where she lived <date
                        from="1869" to="1887">from 1869 until her death</date>. It was built by the
                     architecht <persName ref="#RichardNormanShaw">Norman Shaw.</persName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="AddisonRoad">
                  <placeName>84 Addison Road</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">84 Addison Road is an address in <placeName
                        ref="#Kensington">Kensington</placeName>, <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ArranCottage">
                  <placeName>Arran Cottage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Arran Cottage was a holiday home that Dinah Craik
                     frequented in the <placeName ref="#Arran">Isle of Arran</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bahia">
                  <placeName>Bahia</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bahia is a state in Eastern <placeName ref="#Brazil"
                        >Brazil</placeName>. <persName ref="#MulockBen">Benjamin Mulock</persName>
                     worked as a civil engineer photographing the railway in Bahia <date
                        notBefore="1859" notAfter="1863">from c. 1860 to c. 1862</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BakerStreet">
                  <placeName>Baker Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Baker Street is a street in central <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>. <persName ref="#ChapmanFrederic">Frederic
                        Chapman</persName> and his family might have had an address on Baker
                     Street.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BristoStreet">
                  <placeName>Bristo Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bristo Street was a street in <placeName
                        ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh</placeName> where Dinah's friend <persName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MrsLongstaff">Mrs. Longstaff</persName> lived. The
                     street has since been demolished. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BootlecumLinacre">
                  <placeName>Bootle-cum-Linacre</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bootle-cum-Linacre (Linacre) was a small hamlet
                     located near <placeName ref="#Liverpool">Liverpool</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dunblane">
                  <placeName>Dunblane</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dunblane is a small town in central <placeName
                        ref="#Scotland">Scotland</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Edinburgh">
                  <placeName>Edinburgh</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Edinburgh is the capital city of <placeName
                        ref="#Scotland">Scotland</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="EdenCottage">
                  <placeName>Eden Cottage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ParkerJanice">Eden Cottage on Wickham Road was home to the family of
                     Francis Miers. Eden Cottage was very short walking distance away from distance
                     the Corner House.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Farnham">
                  <placeName>Farnham</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Farnham is a town in <placeName ref="#Surrey"
                        >Surrey</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="FleetStreet"/>
               <place xml:id="GeorgeSquare">
                  <placeName>33 George Square</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">33 George Square was the address of <orgName
                        ref="#Paton">the Patons</orgName> in <placeName ref="#Edinburgh"
                        >Edinburgh</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HenriettaStreet">
                  <placeName>23 Henrietta Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>
                     office of <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co</orgName> publishing was
                     located at 23 Henrietta Street.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="IsleofWight">
                  <placeName>Isle of Wight</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Isle of Wight is a small island off the Southern
                     coast of <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>. In the nineteenth
                     century it was a popular holiday resort for middle- and upper-class
                     Victorians.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kensington">
                  <placeName>Kensington</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Kensington is a district of west-central <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="KentishTown">
                  <placeName>Kentish Town</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Kentish Town is a district of northwest <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kippenross">
                  <placeName>Kippenross</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Kippenross is a geographic barony located near
                        <placeName ref="#Dunblane">Dunblane</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Scotland"
                        >Scotland</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lancashire">
                  <placeName>Lancashire</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Lancashire is a historic county in northwestern
                        <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>. In the nineteenth century,
                     Lancashire was a major industrial centre.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Largo">
                  <placeName>Seatown of Largo</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Largo is a Scottish fishing village that borders the
                     Firth of Forth.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Liverpool">
                  <placeName>Liverpool</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Liverpool is a Northwestern English city located in
                     the historic county of <placeName ref="#Lancashire">Lancashire</placeName>.
                     Dinah lived in Liverpool with her brother <persName ref="#MulockBen">Ben
                        Mulock</persName> from <date from="1858" to="1859">1858 to 1859</date>.<lb/>
                     Alexander, Lynn M., ed, "Dinah Mulock Craik: A Brief Chronology," <hi
                        rend="italics">John Halifax, Gentleman</hi> (Peterborough ON: Broadview,
                     2005), 25-27. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="MelvilleTerrace">
                  <placeName>12 Melville Terrace</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">12 Melville Terrace is an address in <placeName
                        ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="PallMall">
                  <placeName>Pall Mall</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Pall Mall is a street in west-central <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>. <orgName ref="#HodgsonGraves">Hodgson
                        &amp; Graves</orgName> had an office at 6 Pall Mall.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Piccadilly">
                  <placeName>Piccadilly</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Piccadilly is a road in west-central <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>. <orgName ref="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and
                        Hall</orgName> had an office at 193 Piccadilly.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Surrey">
                  <placeName>Surrey</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Surrey is a county in southeastern <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TempleLodge">
                  <placeName>The Temple Lodge</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Temple Lodge is a lodging in <placeName
                        ref="#Hammersmith">Hammersmith</placeName>, <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName> where Dinah visited occasionally.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TorrianoAvenue">
                  <placeName>Torriano Avenue</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Torriano Avenue is a street in <placeName
                        ref="#KentishTown">Kentish Town</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="UpperTooting">
                  <placeName>Upper Tooting <addName>Knapdale</addName></placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Upper Tooting is a district of Southern <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>. <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander"
                        >Alexander Macmillan</persName> of <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp;
                        Co</orgName> owned a spacious house in Upper Tooting where he regularly
                     entertained and lodged friends and authors.<lb/> ODNB.<lb/> "Mr. Alexander
                     Macmillan," <hi rend="italics">Publishers Circular</hi> 58, no. 1385 (1893):
                     57.<lb/> Seiler, Robert M. ed., "The House of Macmillan," <hi rend="italics"
                        >The Beautiful Book: Walter Pater and the House of Macmillan</hi>, (London
                     UK: Bloomsbury, 2013), 29-35. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Richmond">
                  <placeName>Richmond</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Richmond was a town in
                     northwestern <placeName ref="#Surrey">Surrey</placeName>, <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="SudbrookPark">
                  <placeName>Sudbrook Park</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Sudbrook Park was a hydropathic establishment in
                        <placeName ref="#Richmond">Richmond</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Surrey"
                        >Surrey.</placeName>
                     <persName ref="#LaneEdward">Dr. Edward Wickstead Lane</persName> took ownership
                     of Sudbrook Park after leaving <placeName ref="#MoorPark">Moor Park</placeName>
                     in <date when="1860">1860.</date>
                     <lb/>Frederick Burkhardt et al., eds., <hi rend="italics">The Correspondence of
                        Charles Darwin</hi> 13 (New York: Cambridge UP, 2002): 417n7, n9.<lb/> Kate
                     Summerscale, <hi rend="italics">Mrs. Robinson's Disgrace: The Private Diary of
                        a Victorian Woman,</hi> (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012): 60, 184.<lb/></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="UpperTerraceLodge">
                  <placeName>Upper Terrace Lodge</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Upper Terrace Lodge was the residence of <persName
                        ref="#MissJames">Miss James </persName>and <persName ref="#MissCoates">Miss
                        Coates</persName> in <placeName ref="#HampsteadHeath"
                     >Hampstead.</placeName><lb/> “David Gray’s First Proof-Sheet,” <hi
                        rend="italics">The Irish Monthly</hi> 15, (1887): 425.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Amberley">
                  <placeName>Amberley</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Amberley was a village in
                        <placeName ref="#Sussex">Sussex</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName><lb/></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Beckenham">
                  <placeName>Beckenham</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Beckenham was a parish
                     near <placeName ref="#Bromley">Bromley</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Kent"
                        >Kent</placeName>. It was about 16 kilometres south-southeast of <placeName
                        ref="#London">London.</placeName><lb/>
                     <!--"Beckenham," <hi rend="italics">Encyclopaedia Britannica</hi> 1911, accessed July 29, 2015. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page%3AEB1911_-_Volume_03.djvu/627--></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bloomsbury">
                  <placeName>Bloomsbury</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Bloomsbury was a district
                     of Northwest <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>, just east of
                        <placeName ref="#CamdenTown">Camden Town.</placeName><lb/>
                     <!-- "Stanford's Library Map of London And Its Suburbs 1864; Showing All The Proposed Metropolitan Railways and Improvements," <hi rend="italics>MapCo,</hi> accessed July 30, 2015. http://london1864.com/stanford15.htm. --></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BurtonCrescent">
                  <placeName>Burton Crescent</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Burton Crescent was a street in <placeName
                        ref="#Bloomsbury">Bloomsbury</placeName>, near <placeName ref="#CamdenTown"
                        >Camden Town.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dorset">
                  <placeName>Dorset</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dorset is a county in southwest <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName> that borders the English channel.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="MabledonPlace">
                  <placeName>Mabledon Place</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Mabledon Place was a street in <placeName
                        ref="#Bloomsbury">Bloomsbury</placeName>, near <placeName ref="#CamdenTown"
                        >Camden Town.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="OxfordStreet">
                  <placeName>Oxford Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Oxford Street is a major street in west <placeName
                        ref="#London">London.</placeName>
                     <!--Edward Weller, "Map
                            of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed Aug. 2, 2015,
                            http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.-->
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="PmalderCottage">
                  <placeName>Pmalder Cottage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Pmalder Cottage was a property in <placeName
                        ref="#Greenock">Greenock</placeName> that belonged to <persName
                        ref="#PatonAllanPark">Allan Park Paton.</persName> Dinah stayed at Pmalder
                     Cottage in late <date when="1850">1850.</date>."County Directory of Scotland
                     (1868)," 278. <!-- http://www.mocavo.ca/The-County-Directory-of-Scotland-1868-Volume-1868/887793/278.<lb/> -->
                     <!-- Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, "2226. EBB to Allan Park Paton," The Brownings' Correspondence, accessed July 23,
                            2015. http://www.browningscorrespondence.com/correspondence/2473/.--></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="PrincessTheatre">
                  <placeName>The Princess's Theatre</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Princess's Theatre was <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>'s leading theatre <date from="1850" to="1859">from
                        1850-1859</date>, under the management of <persName ref="#KeanCharles"
                        >Charles Kean.</persName> It was located in West London on <placeName
                        ref="#OxfordStreet">Oxford Street.</placeName><lb/> M. Glen Wilson, "Kean,
                     Charles John (1811-1868)," ODNB.<lb/>
                     <!-- Edward
                            Weller, "Map of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed
                            Aug. 2, 2015, http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.<lb/>-->
                     <!--Lloyd, Arthur, "The Royal Princess's Theatre, 73 Oxford street, London," <hi rend="italics">The Music Hall and Theatre History Website,</hi> accessed Aug. 3, 2015, http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/Princess.htm.-->
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="RochesterRoad">
                  <placeName>Rochester Road</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName ref="#MarstonWestland">John Westland
                        Marston</persName> had an address at 22 Rochester Road, <placeName
                        ref="#CamdenRoadVillas">Camden Road Villas</placeName> around the year <date
                        when="1850">1850</date>.<lb/></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="RoseCottage">
                  <placeName>Rose Cottage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Rose Cottage was a holiday home in <placeName
                        ref="#Amberley">Amberley</placeName> that belonged to a <persName
                        ref="#MrGuild">Mr.</persName> and <persName ref="#MrsGuild">Mrs.
                        Guild.</persName> Dinah stayed with the Guilds in the 1850s.<lb/>
                     <!-- Some claim she wrote <title corresp="#JohnHalifaxGentleman">John Halifax,
                                Gentleman.</title> while at Rose Cottage, but we have not found letters to substantiate this.<lb/>
                                Diana Wall, "People of the Past: Dinah Maria
                            Craik (née Mulock) (1826-1827)," <hi rend="italics">Stroud District
                                Council,</hi> accessed Aug. 1, 2015.<lb/> 
                                Howard Beard, "Rose Cottage," <hi rend="italics">Minchinhampton and Amberley Through Time,</hi> (Stroud GLOS: Amberley, 2009): n.p.  --></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="SandyfordPlace">
                  <placeName>Sandyford Place</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">15 Sandyford Place was the residence of <persName
                        ref="#CraikJames">James</persName> and <persName ref="#CraikMargaret"
                        >Margaret Craik</persName> in <placeName ref="#Glasgow"
                     >Glasgow.</placeName><lb/> "General Directory: Craig.-Cramb.," <hi
                        rend="italics">Post Office Glasgow Directory for 1863, 1864,</hi> (Glasgow:
                     William McKenzie, 1863), 98. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Wareham">
                  <placeName>Wareham</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Wareham is a town in <placeName ref="#Dorset"
                        >Dorset</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="WattMonument">
                  <placeName>Watt Monument</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Watt Monument was a name used
                     semi-interchangeably with the prestigious <placeName ref="#Greenock"
                        >Greenock</placeName> Library. It was a large well-funded scientific library
                     characterized by its memorial statue to James Watt, the library’s first and
                     principal benefactor.<lb/>"Watt Library," <hi rend="italics">Inverclyde's
                        History,</hi> accessed July 29, 2015.
                     http://www.inverclydeheritage.org.uk/watt-library/.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Sussex">
                  <placeName>Sussex</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Sussex was a county in
                     the south of <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName> It has since been
                     divided into East and West Sussex, and is referred to as a historic
                     county.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ChilchesterLodge">
                  <placeName>Chilchester Lodge</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah moved to Chilchester Lodge, <placeName
                        ref="#Beckenham">Beckenham</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Kent"
                        >Kent</placeName> in <date when="1866">1866</date> with her new husband,
                        <persName ref="#CraikGeorge">George Craik.</persName><lb/>Alexander, Lynn
                     M., ed, "Dinah Mulock Craik: A Brief Chronology," <hi rend="italics">John
                        Halifax, Gentleman</hi> (Peterborough ON: Broadview, 2005), 25-27.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Corrie">
                  <placeName>Corrie</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ParkerJanice">Corrie is a village on the <placeName ref="#Arran">Isle
                        of Arran</placeName> where the Craiks's friends the <orgName ref="#Paton"
                        >Noel-Paton's</orgName> stayed.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Sannox">
                  <placeName>Sannox</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ParkerJanice">Sannox is a village on the <placeName ref="#Arran">Isle
                        of Arran</placeName> where the Craiks's friends the <orgName ref="#Paton"
                        >Noel-Paton's</orgName> stayed.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TheGrove">
                  <placeName>The Grove</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ParkerJanice">The Grove, Charlton Kings, was one of the homes of the
                     Craik's good friends, the <orgName ref="#Dobell">Dobells</orgName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Detmore">
                  <placeName>Detmore</placeName>
                  <note>Detmore was the residence of the <orgName ref="#Dobell">Dobell
                        family</orgName>, now a bed and breakfast of the same name. See
                     http://www.detmorehouse.com/.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="DouneTerrace">
                  <placeName>Doune Terrace</placeName>
                  <note resp="#BourrierKaren">1 Doune Terrace was the address of the publisher
                        <persName ref="#ChambersRobert">Robert Chambers</persName> in <placeName
                        ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh</placeName>'s Georgian New Town. Dinah stayed
                     with Robert Chambers and his family at this address on more than one
                     occasion.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Wildwood">
                  <placeName>Wildwood</placeName>
                  <note>Wildwood was Dinah's beloved cottage on <placeName ref="#HampsteadHeath"
                        >Hampstead Heath</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HampsteadHeath">
                  <placeName>Hampstead Heath</placeName>
                  <note>Dinah had two residences on Hampstead Heath, <placeName
                        ref="#UpperTerraceCottage">Upper Terrace Cottage</placeName> and most
                     importantly, <placeName ref="#Wildwood">Wildwood</placeName>. In the nineteenth
                     century, Hampstead Heath was much further out than it is today.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="London">
                  <placeName>London</placeName>
                  <note resp="#BourrierKaren">Dinah and her family moved to London when she was 14,
                     in <date when="1840">1840</date>. With the exception of a short residence in
                        <placeName ref="#WemyssBay">Wemyss Bay</placeName>, Craik lived in London
                     and its suburbs for the rest of her life.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="UpperTerraceCottage">
                  <placeName>Upper Terrace Cottage</placeName>
                  <note>Upper Terrace Cottage was Dinah's brief residence in <placeName
                        ref="#HampsteadHeath">Hampstead Heath</placeName>, where she and Ben lived
                     before moving to <placeName ref="#Wildwood">Wildwood
                     Cottage.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lynover">
                  <placeName>Lynover Cottage</placeName>
                  <note>Dinah lived in Lynover cottage with two other young women, likely May James
                     and <persName ref="#LovellMinna">Minna Lovell</persName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="WemyssBay">
                  <placeName>Wemyss Bay</placeName>
                  <note>Dinah fled to Wemyss Bay after the death of her brother <persName
                        ref="#MulockBen">Ben</persName> in <date when="1863">1863.</date> It was
                     here that she rekindled her romance with <persName ref="CraikGeorge">George
                        Craik.</persName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Arran">
                  <placeName>The Isle of Arran</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Arran or "the Isle of Arran" is an island off the
                     western coast of <placeName ref="#Scotland">Scotland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bath">
                  <placeName>Bath</placeName>
                  <note>Dinah's Mulock Aunts lived in Bath, and she was married from one of their
                     houses in Bath. She often went to visit her Mulock aunts in the Spring,
                     bringing her daughter <persName ref="#CraikDorothy">Dorothy</persName> on more
                     than one occasion.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="AlderleyEdge">
                  <placeName>Alderley Edge</placeName>
                  <note>Alderley Edge was a village in Cheshire, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Tewkesbury">
                  <placeName>Tewkesbury</placeName>
                  <note>Tewkesbury was a medieval market town in in Gloucestershire, <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName>, and the basis for Norton Bury in <title
                        ref="#JohnHalifax">John Halifax, Gentleman</title></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Camberley">
                  <placeName>Camberley</placeName>
                  <note>A town in <placeName ref="#Surrey">Surrey</placeName>, <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dover">
                  <placeName>Dover</placeName>
                  <note>Dover is a town and major port in <placeName ref="#Kent">Kent</placeName>,
                        <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName> Dinah Craik owned a cottage
                     in Dover.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HerbertTerrace">
                  <placeName>9 Herbert Terrace.</placeName>
                  <note>9 Herbert Terrace was the address of Craik's cottage in <placeName
                        ref="#Dover">Dover.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Chatham">
                  <placeName>Chatham</placeName>
                  <note>Chatham is a town in <placeName ref="#Kent">Kent</placeName>, <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="KingsCross">
                  <placeName>King's Cross</placeName>
                  <note>King's Cross is a railway station in <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BedfordPlace">
                  <placeName>Bedford Place</placeName>
                  <note>The location of the the <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</orgName>
                     Publishing Firm in <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>, where <persName
                        ref="#CraikGeorge">George Craik</persName> worked.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Eglinton">
                  <placeName>Eglinton</placeName>
                  <note>Eglinton is a village in Londonderry, northern <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                        >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Tore">
                  <placeName>Tore</placeName>
                  <note>The Pilkington family seat in County <placeName ref="#Westmeath"
                        >Westmeath</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                     >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Tyrrellspass">
                  <placeName>Tyrrellspass</placeName>
                  <note>Tyrrellspass is a village in County <placeName ref="#Westmeath"
                        >Westmeath</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                     >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Westmeath">
                  <placeName>Westmeath</placeName>
                  <note>Westmeath is a county in <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                     >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Brompton">
                  <placeName>Brompton</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Brompton is a district of west-central <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName> located near the South end of the
                     Kensington Gardens.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenStreet">
                  <placeName>18 Camden Street North</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dinah moved to 18 Camden Street North, <placeName
                        ref="#CamdenTown">Camden Town</placeName> in <date when="1851-11">November
                        1851</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenTown">
                  <placeName>Camden Town</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Camden Town is a district of northwest <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ClarevilleCottage">
                  <placeName>Clareville Cottage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Clareville Cottage was the dwelling of <persName
                        ref="#ChapmanEdward">Edward Chapman</persName>'s family. It was located in
                        <placeName ref="#Brompton">Brompton</placeName>, <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kilburn">
                  <placeName>Kilburn</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Kilburn is a district of northwest <placeName
                        ref="#London">London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Leipzig">
                  <placeName>Leipzig</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Leipzig was a city
 in the <placeName ref="#Prussia"
                        >Kingdom of Prussia</placeName> and is now part of modern Germany. Leipzig
                     was the location of the Prussian
 publishing house, <orgName ref="#Tauchnitz"
                        >Tauchnitz.</orgName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Paris">
                  <placeName>Paris</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Paris is the capital city of <placeName
                        ref="#France">France.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Prussia">
                  <placeName from="1701" to="1871">Kingdom of Prussia</placeName>
                  <placeName from="1871" to="1947">Prussia</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Renfrewshire">
                  <placeName>Renfrewshire</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Renfrewshire is a historic county in the
                     west-central Scottish lowlands.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Sutherland">
                  <placeName>Sutherland</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Sutherland is a county in the Scottish
                     highlands.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Stafford">
                  <placeName>Stafford</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Stafford is a county town in <placeName
                        ref="#Staffordshire">Staffordshire</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Staffordshire">
                  <placeName>Staffordshire</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Staffordshire is a county in the west English
                     midlands.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Balaklava">
                  <placeName>Balaklava</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Balaklava was a city in the Crimean Peninsula.
                     Balaklava was the site of a major battle during the <rs type="event"
                        ref="#CrimeanWar">Crimean War</rs> (<date from="1853" to="1856"
                        >1853-1856</date>). </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Belfast">
                  <placeName>Belfast</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Belfast is the capital city of Northern <placeName
                        ref="#Ireland">Ireland.</placeName> In the nineteenth century, before the
                     partition of Ireland (<date when="1920">1920</date>), Belfast was one of the
                     country's most populous industrial cities. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Birmingham">
                  <placeName>Birmingham</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Birmingham is a city in the West Midlands of
                        <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName> In the nineteenth century,
                     Birmingham was an industrial and commercial centre.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BrecknockStreet">
                  <placeName>26 Brecknock Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">26 Brecknock Street was an address in <placeName
                        ref="#CamdenNewTown">Camden New Town</placeName>, just off of Camden Street
                     and crossing the tracks of the North London Railway. Dinah lodged at Brecknock
                     Street sometime in the <date notBefore="1846" notAfter="1850">late
                        1840s.</date></note>
                  <!--  Edward Weller, "Map of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed
                        Aug. 2, 2015. http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BrecknockCrescent">
                  <placeName>5 Brecknock Crescent</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">5 Brecknock Crescent was an address in <placeName
                        ref="#CamdenNewTown">Camden New Town</placeName> slightly northeast of
                        <placeName ref="#BrecknockStreet">Brecknock Street.</placeName><lb/>
                     <!-- Edward
                     Weller, "Map of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed Aug. 2,
                     2015. http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.-->
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BrecknockTerrace">
                  <placeName>Brecknock Terrace</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Brecknock Terrace was a street in <placeName
                        ref="#CamdenNewTown">Camden New Town.</placeName>
                     <!-- Edward
                     Weller, "Map of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed
                     Aug. 2, 2015. http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.-->
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenNewTown">
                  <placeName>Camden New Town</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Camden New Town was a district of <placeName
                        ref="#London">London</placeName> just east of <placeName ref="#CamdenTown"
                        >Camden Town.</placeName>
                     <!-- Edward Weller, "Map
                     of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed Aug. 2, 2015.
                     http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.<lb/>--></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenRoad">
                  <placeName>Camden Road</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Camden Road was a major road in <placeName
                        ref="#CamdenTown">Camden Town.</placeName>
                     <!-- Edward Weller, "Map
                     of London 1868," <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed Aug. 2, 2015.
                     http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.<lb/>-->
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="MorningtonCrescent">
                  <placeName>7 Mornington Crescent</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, 7 Mornington Crescent was
                     an address in <placeName ref="#CamdenTown">Camden Town</placeName> South.
                     <!-- Edward Weller, "Map of London 1868,"
                     <hi rend="italics">MapCo</hi> accessed Aug. 2, 2015. http://london1868.com/weller16.htm.<lb/>--></note>
                  <!-- KB: I think this may have been the Lovell's address, it was near where Margaret Oliphant lived. Check Oliphant's autobiography. -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="StationersHall">
                  <placeName>Stationers' Hall Court</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The nineteenth-century Stationers' Hall was a
                     building in central <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName> owned by
                        <orgName ref="#StationersCompany">The Stationers' Company</orgName> of
                        <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName> Stationers' Hall still exists
                     today.<lb/>"The Hall &amp; Heritage," <hi rend="italics">The Stationers'
                        Company</hi>, accessed Aug. 3, 2015.
                     https://stationers.org/the-hall-heritage.html.<lb/> "The Stationers' Hall," <hi
                        rend="italics">The Stationers' Company</hi>, accessed Aug. 3,
                     2015.https://stationers.org/the-hall-heritage/the-stationers-hall.html.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Brighton">
                  <placeName>Brighton</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Brighton is a town on the south coast of <placeName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Fairfield">
                  <placeName>Fairfield</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Fairfield is a town in the county of <placeName
                        ref="#Surrey">Surrey</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName> Samuel Carter Hall purchased a country home in
                     Fairfield in <date when="1849">1849.</date><lb/> ODNB.<lb/> "List of Members,"
                        <hi rend="italics">Surrey Archaeological Collections</hi> 1, (1858):
                     43.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ireland">
                  <placeName>Ireland</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Ireland was yet to be
                     partitioned. Ireland formed a part of the <placeName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#UK">United Kingdom of Great Britain and
                        Ireland</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Oxford">
                  <placeName>Oxford</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Oxford is a city in Southeast <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Saltley">
                  <placeName>Saltley</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Saltley is a district of central <placeName
                        ref="#Birmingham">Birmingham.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Italy">
                  <placeName>Italy <addName>Kingdom of Sardinia</addName>
                     <addName>Piedmont-Sardinia</addName>
                     <addName>Kingdom of Italy</addName></placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Kingdom of Sardinia was an early European state
                     (c. 1324-1861) and a predecessor to modern <placeName ref="#Italy"
                        >Italy.</placeName> In <date when="1861">1861</date>, the Kingdom of
                     Sardinia was unified with the rest of Italy and was thus renamed the Kingdom of
                     Italy. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Donegal">
                  <placeName>Donegal</placeName>
                  <note>Donegal is a town in County Donegal, <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                        >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Cushendall">
                  <placeName>Cushendall</placeName>
                  <note>Cushendall is a village in County Antrim, northern <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                        >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Curran">
                  <placeName>Curran</placeName>
                  <note>Curran is a small village in County Londonderry, northern <placeName
                        ref="#Ireland">Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CorinManor">
                  <placeName>Corin Manor</placeName>
                  <note><persName ref="#PatonNoel">Sir Noel Paton</persName> used to stay at Corin
                     Manor in September.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kilnagarna">
                  <placeName>Kilnagarna</placeName>
                  <note>Kilnagarna is a place in <placeName ref="#Ireland">Ireland</placeName> where
                     the Mulock’s had a residence</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Athlone">
                  <placeName>Athlone</placeName>
                  <note>Athlone is a village in <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                     >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="LoughEskeCastle">
                  <placeName>Lough Eske Castle</placeName>
                  <note>Lough Eske Castle is located in County Donegal in the northwest of
                        <placeName ref="#Ireland">Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dublin">
                  <placeName>Dublin</placeName>
                  <note>In the nineteenth century, Dublin was the capital of <placeName
                        ref="#Ireland">Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Castletown">
                  <placeName>Castletown</placeName>
                  <note>Castletown is a village on the north coast of the Highland in <placeName
                        ref="#Scotland">Scotland</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ShamrockLodges">
                  <placeName>Shamrock Lodges Athlone</placeName>
                  <note>Lodges located in Athlone, County Westmeath, <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                        >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="SlieveLeague">
                  <placeName>Slieve League</placeName>
                  <note>Slieve League is a mountain located on the coast of County Donegal,
                        <placeName ref="#Ireland">Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Llanfairfechan">
                  <placeName>Llanfairfechan</placeName>
                  <note>Llanfairfechan is a town in the Conwy County Borough of <placeName
                        ref="#Wales">Wales</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="LochFyne">
                  <placeName>Loch Fyne</placeName>
                  <note>Loch Fyne is a sea loch located on the west coast of Argyll and Bute,
                        <placeName ref="#Scotland">Scotland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Derry">
                  <placeName>Derry</placeName>
                  <note>Derry is a city in northern <placeName ref="#Ireland"
                     >Ireland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="York">
                  <placeName>York</placeName>
                  <note>York is a city in North Yorkshire, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName> The Flying Scotsman, the train from King's Cross
                     Station, <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>, to <placeName
                        ref="#Edinburgh">Edinburgh Waverley</placeName>, stopped there for lunch
                        <date from="1862" to="1888">from 1862 to 1888.</date></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Morvern">
                  <placeName>Morvern</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Morvern is a peninsula in western <placeName
                        ref="#Scotland">Scotland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dalmally">
                  <placeName>Dalmally</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dalmally is a village in <placeName ref="#Scotland"
                        >Scotland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Greenock">
                  <placeName>Greenock</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Greenock was a burgh in
                     the historic county of <placeName ref="#Renfrewshire">Renfrewshire</placeName>.
                     Dinah sometimes stayed with <persName ref="#PatonAllanPark">Allan Park
                        Paton</persName> in Greenock.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Winchester">
                  <placeName>Winchester</placeName>
                  <note>Winchester is a cathedral town in southern <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Hammersmith">
                  <placeName>Hammersmith</placeName>
                  <note>Hammersmith is a district in West <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bristol">
                  <placeName>Bristol</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bristol is a town in southwest <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName> on the River Avon. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Alexandria">
                  <placeName>Alexandria</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Alexandria is a major port city in northern
                        <placeName ref="#Egypt">Egypt.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Teignmouth">
                  <placeName>Teignmouth</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Teignmouth is a town in south <placeName
                        ref="#Devon">Devon</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Devon">
                  <placeName>Devon</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Devon is a county in southwest <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CorfeCastle">
                  <placeName>Corfe Castle</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The ruins of Corfe Castle are situated in the county
                     of <placeName ref="#Dorset">Dorset</placeName> in southwest <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName>, near <placeName ref="#Swanage"
                        >Swanage.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Swanage">
                  <placeName>Swanage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Swanage is a coastal town in southwest <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Geneva">
                  <placeName>Geneva</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Geneva is a city in western <placeName
                        ref="#Switzerland">Switzerland</placeName>. At the beginning of the
                     nineteenth century Geneva was occupied by <placeName ref="#France"
                        >France</placeName> but at the end of the Napoleonic Wars (<date when="1815"
                        >1815</date>) it became part of the Swiss Confederation.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Switzerland">
                  <placeName>Switzerland <addName>Swiss Confederation</addName></placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Switzerland (formerly the Swiss Confederation) began
                     the nineteenth century as a as a territory of Napoleonic <placeName
                        ref="#France">France.</placeName> It went through a period of
                     Restoration/Reformation after the end of the Napoleonic Wars, and ended the
                     century as an independent nation-state following the drafting of a formal
                     Constitution in <date when="1848">1848.</date></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Nice">
                  <placeName>Nice</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Nice is a city in the south of <placeName
                        ref="#France">France.</placeName>
                     <date from="1814" to="1843">From 1814 to 1843</date> Nice was part of the
                        <placeName ref="#Italy">Kingdom of Sardinia. It was reannexed by <placeName
                           ref="#France">France</placeName> in <date when="1860"
                        >1860.</date></placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dieppe">
                  <placeName>Dieppe</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Dieppe is a coastal town in northern <placeName
                        ref="#France">France.</placeName> Because of its position on the England
                     channel, Dieppe was (and still is) a major port town and was important to the
                     exchange of goods and people in the nineteenth century.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Leamington">
                  <placeName>Leamington</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Leamington was a spa town
                     in central <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Plymouth">
                  <placeName>Plymouth</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Plymouth is a city on the southwest coast of
                        <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName> In the nineteenth century,
                     Plymouth was a major port city. It was a site for the import and export of
                     goods as well as the departure point for many naval expeditions. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="NewSydney">
                  <placeName>New Sydney</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, "New Sydney" was the name
                     attributed to the city that is now Sydney, <placeName ref="#Australia"
                        >Australia.</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Finnart">
                  <placeName>Finnart</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The lands of Finnart once formed a barony to the
                     west of <placeName ref="#Greenock">Greenock</placeName>. By the nineteenth
                     century, they had been dissolved and divided between <placeName ref="#Gourock"
                        >Gourock</placeName> and west Greenock.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Gourock">
                  <placeName>Gourock</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Gourock was a small burgh
                     in the county of <placeName ref="#Renfrewshire">Renfrewshire,</placeName> just
                     west of <placeName ref="#Greenock">Greenock.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Longsight">
                  <placeName>Longsight</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Longsight was a chapelry
                     near <placeName ref="#Manchester">Manchester.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Manchester">
                  <placeName>Manchester</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Manchester is a city in northwest <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName> In the nineteenth century, it was a
                     major industrial center.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Cheltenham">
                  <placeName>Cheltenham</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Cheltenham is a spa town in western <placeName
                        ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CharltonKings">
                  <placeName>Charlton Kings</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Charlton Kings is a suburb of <placeName
                        ref="#Cheltenham">Cheltenham.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="DetmoreHouse">
                  <placeName>Detmore House</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Detmore House, <placeName ref="#CharltonKings"
                        >Charlton Kings</placeName>, was the family home of the <orgName
                        ref="#Dobell">Dobells.</orgName><lb/> "Directory of the Principal Gentry in
                     the County of Gloucester," <hi rend="italics">The Cheltenham Annuaire for
                        1875</hi> (Cheltenham, Henry Davies, 1875), 80.
                     <!-- https://books.google.ca/books?id=f-UNAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA80&dq=cheltenham+detmore+house&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiDwMDUlt_MAhVpxYMKHYGrDn0Q6AEILjAA#v=onepage&q=cheltenham%20detmore%20house&f=false --></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Chelsea">
                  <placeName>Chelsea</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Chelsea is a district of southwest <placeName
                        ref="#London">London.</placeName> In the nineteenth century, it had a
                     reputation as London's bohemian quarter.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TiteStreet">
                  <placeName>Tite Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">16 Tite Street was the home of <persName
                        ref="#WildeOscar">Oscar Wilde </persName>in <placeName ref="#Chelsea"
                        >Chelsea,</placeName>
                     <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName> Since Wilde's time, the house has
                     been renumbered to 34 Tite Street.<lb/> E.H. Mikail, ed., <hi rend="italics"
                        >Oscar Wilde: Interviews and Recollections</hi> 2 (London: Macmillan,
                     1979).<lb/> John Freeman, <hi rend="italics">Literature and Locality: The
                        Literary Topography of Britain and Ireland</hi> (London: Casell, 1963),
                     43.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Cromarty">
                  <placeName>Cromarty</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">In the nineteenth century, Cromarty was a county
                     town and seaport in the Scottish Highlands. It was a well-established port for
                     emigrants. <lb/> Lucille H. Campey, Fast Sailing and Copper-Bottomed: Aberdeen
                     Sailing Ships and the Emigrant Scots They Carried to Canada, 1774-1855
                     (Toronto: Natural Heritage/Natural History Inc., 2002), 57–58.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="OrkneyIsles">
                  <placeName>Orkney Isles</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Orkney is an archipelago off the northeastern coast
                     of <placeName ref="#Scotland">Scotland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ramsgate">
                  <placeName>Ramsgate</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Ramsgate is a seaside town in east
                        <placeName>Kent</placeName>, <placeName>England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Leckhampton">
                  <placeName>Leckhampton</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Leckhampton is a district of south <placeName
                        ref="#Cheltenham">Cheltenham.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Melbourne">
                  <placeName>Melbourne</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Melbourne is a city in southeastern <placeName
                        ref="#Australia">Australia.</placeName></note>
               </place>

