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<!--ebb: Note to Digital Mitford editors: If this site index file appears to be invalid in <oXygen/>, download and save siCheck.sch from the XSLT and Schematron files folder sitting next to this folder in Box. You can save siCheck.sch in the same file directory as your copy of si.xml, and associate the schema locally if the web version isn't running. siCheck.sch is a schematron or simple rule file to check our attribute values for consistency.-->
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      <fileDesc>
         <titleStmt>
            <title>Site Index of Named Entities in the Digital Mitford Archive</title>
            <author>Digital Mitford Editors</author>
            <editor>Elisa Beshero-Bondar</editor>
            <sponsor>
               <orgName>Mary Russell Mitford Society: Digital Mitford Project</orgName>
            </sponsor>
            <sponsor>University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg</sponsor>
            <principal>Elisa Beshero-Bondar</principal>
            <respStmt>
               <resp>Data extraction and compiling by</resp>
               <persName type="hist" ref="#ebb">Elisa Beshero-Bondar</persName>
            </respStmt>
            <respStmt>
               <resp>Proofing and corrections by</resp>
               <persName>Elisa Beshero-Bondar</persName>
            </respStmt>
         </titleStmt>
         <editionStmt>
            <edition> Site Index for the Digital Mitford project. Date: 2014-07-15T03:18:07.126-04:00. Extracted by Elisa Beshero-Bondar.
        Count of all @xml:ids in the current file: 809. First digital edition in TEI P5, launched on 19 August 2013.</edition>
         </editionStmt>
         <publicationStmt>
            <authority>Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive</authority>
            <pubPlace>Greensburg, PA, USA</pubPlace>
            <date>2013</date>
            <availability default="false" status="unknown">
               <licence>Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
                  License</licence>
            </availability>
         </publicationStmt>
         <notesStmt>
            <note>Any special notes on this text? (optional)</note>
         </notesStmt>
         <sourceDesc default="false">
            <p>Information on named entities in this file has been extracted from files in the
               Digital Mitford Archive.</p>
         </sourceDesc>
      </fileDesc>
      <encodingDesc>
         <editorialDecl default="false">
            <p>Describes our editorial practice.</p>
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      <body>
         <div type="Mitford_Team" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listPerson type="Mitford_Team">
               <person xml:id="ad">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Drayton</surname>
                     <forename>Alexandra</forename>
                     <roleName>Ph.D.</roleName>
                     <roleName>Founding Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of St Andrews</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Ph.D. from the University of St Andrews. Alexandra has a
                     specific interest in <title ref="#OV">Our Village</title> and is working with
                        <persName ref="#scw">Samantha Webb</persName> on coding the 1824 first
                     edition of <title ref="#Our_Village1st_ed">Our Village</title>. Research
                     interests include: representations of Gypsies in Romantic and Victorian
                     literature and art, the picturesque and the work of <persName ref="#MRM">Mary
                        Russell Mitford</persName>. <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ahm">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Algee-Hewitt</surname>
                     <forename>Mark</forename>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group</roleName>
                     <roleName>Advisory Board</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Stanford Literary Lab</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ajc">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Colombo</surname>
                     <forename>Amy</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Virginia Commonwealth University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="cmm">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Murray</surname>
                     <forename>Chelsie</forename>
                     <roleName>Research Assistant</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>M. A. English &amp; Communication 
                     <affiliation>State University of New York, Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="csc">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cox</surname>
                     <forename>Catherine S</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Catherine S Cox teaches at the University of Pittsburgh's
                     Johnstown campus, offering classes in biblical and medieval literature and
                     culture, history of the English language, and contemporary critical theory, her
                     areas of professional publication as well. She recently joined the Mitford
                     project, which she sees as an exciting opportunity to create digital resources
                     in a collaborative environment. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="daver">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Robinson</surname>
                     <forename>David</forename>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg: Computing and Telecommunications</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="djb">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Birnbaum</surname>
                     <forename>David</forename>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group</roleName>
                     <roleName>Advisory Board</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="djh">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hitt</surname>
                     <forename>Daniel</forename>
                     <roleName>M. A.</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Primary research interest: contemporary reception of 19th Century
                     American authors, specifically Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe, by
                     European readers. Other interests: issues in composition, the writing process,
                     manuscripts, early short stories, Mitford's connection to <persName ref="#Hawthorne_N">Hawthorne</persName>, and Dark Romanticism. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="dsa">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Saglia</surname>
                     <forename>Diego</forename>
                     <roleName>Advisory Board</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Università degli Studi di Parma</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ebb">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Beshero-Bondar</surname>
                     <forename>Elisa</forename>
                     <roleName>Principal Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Associate Professor of English <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh
                        at Greensburg</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="efp">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Parsons</surname>
                     <forename>Elaine</forename>
                     <forename>Frantz</forename>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Duquesne University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="err">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Raisanen</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of California, Los Angeles</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Elizabeth Raisanen writes on literary representations of the pregnant and birthing body in British Romantic Literature, although her research interests also extend to Romantic drama, during the study of which she first discovered <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName>. Elizabeth has presented papers on Mitford's plays at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, the Wordsworth Summer Conference, and the British Women Writer's Conference, and <bibl>her article on Mitford's play <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title> appeared in <title level="s">European Romantic Review</title> in <date when="2011">2011</date>
                     </bibl>.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="esh">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hood</surname>
                     <forename>Eric</forename>
                     <roleName>Ph.D.</roleName>
                     <roleName>Founding Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Adrian College</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Eric Hood is an Assistant Professor at Adrian College and holds
                     a PhD from the University of Kansas. He specializes in literary theory,
                     eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British poetry (particularly, the epic), and
                     intellectual networks. <ptr target="http://academichood.wordpress.com"/>
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="fbur">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Burwick</surname>
                     <forename>Frederick</forename>
                     <roleName>Advisory Board</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of California, Los Angeles</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ghb">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bondar</surname>
                     <forename>Gregory</forename>
                     <roleName>Founding Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Penn State University</affiliation>
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Greg Bondar has photographed over 300 of Mitford's letters in the
                     Reading Central Library, and another 150 letters in the John Rylands Library in
                     Manchester. He maintains the Digital Mitford project's Excel database
                     documenting over 1000 individual letters and manuscripts. He teaches courses in
                     Anthropology and Archaeology for Penn State Greater Allegheny and the
                     University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg campuses, and he co-teaches
                     Pitt-Greensburg's Digital Humanities course with Elisa Beshero-Bondar. His
                     research involves studying ancient stone tools with nuclear reactor technology,
                     and combines his undergraduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering and
                     Anthropology. While he has only been involved with Digital Humanities
                     applications since 2013, he has spent many years marking up ethnographic data
                     in the mid-1990s. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="hsar">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Sarsfield</surname>
                     <forename>Heather</forename>
                     <roleName>Research Assistant</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>B.A. in English Literature, in progress
                     <affiliation>State University of New York, Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="jbb">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Burwell</surname>
                     <forename>Jaime</forename>
                     <forename>Breanna</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>M.A. in English &amp; Communication, in progress
                     <affiliation>State University of New York, Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <occupation>M.L.S. in progress
                     <affiliation>University at Buffalo</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Jaime is working on an M.A. thesis the reception of the early works of Eliza Haywood.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="jjr">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Rovira</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <roleName>Ph.D.</roleName>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Tiffin University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <ptr target="http://www.jamesrovira.com"/>James Rovira teaches British
                     literature, Creative Writing: Poetry, Creative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction,
                     and Literary Theory at Tiffin University in Tiffin, OH. His research interests
                     include William Blake, Søren Kierkegaard, British and Danish history and
                     literature, poetry, and theory. His book, Blake and Kierkegaard: Creation and
                     Anxiety is available in both hardcover and paperback from Bloomsbury/Continuum.
                     He currently lives in the greater Columbus area with his wife Sheridan and his
                     children Penn, Grace, and Zoe.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="kab">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bourrier</surname>
                     <forename>Karen</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Calgary</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Karen Bourrier is an assistant professor at the University of
                     Calgary. She is currently working on a biography and digital edition of the
                     letters of best-selling Victorian novelist Dinah Mulock Craik. She is very
                     pleased to be part of Digital Mitford. <ptr target="#www.karenbourrier.com"/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="kdc">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Donovan-Condron</surname>
                     <forename>Kellie</forename>
                     <roleName>Ph.D.</roleName>
                     <roleName>Founding Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Babson College</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Kellie Donovan-Condron writes about the intersection of urban
                     and Gothic in the Romantic era. She is also interested in questions of genre
                     and social networking. She has written about Mitford's epic poem <title ref="#Blanch">Blanch</title> and Mitford's network of women writers.
                     Previously, she worked on a project to digitize a collection of 17th- and
                     18th-century maps and ephemeral materials through the Tufts University Perseus
                     Project. <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="lmw">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Wilson</surname>
                     <forename>Lisa</forename>
                     <forename>M.</forename>
                     <roleName>Founding Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>State University of New York at Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Lisa Wilson is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of
                     English and Communication at SUNY Potsdam, where she has taught since 2005. Her
                     areas of interest include transatlantic Romantic and Victorian era literature,
                     particularly women’s writing and popular forms such as the Gothic novel and the
                     ballad revival. She is also interested in book history and bibliographical
                     studies, particularly in the study of authorship in the long nineteenth century
                     (1780-1900). She has published in European Romantic Review, Romanticism on the
                     Net (now RaVon), Romantic Circles, Romantic Textualities, and elsewhere. She is
                     currently working on a monograph on Romantic-period authorship and literary
                     celebrity. Her work on Digital Mitford thus far includes editing and coding
                     Mitford’s lengthy “Introduction” to her collected Dramatic Works (1854), a
                     critical memoir that recounts the author’s influences and experiences at Covent
                     Garden and Drury Lane in the 1820s and 30s. It also includes researching
                     Mitford’s publication history for the site’s working bibliography, particularly
                     tracking the migration of Mitford’s stories from their first publication to
                     their later reappearances in collections and periodicals. She and her team of
                     undergraduate student researchers are also working on transcribing, coding, and
                     researching Mitford’s letters from the early 1820s as found in the John Rylands
                     Library at the University of Manchester. <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="mah">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hughes</surname>
                     <forename>Megan</forename>
                     <forename>Abigail</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Green Scholar, B.A. in English Literature and English Writing, Minor: Visual and Performing Arts
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <occupation>M.F.A. in progress
                     <affiliation>Loyola Marymount University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="mco">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>O'Donnell</surname>
                     <forename>Molly C.</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Nevada, Las Vegas</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Molly O’Donnell is the University of Nevada, Las Vegas,
                     President’s Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She has recently contributed
                     to <title>Victoriographies</title> and the <title>Norton Anthology</title>, and
                     was formerly associate faculty at Notre Dame of Maryland University. Her
                     dissertation uses contemporary sociolinguistics to examine the
                     nineteenth-century tales novel as a useful mode for exploration in the areas of
                     genre, narrative, and gender studies.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="mez">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Zimmer</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Erica</forename>
                     <roleName>Editor</roleName>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Editorial Institute, Boston University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">Mary Erica Zimmer comes to Digital Mitford through her interests in scholarly editing, data visualization, textual scholarship, literary influence, and media change. She is a Ph.D. Candidate in Editorial Studies at Boston University’s Editorial Institute and is also associated with several projects through the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Early Modern Digital Agendas group (<ptr target="http://emdigitalagendas.folger.edu/2013/12/03/emda-news/"/>).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="msm">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Murray</surname>
                     <forename>M.</forename>
                     <forename>Stephanie</forename>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Carnegie Mellon University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="naj">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Joukovsky</surname>
                     <forename>Nicholas</forename>
                     <roleName>Advisory Board</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Penn State University</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ncl">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>LoRusso</surname>
                     <forename>Natalie</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>B.A. in English Literature, in progress
                     <affiliation>State University of New York, Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="rjp">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Parker</surname>
                     <forename>Rebecca</forename>
                     <roleName>Research Assistant</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Green Scholar, B.A. in History and English Literature, in progress
                     <affiliation>University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="rnes">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Nesvet</surname>
                     <forename>Rebecca</forename>
                     <roleName>Ph.D.</roleName>
                     <placeName>University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill</placeName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>University of Wisconsin, Green Bay</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio"> Rebecca Nesvet's research on Romanticism, travel literature, and
                     drama appears in the <title>Keats-Shelley Journal</title>
                     <title>Prism(s): Essays in Romanticism</title>
                     <title>Women's Writing</title>, <title>The Review of English Studies</title>,
                        <title>Literature Compass</title>, <title>Shakespearean International
                        Yearbook</title>, and, in <placeName>Romania</placeName>,&gt;
                        <title>American, British, and Canadian Studies</title>. She won the
                        <orgName>International Conference on Romanticism</orgName>'s 2012 Lore
                     Metzger Award for the best graduate paper. Her dissertation <title>The
                        Vanishing Voyager and the Emerging Outsider, 1818-1930</title>, was directed
                     by Prof. <persName>Jeanne Moskal</persName> and won UNC-Chapel Hill's Thomson
                     award for the best nineteenth-century literature dissertation <ptr target="http://uwgb.academia.edu/RebeccaNesvet"/>. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="scw">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Webb</surname>
                     <forename>Samantha</forename>
                     <roleName>Founding Editor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <note type="bio"> Samantha Webb teaches classes in British Romantic literature,
                        children's literature, and global literature. She specializes in British
                        Romanticism, with an interest in food and agricultural politics, ecology,
                        and women's writing. </note>
                  </occupation>
                  <affiliation>University of Montevallo</affiliation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="tel">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Lombardi</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <roleName>Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>
                     <affiliation>Washington and Jefferson College</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="tlh">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Harnish</surname>
                     <forename>Tracy</forename>
                     <roleName>Research Assistant</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>B.F.A. in Creative Writing, in progress
                     <affiliation>State University of New York, Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
                  <note type="bio">
                     <p/>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="wnb">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Barr</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>B.A. in History and English Literature, in progress
                     <affiliation>State University of New York, Potsdam</affiliation>
                  </occupation>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
            <listOrg type="archives">
               <org xml:id="Baylor">
                  <orgName>Baylor University, Armstrong Browning Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds 3 letters, among correspondence written and received by
                     the Victorian poets <persName ref="#Browning_Rob">Robert Browning</persName>
                     and <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName>. Featuring
                     materials from the collection of the <placeName>Armstrong Browning
                        Library</placeName> at <placeName>Baylor University</placeName> and the
                     holdings of <placeName>Wellesley College</placeName> in <placeName>Wellesley,
                        Massachusetts</placeName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BerkshireRO">
                  <orgName>Berkshire Record Office</orgName>
                  <note>Holds 11 letters, as well as transcripts of Mitford papers--possibly of
                     material at the <placeName>Huntingdon</placeName>. The majority of the letters
                     in this collection are addressed to <persName ref="#Bennett_Wm_Cox">William Cox
                        Bennett</persName>, and one to <persName ref="#Chorley_HF">Chorley</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BL">
                  <orgName>British Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds around 125 letters, as well as manuscripts of Mitford's
                     plays submitted to the Examiner's Office after <date>1825</date>, including
                        <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>, <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>, <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>,
                        <title ref="#Inez_deCastro_MRMplay">Inez de Castro</title>, and <title ref="#Sadak_Kalasrade">Sadak and Kalasrade</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="BostonPL">
                  <orgName>Boston Public Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds 17 letters.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="CambridgeFM">
                  <orgName>Cambridge University: Fitzwilliam Museum</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">? No record at the Cambridge FW library archive. National
                     Archives lists that they hold "1841-6: letters (34) from <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName>. </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Duke">
                  <orgName>Duke University Rubenstein Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds unspecified quantity of letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to <persName>Sir John Easthope</persName>, from
                        <date>1807</date> to <date>1846</date>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="EtonColl">
                  <orgName>Eton College</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">? No record found at library, but National Archives lists they
                     hold letters from <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett
                        Browning</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="FloridaSt">
                  <orgName>Florida State University Special Collections</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds 4 letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to
                     unspecified recipients.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="GlasgowWL">
                  <orgName>The Women's Library, Glasgow</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">2 letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>,
                        <date>1835</date> and <date>1852</date>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HarvardHL">
                  <orgName>Houghton Library, Harvard</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds over 300 letters, including letters from <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert Haydon</persName> to <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, as well as MRM to various recipients including <persName ref="#Hawthorne_N">Nathaniel Hawthorne</persName>, <persName>Thomas William
                        Parsons</persName>, <persName>James Thomas Fields</persName>, <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName>, and <persName ref="#Bennett_Wm_Cox">William Cox Bennett</persName>. Some transcriptions of
                     these letters may be at the <orgName ref="#BerkshireRO">Berkshire Records
                        Office</orgName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="HuntingtonL">
                  <orgName>Huntington Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds over 252 letters of <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>
                     spanning <date>1821</date> to <date>1855</date>, including letters to <persName ref="#Bennoch_Fr">Francis Bennoch</persName> from <date>1837</date> to
                        <date>1855</date>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="IowaSC">
                  <orgName>University of Iowa Special Collections</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Possibly 50 letters here, both from and to <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, including letters from <persName ref="#Bennoch_Fr">Francis
                        Bennoch</persName> and <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon
                        Talfourd</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="MassHS">
                  <orgName>Massachusetts Historical Society</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">10 letters from <persName>Catherine Maria Sedgwick</persName> to