               <place xml:id="StAndrews">
                  <placeName>St. Andrews</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">St. Andrews was once a royal burgh in eastern
                        <placeName ref="#Fife">Fife,</placeName>
                     <placeName ref="#Scotland">Scotland.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Cambridge">
                  <placeName>Cambridge</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Cambridge is a university city in southeastern
                        <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HammersmithBridge">
                  <placeName>Hammersmith Bridge</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Hammersmith Bridge crosses the <placeName
                        ref="#RiverThames">River Thames</placeName> in west <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="RiverThames">
                  <placeName>The River Thames <addName>The Thames</addName></placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The River Thames flows through southern <placeName
                        ref="#England">England</placeName> and is well-known for crossing through
                     the capital, <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Niton">
                  <placeName>Niton</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Niton is a small village on the <placeName
                        ref="#IsleOfWight">Isle of Wight</placeName>, <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Wapping">
                  <placeName>Wapping</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Wapping is a district of east <placeName
                        ref="#London">London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Netherlands">
                  <placeName>The Netherlands</placeName>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">The Netherlands is a country in northwestern
                     Europe.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Neuchatel">
                  <placeName>Neuchâtel</placeName>
                  <note resp="#GivogueStevensonLecia"> Neuchâtel is a French-speaking city in
                     Switzerland. It lies on the northern shore of Lake Neuchâtel. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Armitage">
                  <placeName>Armitage</placeName>
                  <note resp="#GivogueStevensonLecia">Armitage is a small village in <placeName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Staffordshire">Staffordshire.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kingsley">
                  <placeName>Kingsley</placeName>
                  <note resp="#GivogueStevensonLecia">Kingsley is a small village in <placeName
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Staffordshire">Staffordshire.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Strand">
                  <placeName>The Strand</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Strand is a major street in west-central
                     London.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="StJohnsWilderness">
                  <placeName>St. John's Wilderness</placeName>
                  <placeName>The Backs</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>St. John's Wilderness</placeName>, more
                     commonly known as the Backs, is a scenic area in the city of <placeName
                        ref="#Cambridge">Cambridge.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TrinityAvenue">
                  <placeName>Trinity Avenue</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>Trinity Avenue</placeName> is in the city
                     of <placeName ref="#Cambridge">Cambridge.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Oban">
                  <placeName>Oban</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ParkerJanice">Oban is a town in the Argyll and Bute area of Scotland
                     where Dinah would often go for a holiday.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CollinsFarm">
                  <placeName>Collin's Farm</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>Collin's Farm</placeName> or the Wylde's
                     Farmhouse was a fashionable farmhouse resort located near <placeName
                        ref="#Wildwood">Wildwood</placeName> and <placeName ref="#Hampstead"
                        >Hampstead Heath.</placeName>
                     <persName ref="#DickensCharles">Charles Dickens</persName> stayed at
                        <placeName>Collin's Farm</placeName> around <date when="1837-05">May
                        1837.</date> Norman Page, ed. <title>Charles Dickens: Family
                     History</title>, volume 5 (New York: Routledge, 1999), 1837, Web. <!--https://books.google.ca/books?id=xf2QqVI19b8C&pg=PA111&lpg=PA111&dq=Dickens+Collin%27s+Farm&source=bl&ots=0a1ZN9RNQ9&sig=QRdT7K0P_RIus72ODjC9J7fl8-0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiWiYv9uO3SAhVCMGMKHX5lCysQ6AEIMTAE#v=onepage&q=Dickens%20Collin's%20Farm&f=false-->
                     <!--https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/green-spaces/hampstead-heath/heritage/Pages/the-wyldes-farmhouse.aspx--></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ayr">
                  <placeName>Ayr</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>Ayr</placeName> is a town and former
                     Royal Burgh on the southwest coast of <placeName ref="#Scotland"
                        >Scotland</placeName>. It is near the <placeName ref="#Arran">Isle of Arran,
                        where <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah</persName> had a holiday
                     home.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TrinityStreet">
                  <placeName>Trinity Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey"><orgName ref="MacmillanCo">Macmillan Co.</orgName> was
                     located in Trinity Street in <placeName ref="Cambridge">Cambridge</placeName>
                     from <date when="1844">1844</date> to <date when="1863">1863.</date></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="LakesDistrict">
                  <placeName>The Lakes District</placeName>
                  <note resp="FukushimaKailey"><placeName>The Lakes District</placeName> is a region
                     of northwest <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName> It was a popular
                     holiday destination in the nineteenth century and featured prominently in the
                     poems by <persName>William Wordsworth</persName> and other <orgName>Lake
                        Poets.</orgName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Rydal">
                  <placeName>Rydal</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><persName>Rydal</persName> is a village northeast of
                        <placeName ref="#Ambleside">Ambleside</placeName> in the <placeName
                        ref="#LakesDistrict">Lakes District.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ambleside">
                  <placeName>Ambleside</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>Ambleside</placeName> is a town in the
                        <placeName ref="#LakesDistrict">Lakes District</placeName> of northwest
                        <placeName ref="#England">England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenParkRoad">
                  <placeName>1 Camden Park Road</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>1 Camden Park Road</placeName>,
                        <placeName ref="#CamdenParkVillas">Camden Park Villas</placeName> was the
                     address of <persName ref="#MarstonWestland">John Westland Marston</persName> in
                        <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenParkVillas">
                  <placeName>Camden Park Villas</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Whitby">
                  <placeName>Whitby</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>Whitby</placeName> is a seaside town in
                        <placeName>Yorkshire,</placeName> northern <placeName ref="#England"
                        >England.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="NorfolkBuildings">
                  <placeName>15 Norfolk Buildings</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>15 Norfolk Buildings</placeName> was the
                     address of <orgName ref="#MulockAunts">Dinah's aunts</orgName> in west-central
                        <placeName ref="#Bath">Bath.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="GreatMarlboroughStreet">
                  <placeName>13 Great Marlborough Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><placeName>13 Great Marlborough Street</placeName>
                     was the office of the publishers <orgName ref="#HurstBlackett">Hurst &amp;
                        Blackett</orgName> in west <placeName ref="#London"
                     >London.</placeName></note>
               </place>
            </listPlace>
         </div>

         <div type="StubEntriesPlaces">
            <!-- The following are all stub entries to be defined/researched and developed -->
            <head>Stub Entries Places</head>
            <listPlace>
               <place xml:id="Brazil"/>
               <place xml:id="England"/>
               <place xml:id="France"/>
               <place xml:id="Scotland"/>
               <place xml:id="Australia"/>
               <place xml:id="USA">
                  <placeName>The United States of America</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Egypt"/>
               <place xml:id="UK">
                  <placeName from="1801" to="1922">The United Kingdom of Great Britain and
                     Ireland</placeName>
                  <placeName from="1922">The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern
                     Ireland</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Wales">
                  <placeName>Wales</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CamdenRoadVillas"/>
               <place xml:id="Waterloo"/>
               <place xml:id="MoorPark"/>
               <place xml:id="StokeUponTrent">
                  <placeName>Stoke-upon-Trent</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="NewYork">
                  <placeName>New York City</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Shortlands">
                  <placeName>Shortlands</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kent">
                  <placeName>Kent</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kilbourne">
                  <placeName>Kilbourne</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Glasgow">
                  <placeName>Glasgow</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Salton">
                  <placeName>Salton</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Gloucester">
                  <placeName>Gloucester</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Dorsetshire">
                  <placeName>Dorsetshire</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Anbrion">
                  <placeName>Anbrion</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lurne">
                  <placeName>Lurne</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Carlisle">
                  <placeName>Carlisle</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Mulingham">
                  <placeName>Mulingham</placeName>
                  <!-- KF: Entry needs to be verified. One of us wrote, "Mulingham is a village close to Castletown?" -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CrystalPalace">
                  <placeName>The Crystal Palace</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Rome">
                  <placeName>Rome</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="BelgraveTerrace">
                  <placeName>Belgrave Terrace</placeName>
                  <!--UCLA10.1-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Clarendon">
                  <placeName>Clarendon</placeName>
                  <!--UCLA10.15-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HughHouse">
                  <placeName>Hugh House</placeName>
                  <!--UCLA10.16-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Grantham">
                  <!-- Dorothy04 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="StJohnsHouse">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Adrishaig">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Crinan">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TontineHotel">
                  <!-- Dorothy05 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="SannoxHouse">
                  <!-- Dorothy06 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Duddington">
                  <!-- Dorothy07 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CausewayHotel">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Aberforth">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CorrieManse">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Larne">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CushendallHotel">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bushmills">
                  <!-- Dorothy09 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Hunnen">
                  <!-- Dorothy12 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Mullingar">
                  <!-- Dorothy12 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ShamrockLodge">
                  <!-- Dorothy12 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Palermo">
                  <!-- Dorothy13 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Rothesay">
                  <!-- Dorothy14, 16 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Sutton">
                  <!-- Dorothy15 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="GreenhillTerrace">
                  <!-- Dorothy15, 16 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ivanhoe">
                  <!-- Dorothy16 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Duddingston">
                  <!-- Dorothy16 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: There is a Duddington in England and a Duddingston in Scotland. Check context of Dorothy07 & 16 to see if she is referring to one or both. -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Stranraer">
                  <!-- Dorothy18 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Andoversford">
                  <!-- Dorothy18 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Whithington">
                  <!-- Dorothy18 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Paddington">
                  <!-- Dorothy18, 21, 22 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bromley">
                  <!-- Dorothy18, 33 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Peterborough">
                  <!-- Dorothy19, 27 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="CorrieHouse">
                  <!-- Dorothy19 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Gorringes">
                  <placeName>Gorringe's</placeName>
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
                  <!-- KF: Gorringe's was a store. Dinah mentions getting a dress at Gorringe's. -->

               </place>
               <place xml:id="Gravesend">
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bedford">
                  <!-- Dorothy21 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Holborn">
                  <!-- Dorothy22 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="EsplenadeHotel">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Chislehurst">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Knockholt">
                  <!-- Dorothy24 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="FawePark">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Keswick">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="KeswickStreet">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="India">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Shiskine">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HexhamHydro">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="DerwentWater">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Holyhead">
                  <!-- Dorothy26 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Wellingham">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Cromer">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lincoln">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Durham">
                  <!-- Dorothy27 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Killarney">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="LadyKenmaresCottage">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Muckross">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="TorcWaterfall">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Innisfallen">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Keston">
                  <!-- Dorothy30 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="WinchesterCollegeChapel">
                  <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Deanery">
                  <!-- Dorothy32 UCLA -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="WinchesterDeanery"/>
               <place xml:id="HubertTerrace"/>
               <place xml:id="DoverPriory"/>
               <place xml:id="Alderney"/>
               <place xml:id="ChannelIslands"/>
               <!--KF: The following 6 stub entries are from UCLADM25-->
               <place xml:id="Longfield"/>
               <place xml:id="Aberystwyth"/>
               <place xml:id="NewBrighton"/>
               <place xml:id="StGeorgesHall"/>
               <place xml:id="Walton"/>
               <place xml:id="Sydney"/>
               <!--KF: Not sure if this is meant to be Sydney, Australia or another Sydney. To double-check.-->
               <!--KF: The following 2 stub entries are from UCLATM01 -->
               <place xml:id="Newcastle"/>
               <place xml:id="Quebec"/>
               <!-- KF: The following 4 stub entries are from UCLADM14 -->
               <place xml:id="JohannesRiver">
                  <placeName>Johannes River</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ValeLodge">
                  <placeName>Vale Lodge</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HaltonGarden">
                  <placeName>Halton Garden</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="WendCottage">
                  <placeName>Wend Cottage</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="GothieCottage">
                  <placeName>Gothie Cottage</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="LombardStreet">
                  <placeName>Lombard Street</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="RegentStreet">
                  <placeName>Regent Street</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ParliamentStreet">
                  <placeName>Parliament Street</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ClarkHouse">
                  <placeName>Clark House</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="LudgateHill">
                  <placeName>Ludgate Hill</placeName>
                  <note>Ludgate Hill is located in the city of <placeName ref="#London"
                        >London</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HollandPlace">
                  <placeName>Holland</placeName>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">Holland is a region and former province on the western
                     coast of the <placeName ref="#Netherlands">Netherlands, and is also used to
                        refer to the Netherlands in general.</placeName></note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="WoodlandsTerrace">
                  <placeName>Woodlands Terrace, Glasgow</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Syria">
                  <placeName>Syria</placeName>
                  <note>Syria is a country in the Middle East. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Crimea">
                  <placeName>Crimea</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Boston">
                  <placeName>Boston</placeName>
               </place>
            </listPlace>
         </div>

         <div type="Events">
            <!-- This list is for historical dates and/or events mentioned in Dinah's letters -->
            <listEvent>
               <event xml:id="EngCivilWar" type="war" from="1642" to="1651">
                  <label>English Civil War</label>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="CivilWar" type="war" from="1861" to="1865">
                  <label>American Civil War</label>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="Easter">
                  <label>Easter</label>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="Christmas">
                  <label>Christmas</label>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="CrimeanWar" type="war" from="1853" to="1856">
                  <label>Crimean War</label>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="GreatExhibition" when="1851">
                  <label>Great Exhibition</label>
               </event>
            </listEvent>
         </div>

         <div type="Repositories">
            <!-- This list is for the repositories holding Craik's correspondence and diares -->
            <!-- KF: As of March 2017, we have worked extensively with the Craik letters from the following 4 repositories. In the future we need to add all repositories from the Letters spreadsheet to this list. -->
            <head>Repositories</head>
            <listBibl>
               <bibl>
                  <msIdentifier xml:id="UCLA">
                     <country>USA</country>
                     <region>California</region>
                     <settlement>Los Angeles</settlement>
                     <repository>Charles E Young Research Library, University of California at Los
                        Angeles</repository>
                     <collection>Mulock Family Papers</collection>
                     <idno>846</idno>
                  </msIdentifier></bibl>
               <bibl>
                  <msIdentifier xml:id="Princeton">
                     <country>USA</country>
                     <region>New Jersey</region>
                     <settlement>Princeton</settlement>
                     <repository>Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special
                        Collections, Princeton University Library</repository>
                     <collection>M. L. Parrish Collection of Victorian Novelists</collection>
                     <idno>C0171</idno>
                  </msIdentifier></bibl>
               <bibl>
                  <msIdentifier xml:id="PierpontMorgan">
                     <country>USA</country>
                     <region>New York</region>
                     <settlement>New York</settlement>
                     <repository>Literary and Historical Manuscripts, The Morgan Library and
                        Museum.</repository>
                     <collection>Dinah Maria Craik Letters</collection>
                     <idno>MA8610</idno>
                  </msIdentifier>
               </bibl>
               <bibl>
                  <msIdentifier xml:id="NYPLBerg">
                     <country>USA</country>
                     <region>New York</region>
                     <settlement>New York</settlement>
                     <repository>Berg Collection, New York Public Library</repository>
                     <collection>Dinah Maria Mulock Craik Collection of Papers</collection>
                     <idno>Folder 67B2875</idno>
                  </msIdentifier>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
         </div>

         <div type="Periodicals">
            <!-- This list is for periodicals and magazines -->
            <listBibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Charm"><title>The Charm</title>
                  <note>The Charm was a children's periodical published by <orgName ref="#AddeyCo"
                        >Addey &amp; Co.</orgName></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HowittsJournal"><title>Howitt's Journal</title>
                  <note>Howitt's was a weekly periodical launched by <persName ref="#HowittWilliam"
                        >William Howitt</persName> in <date when="1847">1847.</date> The journal
                     went bankrupt in <date when="1848">1848.</date></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="JerroldsMagazine">
                  <title>Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine</title>
                  <note>Jerrold's was a monthly magazine brought out by <orgName
                        ref="#BradburyEvans">Bradbury and Evans</orgName> that ran from <date
                        when="1845">1845</date> to <date when="1848">1848</date>. The magazine was
                     similar in tone to <title corresp="#Punch">Punch</title> and had overlapping
                     contributors.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="BentleysMiscellany">
                  <title>Bentley's Miscellany</title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bentley's Miscellany was a popular Victorian
                     periodical founded by <persName ref="#Bentley"><orgName ref="#Bentley">Richard
                           Bentley</orgName></persName> and edited by <persName
                        ref="#DickensCharles">Charles Dickens.</persName></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="IllustratedNews"><title>Illustrated News</title>
                  <note>The Illustrated London News was a weekly news periodical published from
                        <date from="1842" to="1971">1842 to 1971.</date></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ArtJournal">
                  <title><date from="1838" to="1849"><title>The Art Union</title></date></title>
                  <title><date from="1849" to="1912"><title>The Art Journal</title></date></title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Art Journal was an influential art magazine
                     based in <placeName ref="#London">London</placeName>. It was edited by
                        <persName ref="#HallSamuelCarter">Samuel Carter
                     Hall.</persName><lb/>Mandler, Peter, "Hall, Samuel Carter (1800-1889)," ODNB.
                  </note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OnceAWeek">
                  <title>Once a Week: an Illustrated Miscellany of Literature, Popular Science, and
                     Art</title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Once a Week was a weekly illustrated periodical
                     published by <orgName ref="#BradburyEvans">Bradbury and Evans</orgName> between
                        <date from="1859" to="1880">1859 and 1880.</date><lb/> John Sutherland <hi
                        rend="italics">The Stanford Companion to Victorian Fiction</hi> (Stanford:
                     Stanford UP, 1989), 479–480.<lb/> “Once a Week,” <hi rend="italics">Rosetti
                        Archive Periodicals</hi>, accessed 12 May, 2016,
                     http://www.rossettiarchive.org/docs/ap4.o4.raw.html. </note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="EverySaturday">
                  <title>Every Saturday: A Journal of Choice Reading Selected from Foreign Current
                     Literature</title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Every Saturday was a weekly periodical published by
                        <orgName ref="#TicknorFields">Ticknor and Fields</orgName>
                     <date from="1859" to="1880">from 1866 to 1874.</date><lb/> Frank Luther Mott,
                     "Every Saturday," <hi rend="italics">A History of American Magazines
                        1865–1885</hi> (Cambridge MA, Harvard UP, 1938), 357–362.
                     <!-- https://books.google.ca/books?id=zt1V-ISXFsoC&pg=PA357&lpg=PA357&dq=ticknor+and+fields+every+saturday&source=bl&ots=4LueLzww_5&sig=9cA9QSzlfMqOVgOBGNf4qSBM_Jc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiDwIW0jt_MAhWDz4MKHarGDzUQ6AEIMTAE#v=onepage&q=ticknor%20and%20fields%20every%20saturday&f=false --></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Cornhill">
                  <title>The Cornhill Magazine</title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Cornhill Magazine (<date from="1860" to="1975"
                        >1860–1975</date>) was a monthly illustrated periodical published by
                        <orgName ref="#SmithElder">Smith, Elder &amp; Co.</orgName> and aimed
                     towards middle-class readers. <persName ref="#ThackerayWilliamMakepeace"
                        >William Makepeace Thackeray</persName> was the magazine's original
                     editor.<lb/> ODNB.<lb/> Barbara Quinn Schmidt, "'The Cornhill Magazine':
                     Celebrating Success," <hi rend="italics">Victorian Periodical Review</hi> 32.3
                     (Fall 1999): 202–208.</note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AtlanticMonthly"><title>The Atlantic Monthly</title>
                  <pubPlace><placeName ref="#Boston">Boston</placeName></pubPlace>
                  <publisher><orgName ref="#PhillipSampsonCo">Phillip, Sampson and Co.</orgName>
                        (<date from="1857" to="1859">1857 – 1859</date>)</publisher>
                  <publisher><orgName ref="#TicknorFields">Ticknor &amp; Fields</orgName> (<date
                        from="1859" to="1873">1859 – 1873</date>)</publisher>
                  <publisher><orgName ref="#HougtonMifflin">Houghton &amp; Mifflin</orgName> (<date
                        from="1873" to="1908">1873 – 1908</date>)</publisher>
                  <note resp="FukushimaKailey">The Atlantic Monthly is an American literary and
                     cultural periodical that was founded <placeName ref="#Boston"
                        >Boston</placeName> in <date when="1857">1857.</date> The periodical aimed
                     to attract literary elites, competing with <orgName ref="#HarpersMagazine"
                        >Harper's</orgName> and its large middle-class readership.</note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OurYoungFolks"><title>Our Young Folks</title><note
                     resp="#FukushimaKailey">Our Young Folks was an illustrated literary periodical
                     for children published weekly by <orgName ref="#TicknorFields">Ticknor &amp;
                        Fields.</orgName></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Dial"><title>The Dial</title><note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>The
                        Dial</title> was a weekly <placeName>London</placeName> newspaper planned by
                     the National Newspaper League Company. It was edited by <persName
                        ref="#BaynePeter">Peter Bayne</persName>
                     <date from="1860" to="1862">from 1860 to 1862</date>, during which time, the
                     paper succeeded but <persName>Bayne</persName> went bankrupt.</note></bibl>
            </listBibl>
         </div>