                        <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, apparently in microfilm.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="NYPL">
                  <orgName>New York Public Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">74 letters in 4 collections here, spanning 1814 to 1854. 70
                     letters in the Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American
                     Literature are described as "a synthetic collection consisting of manuscripts,
                     correspondence, and portraits of the author." 10 letters in the Pforzheimer
                     Collection, to <persName ref="#Bennett_Wm_Cox">William Cox Bennett</persName>,
                     to <persName>Cecilia Lucy Brightwell</persName> (a memorial to <persName>Amelia
                        Opie</persName>), and to <persName>Abraham Hayward</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="OxfordBalliol">
                  <orgName>Oxford University, Balliol College Archives</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">2 letters from <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett
                        Browning</persName> to <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="OxfordBodleian">
                  <orgName>Oxford University, Bodleian Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">83 letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="ReadingCL">
                  <orgName>Reading Central Library <note resp="#ghb">The principal archive of Mary
                        Russell Mitford's personal papers and related documents, holding
                        approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her
                        publications.</note>
                  </orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="RuskinL">
                  <orgName>John Ruskin Library, Lancaster</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Holds 11 letters from <persName>John James Ruskin</persName> to
                        <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, written between <date>1848</date> and
                        <date>1854</date>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Rylands">
                  <orgName>The John Rylands Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">The John Rylands Library at the <placeName>University of
                        Manchester</placeName> holds 180 of <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> letters from <date>1821</date> to <date>1843</date>,
                     including most of her correspondence to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas
                        Noon Talfourd</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="ScotlandNL">
                  <orgName>National Library of Scotland, Manuscript Collections</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">? No record found at this library, but the National Archives
                     lists letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwoods magazine</title>, spanning <date>1826</date> to
                        <date>1854</date>. Check the Location Register of English Literary
                     Manuscripts.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Texas">
                  <orgName>University of Texas, Ransom Center</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">1 letter from <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett
                        Browning</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="UReading">
                  <orgName>University of Reading Special Collections</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Something may be here, but there's an apparently erroneous
                     National Archives listing of 800 letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William
                        Elford</persName> spanning <date>1806</date> to <date>1855</date>. Possibly
                     these are actually at <orgName ref="#ReadingCL">Reading Central
                        Library</orgName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="UVa">
                  <orgName>University of Virginia Special Collections</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">20+ letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to various
                     recipients including William Cox Bennet and Frances Trollope. Letters to
                        <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> from <persName>Catherine Maria
                        Sedgwick</persName>, <persName>Francis Trollope</persName>, and
                        <persName>Nathaniel Parker Willis</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="WellesleyL">
                  <orgName>Wellesley College, Margaret Clapp Library, Special Collections</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">
                     <persName ref="#Browning_Rob">Robert Browning's</persName> letters to <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett</persName>, presumably some of which
                     mention <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="WWTrust">
                  <orgName>Wordsworth Trust</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">14 letters from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, spanning
                        <date>1825</date> to <date>1843</date>, 13 of which are to <persName>Francis
                        Wrangham</persName> and 1 to <persName>Captain
                     Osbaldeston</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="YaleL">
                  <orgName>Yale University, Beineke Library</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">Two collections: The first contains 119 letters spanning
                        <date>1817</date> to <date>1851</date>, from <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> to <persName>Charles Boner</persName> (19 letters,
                     1845-1849), to <persName ref="#Hofland_B">Barbara Hofland</persName> (42
                     letters, 1817-1838), <persName>Mrs. William Edwards Partridge, née L. O. H.
                        Anderdon</persName> (57 letters, 1837-1851). The second collection contains
                     letters from MRM to various recipients on <title>Our Village</title>, as well
                     as manuscripts of poems and drama.</note>
               </org>
            </listOrg>
         </div>
         <div type="Past_Editors" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listPerson type="Past_Editors">
               <person xml:id="coles">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Coles</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Allan</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">Wrote his PhD Dissertation to the Dept. of English at Harvard
                     University of August 1956 as an edition of the correspondence of <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName> and <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName>, representing parts of
                     the collections at the John Rylands Library and the Harvard and Yale special
                     collections.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Needham_Francis">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Needham</surname>
                     <forename>Francis R</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="ad">
                     <persName ref="#Needham_Francis">Francis R. Needham</persName> was librarian
                     and secretary to the Duke Wellington (based at Stratfield Saye in Hampshire).
                     He was a passionate Mitfordian and worked tirelessly to try and collect
                     Mitford's letters. He corresponded with <persName ref="#coles">W. A.
                        Coles</persName> and <persName ref="#Roberts_Wm">W. J. Roberts</persName>,
                     two Mitford biographers, and may have also corresponded with <persName ref="#Watson_Vera">Vera Watson</persName>, the most reliable of Mitford's
                     biographer. He attempted to set up a Mitford Society and is largely responsible
                     for the Mitford collection at <orgName ref="#ReadingCL">Reading Central Library</orgName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="pencil">
                  <persName>unknown</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Someone, apparently other than <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who
                     left grey pencil marks on her letters now in the Reading Central Library's
                     collection. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="pencilRy">
                  <persName>unknown</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Someone, apparently other than <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who
                     left grey pencil marks on her letters now in the <placeName>The John Rylands
                        Library</placeName> collection. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="rc">
                  <persName>unknown</persName>
                  <note resp="#kab">Someone, apparently other than <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who
                     left red crayon marks on her letters now in the Reading Central Library's
                     collection. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Roberts_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Roberts</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Scholar</occupation>
                  <note>Early Mitford critic and author of <title>The Tragedy of a Blue
                        Stocking</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Watson_Vera" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Watson</surname>
                     <forename>Vera</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note>Early Mitford critic and author of the biography <title>Mary Russell
                        Mitford</title>
                  </note>
                  <occupation>Scholar</occupation>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>
         <div type="historical_people" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listOrg type="hist">
               <org xml:id="Billiard_Club">
                  <orgName>Billiard Club</orgName>
                  <note resp="#err">A club that <persName ref="#Mitford_Geo">George
                        Mitford</persName> and perhaps <persName ref="#Palmer_CF">Mr.
                        Palmer</persName> are members of.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Bourbon">
                  <orgName>House of Bourbon</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. Dynasty that ruled <placeName>France</placeName> from 1589-1792 and 1814-30. </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Cavaliers">
                  <orgName>Cavaliers</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. Colloquialism for the Monarchist faction in <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">the English Civil Wars (1642-51)</rs>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Chancery">
                  <orgName>Court of Chancery</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Court founded in Norman England, adjudicating equity cases with a tradition of leniency. This court had powers to cancel debts in cases of poverty.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Church_of_E">
                  <orgName>Church of England</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. The English national church, generally adhering to the Anglican (Protestant) Communion since the reign of <persName>Henry III</persName>. </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="CockneyS">
                  <orgName>the Cockney School</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Satirical term coined by <bibl>an anonymous <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's</title> article of <date when="1817-10">October 1817</date>
                     </bibl> targeting a circle of intellectuals, writers, and artists specifically
                     including <persName ref="#Keats">John Keats</persName>, <persName ref="#Hazlitt_Wm">William Hazlitt</persName>, <persName ref="#Hunt">Leigh
                        Hunt</persName>, and <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert
                        Haydon</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Eton">
                  <orgName>Eton College</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Boarding school for boys, located in  <placeName>Eton, Berkshire</placeName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="High_Court_of_Justice">
                  <orgName>High Court of Justice</orgName>
                  <orgName>Commissioners of the High Court of Justice</orgName>
                  <orgName>Commissioners</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. The Commissioners of the High Court of Justice tried <persName ref="#ChasI">Charles I</persName> for treason. Those who convicted him and signed the death warrant were subsequently termed the <orgName>Regicides</orgName>[See Britannica.]</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="House_Commons">
                  <orgName>House of Commons</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. The "lower" house of the bicameral Parliament, the Commons was established in the mid-thirteenth century.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Kemble_family">
                  <orgName>the Kembles</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Medici">
                  <orgName>House of Medici</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Dynasty that ruled various Italian territories from 1434 to 1737, excepting in 1494-1512 and 1527-30, and also provided <placeName>France</placeName> with several queens.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Mitfords_Ma_Pa">
                  <orgName>Mr.and Mrs.Mitford</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Monck_family">
                  <orgName>the Moncks, family of <persName ref="#Monck_JB">John Berkeley
                        Monck</persName>
                  </orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="New_Model_Army">
                  <orgName>New Model Army</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Parliamentary army founded in 1645; victor in <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">the English Civil War</rs>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Palmerite">
                  <orgName>Palmerite</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Supporter of <persName ref="#Palmer_CF">Charles Fyshe Palmer</persName> in the Reading elections of <date when="1820-03-16">March 16, 1820</date>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Parliament_UK">
                  <orgName>Parliament</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; supreme legislative body in <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>. 
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Pius7_Court">
                  <orgName>Court of Pope Pius VII</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#Pius7_Pope">Pope Pius VII</persName> and his Cardinals, <date from="1800" to="1823">from 1800 to 1823</date>. The court was driven to exile in Savona between <date from="1809" to="1813">1809 and 1813</date>, but restored to Rome after a treaty with <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon</persName>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Prelacy">
                  <orgName>Prelacy</orgName>
                  <orgName>Prelates</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. Colloquially, the Archbishops and bishops of the <orgName>Church of England</orgName>. [See Britannica.]</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Presbyters">
                  <orgName>the Presybterian faction</orgName>
                  <orgName>Peace Party</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Faction in <orgName ref="#Parliament_UK">Parliament</orgName> during <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">the English Civil War</rs> which sought peace and negotiation with <persName ref="#ChasI">King Charles I</persName>. Its members were not all Presbyterian by religious persuasion, but they sought support for Presbyterianism as a state sanctioned church. They were opposed by the Independents and leaders of <orgName ref="#New_Model_Army">the New Model Army</orgName>.  [Source: <ref target="http://bcw-project.org/church-and-state/sects-and-factions/presbyterians">BCW Project</ref>]</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Privy_Council">
                  <orgName>Privy Council</orgName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">. Councillors to the British king or queen. </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Richmond_Coach">
                  <orgName>Richmond Coach or Stage</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Scriblerians">
                  <orgName>Scriblerus Club</orgName>
                  <orgName>Scriblerians</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> organization of prominent writers, including <persName>Jonathan Swift</persName>, <persName ref="#Pope_Alex">Alexander Pope</persName>, <persName ref="#Fielding_Henry">Henry Fielding</persName>, <persName>John Arbuthnot</persName>, and <persName>John Gay</persName> among others. The Scriblerians <date from="1715" to="1745">organized in 1715 and disbanded in 1745</date> after the deaths of its founders, Pope and Swift. The club's various members often wrote under "Scriblerus" pseudonyms.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Slades">
                  <orgName>
                     <surname>Slade</surname>
                  </orgName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">The Slades are referenced in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas
                           Noon Talfourd</persName> of <date when="1821-06-21">June 21, 1821</date>,
                        a family distantly related to Mitford involved as adversaries in a law case
                        taken on by Talfourd.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Taylor_Hessey">
                  <orgName>Taylor and Hessey</orgName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> publishers at <placeName>93
                        Fleet Street</placeName>, began around <date>1819</date>. The firm included
                        <persName ref="#Taylor_J">John Taylor</persName> and <persName ref="#Hessey_J">J. A. Hessey</persName>
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Tory">
                  <orgName>Tory Party</orgName>
                  <addName>Conservative Party</addName>
                  <note resp="#kdc">
                     <p>Originally, a 17th-century insulting nickname for those who supported
                           <persName ref="#JamesII">James II</persName>'s right to the throne of
                        England, even though he was Catholic. The term connoted "Irish Catholic
                        outlaw." The term was adopted by the party, which became generally
                        affiliated with the interests of the country gentry, Anglicanism, and
                        support of the divine right of kings. The party was loosely affiliated until
                        the late 18th century, when <persName>William Pitt the Younger</persName>
                        emerged as the leader of a revitalized party. The Conservative Party,
                        founded in <date>1834</date> by <persName>Sir Robert Peel</persName>,
                        absorbed and organized the Tory Party and retained the party nickname.</p>
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Twickenham_Coach">
                  <orgName>Twickenham Coach or Stage</orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Weylandite">
                  <orgName>Weylandite</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ajc"> Weyland supporter; On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: <persName ref="#Monck_JB">John Berkeley Monck</persName> (418 votes), <persName ref="#Palmer_CF">Charles Fyshe Palmer</persName>(399 votes), and <persName ref="#Weyland_John">John Weyland</persName>(395 votes.)http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading</note>
               </org>
            </listOrg>
            <listPerson type="hist">
               <person xml:id="Aeschylus" sex="1">
                  <persName>Aeschylus</persName>
                  <birth notBefore="-0525">525 BC
                        <placeName type="city">Eleusis, Greece</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death notAfter="-0455">455 BC
                        <placeName type="city">Gela, Sicily</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Ancient writer of tragedies, the earliest of the three celebrated progenitors of classical tragedy, including <persName ref="#Euripides">Euripides</persName> and <persName ref="#Sophocles">Sophocles</persName> against both of whom he successfully competed for prize-winning plays in ancient Greece. His plays are some of the earliest existing examples of tragedy, though the genre likely predates him. Aeschylus, like Euripides and Sophocles, served in military roles to fight the Persians. Author of <bibl>the  historical tragedy, <title>Persians</title> (<date when="-0472">472 BC</date>)</bibl>, as well as <bibl>
                        <title>the Oresteia</title> (<date when="-0458">458 BC</date>, the only complete trilogy cycle of plays from ancient Greece</bibl>, Aeschylus was credited by <orgName>the librarians at Alexandria</orgName> with writing <title ref="#PromBound_Aesch">Prometheus Bound</title>, though the authorship is now disputed. <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> knew and discussed <bibl corresp="#Aeschylus_Potter">the eighteenth-century translation of Aeschylus's plays by <editor role="translator" ref="#Potter_R">Robert Potter</editor>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Albert_SaxeCbrg">
                  <persName>Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha</persName>
                  <persName>Albert <roleName>Prince Consort</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel</forename>
                     <surname>House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1819-08-26">
                     <placeName>Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1861-12-14">
                     <placeName>Windsor Castle, Berkshire</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#Victoria_Queen">Queen Victoria</persName>'s first cousin and spouse, whose death at the age of 48 led her to a prolonged period of mourning as the "Widow at Windsor."</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Alfieri_Vittorio" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Alfieri</surname>
                     <forename>Vittorio</forename>
                     <roleName>Count</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1749-01-16">
                     <placeName>Asti, Piedmont region</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1803-10-08">
                     <placeName>Florence</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Credited with reviving Italian tragedy in the eighteenth century, Alfieri's plays included <title>Filippo</title>, <title>Polinice</title>, <title>Antigone</title>, <title>Virginia</title>,and the highly acclaimed <title>Saul</title>. He also authored an ode on <rs type="event" ref="#American_Revol">American Independence</rs> and a satirical poem, <title>The Antigallican</title>, on <rs type="event">the French Revolution</rs>.   
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ashburton_Lord">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Baring</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                     <roleName>First Baron Ashburton</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1774-10-27"/>
                  <death when="1848-05-13"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Austen_Jane">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                     <surname>Austen</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1775-12-16">
                     <placeName>Steventon, Hampshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1817-07-18">
                     <placeName>Winchester, Hampshire</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Novelist celebrated for her wit and style, whose works investigated women's social and economic vulnerabilities in English society. During her lifetime she published <bibl>
                        <title>Sense and Sensibility</title> (<date when="1811">1811</date>)</bibl>, <bibl>
                        <title>Pride and Prejudice</title> (<date>1813</date>)</bibl>, <bibl>
                        <title>Mansfield Park</title> (<date when="1814">1814</date>)</bibl>, and <bibl>
                        <title>Emma</title> (<date when="1815">1815</date>)</bibl>, all anonymously. <bibl>
                        <title>Northanger Abbey</title>, the first written of her novels (<date from="1798" to="1799">composed in 1798-1799</date>)</bibl> was published posthumously in 1818 along with her last finished novel, <title>Persuasion</title>. <rs type="letter">
                        <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> claims in a letter to <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName> of <date when="1815-04-03">3 April 1815</date>
                     </rs> that she has recently discovered Austen <quote defective="false">"is my countrywoman,"</quote>, that is, a neighbor. Later in <rs type="letter">a letter of <date when="1816-07-02">2 July 1816</date> praised <title>Emma</title> in particular among Austen's novels</rs>. She and Elford evidently knew the identity of Austen as the author long before the information was public knowledge, and she claims in the April 3 letter that <rs type="person" ref="#Russell_M">her mother</rs> remembered Jane in her youth as <quote defective="false">"the prettiest, silliest, most affected, husband-hunting butterfly she ever remembers"</quote>, but that Jane was by the 1810s extremely quiet, which impressed Mitford: <quote defective="false">"till <title>Pride and Prejudice</title> showed what a precious gem was hidden in that unbending case, she was no more regarded in society than a poker or a fire-screen, or any other thin upright piece of wood or iron that fills its corner in peace and quietness. The case is very different now; she is still a poker--but a poker of whom every one is afraid. It must be confessed that this silent observation from such an observer is rather formidable. Most writers are good-humoured chatterers--neither very wise nor very witty:--but nine times out of ten (at least in the few that I have known) unaffected and pleasant, and quite removing by their conversation any awe that may have been excited by their works. But a wit, a delineator of character, who does not talk, is terrific indeed!"</quote> [Source: L'Estrange.]</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Baillie_Joanna" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Baillie</surname>
                     <forename>Joanna</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1762-09-11">
                     <placeName>Hamilton, Lanark, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1851-02-23">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p>Successful poet and playwright, authored <bibl>
                           <title>Poems: Wherein It Is Attempted to Describe Certain Views of Nature
                              and of Rustic Manners</title> (<date>1790</date>)</bibl> and more than
                        25 plays. Her best-known works are included in <bibl>
                           <title>Plays on the Passions</title> (<date>1798</date>)</bibl> and were
                        later collected in <bibl>
                           <title>The Dramatic and Poetical Works of Joanna Baillie</title>
                              (<date>1851</date>)</bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Baldwin_R" sex="1">
                  <persName>Robert Baldwin</persName>
                  <birth when="1780"/>
                  <death when="1858"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Printer of the <title ref="#LondonMag">London
                           Magazine</title>; <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                        printer and bookseller. See <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> 14.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bannister_Jack" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bannister</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <addName>Jack</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>British actor (1760-1836). Specialized in comic roles. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Barrett_E">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Barrett Browning</surname>
                     <surname>Barrett</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Elizabeth Barrett</persName>
                  <persName>Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Victorian poet, long-time correspondent, mentee, and friend of
                     MRM. <!--Expand this note and entry!--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bayley" sex="1">
                  <persName>Mr. Bayley</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Editor of the <title ref="#Ladys_Monthly_Museum">Lady's Monthly
                        Museum</title>, married to the <persName ref="#Bayley_Mrs">Mrs.