         <div type="WorksByCraik">
            <!-- This list is for works by Craik -->
            <listBibl>
               <bibl xml:id="MissTommy"><title>Miss Tommy</title></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Ogilvies">
                  <author>
                     <persName> Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Ogilvies</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
                  <date when="1849"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Olive">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC"> Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Olive</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
                  <date when="1850"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HeadOfTheFamily">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Head of the Family</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
                  <date when="1852"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AgathasHusband">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Agatha's Husband</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
                  <date when="1853"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="JohnHalifaxGentleman">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">John Halifax, Gentleman</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett</publisher>
                  <date when="1856"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="LifeForLife">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Life for a Life</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett</publisher>
                  <date when="1859"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OurYear">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Our Year</title>
                  <pubPlace>Boston</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#TicknorFields">Ticknor &amp; Fields</publisher>
                  <date when="1860"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="MistressAndMaid">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Mistress and Maid</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett</publisher>
                  <date when="1862"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ChristiansMistake">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m"> Christian's Mistake</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett</publisher>
                  <date when="1865"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="NobleLife">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Noble Life</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1866"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TwoMarriages">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Two Marriages</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1867"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="WomansKingdom">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Woman's Kingdom</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1868"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="BraveLady">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Brave Lady</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1870"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hannah">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Hannah</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1871"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="YoungMrsJardine">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Young Mrs. Jardine</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1879"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ColaMonti">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Cola Monti</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="ArthurHallVirtueCo">Arthur Hall, Virtue &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1849"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="KingArthur">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC"> Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">King Arthur: Not a Love Story</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1886"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AliceLearmont">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Alice Learmont: a Fairy Tale</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
                  <date when="1852"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Avillion">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Avillion and Other Tales</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="SmithElder">Smith Elder &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1853"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hero">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Hero: Philip's Book</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#AddeyCo">Addey &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1853"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="DoubleHouse">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Double House</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#ParkerAndSon">John W. Parker &amp; Son</publisher>
                  <date/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">"A Double House" was originally published in <title
                        corresp="#Frasers">Fraser's Magazine.</title></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HowToWinLove">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">How to Win Love, or Rhoda's Lesson</title>
                  <pubPlace/>
                  <publisher/>
                  <date when="1848"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Before settling on a title for "How to Win Love, or
                     Rhoda's Lesson", Dinah Craik appears to have titled this children's tale
                     "Winifred Lee" after one of its central characters.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="LastHouseInCecilSt">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Last House in Cecil Street</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#ParkerAndSon">John W. Parker &amp; Son</publisher>
                  <date/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">"The Last House in Cecil Street" was originally
                     published in <title corresp="#Frasers">Fraser's Magazine.</title></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="LittleLychetts">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Little Lychetts</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#AddeyCo">Addey &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1855"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="LowMarriage">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Low Marriage</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#ParkerAndSon">John W. Parker &amp; Son</publisher>
                  <date/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">"A Low Marriage" was originally published in <title
                        corresp="#Frasers">Fraser's Magazine.</title></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="SongsOfOurYouth">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Songs of our Youth</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#DaldyIsbisterCo">Daldy, Isbister &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1875"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Songs of our Youth was a collection of Swedish,
                     French, Irish, Gaelic, Welsh, Old English, and original melodies with lyrics by
                     Dinah Mulock Craik. The collection contained original music by B.R.M.— an
                     amateur composer who many believed to be Dinah's deceased brother <persName
                        ref="#MulockBen">Benjamin Robert Mulock.</persName><lb/> John Hannavy, ed.,
                     "Mulock, Benjamin Robert," <hi rend="italics">Encyclopedia of
                        Nineteenth-Century Photography</hi> (New York: Routledge, 2008): 959-960,
                     accessed August 12, 2015.<lb/>
                     <lb/>"Music," <hi rend="italics">The Athenaeum</hi>, no. 2471 (March 6, 1875):
                     333. accessed August 11, 2015.<lb/> "Music," <hi rend="italics">The Atlantic
                        Monthly</hi> 37 (1876): 251-252. accessed August 11, 2015.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="DreadfulGhost">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">A Dreadful Ghost</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#BradburyEvans">Bradbury and Evans</publisher>
                  <date when="1862-02"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">"A Dreadful Ghost" was a short story by <persName
                        ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName> published in <title corresp="#OnceAWeek"
                        >Once a Week</title> in <date when="1862-02">February 1862.</date> It was
                     later included in volume II of Dinah's <date when="1870">1870</date> book of
                     short stories, <title corresp="#UnkindWord">The Unkind Word and Other
                        Stories.</title><lb/> Dinah Craik, <hi rend="italics">The Unkind Word and
                        Other Stories</hi> II (London, Hurst &amp; Blackett, 1870), 73–88. <!--https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=zCcCAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&hl=en&pg=GBS.PA73.-->
                     <lb/>Sally Mitchell, <hi rend="italics">Dinah Mulock Craik</hi> (Boston: Twayne
                     Publishers, 1983), 134–135. </note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="UnkindWord">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Unkind Word and Other Stories</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett</publisher>
                  <date when="1870"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Unkind Word and Other Stories was a collection
                     of Dinah Craik's short stories published in two volumes by <orgName
                        ref="#HurstBlackett">Hurst and Blackett</orgName> in <date when="1870"
                        >1870.</date>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="UnknownCountry"><title>An Unknown Country</title><author ref="#DMC"
                     >Dinah Mulock Craik</author><date when="1887"/><note resp="#FukushimaKailey">An
                     Unknown Country was a travel narrative recording one of Dinah's trips to
                     northern <placeName ref="#Ireland">Ireland.</placeName> It was published in the
                     English Illustrated Magazine in <date when="1887">1887.</date></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ConcerningMen">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Concerning Men</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#SmithElder">Smith, Elder &amp; Co.</publisher>
                  <date when="1887"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">"Concerning Men," was first published anonymously in
                     volume 9 of <title corresp="#Cornhill">The Cornhill Magazine</title> (<date
                        when="1887-10">October 1887</date>). In Craik's own words, the essay
                     examines "the mutual limitations of each sex, and its supplementation by the
                     other." <lb/> Dinah Mulock Craik, "Concerning Men," <hi rend="italics">The
                        Cornhill Magazine</hi> 9.56 (Oct. 1887): 368–377.
                     <!-- https://books.google.ca/books?id=N-rPAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA368&ots=9_o2h7vZoh&dq=%22Concerning%20Men%22%20Cornhill&pg=PA368#v=onepage&q=%22Concerning%20Men%22%20Cornhill&f=false -->
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AMansWrong"><title>A Man's Wrong </title><author><persName ref="#DMC"
                        >Dinah Craik</persName></author><note>"A Man's Wrong" was a short poem by
                     Dinah.</note>
                  <!--KF: This is a poem in either Cornhill or Macmillan.--></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TravellingandTravellers">
                  <title>Travelling &amp; Travellers</title>
                  <author ref="DMC">Dinah Craik</author>
                  <!-- Dinah mentions this in PU211. Kelsey Jacobi -->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="SavetheChildren">
                  <title>Save the Children</title>
                  <author ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</author>
                  <!--- Dinah mentions this in PU 195 and PU 209. Kelsey Jacobi --></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Blind">
                  <title>Blind</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey"> Blind is an essay found in the <date when="1860-11"
                        >November 1860</date> to <date when="1861-04">April 1861</date> volume of
                        <title corresp="#MacmillansMagazine">Macmillan's Magazine</title> in which
                        <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah</persName> recounts a visit to <persName
                        ref="#GilbertElizabeth">Elizabeth Gilbert's</persName>
                     <orgName ref="#BlindAssociation">Association for Promoting the General Welfare
                        of the Blind.</orgName></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="CathairFhargus">
                  <title>Cathair Fhargus (Fergus's Seat)</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">Cathair Fhargus is a poem by Craik, found in the <date
                        when="1860-11">November 1860</date> to <date when="1861-04">April
                        1861</date> volume of <title corresp="#MacmillansMagazine">Macmillan's
                        Magazine</title>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AdventuresofBrownie"><title>Adventures of a Brownie, as Told to my
                     Child</title>
                  <date when="1872">1872</date>
                  <note resp="#AndersonHannah">Adventures of a Brownie was a children's book of
                     short stories about a brownie, a traditional Scottish household creature.
                     Published</note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TheSwanMaiden"><note resp="GivogueStevensonLecia">This may have shown
                     up in <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah's</persName> novel <title ref="#TheFairyBook"
                        >"The Fairy Book"</title> as "The Six Swans" story.</note></bibl>

               <bibl xml:id="TheFairyBook">
                  <title>The Fairy Book: Best Popular Fairy Stories Selected and Rendered
                     Anew</title>
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik </persName>
                  </author>
                  <publisher><orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan.</orgName></publisher>
                  <pubPlace>London and Cambridge</pubPlace>
                  <date when="1863"/>
                  <note resp="#GivogueStevensonLecia">This book by <persName ref="DMC">Dinah Mulock
                        Craik</persName> was published in <date when="1863">1863</date>. It is a
                     collection of fairy stories from several countries. </note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="BrotherJonathansPet">
                  <title>Brother Jonathan's Pet</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Brother Jonathan's Pet</title> was a short
                     story by <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName> published anonymously in
                        <title ref="#ChambersMagazine">Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title> on <date
                        when="1858-01-16">January 16, 1858 (no. 211).</date></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="GoingOutToPlay">
                  <title>Going Out to Play</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Going Out to Play</title> was a short story
                     by <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName> published anonymously in <title
                        ref="#ChambersMagazine">Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title> on <date
                        when="1858-03-06">March 6, 1858 (no. 218).</date></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="WantSomethingToRead">
                  <title>Want Something to Read</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Want Something to Read</title> was a short
                     story by <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName> published anonymously in
                        <title ref="#ChambersMagazine">Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title> on <date
                        when="1858-05-08">May 8, 1858 (no. 227).</date></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OurLostPet">
                  <title>Our Lost Pet</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Our Lost Pet</title> was a short
                     story by <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Craik</persName> published anonymously in
                     <title ref="#ChambersMagazine">Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title> on <date
                        when="1858-05-08">May 29, 1858 (no. 230).</date></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="WomansThoughtsAboutWomen">
                  <title level="m">A Woman's Thoughts About Women</title>
                  <author><persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName></author>
                  <publisher><orgName ref="#HurstBlackett">Hurst &amp;
                     Blackett</orgName></publisher>
                  <pubPlace><placeName ref="#London">London</placeName></pubPlace>
                  <date when="1858"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>A Woman's Thoughts About Women</title> was a
                     women's advice book by <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik.</persName> The
                     book was a compilation of essays on subjects such as self-dependence,
                     worldliness, and female friendship – all originally published anonymously in
                        <title corresp="#ChambersMagazine">Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title> in
                        <date when="1857">1857.</date>
                     <title>A Woman's Thoughts About Women</title> was published without <persName
                        ref="#DMC">Dinah</persName>'s permission in the <placeName ref="#USA">United
                        States</placeName> in the same year of its original publication.<lb/> Sally
                     Mitchell, Dinah Mulock Craik (Boston: Twayne, 1983), 53-55.
                     <!--KF: The American publication might have been done by the firm Rudd & Carleton. It doesn't look like Dinah did business with this firm, but they published "A Woman's Thoughts" in 1858 (and no other titles by DMC as far as I can tell). See: https://books.google.ca/books?id=mkraAAAAMAAJ&dq=A%20Woman's%20Thoughts%20About%20Women%201858&pg=PR1#v=onepage&q&f=false -->
                  </note>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
         </div>

         <div type="WorksByOthers">
            <!--This list is for works not by Craik.-->
            <listBibl>
               <bibl xml:id="JaneEyre">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#BronteCharlotte">Charlotte Brontë</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Jane Eyre</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#SmithElder">Smith, Elder &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1847"/></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Balder">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#DobellSydney">Sydney Dobell</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">Balder</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#SmithElder">Smith, Elder &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1854"/></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TomBrown">
                  <title>Tom Brown</title>
                  <author ref="#HughesThomas">Thomas Hughes</author>
                  <date when="1857"/>
                  <note>Tom Brown's School Days was a children's novel by <persName
                        ref="#HughesThomas">Thomas Hughes.</persName> It follows the life of a young
                     boy in an 1830s Rugby school.</note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="CupAndTheLip">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#MrsValentine">Laura Jewry</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m">The Cup &amp; the Lip</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#TCNewby">T.C. Newby</publisher>
                  <date when="1851"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AsILay">
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"
                     ><!--Dinah refers to a song entitled "As I Lay" in
                            PU65 in the Princeton Parrish Collection.--></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="EnochArden"><title>Enoch Arden</title><author>Tennyson</author><note>A
                     narrative poem by Lord Alfred Tennyson.</note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Householdgods">
                  <title>Household Gods</title>
                  <author/>
                  <note>A play</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="AuroraLeigh">
                  <title>Aurora Leigh</title>
                  <author/>
                  <note resp="BourrierKaren"><title>Aurora Leigh</title> is an epic poem telling the
                     story of a young woman writer by <persName ref="#BrowningElizabethBarrett"
                        >Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HistoiredeFrance">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#GuizotFrancois">François Guizot</persName>
                  </author>
                  <title level="m"><foreign xml:lang="fr">L'Histoire de France depuis les temps les
                        plus reculés jusqu'en 1789 – racontée à mes petits enfants</foreign></title>
                  <pubPlace>Paris</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#Hachette"><foreign xml:lang="fr">Librairie Hachette &amp;
                        Co</foreign></publisher>
                  <date/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Douglas">
                  <title level="m">Douglas</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher corresp="#DaldyIsbisterCo">Daldy, Isbister &amp; Co</publisher>
                  <date when="1875"/>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">“Douglas” was the title of a ballad published in
                     Dinah’s <date when="1875">1875</date> musical collection, <hi rend="italics"
                        >Songs of our Youth.</hi><lb/>
                     <lb/> "Music," <hi rend="italics">The Athenæum</hi>, no. 2471 (March 6, 1875):
                     333. accessed August 11, 2015.<lb/>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
            <bibl xml:id="MoorlandCottage">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="GaskellElizabeth">Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">The Moorland Cottage</title>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
               <date when="1850"/>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="BerthasLove">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#MissJames">Miss James</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">Bertha's Love</title>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#ParkerAndSon">John W. Parker and Son</publisher>
               <date when="1853"/>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Bertha's Love was published anonymously in volume 48 of
                     <title corresp="#Frasers">Fraser's Magazine</title>. In letter PU50 in the
                  Princeton Parrish collection, Dinah reveals that the story was authored by her
                  friend <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#MissJames">Miss James</persName>.</note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="RichardII">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">The Tragedy of Richard II</title>
               <pubPlace/>
               <publisher/>
               <date notBefore="1595" notAfter="1597">Between 1595 and 1597</date>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Richard II is a history play by <persName
                     ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare.</persName> It is
                  based on King Richard II of Englands's life from the time of his coronation to his
                  deposition (<date from="1377" to="1399">1377-1399</date>).</note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="HistoryofaHousehold">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">The History of a Household</title>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#SharpesLondonMag">Sharpe's London Magazine</publisher>
               <date when="1849"/>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="TalesofaGrandfather">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#ScottWalter">Walter Scott</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">Tales of a Grandfather</title>
               <pubPlace>Edinburgh</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#CadellCo">Cadell &amp; Co</publisher>
               <date notBefore="1828" notAfter="1831">Between 1828 and 1831</date>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="WondersofEngraving">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#DuplessisGeorges">Georges Duplessis</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">The Wonders of Engraving</title>
               <pubPlace/>
               <publisher/>
               <date when="1870"/>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="VanityFair">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#ThackerayWilliamMakepeace">William Makepeace Thackeray</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">Vanity Fair</title>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#BradburyEvans"/>
               <date from="1847" to="1848"/>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Vanity Fair was serialized in 20 parts in <title
                     corresp="#Punch">Punch</title> Magazine <date from="1847" to="1848">from 1847
                     to 1848</date>. It was later published in volume form by <orgName
                     ref="#BradburyEvans">Bradbury and Evans</orgName> in <date when="1848"
                     >1848</date>.<lb/> Sutherland, John ed., Introduction to <hi rend="italics"
                     >Vanity Fair</hi>, (Toronto: Oxford UP, 2008), vii-xxx. </note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="DonQuixote">
               <title>Don Quixote</title>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Don Quixote is an early Spanish novel (<date
                     when="1605">1605</date>) written by <persName ref="#DeCervantesMiguel">Miguel
                     de Cervantes</persName>. <!--UCLA10.15-->
               </note></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="TwoWomen">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#CraikGeorgiana">Georgiana M. Craik</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">Two Women</title>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#Bentley">Richard Bentley and Son</publisher>
               <date when="1880"/>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Two Women was a novel written by Dinah's cousin,
                  Georgiana Craik, published in <date when="1880">1880.</date> It appears to have
                  been originally titled A Story of Two Women <!-- See PU87 --><lb/>
                  <!-- Georgiana M. Craik, <hi rend="italics">Two Women,</hi> (London, Richard Bentley and Son, 1880), https://books.google.ca/books?id=TekBAAAAQAAJ&pg=PP7&lpg=PP7&dq=Georgiana+Craik+Two+Women+1880&source=bl&ots=kNyiy9_qQp&sig=6Hc_AE4phPqa_hOtNIQVgLTkLPc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiZs6-cit_MAhUowYMKHfs6CkgQ6AEIKjAE#v=onepage&q=Georgiana%20Craik%20Two%20Women%201880&f=false --></note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="PriscillasLot">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#CraikGeorgiana">Georgiana M. Craik</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">Priscilla's Lot</title>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#TicknorFields">Ticknor and Fields</publisher>
               <date when="1867"/>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Priscilla's Lot was a three-chapter short story written
                  by Dinah's cousin, Georgiana Craik. It was published in <orgName
                     ref="#BradburyEvans">Bradbury and Evans</orgName>'s <title corresp="#OnceAWeek"
                     >Once a Week</title> and also appeared in <orgName ref="#TicknorFields">Ticknor
                     and Fields</orgName>'s <title corresp="#EverySaturday">Every
                  Saturday.</title><lb/> Georgiana M. Craik, "Priscilla's Lot, Chapter III" <hi
                     rend="italics">Once a Week</hi> 3 (1867), 537–540.
                  <!-- https://books.google.ca/books?id=FBhLAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA713&lpg=PA713&dq=%22Priscilla%27s+Lot%22&source=bl&ots=qkS5O2WBow&sig=wjXmuglbd96_dXdzvICxtSMyUnU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwioq-bGjN_MAhUj4IMKHaYfCf8Q6AEIIjAC#v=onepage&q=%22Priscilla's%20Lot%22&f=false -->
                  Georgiana M. Craik, "Priscilla's Lot, Chapter III" <hi rend="italics">Every
                     Saturday</hi> 3 (1867), 714–716.
                  <!-- https://books.google.ca/books?id=FBhLAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA713&lpg=PA713&dq=%22Priscilla%27s+Lot%22&source=bl&ots=qkS5O2WBow&sig=wjXmuglbd96_dXdzvICxtSMyUnU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwioq-bGjN_MAhUj4IMKHaYfCf8Q6AEIIjAC#v=onepage&q=%22Priscilla's%20Lot%22&f=false -->
               </note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="PoemsBeforeCongress">
               <author>
                  <persName ref="#BrowningElizabethBarrett">Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName>
               </author>
               <title level="m">Poems Before Congress</title>
               <publisher corresp="#ChapmanHall">Chapman and Hall</publisher>
               <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <date when="1860"/>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Barrett-Browning's Poems Before Congress was a
                  collection of controversial political poetry. It received an overwhelmingly
                  negative response following its English publication in <date when="1860"
                     >1860,</date> and was frequently decried as "anti-English."<lb/> Katherine
                  Montwieler, "Domestic Politics: Gender, Protest, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's
                  Poems before Congress," Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature 24.2 (2005): 291-317.
                  <!--http://www.jstor.org/stable/20455242--></note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="UnderTwoFlags"><title>Under Two Flags</title><author ref="#Ouida"
                  >Ouida</author>
               <date when="1867"/></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="SundayMagazine">
               <title>Sunday Magazine</title>
               <publisher>Alexander Strahan</publisher>
               <date from="1864" to="1905"/>
               <note resp="#JacobiKelsey"><title corresp="SundayMagazine">Sunday Magazine</title>
                  was an Evangelical journal designed to be read on the Sabbath. It was designed to
                  be a compliment to <title corresp="#GoodWords">Good Words</title>, which Dinah
                  often published in.</note></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="WaterGipsies">
               <title>Water Gipsies</title>
               <author ref="#MeadeElizabeth">Elizabeth Meade</author>
               <!-- Dinah mentions this text in letter PU 208. Kelsey Jacobi --></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="NedLocksley">
               <title>Ned Locksley, the Etonian; Or, the Only Son</title>
               <publisher><orgName ref="#Bentley">Richard Bentley</orgName></publisher>
               <pubPlace><placeName ref="#London">London</placeName></pubPlace>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Ned Locksley</title> was a novel by <persName
                     ref="#MrChermside">Richard Seymour C. Chermside.</persName> Dinah helped to
                  edit this novel for publication by <orgName ref="#Macmillan"
                  >Macmillan.</orgName></note></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="LifeofWilliamBlake"><note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>The Life of
                     William Blake</title> was a popular biography of the Romantic poet, <persName
                     ref="#BlakeWilliam">William Blake,</persName> written by <persName
                     ref="#GilchristAlexander">Alexander Gilchrist.</persName> It was published in
                     <date when="1863">1863</date> after Gilchrist's death.<lb/> ODNB.<lb/>
                  <!--See https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=6HdAAAAAYAAJ&rdid=book-6HdAAAAAYAAJ&rdot=1 --></note></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="HerbertsPrize"><title level="m">Captain Herbert</title><author><persName
                     ref="#CupplesGeorge">George
                  Cupples</persName></author><pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
               <publisher corresp="#ChapmanHall">Chapman &amp; Hall</publisher>
               <date when="1864">1864</date>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Captain Herbert</title> was a 3-volume novel by
                     <persName ref="#CupplesGeorge">George Cupples.</persName> Dinah reviewed this
                  novel for <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co</orgName> around <date
                     when="1860">1860</date> but it was published by <orgName ref="#ChapmanHall"
                     >Chapman and Hall</orgName> in <date when="1864">1864.</date></note></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="MoorCottage">
               <title level="m">The Moor Cottage</title>
               <author ref="#MissBlyth">May Beverley</author>
               <publisher><orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co.</orgName></publisher>
               <pubPlace><placeName ref="#London">London</placeName></pubPlace>
               <date when="1861">1861</date>
               <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>The Moor Cottage</title> was an <date
                     when="1861">1861</date> novel by <persName ref="#MissBlyth">May
                     Beverley.</persName>
                  <persName ref="#DMC">Dinah</persName> read and edited this novel as a publisher's
                  reader for <orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co.</orgName> and praised its
                  description of life in <placeName ref="#Crimea">Crimea.</placeName>
                  <!--https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=osYBAAAAQAAJ&rdid=book-osYBAAAAQAAJ&rdot=1-->
               </note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="HampsteadHeathens">
               <title>Hampstead Heathens</title>
               <author><persName ref="#MassonDavid">David Masson</persName></author>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="Harold">
               <title>Harold</title>
               <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">This appears to be an unpublished work, as Dinah said this
                  was not suitable to be published by <orgName ref="#MacmillanCo"
                     >Macmillan.</orgName></note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="CoachandFour">
               <title>Coach &amp; Four </title>
               <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">This appears to be an unpublished work, as Dinah said this
                  was not suitable to be published by <orgName ref="#MacmillanCo"
                     >Macmillan.</orgName></note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="Bengala">
               <title>Bengala, or, Some Time Ago</title>
               <author><persName ref="#VidalMay">Mary Vidal</persName></author>
               <date when="1860">1860 </date>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="KyloeJock">
               <title>Kyloe-Jock and the Weird of Wanton Walls</title>
               <author><persName ref="#CupplesGeorge">George Cupples</persName></author>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="GoblinMarket">
               <title>Goblin Market</title>
               <author><persName ref="#RosettiChristina">Christina Rossetti</persName></author>
               <publisher corresp="#MacmillanCo">Macmillan Co.</publisher>
               <date when="1862">1862</date>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="OutoftheDepths">
               <title> Out of the Depths: The Story of a Woman's Life</title>
               <author ref="JebbHG">H.G. Jebb</author>
               <date when="1859"/>
               <publisher><orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan</orgName></publisher>
               <note>Out of the Depths was originally published anonymously.</note>
            </bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="RiverPontimac"><title>River Pontimac</title>
               <note resp="#AndersonHannah">River Pontimac was recommended to Dinah by <persName
                     ref="#HooperJane">Mrs. Hooper.</persName> Dinah did not read it.</note></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="WomenandWarriors"><title>Women and Warriors</title></bibl>
            <bibl xml:id="Chatterton"><title>Chatterton</title>is possibly an unpublished poetry
               manuscript.</bibl>
         </div>

         <div type="StubEntriesTitles">
            <!-- The following are all stub entries to be defined/researched and developed -->
            <head>Stub Entries Titles</head>
            <listBibl>
               <!-- Periodicals -->
               <bibl xml:id="ChambersMagazine">
                  <title>Chambers's Edinburgh Journal</title>
                  <note resp="ParkerJanice">Chamber's Journal was a magazine founded by William
                     Chambers in Edinburgh in 1832. </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HarpersMagazine">
                  <title>Harper's Monthly Magazine</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="GoodWords">
                  <title>Good Words</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="MacmillansMagazine">
                  <title>Macmillan's Magazine</title>
                  <publisher><orgName ref="#Macmillan">Macmillan &amp; Co.</orgName></publisher>
                  <pubPlace><placeName ref="#London">London</placeName></pubPlace>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey"><title>Macmillan's Magazine</title> was a monthly
                     literary periodical published <date from="1859" to="1907">from 1859 to
                        1907</date> by <persName ref="#MacmillanAlexander">Alexander
                        Macmillan.</persName> Its first editor was <persName ref="#MassonDavid"
                        >David Masson.</persName></note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TempleBar">
                  <title>Temple Bar</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Athaneum">
                  <title>The Athenaeum</title>
                  <note resp="ParkerJanice">The Athenaeum was a literary magazine published in
                     London, England from 1828 to 1921.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Graphic">
                  <title>The Graphic</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Punch">
                  <title>Punch</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Frasers">
                  <title>Fraser's Magazine</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="SaturdayReview">
                  <title>The Saturday Review</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="SharpesLondonMag">
                  <title>Sharpe's London Magazine</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="SundayTimes">
                  <title>The Sunday Times</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="NewMonthly">
                  <title>The New Monthly Magazine</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="SundayLibrary">
                  <title>The Sunday Library for Household Reading</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ManchesterExaminerTimes">
                  <title>The Manchester Examiner &amp; Times</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ChambersLibraryForYoungPeople">
                  <title>Chambers's Library for Young People</title>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Times">
                  <title>The Times</title>
                  <title>The London Times</title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">The Times is a national British daily newspaper
                     based in <placeName ref="#London">London.</placeName> It has been printed under
                     its current name since <date when="1788">1788.</date></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="RevueDesDeuxMondes">
                  <title xml:lang="fr">Revue Des Deux Mondes</title>
                  <note resp="#FukushimaKailey">Revue Des Deux Mondes is a French language monthly
                     periodical based in <placeName ref="#Paris">Paris.</placeName> It has been in
                     print since <date when="1829">1829.</date></note></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="PathsofPeace">
                  <title>Paths of Peace</title>
                  <date when="1878"/>
                  <note resp="#JacobiKelsey">Paths of Peace was the Christmas special number of the
                        <title corresp="#SundayMagazine">Sunday Magazine.</title></note>
               </bibl>

               <!-- Works not by Craik -->
               <bibl xml:id="NothingNew">
                  <title>Nothing New</title>
                  <!--UCLA10.11-->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HouseholdGods">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Saul">
                  <!-- Dorothy23 UCLA -->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="PhotographyInHotClimates">
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#MulockBen">Benjamin Mulock</persName>
                  </author>
                  <!-- UCLADM14 --></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ALegacy"><title>A Legacy: Being the Life and Remains of John Martin,
                     Schoolmaster and Poet </title><author ref="#DMC">Dinah Mulock Craik</author>
                  <date when="1878"/></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HolidayAfloat"><title>Holiday Afloat</title><author ref="#DMC">Dinah
                     Mulock Craik</author>
                  <date when="1884"/>
                  <note resp="GivogueStevensonLecia">Holiday Afloat was published in <title
                        ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#GoodWords">Good Words</title> in 1884. It was
                     illustrated by <persName ref="CraikSiteIndex.xml#Margery">Margery
                        May</persName></note></bibl>
               <!--KF: the following five entries are from Berg 19. Dinah read these as a publisher's reader for Macmillan c. 1860 but gave no context re: who they were by, if they were published, etc.-->
               <bibl xml:id="Riverswood"><title level="m">The Master of
                        Riverswood</title><author><persName ref="#LewisArthur">Arthur
                        Lewis</persName></author></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="LittleGreyLady"
                  ><!--KF: This could potentially be an alt title for the Moor Cottage, as one of the characters is referred to as a little grey lady.--></bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Leighs"/>
               <bibl xml:id="QuiteProvidential"/>
               <bibl xml:id="Sorrow"/>
               <bibl xml:id="SultanCourt">
                  <title>Sultan Court</title>
                  <!-- Mentioned in Berg 22. Likely a poem by Christina Rossetti, but I could not confirm this. Kelsey Jacobi -->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="MothersInLaw">
                  <title>A Defense of Mothers-in-Law</title>
                  <!-- Mentioned in Berg 20. This title is found in Macmillan's November 1860 edition with no clear author. Kelsey Jacobi  -->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="WomenAndWarriors"/>
            </listBibl>
         </div>
      </body>
   </text>
</TEI>
Digital Dinah Craik Site Index University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. May 2016.

The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License applies to this document.

The license was added on 25 May 2016.

This prosopography has been populated from the letters of Dinah Craik. Information about each person comes from Craik's correspondence and the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