                        Bayley</persName> mentioned in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s
                     letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of <date when="1825-05-11">11 May 1825</date>. According to <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName>, he drafted the as yet unidentified play mentioned in that
                     letter before his death.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bayley_Mrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mrs. Bayley</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Mrs. Bayley, presumably the wife (here, the widow?)
                     of <persName ref="#Bayley">Bayley</persName> the editor of <title ref="#Ladys_Monthly_Museum">Lady's Monthly Museum</title>. Mrs. Bayley is
                     mentioned in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of <date when="1825-05-11">11 May
                        1825</date>. See <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> 87, note 2. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bayley_P" sex="1">
                  <persName>Peter Bayley</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Peter Bayley (1778?-1823) Editor of <title ref="#Museum_per">the Museum</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Beaumont_Fr" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Beaumont</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1584">
                     <placeName>Grace-Dieu, Leicestershire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1616">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Beaumont_Sir_Geo">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Beaumont</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Howland</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>Seventh Baronet</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1753-11-06"/>
                  <death when="1827-02-07"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Art collector and patron of the arts, donated the first
                     collection to form the <placeName>National Gallery</placeName> in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bennet_G">
                  <persName>The Hon. Henry Grey Bennet </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bennet</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>Grey</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Grey Bennett</persName>
                  <birth when="1777-12-02"/>
                  <death when="1836-05-29">
                     <placeName>Lake Como, Italy</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">M.P. for Shrewsbury after <date>1806</date> and into
                     the <date>1820s</date>, known as "Grey Bennett," the brother of Charles
                     Augustus Bennet (1776-1854) who shared his Whig politics and like him belonged
                     to the Whig <orgName>Brooks's Club</orgName>. Advocate of Catholic emancipation
                     and parliament reform. Bennet gave up his parliament seat in 1826 amid a cloud
                     of scandal after a threat of prosecution "for importuning a young male servant
                     at Spa in August 1825" (ODNB). He had been travelling in Italy after the deaths
                     of a son and daughter from consumption in 1824, and remained in exile near Lake
                     Como until his death in 1836.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bennett_Wm_Cox">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bennett</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Cox</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>William Cox Bennett</persName>
                  <birth when="1820-10-14">
                     <placeName>Greenwich</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1895-03-04">
                     <placeName>4 Eliot Cottages, Blackheath</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>watchmaker</occupation>
                  <occupation>journalist</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A friend of <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>. Married to
                        <persName>Elizabeth Sinnock Bennett</persName> and younger sibling of
                        <persName>Sir John Bennett</persName>. Organizer of very liberal politics in
                        <placeName>Greenwich</placeName>. In <date>1868</date> he helped stump for
                     the liberal <persName>William Gladstone</persName> in his first successful
                     campaign for Prime Minister. Lead writer and art critic for the <title>Weekly
                        Dispatch</title> in <date>1869</date>-<date>1870</date>, contributor to the
                        <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> paper,
                        <title>Figaro</title>, and editor of the literary periodical, <title>The
                        Lark</title>, from <date>1883</date> to <date>1884</date>. Author of
                        <title>Prometheus the Fire Giver</title> published in <date>1877</date>, and
                        <title>Songs for Sailors</title> in <date>1878</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bennoch_Fr" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bennoch</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                     <roleName>Esq.</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> Scottish merchant and wealthy arts patron (1812-1890). Head of firm of
                        Bennoch, Twentyman, and Rigg, wholesalers. Resided in city of London, served
                        as common councilman and deputy of a ward. Dedicatee of Mitford's <title ref="#Dramatic_Works_of_MRM">Dramatic Works (1854)</title>, and assisted
                        in publication of <title ref="#Atherton">Atherton and Other Tales
                           (1854).</title>
                        <!--See www.scotsites.co.uk/ebooks/modernminstrelfrancisbennoch.htm NEEDS RESEARCH LMW-->
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Berengaria" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Berengaria</forename> of Navarre <roleName>Queen Consort of
                        England</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Queen Consort of Richard I of England, 1191-1199. Born ca. 1165, Died 1230.
                        Eldest daughter of King Sancho VI of Navarre and Sancha of Castile. She
                        reportedly accompanied her new husband on his first crusade but they
                        returned separately. Berengaria remained in Europe and later attempted to
                        raise money for his return after he was captured. Became proverbial for
                        wifely faithfulness. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Berghem">
                  <persName>Nicholas Berghem</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Berghem</surname>
                     <forename>Nicholas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Berchem</persName>
                  <birth when="1624"><!-- err: there is some disagreement as to when he was born. The Illustrated Magazine of Art, 4.24(1854) says 1624, while Wikipedia (and probably its sources, though I need to check) says 1620. -->
                     <placeName>Haarlem, Holland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1683">
                     <placeName>Amsterdam</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>artist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#err">Dutch landscape painter known for his pastoral
                     subjects and scenes of rural village life in Holland and Italy. His works are
                     signed both as Berghem and Berchem.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bess_of_Hardwick">
                  <persName>Elizabeth Talbot <roleName>Countess of Shrewsbury</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Bess of Hardwick</persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1521"/>
                  <death when="1608-02-13"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A very rich and powerful woman in Elizabethan England, Bess of Hardwick married four times, and her last husband, <persName ref="#Talbot_Geo">George Talbot</persName>, gave her the title Countess of Shrewsbury. While <persName ref="#MaryQoS">Mary Queen of Scots</persName> was held captive and under Talbot's guard at <placeName ref="#Sheffield_Castle">Sheffield Castle</placeName> in <date when="1568">1568</date>, Bess befriended her, and the two worked on the Oxburgh Hangings tapestries during the queen's confinement. After Talbot's death in <date when="1590">1590</date> she commissioned the architect <persName>Robert Smythson</persName> to build <placeName ref="#Hardwick_Hall">Hardwick Hall</placeName> in Renaisssance style. <ref target="http://www.bessofhardwick.org/">
                        <title>Bess of Hardwick's Letters</title>
                     </ref> archives her complete correspondence from 1550 to 1608.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bickerstaff_Is" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Bickerstaff, Isaac</reg>
                     <surname>Bickerstaff</surname>
                     <forename>Isaac</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1733-09-26">
                     <placeName>Dublin, Ireland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death notBefore="1808"/>
                  <occupation>military</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#kdc #ebb">
                     <p>Irish librettist and writer of musical theater and comic opera in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> and for <placeName ref="#Drury_Lane_Theatre">Drury Lane Theatre</placeName>. Commissioned
                        first in the <orgName>Northumberland Fusiliers</orgName>, then in the
                           <orgName>marines</orgName>. Author of several very popular comedies,
                        including <bibl>
                           <title>Thomas and Sally: or the Sailor's Return</title>
                        </bibl>, <bibl>
                           <title>Love in a Village</title> (<date>1762</date>)</bibl>, <bibl>
                           <title>Love in the City</title> (<date>1767</date>)</bibl>, and the
                        internationally successful play, <bibl>
                           <title>The Padlock</title> (<date>1768</date>)</bibl>, which was produced
                        in <placeName ref="#Germany">Germany</placeName> and
                           <placeName>Hungary</placeName>. Bickerstaff went into exile from
                           <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName> due to published reports
                        from a blackmailing soldier who accused him of a sodomous encounter. He is
                        known to have travelled in <placeName ref="#France">France</placeName>,
                           <placeName>Austria</placeName>, and <placeName>Italy</placeName> under
                        assumed names, but his finale whereabouts are unknown. The ODNB cites
                        records that he was receiving army half pay in <date>1808</date>, and
                        perhaps died shortly thereafter.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bradshaw_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>John Bradshaw</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <surname>Bradshaw</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>magistrate</occupation>
                  <birth when="1602-07-15">15 July 1602</birth>
                  <death when="1659-10-31">31 October 1651</death>
                  <note resp="#rnes #ebb">Appointed Judge of the Sheriff's Court at the <placeName ref="#Guildhall_London">Guildhall in London</placeName>, Bradshaw was the presiding judge who <rs type="event">sentenced <persName ref="#ChasI">King Charles I</persName> to death on <date when="1649-01-27">27 January 1649</date> at <placeName ref="#Westmnst_Palace">Westminster Hall</placeName>
                     </rs>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Broghill" sex="1">
                  <persName>Roger Boyle, Lord Broghill</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Roger</forename>
                     <surname>Boyle</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>"playwright"&gt;</occupation>
                  <occupation>"warrior"&gt;</occupation>
                  <occupation>"politician"&gt;</occupation>
                  <birth when="1621-04-24">25 April 1621<placeName>
                        <placeName type="fortress">Lismore Castle</placeName>
                     </placeName>
                     <district>Waterford</district>
                     <placeName>
                        <country>Ireland</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1679-10-16">16 October 1679</death>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Broghill defended his ancestral estate, <placeName>Lismore
                        Castle</placeName> against an Irish rebellion in 1641-2, then defied his
                     Royalist family by fighting for the Parliamentary cause in <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">the Civil War</rs>. He tortured prisoners and committed
                     other atrocities to intimidate the <orgName>Royalists</orgName> in Ireland.