Historical People
Fictional Characters
Stub Entries for Historical People
Organizations
Stub Entries Organizations
Placeography
Stub Entries Places
Repositories USA California Los Angeles Charles E Young Research Library, University of California at Los Angeles Mulock Family Papers 846 USA New Jersey Princeton Manuscripts Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library M. L. Parrish Collection of Victorian Novelists C0171 USA New York New York Literary and Historical Manuscripts, The Morgan Library and Museum. Dinah Maria Craik Letters MA8610 USA New York New York Berg Collection, New York Public Library Dinah Maria Mulock Craik Collection of Papers Folder 67B2875
The Charm 554 The Charm was a children's periodical published by Addey & Co. Howitt's Journal 555 Howitt's was a weekly periodical launched by William Howitt in 1847. The journal went bankrupt in 1848. Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine 556 Jerrold's was a monthly magazine brought out by Bradbury and Evans that ran from 1845 to 1848. The magazine was similar in tone to Punch and had overlapping contributors. Bentley's Miscellany 557 Bentley's Miscellany was a popular Victorian periodical founded by Richard Bentley and edited by Charles Dickens. Illustrated News 558 The Illustrated London News was a weekly news periodical published from 1842 to 1971. The Art Union The Art Journal 559 The Art Journal was an influential art magazine based in London. It was edited by Samuel Carter Hall. Mandler, Peter, "Hall, Samuel Carter (1800-1889)," ODNB. Once a Week: an Illustrated Miscellany of Literature, Popular Science, and Art 560 Once a Week was a weekly illustrated periodical published by Bradbury and Evans between 1859 and 1880. John Sutherland The Stanford Companion to Victorian Fiction (Stanford: Stanford UP, 1989), 479–480. “Once a Week,” Rosetti Archive Periodicals, accessed 12 May, 2016, http://www.rossettiarchive.org/docs/ap4.o4.raw.html. Every Saturday: A Journal of Choice Reading Selected from Foreign Current Literature 561 Every Saturday was a weekly periodical published by Ticknor and Fields from 1866 to 1874. Frank Luther Mott, "Every Saturday," A History of American Magazines 1865–1885 (Cambridge MA, Harvard UP, 1938), 357–362. The Cornhill Magazine 562 The Cornhill Magazine (1860–1975) was a monthly illustrated periodical published by Smith, Elder & Co. and aimed towards middle-class readers. William Makepeace Thackeray was the magazine's original editor. ODNB. Barbara Quinn Schmidt, "'The Cornhill Magazine': Celebrating Success," Victorian Periodical Review 32.3 (Fall 1999): 202–208. The Atlantic Monthly Boston Phillip, Sampson and Co. (1857 – 1859) Ticknor & Fields (1859 – 1873) Houghton & Mifflin (1873 – 1908) 563 The Atlantic Monthly is an American literary and cultural periodical that was founded Boston in 1857. The periodical aimed to attract literary elites, competing with Harper's and its large middle-class readership. Our Young Folks564 Our Young Folks was an illustrated literary periodical for children published weekly by Ticknor & Fields. The Dial565 The Dial was a weekly London newspaper planned by the National Newspaper League Company. It was edited by Peter Bayne from 1860 to 1862, during which time, the paper succeeded but Bayne went bankrupt.
Miss Tommy Dinah Mulock Craik The Ogilvies London Chapman and Hall Dinah Mulock Craik Olive London Chapman and Hall Dinah Mulock Craik The Head of the Family London Chapman and Hall Dinah Mulock Craik Agatha's Husband London Chapman and Hall Dinah Mulock Craik John Halifax, Gentleman London Hurst and Blackett Dinah Mulock Craik A Life for a Life London Hurst and Blackett Dinah Mulock Craik Our Year Boston Ticknor & Fields Dinah Mulock Craik Mistress and Maid London Hurst and Blackett Dinah Mulock Craik Christian's Mistake London Hurst and Blackett Dinah Mulock Craik A Noble Life London Dinah Mulock Craik Two Marriages London Dinah Mulock Craik The Woman's Kingdom London Dinah Mulock Craik A Brave Lady London Dinah Mulock Craik Hannah London Dinah Mulock Craik Young Mrs. Jardine London Dinah Mulock Craik Cola Monti London Arthur Hall, Virtue & Co Dinah Mulock Craik King Arthur: Not a Love Story London Dinah Mulock Craik Alice Learmont: a Fairy Tale London Chapman and Hall Dinah Mulock Craik Avillion and Other Tales London Smith Elder & Co Dinah Mulock Craik A Hero: Philip's Book London Addey & Co Dinah Mulock Craik A Double House London John W. Parker & Son 566 "A Double House" was originally published in Fraser's Magazine. Dinah Mulock Craik How to Win Love, or Rhoda's Lesson 567 Before settling on a title for "How to Win Love, or Rhoda's Lesson", Dinah Craik appears to have titled this children's tale "Winifred Lee" after one of its central characters. Dinah Mulock Craik The Last House in Cecil Street London John W. Parker & Son 568 "The Last House in Cecil Street" was originally published in Fraser's Magazine. Dinah Mulock Craik The Little Lychetts London Addey & Co Dinah Mulock Craik A Low Marriage London John W. Parker & Son 569 "A Low Marriage" was originally published in Fraser's Magazine. Dinah Mulock Craik Songs of our Youth London Daldy, Isbister & Co 570 Songs of our Youth was a collection of Swedish, French, Irish, Gaelic, Welsh, Old English, and original melodies with lyrics by Dinah Mulock Craik. The collection contained original music by B.R.M.— an amateur composer who many believed to be Dinah's deceased brother Benjamin Robert Mulock. John Hannavy, ed., "Mulock, Benjamin Robert," Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Photography (New York: Routledge, 2008): 959-960, accessed August 12, 2015. "Music," The Athenaeum, no. 2471 (March 6, 1875): 333. accessed August 11, 2015. "Music," The Atlantic Monthly 37 (1876): 251-252. accessed August 11, 2015. Dinah Mulock Craik A Dreadful Ghost London Bradbury and Evans 571 "A Dreadful Ghost" was a short story by Dinah Craik published in Once a Week in February 1862. It was later included in volume II of Dinah's 1870 book of short stories, The Unkind Word and Other Stories. Dinah Craik, The Unkind Word and Other Stories II (London, Hurst & Blackett, 1870), 73–88. Sally Mitchell, Dinah Mulock Craik (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1983), 134–135. Dinah Mulock Craik The Unkind Word and Other Stories London Hurst and Blackett 572 The Unkind Word and Other Stories was a collection of Dinah Craik's short stories published in two volumes by Hurst and Blackett in 1870. An Unknown Country Dinah Mulock Craik 573 An Unknown Country was a travel narrative recording one of Dinah's trips to northern Ireland. It was published in the English Illustrated Magazine in 1887. Dinah Mulock Craik Concerning Men London Smith, Elder & Co. 574 "Concerning Men," was first published anonymously in volume 9 of The Cornhill Magazine (October 1887). In Craik's own words, the essay examines "the mutual limitations of each sex, and its supplementation by the other." Dinah Mulock Craik, "Concerning Men," The Cornhill Magazine 9.56 (Oct. 1887): 368–377. A Man's Wrong Dinah Craik 575 "A Man's Wrong" was a short poem by Dinah. Travelling & Travellers Dinah Craik Save the Children Dinah Craik Blind Dinah Mulock Craik 576 Blind is an essay found in the November 1860 to April 1861 volume of Macmillan's Magazine in which Dinah recounts a visit to Elizabeth Gilbert's Association for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind. Cathair Fhargus (Fergus's Seat) Dinah Mulock Craik 577 Cathair Fhargus is a poem by Craik, found in the November 1860 to April 1861 volume of Macmillan's Magazine. Adventures of a Brownie, as Told to my Child 1872 578 Adventures of a Brownie was a children's book of short stories about a brownie, a traditional Scottish household creature. Published 579 This may have shown up in Dinah's novel "The Fairy Book" as "The Six Swans" story. The Fairy Book: Best Popular Fairy Stories Selected and Rendered Anew Dinah Mulock Craik Macmillan. London and Cambridge 580 This book by Dinah Mulock Craik was published in 1863. It is a collection of fairy stories from several countries. Brother Jonathan's Pet Dinah Mulock Craik 581 Brother Jonathan's Pet was a short story by Dinah Craik published anonymously in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal on January 16, 1858 (no. 211). Going Out to Play Dinah Mulock Craik 582 Going Out to Play was a short story by Dinah Craik published anonymously in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal on March 6, 1858 (no. 218). Want Something to Read Dinah Mulock Craik 583 Want Something to Read was a short story by Dinah Craik published anonymously in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal on May 8, 1858 (no. 227). Our Lost Pet Dinah Mulock Craik 584 Our Lost Pet was a short story by Dinah Craik published anonymously in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal on May 29, 1858 (no. 230). A Woman's Thoughts About Women Dinah Mulock Craik Hurst & Blackett London 585 A Woman's Thoughts About Women was a women's advice book by Dinah Mulock Craik. The book was a compilation of essays on subjects such as self-dependence, worldliness, and female friendship – all originally published anonymously in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal in 1857. A Woman's Thoughts About Women was published without Dinah's permission in the United States in the same year of its original publication. Sally Mitchell, Dinah Mulock Craik (Boston: Twayne, 1983), 53-55.
Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre London Smith, Elder & Co Sydney Dobell Balder London Smith, Elder & Co Tom Brown Thomas Hughes 586 Tom Brown's School Days was a children's novel by Thomas Hughes. It follows the life of a young boy in an 1830s Rugby school. Laura Jewry The Cup & the Lip London T.C. Newby 587 Enoch Arden Tennyson588 A narrative poem by Lord Alfred Tennyson. Household Gods 589 A play Aurora Leigh 590 Aurora Leigh is an epic poem telling the story of a young woman writer by Elizabeth Barrett Browning François Guizot L'Histoire de France depuis les temps les plus reculés jusqu'en 1789 – racontée à mes petits enfants Paris Librairie Hachette & Co Douglas London Daldy, Isbister & Co 591 “Douglas” was the title of a ballad published in Dinah’s 1875 musical collection, Songs of our Youth. "Music," The Athenæum, no. 2471 (March 6, 1875): 333. accessed August 11, 2015. Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell The Moorland Cottage London Chapman and Hall Miss James Bertha's Love London John W. Parker and Son 592 Bertha's Love was published anonymously in volume 48 of Fraser's Magazine. In letter PU50 in the Princeton Parrish collection, Dinah reveals that the story was authored by her friend Miss James. William Shakespeare The Tragedy of Richard II Between 1595 and 1597 593 Richard II is a history play by William Shakespeare. It is based on King Richard II of Englands's life from the time of his coronation to his deposition (1377-1399). Dinah Mulock Craik The History of a Household London Sharpe's London Magazine Walter Scott Tales of a Grandfather Edinburgh Cadell & Co Between 1828 and 1831 Georges Duplessis The Wonders of Engraving William Makepeace Thackeray Vanity Fair London 594 Vanity Fair was serialized in 20 parts in Punch Magazine from 1847 to 1848. It was later published in volume form by Bradbury and Evans in 1848. Sutherland, John ed., Introduction to Vanity Fair, (Toronto: Oxford UP, 2008), vii-xxx. Don Quixote 595 Don Quixote is an early Spanish novel (1605) written by Miguel de Cervantes. Georgiana M. Craik Two Women London Richard Bentley and Son 596 Two Women was a novel written by Dinah's cousin, Georgiana Craik, published in 1880. It appears to have been originally titled A Story of Two Women Georgiana M. Craik Priscilla's Lot London Ticknor and Fields 597 Priscilla's Lot was a three-chapter short story written by Dinah's cousin, Georgiana Craik. It was published in Bradbury and Evans's Once a Week and also appeared in Ticknor and Fields's Every Saturday. Georgiana M. Craik, "Priscilla's Lot, Chapter III" Once a Week 3 (1867), 537–540. Georgiana M. Craik, "Priscilla's Lot, Chapter III" Every Saturday 3 (1867), 714–716. Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poems Before Congress Chapman and Hall London 598 Barrett-Browning's Poems Before Congress was a collection of controversial political poetry. It received an overwhelmingly negative response following its English publication in 1860, and was frequently decried as "anti-English." Katherine Montwieler, "Domestic Politics: Gender, Protest, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Poems before Congress," Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature 24.2 (2005): 291-317. Under Two Flags Ouida Sunday Magazine Alexander Strahan 599 Sunday Magazine was an Evangelical journal designed to be read on the Sabbath. It was designed to be a compliment to Good Words, which Dinah often published in. Water Gipsies Elizabeth Meade Ned Locksley, the Etonian; Or, the Only Son Richard Bentley London 600 Ned Locksley was a novel by Richard Seymour C. Chermside. Dinah helped to edit this novel for publication by Macmillan. 601 The Life of William Blake was a popular biography of the Romantic poet, William Blake, written by Alexander Gilchrist. It was published in 1863 after Gilchrist's death. ODNB. Captain Herbert George Cupples London Chapman & Hall 1864 602 Captain Herbert was a 3-volume novel by George Cupples. Dinah reviewed this novel for Macmillan & Co around 1860 but it was published by Chapman and Hall in 1864. The Moor Cottage May Beverley Macmillan & Co. London 1861 603 The Moor Cottage was an 1861 novel by May Beverley. Dinah read and edited this novel as a publisher's reader for Macmillan & Co. and praised its description of life in Crimea. Hampstead Heathens David Masson Harold 604 This appears to be an unpublished work, as Dinah said this was not suitable to be published by Macmillan. Coach & Four 605 This appears to be an unpublished work, as Dinah said this was not suitable to be published by Macmillan. Bengala, or, Some Time Ago Mary Vidal 1860 Kyloe-Jock and the Weird of Wanton Walls George Cupples Goblin Market Christina Rossetti Macmillan Co. 1862 Out of the Depths: The Story of a Woman's Life H.G. Jebb Macmillan 606 Out of the Depths was originally published anonymously. River Pontimac 607 River Pontimac was recommended to Dinah by Mrs. Hooper. Dinah did not read it. Women and Warriors Chattertonis possibly an unpublished poetry manuscript.
Stub Entries Titles Chambers's Edinburgh Journal 608 Chamber's Journal was a magazine founded by William Chambers in Edinburgh in 1832. Harper's Monthly Magazine Good Words Macmillan's Magazine Macmillan & Co. London 609 Macmillan's Magazine was a monthly literary periodical published from 1859 to 1907 by Alexander Macmillan. Its first editor was David Masson. Temple Bar The Athenaeum 610 The Athenaeum was a literary magazine published in London, England from 1828 to 1921. The Graphic Punch Fraser's Magazine The Saturday Review Sharpe's London Magazine The Sunday Times The New Monthly Magazine The Sunday Library for Household Reading The Manchester Examiner & Times Chambers's Library for Young People The Times The London Times 611 The Times is a national British daily newspaper based in London. It has been printed under its current name since 1788. Revue Des Deux Mondes 612 Revue Des Deux Mondes is a French language monthly periodical based in Paris. It has been in print since 1829. Paths of Peace 613 Paths of Peace was the Christmas special number of the Sunday Magazine. Nothing New Benjamin Mulock A Legacy: Being the Life and Remains of John Martin, Schoolmaster and Poet Dinah Mulock Craik Holiday Afloat Dinah Mulock Craik 614 Holiday Afloat was published in Good Words in 1884. It was illustrated by Margery May The Master of Riverswood Arthur Lewis Sultan Court A Defense of Mothers-in-Law

Wildwood

Wildwood was Dinah's beloved cottage on Hampstead Heath.

the Corner House

The Corner House was Dinah's most important residence, where she lived from 1869 until her death. It was built by the architecht Norman Shaw.

Craik Mulock Dinah Maria

female

1826

1887

1865

Dinah Maria Mulock

married

George Lillie Craik.

English

Writer

Harper Brothers

Bath

Dinah's Mulock Aunts lived in Bath, and she was married from one of their houses in Bath. She often went to visit her Mulock aunts in the Spring, bringing her daughter Dorothy on more than one occasion.

Hoblyn Francis Parker

male

1817

1896-08-10

English

Dr. Francis Hoblyn was a general practitioner and surgeon in Bath who married Dinah's paternal aunt Alicia in 1864. Ancestry.

Hall Samuel Carter

male

1800

1889

English

EditorWriter

Samuel Carter Hall was the editor of New Monthly Magazine and the Art Journal. He married Anna Maria Fielding in 1824.

Craik George Lillie

male

Macmillan

Scottish

PublisherAccountant

George Craik was Dinah's husband.

Wolley Emily

female

English

Gentlewoman

Mrs. Wolley was the wife of Reverend Wolley and a close friend of the Craiks.

Miers Anne Mary Annie

female

1828

1898

English

Gentlewoman

Annie Miers was a close friend of Dinah's who attended her wedding to George and who, along with Emily Wolley, was one of the two executors of Dinah's estate.

Miers Francis

male

1822

English

Marston John Westland

male

1819

1890

English

Writer

Westland Marston was a playwright. Dinah was very close to their entire family throughout the 1850s and beyond, often spending Christmas with them. Ben may have been engaged to one of the girls.

Marston Potts Eleanor Jane

female

1870

English

Eleanor Marston was married to Westland Marston. ODNB.

Dobell Duffield Emily Ann

female

1847

1921

English

Emily was the wife of Clarence Dobell. Her sister married Henry Craik.

Dobell Clarence

male

1836

1917

English

Artist

Clarence Dobell and his wife Emilywere close friends of Dinah's. Clarence illustrated Dinah's 1860 collection Our Year and painted a portrait of Dinah.

Craik Henry

male

1846

1927

Scottish

Civil ServantWriter

Henry Craik was George's younger brother. He married Emily Dobell (née Duffield)'s sister.

Dobell Sydney

1824

1874

Spasmodic Poets

English

Writer

Dobell

Hunt Holman William

male

1827

1910

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

English

Artist

Hurst and Blackett

Macmillan Alexander

male

1818-10-03

1896-01-26

Macmillan

Scottish

Publisher

Alexander Macmillan was the younger of the Macmillan brothers.

Royal Academy

AllinghamPatersonHelen

female

1848

1926

1874

William Allingham

married

Helen Allingham

.

English

Artist

Artist Helen Allingham illustrated Craik's work. She was niece to the artist Laura Herford.

AllinghamWilliam

male

1824

1889

1874

William Allingham

married

Helen Allingham

.

Irish

Author

Herford Laura

female

Artist

Laura Herford, the first woman to be admitted to the Royal Academy, was a close friend of Dinah Craik's. She was aunt to the illustrator Helen Allingham.

Upper Tooting Knapdale

Upper Tooting is a district of Southern London. Alexander Macmillan of Macmillan & Co owned a spacious house in Upper Tooting where he regularly entertained and lodged friends and authors. ODNB. "Mr. Alexander Macmillan," Publishers Circular 58, no. 1385 (1893): 57. Seiler, Robert M. ed., "The House of Macmillan," The Beautiful Book: Walter Pater and the House of Macmillan, (London UK: Bloomsbury, 2013), 29-35.

Craik William

male

Scottish

William Craik was George's younger brother.

Craik Pilkington Dorothy

female

English

Dorothy Craik was Dinah's adopted daughter.

Paton

Paton Kidston Mona Margaret Noel

female

1860-06-30

1930-01-02

Scottish

Writer

Mona Paton was the eldest daughter of Noel and Margaret Paton. She had a difficult adolescence, and came to stay with the Craik's every spring for several years.

Cockerell Sydney Carlyle

male

1867-07-16

1962-05-01

Fitzwilliam Museum

Curator

Sydney Cockerell, a book collector and museum curator, was a friend of Dinah's. He was brother to Olive. ODNB.

Hill Octavia

female

1838

1912

Octavia Hill was a housing and social reformer. She was Olive Cockerell's godmother. ODNB.

Cockerell Olive Juliet

female

1868-09-13

1910-07-24

ArtistAuthor

Olive Cockerell lived with the Craiks as a companion for Dorothy in the 1870s. Her brother was Sydney Cockerell and Octavia Hill was her godmother.

Meo Carmela

Musician

Carmela Meo was a young Italian girl whom Dinah met in 1885. She took up a subscription among her friends to have her placed at the Royal College of Music. The relationship ended poorly two years later when Carmela determined to marry a young man Dinah found unsuitable.

Glasgow

England

Oxland

female

Education

Miss Oxland was Dorothy and Olive's governess.

Arnold

male

Arnold, an acquaintance at Dinah's Mulock Aunt's house in Bath, appears to have been married to Gertrude.

Gertrude

female

Gertrude, an acquaintance at Craik's Mulock Aunt's house in Bath, appears to be married to Arnold.

The Craiks

The Craiks were Dinah's husband George's family.

The Royal College of Music

Meo Henderson Jemima

female

1824

Jemima was the wife of Luigi Meo, a musician acquaintance of Dinah's.

Henderson James Stewart

male

1863

Stewart Henderson, misnamed by Dinah in a letter as "Stewart Anderson," was an acquaintance of Dinah's. Stewart was in a secret relationship with Carmela Meo.

Wolley H. F. Reverend

male

English

Reverend Wolley was the Vicar of Shortlands Vicarage, Bromley, Kent. He and his wife were close friends of the Craiks

Pike Isabel Bel

female

1860

1946

Bel Pike was a young person and friend of Dinah's during her years at the Corner House. She was the middle sister of ConnieAda Pike.

Pike Ada Violet

female

1865

1933

Ada Pike was a young person and friend of Dinah's during her years at the Corner House. Youngest sister of ConnieBel

Pike Mary Constance Connie

female

1858

1937

Mary Constance Pike was a young person and friend of Dinah's during her years at the Corner House. She was the eldest sister of Bel and Ada. Connstance Pike married Charles Thomas in 1891 and had two daughters, Constance Dinah and Margaret Isabel.

The Princess's Theatre

The Princess's Theatre was London's leading theatre from 1850-1859, under the management of Charles Kean. It was located in West London on Oxford Street. M. Glen Wilson, "Kean, Charles John (1811-1868)," ODNB.

Chapman and Hall

Cundall & Addey

Addey & Co

Hall William

male

sometime between 1800 and 1802Between 1800 and 1802

18471847

1830–1847Partner in publishing company

English

Publisher

William Hall founded Chapman and Hall with Edward Chapman and worked with the company until his sudden death in 1847.

Chapman Edward

male

1804

1880

1830–1864Partner in publishing company

English

Publisher

Edward Chapman founded Chapman and Hall with William Hall and worked with the company until his retirement in 1864.

Howitt William

male

1792-12-18

1879-03-03

1847–1848Proprietor of Howitt's Journal

English

Writer

William Howitt was a popular Victorian writer who published both independently and collaboratively with his wife Mary Howitt.

Howitt Botham Mary

female

1799-03-12

1888-01-30

English

Writer

Mary Howitt was a popular Victorian writer who published both independently and collaboratively with her husband William Howitt.

Morris William

male

1834-03-24

1896-10-03

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

DesignerWriter

William Morris was a British poet, novelist, and textile designer.

Rossetti Dante Gabriel

male

1828-05-12

1882-04-09

Pre-Rafaelite Brotherhood

Anglo-Italian

PainterWriter

Dante Gabriel Rossetti was a famous poet and a painter of the Pre-Rafaelite brotherhood.

Greenock

In the nineteenth century, Greenock was a burgh in the historic county of Renfrewshire. Dinah sometimes stayed with Allan Park Paton in Greenock.

BrowningRobert

male

1812

1889

English

Writer

BrowningBarrettElizabeth

female

1806

1861

English

Writer

Chalmers Thomas

male

1780-03-17

1847-05-31

Scottish

ClergymanPolitician

Reverend Dr. Thomas Chalmers served as the leader of the Church of Scotland and later established the Free Church of Scotland. He was an important and well-known religious figure in the nineteenth century. ODNB.

Catharine Lodge School for Young Ladies

Established in 1851, the Catharine Lodge School for Young Ladies was a boarding and day school that prepared middle-class girls to be good governesses and wives.

Brompton

Brompton is a district of west-central London located near the South end of the Kensington Gardens.

London

Dinah and her family moved to London when she was 14, in 1840. With the exception of a short residence in Wemyss Bay, Craik lived in London and its suburbs for the rest of her life.

Paton Joseph Noel Sir

1821

1901

Royal Academy

Scottish

Artist

Hill Paton Amelia Robertson

female

1821-01-15

1904-07-05

Scottish

Artist

Amelia Robertson Hill was Sir Joseph Noel Paton's sister. She is best-known for her work in sculpture, but began her career as a painter. Dinah Craik was one of her sitters c. 1844. ODNB.

Kingsley Charles

male

1819-06-12

1875-01-23

English

ClergymanWriterEducation

Charles Kingsley was a Christian socialist, a university professor, and a celebrated novelist. He and Dinah Craik were literary acquaintances. ODNB.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland.

Mulock Thomas Samuel

male

1789

1869-08-11

Anglo-Irish

WriterClergyman

Thomas Mulock was Dinah's father.

Craik Mulock Dinah Maria

female

1826

1887

1865

Dinah Maria Mulock

married

George Lillie Craik.

English

Writer

Lovell George William

male

1804

1878-05-13

English

Writer

George William Lovell was a popular Victorian dramatist. He was an early acquaintance of Thomas Mulock's and a friend of Dinah Craik's. ODNB.

Lynover Cottage

Dinah lived in Lynover cottage with two other young women, likely May James and Minna Lovell.

John W. Parker

John W. Parker & Son (and all its iterations) was a publishing company located in central London. ODNB.

Renfrewshire

Renfrewshire is a historic county in the west-central Scottish lowlands.

Scotland

Sutherland

Sutherland is a county in the Scottish highlands.

Saltley Reformatory

Established in 1852, The Saltley Reformatory was a boy's industrial school located in central Birmingham. Its goal was to train juvenile offenders in the trades so as to mould them into productive members of society and prevent them from falling into a life of crime. ODNB. Barnett, Mary G. "D— The First Reformatory School Acts," Young Delinquents: A Study of Reformatory and Industrial Schools, (New York, E. P. Dutton & Co., 1913): 20-22.

Bentley & Co

Edward Bentley, his son Richard and his grand-son George were three generations of publishers based out of London. The name Bentley is best-known for Richard Bentley's periodical "Bentley's Miscellany" which was edited by Charles Dickens. Anderson, Patricia J. and Jonathan Rose, eds., "Richard Bentley," British Literary Publishing Houses, 1820-1880 106, (Detroit: Gale, 1991), 39-52. DLB 106.