                     After the war, he received confiscated property in Ireland. He changed
                     allegiances again at the Restoration, and supported <persName>Charles
                        II</persName>. Broghill's literary works include several stage plays and a
                     novel, <title>Parthenissa(1655)</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Browning_Rob">
                  <persName>Robert Browning</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Victorian poet, married to <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth
                        Barrett Browning</persName>. <!--Expand this note and entry!--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Brumoy_Pierre" sex="1">
                  <persName>Father Pierre Brumoy </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Brumoy</surname>
                     <forename>Pierre</forename>
                     <roleName>Father</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>Catholic priest</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> French author and Jesuit priest (1688-1742). "le pere Brumoy," author of
                           <title ref="#Th_d_Gr">Theatre des Greces</title>, later translated by
                           <persName>Charlotte Lennox</persName> as "The Greek Theatre of Father
                        Brumoy"(2 vols., 1759). According to her letters, <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> read this work in the original French.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Brutus" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Marcus Junius</forename>
                     <surname>Brutus</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="-0085-06">June 85 BC</birth>
                  <occupation>assassin</occupation>
                  <occupation>rebel</occupation>
                  <occupation>republican</occupation>
                  <occupation>senator</occupation>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>orator</occupation>
                  <death when="0042-10-23">23 October 42 <placeName type="battlefield">Philippi</placeName>
                  </death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bullock_Wm">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bullock</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1773">
                     <placeName>Plymouth, Devon, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1849-03-07">
                     <placeName>Chelsea, England</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>naturalist</occupation>
                  <occupation>antiquarian</occupation>
                  <occupation>museum</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Collector and systematic organizer of museums,
                     including the Liverpool Museum at <placeName ref="#EgyptianHall">Egyptian
                        Hall</placeName> in Piccadilly, <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, which housed artifacts from Captain Cook's voyages that
                     Bullock had acquired from other collections. An early British traveller to
                        <placeName ref="#Mexico">Mexico</placeName> in <date when="1822">1822</date>, after <rs type="event" ref="#MexIndependence">Mexican
                        independence in 1821</rs>, Bullock returned in 1823 with Mexican artifacts
                     that he exhibited at Egyptian Hall, and published catalogs as well as <bibl>
                        <title>Six Months' Residence and Travels in Mexico</title> in <date when="1824">1824</date>
                     </bibl>. Between 1825 and 1825 he travelled again in Mexico and the <placeName ref="#USA">United States</placeName>, where he purchased an estate called
                     The Elms or Elmwood near <placeName ref="#Cincinnati">Cincinnati</placeName> on
                     the <placeName ref="#Kentucky">Kentucky</placeName> border, and laid out an
                     unsuccessful but admired town plan called "Hygeia" that would become Ludlow,
                     Kentucky. (ODNB)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Burdett_F">
                  <persName>Sir Francis Burdett </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Burdett</surname>
                     <forename>Francis</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>fifth baronet</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1770-01-25">
                     <placeName>Foremark, Derbyshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1844-01-23">
                     <placeName>St. James's Place</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Famous, frequently caricatured radical politician,
                     and M.P. for Westminster. Gave many public speeches, protested abuse of
                     prisoners and flogging of soldiers. His harsh critique of the House of Commons
                     for excluding reporters from their debates led to the Commons voting to
                     imprison Burdett in the <placeName ref="#Tower_of_London">Tower of London</placeName> in 1810, where he was committed until
                     June after clashes between crowds of Burdett's supporters and the army in
                        <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>. The incident increased his
                     popularity. Burdett introduced a parliamentary reform bill in 1818, condemned
                     <rs type="event" ref="#Peterloo">the Peterloo Massacre</rs> in 1820, and remained politically active into the 1830s.
                     (See ODNB).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Burgess">
                  <persName>Mr. Burgess</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">A "Mr. Burgess" who recommended a particular volume
                        of<persName ref="#Sophocles"> Sophocles'</persName> plays to <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, mentioned in her letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of <date>Nov. 12-13
                     1821</date>.<!-- Need to identify.  Reading bookseller?  LMW or clergyman? ebb Many possibilities in ODNB.--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Burns_Rob" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Burns, Robert</reg>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <surname>Burns</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1759-01-25">
                     <placeName>Alloway, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1796-07-21">
                     <placeName>Dumfries, Scotland</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>tax collector</occupation>
                  <occupation>farmer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #esh">Scottish poet, author of <bibl>
                        <title>Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect</title>
                        (<date>1786</date>)</bibl>. Rented and farmed the 170-acre
                        <placeName>Ellisand Farm</placeName>, where he built a house and collected
                     and rewrote local songs and ballads from his neighbors. <bibl>Burns's poems and
                        songs were mostly published in posthumous collections between <date from="1799" to="1808">1799 and 1808</date>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Butler_Mr" sex="1">
                  <persName>Butler</persName>
                  <occupation>merchant</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ajc">A <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName> shop owner and <orgName ref="#Palmerite">Palmerite</orgName> mentioned in Mitford's discussion of the Reading elections in her letter to <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName> of <date when="1820-03-20">20 March 1820</date>
                     <!-- not sure about him -->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Byron">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Byron</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Gordon</forename>
                     <forename>Noel</forename>
                     <roleName type="nobility">sixth Baron Byron</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1788-01-22">
                     <placeName>Holles Street, London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1824-04-19">
                     <placeName>Missolonghi, Greece</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Campbell_Thos">
                  <persName>Thomas Campbell</persName>
                  <birth when="1777-07-27">
                     <placeName>Glasgow, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1844-06-15">
                     <placeName>Boulogne-sur-Mer, France</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Scottish poet and editor: author of <bibl>
                        <title>The Pleasures of Hope</title> (<date>1799</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                        <title>Gertrude of Wyoming</title> (<date>1799</date>)</bibl>. Editor of the
                        <title ref="#New_Monthly_Mag">New Monthly Magazine</title> from <date from="1821" to="1830">1821 to 1830</date>, in which capacity he knew
                        <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName> as a
                     contributor. See <ptr target="http://lordbyron.cath.lib.vt.edu/contents.php?doc=CyReddi.Campbell.Contents"/>
                     <bibl>
                        <author>Cyrus Redding</author>'s <title>Literary Reminiscences and Memoirs
                           of Thomas Campbell</title>
                     </bibl>. Possibly the Mr. Campbell that <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>
                     mentions in her letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of
                        <date when="1822-08-13">13 August 1822</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Canning_George" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Canning</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>politics</occupation>
                  <birth when="1770-04-11">
                     <placeName>Marylebone, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1827-08-08">
                     <placeName>Chiswick, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author and <orgName ref="#Tory">Tory</orgName> politician
                        (1770-1827) Founder of <bibl corresp="#Anti-Jacobin">
                           <title>The Anti-Jacobin, or Weekly Examiner</title> conservative
                        newspaper in <date when="1797">1797</date>
                        </bibl>. Served as Foreign Secretary and briefly as Prime Minister.
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="CharlesSpencer">
                  <persName>Charles Spencer</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <surname>Spencer</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>critic</occupation>
                  <birth when="1955-03-04"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <date notBefore="1991">Since 1991</date>, Charles Spencer has been a theatre critic for the conservative <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> paper <title>The Daily Telegraph</title>.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChasI" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Charles I</forename>
                     <roleName>King of England</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p><!-- ADD INFO --></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ChasII" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Charles II</forename>
                     <roleName>king of England, Scotland, and Ireland</roleName>
                     <persName>King Charles II</persName>
                     <persName>
                        <forename>Charles</forename>
                        <surname>Stuart</surname>
                     </persName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>king</occupation>
                  <birth when="1630-05-29">
                     <placeName>St James's Palace, London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1685-02-06">
                     <placeName>Whitehall Palace, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #rnes"> The son of the executed <persName ref="#ChasI">King Charles I</persName>, Charles II was restored to his father's kingdoms
                     in 1660, occasioning the naming of his reign the Restoration. <p>King of
                        England, Scotland, and Ireland, reigned 29 May 1660-6 Feb. 1685. King of
                        Scotland, reigned 30 Jan. 1649-3 Sept. 1651. House of Stuart. Born 29 May
                        1630, St. James Place, London. Died 6 Feb. 1685 Whitehall Palace, <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Chorley_HF">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Chorley</surname>
                     <forename>Fothergill</forename>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1808-12-15">
                     <placeName>Blackley Hurst, Lancashire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1872-02-16">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>journalist</occupation>
                  <occupation>music critic</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Of Quaker parentage, Chorley worked unhappily in clerical
                     positions and cultivated the arts as a music and literary critic publishing
                     reviews of around 2500 books, weekly reviews of musical performances, and
                     "columns of musical 'gossip'" for <title>The Athenaeum</title> beginning in
                        <date>1830</date> through <date>1868</date>, "the most prolific of all its
                     reviewers," according to the ODNB. Reviewed <persName ref="#Hawthorne_N">Nathaniel Hawthorne</persName> and <persName>Charles Dickens</persName>,
                     and promoted the compositions and operas of <persName>Rossini</persName>,
                        <persName>Mendelssohn</persName>, <persName>Meyerbeer</persName>, and
                        <persName>Gounod</persName>, though he disliked <persName>Verdi</persName>.
                        <persName ref="#Hemans_Felicia">Felicia Hemans</persName> and <persName>E.
                        T. A. Hoffman</persName> made lasting impressions on him. Wrote <bibl>
                        <title>Memorials of Mrs. Hemans</title>, in two volumes, published in
                           <date>1836</date>
                     </bibl>. Served as editor of <title>The Ladies' Companion</title> in 1850
                     (after <persName>Jane Loudon</persName>), and wrote plays, novels, and short
                     stories, though these did not receive much recognition. Correspondent of
                        <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>, as well as <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett</persName>, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Sullivan. Edited
                     the <bibl>
                        <date>1872</date> edition of Mitford's correspondence, <title>Letters of
                           Mary Russell Mitford, Second Series</title>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Christie_JH">
                  <persName>Jonathan Henry Christie</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Fought the duel on <date when="1821-02-27">27 February 1821</date> with <persName ref="#Scott_John">John Scott</persName> that resulted in Scott's death; after trial in April 1821 acquitted of murder; <persName>James Traill</persName> was his second. Christie was the literary agent of <persName ref="#Lockhart_JG">J. G. Lockhart</persName>.  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cobbett_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Cobbett, William</reg>
                     <surname>Cobbett</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <addName>Peter Porcupine</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1763-03-09">
                     <placeName>Surrey, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1835-06-18">
                     <placeName>London, England</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>farmer</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>journalist</occupation>
                  <occupation>politics</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#kdc">
                     <p>English farmer, editor, and M.P. for <placeName>Oldham</placeName> from late
                           <date>1832</date> to his death in <date>1835</date>. Lived in the
                           <placeName>United States</placeName> between <date from="1792" to="1800">1792 and 1800</date> and again between <date from="1817" to="1819">1817
                           and 1819</date>. Founded <title ref="#Political_Register">The Political
                           Register</title> in <date>1802</date>, and contributed to it until his
                        death. Held strongly anti-Jacobin views during the French Revolution,
                        although he came to support various financial and parliamentary reforms; he
                        was primarily concerned with issues pertaining to farmers and agriculture in
                        his later years. "As <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName>
                        observed in 1806, Cobbett's ready hospitality, together with his ruddy
                        complexion, red waistcoat, ample mid-section, and twinkling eye, gave him
                        the appearance ‘of a great English yeoman of the old time" (<bibl>
                           <title ref="#Recollections">Recollections of a Literary Life</title>
                           <date>1883</date>, edn, 200–01</bibl>)" (ONDB). Author of twenty books,
                        most of which initially appeared serially in <title ref="#Political_Register">The Political Register</title>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Colburn" sex="1">
                  <persName>Henry Colburn</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Founding editor of <title ref="#Lit_Gazette">The
                        Literary Gazette</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Coleridge_ST" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Coleridge</surname>
                     <forename>Samuel</forename>
                     <forename>Taylor</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1772-10-21">
                     <placeName>Ottery St. Mary</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1834-07-25">
                     <placeName>Highgate</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Collins_little" sex="1">
                  <persName>"little Collins"</persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British actor.
                        <!-- NEED DATES & DETAILS  May be T. Collins, Covent Garden?--></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Colman_the_Elder" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Colman</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <roleName>the Elder</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1732-04">
                     <placeName>Florence, Italy</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1794-08-14">
                     <placeName>Paddington, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>theatre manager</occupation>
                  <occupation>barrister</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author, barrister, <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent
                           Garden</placeName> theater manager (1732-1794) Also called "George the
                        First." His son, <persName ref="#Colman_the_Younger">George Colman the
                           Younger</persName>, was also an author and theater manager. Friend of
                           <persName ref="#Garrick_David">David Garrick</persName>. Author of <bibl>
                           <title>The Clandestine Marriage</title> (<date>1766</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                           <title>The Jealous Wife</title> (<date>1761</date>)</bibl>, partly based
                        on <bibl>
                           <persName>Fielding's</persName> novel <title>Tom Jones</title>
                        </bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Colman_the_Younger" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Colman</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <roleName>the Younger</roleName>
                     <addName>the licenser</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1762-10-21">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1836-10-26">
                     <placeName>22 Brompton Square, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>theatre manager</occupation>
                  <occupation>Examiner of Plays</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author and theater manager (1762-1836) His father, <persName ref="#Colman_the_Elder">George Colman the Elder</persName>, was also an
                        author and theater manager. Author of <title>The Heir at Law</title>, and
                           <title>The Iron Chest</title>, a play based on <persName>William
                           Godwin's</persName> novel <title>Caleb Williams</title>. As Lord
                        Chamberlain's Examiner of Plays from 1824 until his death in 1836, he was
                        responsible for rejecting production of <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName>
                        <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Congreve_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Congreve</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1670-01"> Either born on 24th or 31st. <placeName>Bardsey Grange,
                        Yorkshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1729-01-19">
                     <placeName>Surrey Street, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1670-1729) </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cook_CaptJ">
                  <persName>James Cook </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cook</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <roleName>Captain</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1728-10-27">
                     <placeName>Marton</placeName> village in <placeName>Yorkshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1779-02-14">
                     <placeName>Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>navigator</occupation>
                  <occupation>cartographer</occupation>
                  <occupation>captain</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Mapped Newfoundland and explored the Pacific,
                     including New Zealand and Australia, as well as the Antarctic Circle in three
                     historic voyages between <date from="1768" to="1779">1768 and 1779</date>. Died
                     in an unexpectedly hostile encounter with islanders on Hawaii.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Corneille" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Corneille</surname>
                     <forename>Pierre</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1606-06-06">
                     <placeName>Rouen, France</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1684-10-01">
                     <placeName>Paris, France</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>French author (1606-1684)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Coutts_HM" sex="2">
                  <persName>Harriot Mellon Coutts</persName>
                  <persName>Harriot Mellon</persName>
                  <persName>Harriot Beauclerk, <roleName>Duchess of St. Albans</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Mrs. Coutts was the second wife of <persName ref="#Coutts_T">Thomas Coutts</persName>, banker; she was the former actress
                     Harriot Mellon and later became Harriot Beauclerk, Duchess of St. Albans upon
                     her second marriage. Her first name seems to be variously spelled Harriot and
                     Harriet. She was widowed early <date when="1822">1822</date> and inherited the
                     bulk of her husband's estate, including controlling shares in his banking
                     interests. She gave <rs type="event">a famous party at <placeName>Holly
                           Hill</placeName> in <date when="1822-07">July 1822</date>
                     </rs> (not sure of exact date, whether before or after the date of this
                     letter.) See "Harriot Coutts,"
                     http://heritagearchives.rbs.com/people/list/harriot-coutts.html.