Bentley Richard

male

1794-10-24

1871-11-10

English

Publisher

Richard Bentley was the son of Edward Bentley. He was a well-known publisher in London throughout his lifetime. ODNB.

Bentley Edward

male

1753

English

Publisher

Edward Bentley was a London publisher and the proprietor of Bentley & Co. ODNB.

W. & R. Chambers

Chambers was a publishing company located in Edinburgh.

Doune Terrace

1 Doune Terrace was the address of the publisher Robert Chambers in Edinburgh's Georgian New Town. Dinah stayed with Robert Chambers and his family at this address on more than one occasion.

Upper Terrace Lodge

Upper Terrace Lodge was the residence of Miss Jamesand Miss Coates in Hampstead. “David Gray’s First Proof-Sheet,” The Irish Monthly 15, (1887): 425.

James Marian Julia

female

1830

1910

Writer

Marian James was a friend of Dinah's and an acquaintance of the Dobell family. Miss James lodged at Upper Terrace Lodge, Hampstead with Miss Coates— a cousin of Sydney Dobell's. “David Gray’s First Proof-Sheet,” The Irish Monthly 15, (1887): 425. Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, “List of Publications: Sampson Low, Son, and Co,” Right at Last, and Other Tales, (London: Sampson Low, Son & Co., 1860): 333. "A History of West Down, Hindhead GU26 6BQ," Grayshott Village Archive, last modified February 6, 2012. James Hedderwick, ed., “Memoir of the Author,” Poems of David Gray, with Memoirs of His Life, (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1865): 36-37. Marian James, A Lord of the Creation, (London: Groombridge & Sons, 1857): 1. “Miss Marian Julia James, Deceased,” The London Gazette 28448, (20 December, 1910): 9500. Samuel Halkett, ed., Dictionary of Anonymous and Pseudononymous English Literature 3, (New York: Haskell House, 1926-1934): 401. Web.

Hampstead Heath

Dinah had two residences on Hampstead Heath, Upper Terrace Cottage and most importantly, Wildwood. In the nineteenth century, Hampstead Heath was much further out than it is today.

Coates Emily

female

Miss Coates was a cousin of Sydney Dobell's. She lived at Upper Terrace Lodge with her friend Miss Marian James. "Donations for the Bow and Poplar Charity Organisation Committees," Reports of the Council and of the District Committees, (Charity Organisation Society, London, 1887): 22. “David Gray’s First Proof-Sheet,” The Irish Monthly 15, (1887): 425. James Hedderwick, ed., “Memoir of the Author,” Poems of David Gray, with Memoirs of His Life, (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1865): 36-37.

Dobell Sydney

1824

1874

Spasmodic Poets

English

Writer

18 Camden Street North

Dinah moved to 18 Camden Street North, Camden Town in November 1851.

Chapman and Hall

Ritchie Duncan Leith

male

1797-06-12

1865-01-14

Scottish

writerjournalist

Leitch Ritchie was a Scottish novelist and journalist. ODNB. Ancestry.

University of Oxford

The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the English speaking world. It is said to have been founded in Oxford, England the last decade of the eleventh century, c. 1096. "Introduction and History," University of Oxford, accessed July 14, 2015, http://www.ox.ac.uk/about/organisation/history.

Chambers William

male

1800-04-16

1883-05-20

Scottish

Publisher

William Chambers was a partner in the publishing company W. & R. Chambers. ODNB.

Chambers Robert

male

1802-07-10

1871-03-17

Scottish

PublisherWriter

Robert Chambers was a partner in the publishing company W. & R. Chambers. Dinah often visited his residence at Doune Terrace in Edinburgh's Georgian New Town. ODNB.

Wills William Henry

male

1810-01-13

1880-09-01

English

Writer

William Henry Wills was a successful journalist and journal editor. He was one of the original contributers to Punch and was an assistant editor for Chambers's Edinburgh Journal. ODNB

Rose Cottage

Rose Cottage was a holiday home in Amberley that belonged to a Mr. and Mrs. Guild. Dinah stayed with the Guilds in the 1850s.

Amberley

In the nineteenth century, Amberley was a village in Sussex, England.

Guild

male

Mr. Guild was the proprietor of Rose Cottage in Amberley. Dinah lodged with the Guild family sometime in the mid 1850s. She wrote the first chapter of John Halifax, Gentleman, there. Diana Wall, "People of the Past: Dinah Maria Craik (née Mulock) (1826-1827)," Stroud District Council, accessed Aug. 1, 2015.

Paton Allan Park

Scottish

EditorWriterLibrarian

Allan Park Paton was best known for editing the Hamnet Shakespeare, published between 1877 and 1879. He worked at the Greenock Library, Watt Monument.

Lamont

male

Mr. Lamont and his wife were friends of Dinah's. She met them while lodging with Allan Park Paton at Greenock in 1849.

Lamont

female

Mrs. Lamont and her husband were friends of Dinah's. She met them while lodging with Allan Park Paton at Greenock in 1849.

Mulock Benjamin Robert Ben

male

1829-06-18

1863

English

EngineerArtist

Ben Mulock was Dinah's youngest brother.

Australia

Macmillan Daniel

male

1813-09-13

1857-06-26

Macmillan

Scottish

Publisher

Daniel Macmillan was the elder of the Macmillan brothers, who established a small bookshop and publishing house at 57 Aldersgate Streetin 1842. He died of tuberculosis, leaving the company and his family to his brother Alexander.

Wm. William S. Orr & Co

Wm. S. Orr & Co was a London-based publisher run by William Somerville Orr. ODNB.

Procter Skepper Anne

female

1799

1888

English

Gentlewoman

Anne Skepper Procter was married to the poet and lawyer Bryan Waller Procter. From 1843 onwards, she and her husband hosted lively parties and were well-known names in literary London. ODNB.

Procter Bryan Waller

male

1787-11-21

1874-10-04

English

WriterLawyer

Bryan Waller Procter was a nineteenth-century poet and lawyer. He and his wife Anne Procter were well-known in London for their literary salons. ODNB.

Dover

Dover is a town and major port in Kent, England. Dinah Craik owned a cottage in Dover.

Dyason Jane Frances

female

1839

Servant

Mrs. Dyason was the housekeeper that took care of Dinah's home in Dover.

Reade Mellard Mary

female

1790-07-06

1866

English

Mary Reade was Dinah's maternal aunt.

Reade William James

male

1794

1867

English

William Reade was married to Dinah's maternal aunt Mary Reade.

Wright George Newenham

male

1794

1877

WriterClergyman

George Newenham Wright was an Irish writer and clergyman who was married to Dinah's paternal aunt Charlotte.ODNB.

Wright Mulock Charlotte

female

1797

Charlotte was one of Dinah's paternal aunts. She married George Newenham Wright.

Jolly Dobell Ellen Mrs. Paul Jolly

female

English

The Isle of Arran

Arran or "the Isle of Arran" is an island off the western coast of Scotland.

Hoblyn Mulock Alicia Bonne

female

1812

1896-06-26

Anglo-Irish

Alicia Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal aunts who lived in Bath. She married Francis Parker Hoblyn, a surgeon, in 1864.

Spencer-Bell Spencer Mary

female

Mary Ann Spencer-Bell was the wife of James Spencer-Bell. The SpencerBell were friends of the Craiks.

James Frederick Spencer-Bell

male

1818

1872

English

James Spencer-Bell, formerly James Bell, was a British politician and MP for Guildford from 1853 to 1857. He and his wife, Mary Ann Spencer, had homes at Marylebone and Fawe Park, Keswick. The Spencer-Bells were friends of the Craiks.

SpencerBell

Pilkington Alexander John McDonnell

male

1863-05-17

1930-01-30

Anglo-Irish

Alexander Pilkington was the first husband of Dinah's daughter Dorothy. The pair married in 1887.

Meo Luigi

male

1855

1935

Italian

Luigi Meo, a violinist and older brother of Carmela, was an acquaintance of Dinah's. He married widow Jemima Hendersonin 1884; Jemima's son Stewart was in a secret relationship with Carmela.

Speer Charlton Templeman

male

1859

1921

English

Charlton Speer, an acquaintance of the Craiks, was a professor of piano at the Royal Academy of Music.

Keene John Wood

male

1842

1919

English

Servant

John Keene was the Craiks coachman and gardener at Corner House In the 1881 Census of England he is listed as living at the Stables at Corner House.

Annie Langdale

female

Annie Langdale was the wife of Arthur Langdale. The Langdales were friends of the Craiks.

The Craiks

The Craiks were Dinah's husband George's family.

Artuhur Langdale

male

Arthur Langdale was the husband of Annie Langdale. The Langdales were friends of the Craiks.

Newcastle

Cromarty

In the nineteenth century, Cromarty was a county town and seaport in the Scottish Highlands. It was a well-established port for emigrants. Lucille H. Campey, Fast Sailing and Copper-Bottomed: Aberdeen Sailing Ships and the Emigrant Scots They Carried to Canada, 1774-1855 (Toronto: Natural Heritage/Natural History Inc., 2002), 57–58.

Quebec

MissWhite

female

Springfield

male

Springfield was a friend of Dinah and Ben Mulock's.

Henry Blackett

male

1825

1871

English

Publisher

The Ziepels

Smedley Francis Edward Frank

male

1818-10-04

1864-05-01

Writer

Frank E. Smedley was a friend of Dinah's. He was a novelist and was also editor for Sharpe's London Magazine. ODNB.

Hughes Francis

male

1822-10-20

1896-03-22

Writer

Thomas Hughes was a writer of children's novels. He was well-known for authoring the bestselling children's novel, Tom Brown's School Days (1857). ODNB.

Richards

male

JackWilliam

male

MayallJohnJabezEdwinJabez Meal

1813-09-17

1901-03-06

English

Artist

John Mayall was a successful professional photographer specializing in portraiture and narrative photography. He became a prominent name in England following his work at the Great Exhibition in 1851, and was commissioned to photograph the royal family on several occasions.

MayallJosephParkinJoe

male

1839

1906

English

Artist

Joe Mayall was the second son of the renowned photographer, John Mayall. Ben Mulock worked for John and Joe Mayall at their studio in London, for about a year from 1858 to 1859.

Good Words

Corbett Thomas

male

1822-03-23

1880-04-01

Scottish

Merchant

Thomas Corbett was a Glasgowmerchant also known as a philanthropist who founded many Cooking Depots.

Anderson Alexander Surfaceman

male

1845-05-30

1909-07-11

Scottish

Writer

Alexander Anderson was a poet who wrote under the pseudonym Surfaceman. When he was younger, in 1862, he became a platelayer for the Glasgow and South-Western Railway Company when Dinah recommended him to William Isbister as she felt he was talented and should move to literary work.

Isbister William

male

1838

1916

Scottish

Publisher

William Isbister was part of the publishing Daldy, Isbister and Co. He founded the publishing company with Alexander Strahan.

Macmillan

GilchristAlexander

1828-04-28

1861-11-30

English

Writer

Alexander Gilchrist was a Victorian biographer best known for writing the first biography of William Blake. The Life of William Blake was published in 1863 after Gilchrist's death. ODNB.

Blake William

male

1757-11-28

1827-08-12

English

WriterArtist

William Blake was an engraver and poet of the Romantic era. His work gained popularity with Victorian audiences following the publication of Alexander Gilchrist's Life of William Blake in 1863. ODNB.

Chermside Richard Seymour Conway Reverend

male

1823

1867-07-30

English

WriterClergyman

Reverend Richard S.C. Chermside was a novelist whose works Dinah reviewed for publication by Macmillan c. 1860.

Ogilvie Eleanor

female

The orphaned Eleanor Ogilvie is a primary character in Dinah's 1849 novel The Ogilvies.

MottClara

female

Mott Albert Julius A. J. Barrowcliffe

male

1822

1899-06-13

Wine Merchant

Albert was a friend of Dinah's. He married Clara Dobell, sister of Clarence Dobell, a close friend of Dinah's. Albert wrote non-fiction pieces under his own name, and used the pseudonym A. J. Barrowcliffe to publish three novels. Sutherland, John. The Longman Companion to Victorian fiction. Routledge, 2014.

Daldy Isbister & Co

Daldy Isbister & Co was a publishing company located in London.

Macmillan Orridge Frances Eliza

female

1821

1867

Gentlewoman

Frances Macmillan was married to the publisher, Daniel Macmillan. ODNB.

BowesRobert

male

1835-08-22

1919-02-09

British

Publisher

Robert Bowes was a nephew of Daniel and Alexander Macmillan's. He worked for Macmillan's London branch at Henrietta Street Macmillan & Co. from 1846 until 1863 and then moved to manage the Cambridge location. ODNB.

New York City

23 Henrietta Street

The London office of Macmillan & Co publishing was located at 23 Henrietta Street.

Cambridge

Cambridge is a university city in southeastern England.

Association for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind

The Association for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind was founded by Elizabeth Gilbert first as a private undertaking in 1854 and it grew into an association in 1856. Its purpose was to give blind people employment and train them in industrial occupations.

Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres

The Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres is a French society for the support and promotion of the humanities. It was founded in 1663.

The Lakes District

The Lakes District is a region of northwest England. It was a popular holiday destination in the nineteenth century and featured prominently in the poems by William Wordsworth and other Lake Poets.

Rydal

Rydal is a village northeast of Ambleside in the Lakes District.

MissMarchall

female

Lily Pike

female

Lily and her sister Kate are cousins of the Pike sisters.

Pike

Kate Pike

female

Kate and her sister Lily are cousins of the Pike sisters.

Mulock Horner Maria Sarah

female

1841-02-14

Maria Mulock was Dinah's paternal grandmother.

Mulock Robert

male

1837-04-16

Anglo-Irish

Robert Mulock was Dinah's paternal grandfather.

Mulock Francis John

male

1853

1886

Dinah had a letter from Mrs. Mulock around August 1887 in which she mentions her son Francis is dead.

Tennyson Alfred Lord

English

Writer

Lord Alfred Tennyson was a popular English poet.

The Macmillans

The Macmillans were the family members of Daniel and Alexander Macmillan, founders of the Macmillan publishing house. For a list of the brothers' respective spouses and children, consult the ODNB entry "Macmillan Family."

Bentley George

male

1826-06-07

1895-05-29

English

Publisher

George Bentley was the son of Richard Bentley. He became a partner in his father's publishing company in 1845 and later shared the business with his own son. ODNB.

Dickens Charles John Huffman

male

1812-02-07

1870-06-09

English

Writer

Charles Dickens is English novelist who is still widely read and celebrated in the twenty-first century. He is known for his astute criticisms of Victorian social conditions in novels such as Bleak House. ODNB

Orr William Somerville

male

1871

Publisher

William Somerville Orr was the head of the publishing company Wm. S. Orr & Co. William Somerville Orr, Orr's Circle of the Sciences, (London: Wm. S. Orr & Co, 1854).

Newby Thomas Cautley

male

1797-12-26

1882-06-14

English

Publisher

Thomas Cautley Newby was a successful English publisher best-known for publishing the first works by Emily and Ann Brontë, Wuthering Heights and Agnes Grey. ODNB.

Pall Mall

Pall Mall is a street in west-central London. Hodgson & Graves had an office at 6 Pall Mall.

Bell George

male

1812-10-12

1890-11-27

English

Publisher

George Bell was an English publisher and bookseller. From the late 1860s until his death in 1890, he was known as an authority on English copyright. ODNB.

FleetStreet

Low Sampson

male

1797

1886

English

Publisher

Sampson Low was the London literary agent and correspondent for the American publisher Harper's.

Boston

Marston Philip Bourke

male

1850-08-13

1887-02-14

English

Writer

Philip Marston was the third child of Dinah's close friends John Westland Marston and Eleanor Marston. Dinah Craik was his godmother. ODNB.

Stationers' Hall Court

The nineteenth-century Stationers' Hall was a building in central London owned by The Stationers' Company of London. Stationers' Hall still exists today. "The Hall & Heritage," The Stationers' Company, accessed Aug. 3, 2015. https://stationers.org/the-hall-heritage.html. "The Stationers' Hall," The Stationers' Company, accessed Aug. 3, 2015.https://stationers.org/the-hall-heritage/the-stationers-hall.html.

Birmingham

Birmingham is a city in the West Midlands of England. In the nineteenth century, Birmingham was an industrial and commercial centre.

Oxford

Oxford is a city in Southeast England.

Paris

Paris is the capital city of France.

Neuchâtel

Neuchâtel is a French-speaking city in Switzerland. It lies on the northern shore of Lake Neuchâtel.

Geneva

Geneva is a city in western Switzerland. At the beginning of the nineteenth century Geneva was occupied by France but at the end of the Napoleonic Wars (1815) it became part of the Swiss Confederation.

Gilbert Elizabeth Margaretta Maria

female

1826-08-07

1885-02-07

English

Social Reformer

Elizabeth Gilbert was a campaigner for blind people, as she herself was blinded at a young age due to a severe case of scarlet fever. She supported many organziations that helped the blind, and also founded what became the Association for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind.

Kensington

Kensington is a district of west-central London.

Brazil

Chapman Frederic

male

1823

1895

English

Publisher

Liverpool

Liverpool is a Northwestern English city located in the historic county of Lancashire. Dinah lived in Liverpool with her brother Ben Mulock from 1858 to 1859. Alexander, Lynn M., ed, "Dinah Mulock Craik: A Brief Chronology," John Halifax, Gentleman (Peterborough ON: Broadview, 2005), 25-27.

Surrey

Surrey is a county in southeastern England.

Dunblane

Dunblane is a small town in central Scotland.

Lancashire

Lancashire is a historic county in northwestern England. In the nineteenth century, Lancashire was a major industrial centre.

Hodgson & Graves

Hodgson & Graves was an English publishing company located at 6 Pall Mall, London.

Hammersmith

Hammersmith is a district in West London.

Kentish Town

Kentish Town is a district of northwest London.

Richmond

In the nineteenth century, Richmond was a town in northwestern Surrey, England.

Lane Edward Wickstead

male

1822

1891

Moor Park

Doctor

MoorPark

Sussex

In the nineteenth century, Sussex was a county in the south of England. It has since been divided into East and West Sussex, and is referred to as a historic county.

Bromley

Kent

Camden Town

Camden Town is a district of northwest London.

Bloomsbury

In the nineteenth century, Bloomsbury was a district of Northwest London, just east of Camden Town.

Kean Charles John

male

1811-01-18

1868-01-22

Anglo-Irish

Actor

Charles Kean was a popular nineteenth-century actor and manager of London's Princess's Theatre from 1850-1859. He was best-known for his work in Victorian Shakespeare revivals. ODNB.

Oxford Street

Oxford Street is a major street in west London.

CamdenRoadVillas

Guild

female

Mrs. Guild was married to Mr. Guild, the proprietor of Rose Cottage.

Craik James Reverend

male

1802

1870

Scottish

Clergyman

Reverend James Craik was the father of Dinah's husband George. ODNB.

Craik Grieve Margaret

female

1806

1883

Scottish

Margaret Craik was Dinah's mother-in-law.

Dorset

Dorset is a county in southwest England that borders the English channel.

Beckenham

In the nineteenth century, Beckenham was a parish near Bromley, Kent. It was about 16 kilometres south-southeast of London.

Upper Terrace Cottage

Upper Terrace Cottage was Dinah's brief residence in Hampstead Heath, where she and Ben lived before moving to Wildwood Cottage.

Wemyss Bay

Dinah fled to Wemyss Bay after the death of her brother Ben in 1863. It was here that she rekindled her romance with George Craik.

Lovell Maria Ann Marian Minna

female

1832-09-066 September 1832

1822-04-2929 April 1822

Gentlewoman

Minna Lovell was a friend of Dinah's who lived with her at Lynover Cottage. She was briefly engaged to Dinah's brother Benjamin from around 1860 to 1863.

Craik George Lillie

male

Macmillan

Scottish

PublisherAccountant

George Craik was Dinah's husband.

Ireland

In the nineteenth century, Ireland was yet to be partitioned. Ireland formed a part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Westmeath

Westmeath is a county in Ireland.

Kingdom of Prussia

Tauchnitz

France

Staffordshire

Staffordshire is a county in the west English midlands.

Camden New Town

Camden New Town was a district of London just east of Camden Town.

26 Brecknock Street

26 Brecknock Street was an address in Camden New Town, just off of Camden Street and crossing the tracks of the North London Railway. Dinah lodged at Brecknock Street sometime in the late 1840s.

The Stationers' Company

The Stationers' Company was a Guild of Stationers in the city of London. At its conception, the Guild was comprised of those who worked in the trade of manuscript books (i.e. copiers, limners, and booksellers) but came to include printers in the early sixteenth century. The Stationers' Company owned a building in London called Stationers' Hall. "The Hall & Heritage," The Stationers' Company, accessed Aug. 3, 2015. https://stationers.org/the-hall-heritage.html.

Italy Kingdom of Sardinia Piedmont-Sardinia Kingdom of Italy

The Kingdom of Sardinia was an early European state (c. 1324-1861) and a predecessor to modern Italy. In 1861, the Kingdom of Sardinia was unified with the rest of Italy and was thus renamed the Kingdom of Italy.

Wales

Renfrewshire

Renfrewshire is a historic county in the west-central Scottish lowlands.

Egypt

Devon

Devon is a county in southwest England.

Swanage

Swanage is a coastal town in southwest England.

Switzerland Swiss Confederation

Switzerland (formerly the Swiss Confederation) began the nineteenth century as a as a territory of Napoleonic France. It went through a period of Restoration/Reformation after the end of the Napoleonic Wars, and ended the century as an independent nation-state following the drafting of a formal Constitution in 1848.

Gourock

In the nineteenth century, Gourock was a small burgh in the county of Renfrewshire, just west of Greenock.

Manchester

Manchester is a city in northwest England. In the nineteenth century, it was a major industrial center.

Cheltenham

Cheltenham is a spa town in western England.

Charlton Kings

Charlton Kings is a suburb of Cheltenham.

Wilde Oscar

male

1854-10-16

1900-11-30

Irish

Writer

Oscar Wilde was a famous writer of the late Victorian period. He was a central figure in the decadent/aesthetic movement in Victorian literature and is well-known today for works such as The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) and The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). ODNB.

Chelsea

Chelsea is a district of southwest London. In the nineteenth century, it had a reputation as London's bohemian quarter.

The River Thames The Thames

The River Thames flows through southern England and is well-known for crossing through the capital, London.

Cambridge

Cambridge is a university city in southeastern England.

Ambleside

Ambleside is a town in the Lakes District of northwest England.

Camden Park Villas

The Mulock Aunts

Dinah's paternal aunts Jane, Emily, Eliza, Frances, Ann, and Eliza Mulock lived at Bath.

The Netherlands

The Netherlands is a country in northwestern Europe.

Bradbury & Evans

Ticknor and Fields

Smith Elder & Co

Thackeray William Makepeace

male

1811-07-18

1863-12-23

English

Writer

William Makepeace Thackeray was a popular Victorian writer best-known for his satirical novels, including Vanity Fair. ODNB.

Harper's Monthly Magazine

BaynePeter

male

1830-10-18

1883-10-17

Scottish

Writer

Peter Bayne was a Scottish journalist who, from 1860 to 1862, also worked as the editor of The Dial. ODNB.

The United States of America

Nicholls Brontë Charlotte Currer Bell

female

1816-04-21

1855-03-31

English

Writer

Charlotte Brontë is a celebrated novelist of the Victorian period, best known for her novel, Jane Eyre. ODNB.

Valentine Jewry Laura Belinda Charlotte Aunt Louisa

female

1815-02-15

1899

Writer

Mrs. Valentine, otherwise known by her maiden name Laura Jewry or her pseudonym Aunt Louisa, was a writer of children's fiction. Dinah introduced her to Chapman and Hall on behalf of her acquaintance Leitch Ritchie, c. 1851. "Valentine, L. (Laura), 1814-1899," Library of Congress Name Authority File, accessed Aug. 1, 2015. http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81149497.html WM. H. Peet, "Laura Jewry, Afterwards Mrs. R. Valentine" Notes & Queries 11S-XII, (1915): 266.

Guizot François

male

1787

1874

French

PoliticianWriter

Dinah translated works by François Guizot and his daughter Henriette Guizot de Witt.

Gaskell Elizabeth

Elizabeth Gaskell was a novelist and acquaintance of Dinah Craik's.

Scott Walter

male

Scottish

Writer

Gratet-Duplessis Georges Victor Antoine

male

1834-03-19

1899-03-26

French

Curator

George Duplessis was a French curator and art historian who specialized in the art of engraving. An anonymous note on letter PU34 (AM20763) in the Princeton Parrish Collection suggests that Dinah Craik may have helped translate his text "The Wonders of Engraving."

De Cervantes Miguel

male

Writer

Miguel de Cervantes was a seventeenth-century Spanish writer.

Craik Georgiana

female

1831

1895

English

Author

Georgiana Craik was a cousin of Dinah's husband, who Dinah knew well beforehand. She was born in Brompton, London, but lived in Ireland.

CupplesGeorge

male

1822

1891

Scottish

Writer

George Cupples was a Scottish writer who specialized in nautical novels. Dinah reviewed his novel Herbert's Prize for publication by Macmillan. "George Cupples Author Information," The Circulating Library: a Database of Victorian Fiction, 1837-1901, Web. "The Author of 'the Green Hand'," Book News: an Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Books volume 9 (1890-1891): 452-453, Web.

Blyth Mary Popham May Beverley

female

1831

1915

English

Writer

Miss Blyth (pseud. May Beverley) was a writer who primarly produced literature for young people. Dinah read and reviewed her works when she was working as a publisher's reader for Macmillan Magazine c. 1860. "Mary Popham Blyth: Author Information," Circulating Library, Web.

Crimea

MassonDavid

male

1822-12-07

1907-10-06

Scotland

WriterEditor

David Masson was a biographer as well as an editor with the publishing firm Macmillan & Co. Dinah corresponded with him while working as a copy-editor for Macmillan. ODNB. Jack M. Downs, "David Masson, Belles Lettres, and a Victorian Theory of the Novel," Victorian Literature and Culture 43 (2015): 1-21, doi:10.1017/S106015031400031X.

Rossetti Christina Georgina

female

1830-12-05

1894-12-29

Anglo-Italian

Writer

Christina Rossetti was a poet who published in Macmillan's Magazine. She is well-known for her poem Goblin Market published in 1862. She was the sister of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and had connections with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

Hooper Winnard Jane

female

1818

1907

English

Writer

Dinah and Jane Winnard Hooper were friends and fellow writers. Jane was also close with the Craiks in Glasgow. Charlotte Mitchell, Ellen Jordan and Helen Schinske, eds., "Jane Margaret (Winnard) Hooper," Letters of Charlotte Mary Yonge (1823-1901), accessed July 22, 2015. http://www.yongeletters.com/people?person=711

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Themes:

Digital Dinah Craik Site Index University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. May 2016.

The Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License applies to this document.

The license was added on 25 May 2016.

This prosopography has been populated from the letters of Dinah Craik. Information about each person comes from Craik's correspondence and the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

Bourrier Karen Project Director University of Calgary Karen Bourrier is an assistant professor at the University of Calgary. Her interests include Victorian studies, disability studies, and the digital humanities. Parker Janice Editor University of Calgary Janice Parker is a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary. Fukushima Kailey Editor University of Calgary Kailey Fukushima is a Digitization Assistant at the University of Calgary. She holds a BA (Hons) in English, 2016. Jacobi Kelsey Editor University of Calgary Givogue Stevenson Lecia Editor University of Calgary Anderson Hannah Editor University of Calgary
Ellsworth Aaron Editor University of Calgary Aaron Ellsworth is an MA student at the University of Calgary. His research interests include comics, semiology, and narratology. Carter Jaclyn Editor University of Calgary Jaclyn Carter is a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary. Cunningham Sidney Editor University of Calgary Sidney Cunningham is an MA student at the University of Calgary. His specialization is in contemporary transgender literature, as well as early modern literature. Aleman Keila Karinne Editor University of Calgary Keila Karinne Aleman is a PhD candidate and teaching assistant at the University of Calgary. Her research is on gender in popular culture, comics, and manga. Ruddy Pippa University of Calgary Pippa Ruddy is a Master's student at the University of Calgary. Her interests include affect theory, performance/performativity studies, and intersectional feminism. Rahman Zainub Editor University of Calgary Rahman Zainub is an MA student at the University of Calgary. Fox Kerry-Leigh Editor University of Calgary Kerry-Leigh Fox is an MA student at the University of Calgary. Her interests include Victorian literature, Vernon Lee, queer studies, gender studies, and creative writing. Best Will Editor University of Calgary Kent Sarah Editor University of Calgary
Christopher Christopher appears to be one of Dinah's cats from her time at Wildwood. Blackie Blackie was the Craiks' cat at the Corner House. Pixie Pixie was the Craiks' horse at the Corner House. Songbird Songbird was a horse of Dinah Craik's at the Corner House. Nell Nell was Thomas Mulock Jr.'s beloved horse.
Historical People Craik Mulock Dinah Maria Writer English Dinah Maria Mulock married George Lillie Craik. Scott Walter Writer Scottish Alden Henry Henry Alden was an editor at Harper's magazine. Phayre John John Phayre was a clerk at Harper's. See https://archive.org/stream/houseofharpercen00harp/houseofharpercen00harp_djvu.txt Caird Mrs. Edward Caird was married to the Master of Balliol, Dr. Caird. See http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/3rd-june-1916/15/the-late-mrs-edward-caird Osgood James Ripleh James Ripley Osgood was the editor of the Atlantic and possibly Our Young Folks. Low Sampson Publisher English Sampson Low was the London literary agent and correspondent for the American publisher Harper's. Mulock Thomas Mellard Tom Jr. Tom Mulock was Dinah's younger brother. Mulock Thomas Samuel Anglo-Irish Writer Clergyman Thomas Mulock was Dinah's father. Mulock Mellard Dinah English Dinah (Mellard) Mulock was Dinah (Mulock) Craik's mother Mulock Benjamin Robert Ben English Engineer Artist Ben Mulock was Dinah's youngest brother. Mulock Jane Anglo-Irish Gentlewoman Jane Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal aunts who lived in Bath. Emily Mulock Anglo-Irish Emily Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal aunts who lived in Bath. Mulock Elizabeth Eliza Anglo-Irish Eliza Mulock was the eldest of Dinah's paternal aunts living at Bath. Mulock Frances Fanny Anglo-Irish Fanny Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal aunts living at Bath. Mulock Ann Anne Anglo-Irish Fanny Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal aunts living at Bath. Hoblyn Mulock Alicia Bonne Anglo-Irish Alicia Mulock was one of Dinah's paternal aunts who lived in Bath. She married Francis Parker Hoblyn, a surgeon, in 1864. Reade Mellard Mary English Mary Reade was Dinah's maternal aunt. Hall Samuel Carter Editor Writer English Samuel Carter Hall was the editor of New Monthly Magazine and the Art Journal. He married Anna Maria Fielding in 1824. Hall Fielding Anna Maria Writer Irish Sharpe's London Magazine St James's Magazine The Rosery, Old Brompton Anna Maria Fielding married Samuel Carter Hall. Anna Maria Hall was an Irish-born writer and editor. She lived in England with her husband Samuel Carter Hall. Miers Anne Mary Annie English Gentlewoman Annie Miers was a close friend of Dinah's who attended her wedding to George and who, along with Emily Wolley, was one of the two executors of Dinah's estate. Miers MacGregor Ellen Emily English Brazilian Ellen, an English subject born in Brazil, was the niece of Annie Miers and a young friend of Dinah's. Dinah attended her wedding to Archibald Grey MacGregor on 24 September 1887. Miers Edward John English Brazilian Edward, an English subject born in Brazil, was the nephew of Dinah's close friend Annie Miers. Edward's father was Francis Miers. Miers Henry Alexander Harry English Brazilian Harry, an English subject born in Brazil, was the nephew of Dinah's close friend Annie Miers. Harry's father was Francis Miers. Miers Francis English Miers Fry Catherine Emily Katie English Brazilian Katie, an English subject born in Brazil, was the niece of Dinah's close friend Annie Miers. Katie's father was Francis Miers. She married Edward Sydney Fry in Bromley in 1886. Miers Annie Esther English Brazilian Annie, an English subject born in Brazil, was the niece of Dinah's close friend Annie Miers. Annie's father was Francis Miers. Miers Julia Mary English Julia was the niece of Dinah's close friend Annie Miers. Julia's father was Francis Miers. Jennings Felicia Hanmer English Felicia Jennings was a friend Annie Miers and companion to Annie's brother Francis's mother-in-law for many years after she was widowed. Marston John Westland Writer English Westland Marston was a playwright. Dinah was very close to their entire family throughout the 1850s and beyond, often spending Christmas with them. Ben may have been engaged to one of the girls. Marston Potts Eleanor Jane English Eleanor Marston was married to Westland Marston. ODNB. Marston Philip Bourke Writer English Philip Marston was the third child of Dinah's close friends John Westland Marston and Eleanor Marston. Dinah Craik was his godmother. ODNB. James Maria Maria James was a friend of Dinah's from her days in Camden. Gaskell Elizabeth Elizabeth Gaskell was a novelist and acquaintance of Dinah Craik's. Dobell Sydney Writer English Spasmodic Poets Dobell Clarence Artist English Clarence Dobell and his wife Emilywere close friends of Dinah's. Clarence illustrated Dinah's 1860 collection Our Year and painted a portrait of Dinah. Dobell Duffield Emily Ann English Emily was the wife of Clarence Dobell. Her sister married Henry Craik. Walter Dobell Walter Dobell was the son of Clarence and Emily Dobell Dobell Eveline Jessie Eva English Writer Eva was the young daughter of Dinah's good friends Clarence and Emily Dobell and the niece of poet Sydney Dobell. Eva also became a poet and is known for her WWI poetry. Riviere Briton English Artist Oxford University Royal Academy Good Words Mary Alice Dobell married Briton Riviere. Dobell Riviere Mary Alice English Detmore House Mary Alice Dobell married Briton Riviere. Jolly Dobell Ellen Mrs. Paul Jolly English Jolly Paul Dobell Thompson Julietta Julietta Dobell was the matriarch of the Dobell clan. Ursula March in Craik's novel John Halifax, Gentleman may have been based on her. Drysdale Copeland Pew Elizabeth Lady Gentlewoman Moor Park J. Miriam Benn, "Drysdale George (1824-1904)," ODNB. Lane Drysdale Mary Margaret Lane Edward Wickstead Doctor Moor Park Drysdale Charles Robert Doctor Writer Scottish Trinity College, Cambridge University College, London University of St Andrews Drysdale George Writer Doctor Scottish Glasgow University Moor Park Macready William Charles Dinah knew Macready in her youth from her time in London. According to Aleyn Lyell Reade her father got into a huge fight with Macready. Hunt Holman William Artist English Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood Waugh Hunt Fanny Fanny (Waugh) Hunt was William Holman Hunt's first wife. Waugh Hunt Edith Edith Waugh was William Holman Hunt's second wife and the sister of his first wife Fanny Waugh. Dinah Craik chaperoned her to Switzerland for her marriage to Holman Hunt in 1875 when the Deceased Wife's Sister Act made such a marriage illegal. Hunt Gladys Millais Mulock Holman Dinah's goddaughter and the first child of Edith Waugh and Holman Hunt Henry Blackett Publisher English Hurst and Blackett John Bright Politician English William Ewart Gladstone Prime Minister Prime Minister English Edward White Benson Archbishop Archbishop of Canterbury Clergyman Frederick Temple Archbishop Archbishop of Canterbury Clergyman Macmillan Alexander Publisher Scottish Macmillan Alexander Macmillan was the younger of the Macmillan brothers. Macmillan Daniel Publisher Scottish Macmillan Daniel Macmillan was the elder of the Macmillan brothers, who established a small bookshop and publishing house at 57 Aldersgate Streetin 1842. He died of tuberculosis, leaving the company and his family to his brother Alexander. Guizot François Politician Writer French Dinah translated works by François Guizot and his daughter Henriette Guizot de Witt. Guizot de Witt Henriette Author French Dinah translated works by Henriette Guizot de Witt and her father François Guizot. Dore Gustave Artist Shaw Richard Norman Scottish Architect Royal Academy Chapman Frederic English Publisher Chapman Clara Browning Barrett Elizabeth English Writer Browning Robert English Writer Bulwer Edward Lytton English Writer Politician Herford Laura Artist Laura Herford, the first woman to be admitted to the Royal Academy, was a close friend of Dinah Craik's. She was aunt to the illustrator Helen Allingham. Allingham Paterson Helen Artist English William Allingham married Helen Allingham. Artist Helen Allingham illustrated Craik's work. She was niece to the artist Laura Herford. Allingham William Author Irish William Allingham married Helen Allingham. Millais John Everett Artist English Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood Leighton Frederick Sir Baron English Artist President of the Royal Academy Servant Miss Fanny was a servant in the Craiks' first household as a married couple, Upper Tooting. See Letter to Miss Rankin in the Parrish Collection, Princeton. Paton Joseph Noel Sir Artist Scottish Royal Academy Gourlay Paton Margaret Maggie 33 George Square, Edinburgh Scottish Craik George Lillie Publisher Accountant Macmillan Scottish George Craik was Dinah's husband. Craik Henry Civil Servant Writer Scottish Henry Craik was George's younger brother. He married Emily Dobell (née Duffield)'s sister. Craik William Scottish William Craik was George's younger brother. Craik James Reverend Clergyman Scottish Reverend James Craik was the father of Dinah's husband George. ODNB. Craik Grieve Margaret Scottish Margaret Craik was Dinah's mother-in-law. Craik Jane Scottish Jane Craik was George's older sister. Craik Margaret Maggie Scottish Maggie Craik was George's older sister. Craik Jane Janie Janie Craik was the wife of George's younger brother William. Craik Georgiana