                     <!--What kind of rumor about her and Macready?  An affair?  Going back on the stage?  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Coutts_T" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas Coutts</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Banker (1735-1822) and founder of Coutts &amp;
                     Co.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Croly_G" sex="1">
                  <persName>George Croly</persName>
                  <birth when="1780-08-17"/>
                  <death when="1860-11-24"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>b. 17 Aug. 1780 d. 24 Nov. 1860. Irish writer and cleric, held the living of
                        St. Stephen Walbrook in the <placeName ref="#London_city">City of
                           London</placeName>. Contributor to <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwoods
                           Magazine</title> and other <orgName ref="#Tory">Tory</orgName>
                        periodicals.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cromwell" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cromwell</surname>
                     <forename>Oliver</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>military</occupation>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <birth when="1599-04-25">
                     <placeName>Huntingdon</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1658-09-03">
                     <placeName>Whitehall, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Member of Parliament, Puritan, Parliamentarian ("Roundhead") military
                        commander. 1st Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and
                        Ireland (25 Dec. 1653-3 Sept. 1658). He was buried in <placeName ref="#Westminster_Abbey">Westminster Abbey</placeName> in
                        1658, then exhumed and posthumously "executed" by Royalists after 1660 and
                        is buried in <placeName>Tyburn</placeName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cromwell_Hen">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Henry Cromwell</reg>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <surname>Cromwell</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1628-12-26">
                     <placeName>Huntingdon, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1674-03-23">
                     <placeName>Spinney Abbey, Northborough, England</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#rnes"> The fourth of <persName ref="#Cromwell">Oliver Cromwell</persName>'s five sons (out of nine children total), Henry served as <roleName>Lord Lieutenant of Ireland</roleName> and in various capacities during his father's rise and regime. He corresponded copiously with his father. [ODNB]</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Culpepper_Mrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mrs. Culpepper</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">According to <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName>,
                        <persName ref="#Valpy_Richard">Dr. Valpy</persName>'s eldest daughter (Coles
                     #15, p. 90, note 14).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cumberland_Rich" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Cumberland</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1732-02-19"/>
                  <death when="1811-05-07">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Older brother of poet <persName>Mary Alcock</persName>. Author of <bibl>
                           <title>The West Indian</title> (play, <date>1771</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                           <title>The Wheel of Fortune</title> (play, <date>1795</date>)</bibl>.
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="d_Aubigné_Françoise" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>
                        <nameLink>d'</nameLink>Aubigné</surname>
                     <forename>Françoise</forename>
                     <roleName>Marquise de Maintenon</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>French aristocrat (1639-1699) Second morganatic wife of <persName>Louis
                           XIV</persName> of France (1635-1719) </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Daphne" sex="2">
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <p>A pet dog. <persName type="animal">Daphne</persName>
                        <!--What do we know about Daphne the dog?-->
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Davenport_MA" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Harvey</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Davenport</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1759-1843). </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="de_Chaboulon" sex="1">
                  <persName>Pierre Alexandre Fleury de Chaboulon</persName>
                  <birth when="1779"/>
                  <death when="1835-09-28"/>
                  <note resp="#ajc"> Cabinet secretary of Napoleon after his return from Elba. in 1820 he published
                     <title ref="#Napoleon_memoir_nonfict">Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dekker_Thos" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Dekker</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1572">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1632">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="DeQuincey_Thos" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>
                        <nameLink>de</nameLink> Quincey</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1785-08-15">
                     <placeName>Manchester</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1859-12-08">
                     <placeName>Edinburgh</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p>Best known for <title ref="#Confessions_OpiumEater_nonfict">Confessions of
                           an English Opium-Eater</title> (1822). Also wrote <bibl>
                           <title>Klosterheim</title> (novel, <date>1832</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                           <title>The Logic of Political Economy</title> (nonfiction,
                              <date>1844</date>)</bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dibdin_TJ" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Dibdin</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1771-03-21">
                     <placeName>5 Peter Sreet, Bloomsbury, London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1841-09-16"> died from asthma. <placeName>22 Trevor Square,
                        Knightsbridge</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author, actor, and theater manager (1771-1841) Author of Something
                        New (play); Best known for his operas, farces, and pantomimes such as Mother
                        Goose (pantomime, 1807) and the High-mettled Racer (pantomime adaptation of
                        his father's play). Also published 2-volume Reminiscences (1827). (</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dickinson_Charles" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Dickinson</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Mr. Dickinson</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ajc">Husband of Mrs. Dickinson, owner of a private press--See letters to
                     Sir W. Elford, March 13th, 1819, June 21st, 1820, L'Estrange </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dickinson_Daughter" sex="2">
                  <persName>Dickinson girl</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ajc"> Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dickinson's young daughter</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dickinson_Grandmama" sex="2">
                  <persName>Grandmama Dickinson</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dickinson_Mrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mrs. Dickinson</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ajc">Mrs. Dickinson, match-maker,from Reading (February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford, L'Estrange). 
                     Wife of <persName ref="#Dickinson_Charles">Mr. Charles Dickinson</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dickinson_Nurse" sex="2">
                  <persName>Dickinson Nurse</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Doge_F_hist">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Foscari</surname>
                     <!-- fix full name -->
                     <forename>Doge</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Historical Doge of Venice on whom Mitford based her <persName ref="#Doge_F">Doge</persName> in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> declared historical source is <title ref="#Moore_ViewItaly">A View of Society and Manners in Italy</title> by
                        <persName ref="#Moore_DrJ">Dr. John Moore</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Donato_hist">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Donato</surname>
                     <roleName>Senator</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Historical personage on whom <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> based <persName ref="#Donato">Senator Donato</persName>
                     in her play, <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>.</note>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> declared historical source is <title ref="#Moore_ViewItaly">A View of Society and Manners in Italy</title> by
                        <persName ref="#Moore_DrJ">Dr. John Moore</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Doria_Andrea">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Andrea</forename>
                     <surname>Doria</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>D'Oria</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Drake_Nathan" sex="1">
                  <persName>Nathan Drake</persName>
                  <birth when="1766-01-15">
                     <placeName>York</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <!--ebb: Notice how placeName is set inside (as a child element) of <birth>, and <death> here. <person> entries in a <listPerson> have a strict hierarchical order of elements, kind of like our TEI header. <birth> and <death> could be empty elements, or they could contain a <placeName> element inside when you know the place of birth or death.-->
                  <death when="1836">
                     <placeName>Hadleigh, Suffolk</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Essayist and physician; his most ambitious work was <title ref="#Shakespeare_Times_nonfict">Shakespeare and his Times</title> (ODNB)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dryden" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Dryden</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1631-08-09">
                     <placeName>Aldwincle, Northamptonshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1700-05-01"><placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">
                    <rs type="event">Named Poet Laureate in <date when="1668">1668</date></rs>, <bibl><author>Dryden</author> authored <title>Annus mirabilis: the Year of Wonders, MDCLXVI</title> in <date when="1667">1667</date></bibl>, reflecting on climactic events of <date when="1666">the previous year</date>, <rs type="event">the Great Fire of London</rs> and <rs type="event">the second Anglo-Dutch War</rs>. Dryden supported a revival of drama in Restoration England, and <bibl>in <date when="1668">1668</date> he wrote <title>Of Dramatick Poesie</title></bibl>, which contained critiques of <persName ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</persName>'s and <persName ref="#Jonson_B">Ben Jonson</persName>'s plays and reflection on English and French theater and playwrights from the Renaissance to the Restoration in England. Several of his plays were staged in London in the 1670s, including <bibl>his treatment of the <persName>Antony</persName> and <persName>Cleopatra</persName> narrative, in <title>All for Love, or, The World Well Lost</title>, performed in <date when="1677">December 1677</date> and published in <date when="1678">1678</date></bibl>. His satirical poem <title>Absalom and Achitophel</title>, published in <date when="1681">1681</date>, presents Restoration politicians and government figures in <bibl corresp="#OldTestament_Bible">Old Testament</bibl> roles, casting <persName ref="#ChasII">King Charles II</persName> in flattering terms as a merciful and benevolent <persName>David</persName>.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Duke_Montrose" sex="1">
                 <persName>James Graham <roleName>third duke of Montrose</roleName></persName> 
                  <persName>Montrose</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <surname>Graham</surname>
                     <roleName>third duke of Montrose</roleName>
                     <roleName>Lord Chamberlain 
                        <date from="1821-12" to="1827-05">from December 1821 to May 1827</date><date from="1828-02" to="1830-07">February 1828 to July 1830</date></roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1755-09-08"/>
                  <death when="1836-12-30"><placeName>Grosvenor Square, London</placeName></death>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Among his many governmental roles, the third Duke of Montrose served as Lord Chamberlain twice during the 1820s, between <date from="1821-12" to="1827-05">December 1821 and May 1827</date>, and <date from="1828-02" to="1830-07">from February 1828 to July 1830</date>. As Lord Chamberlain, he supervised the Examiner of Plays, and in <date when="1825">1825</date> he acted on recommendation of the current Examiner, <persName ref="#Colman_the_Younger">George Colman</persName>, to refuse a license to <bibl corresp="#CharlesI_MRMplay"><author ref="#MRM">Mitford</author>'s play, <title>Charles the First</title></bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Duke_of_Devonshire" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <roleName>Duke of Devonshire</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British peer and Whig politician (1790-1858). Likely the 6th Duke: William
                        George Spencer Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire, KG, PC. Marquess of
                        Hartington until 1811. Known as the "Bachelor Duke." Served as Lord
                        Chamberlain of the Household (George IV, 1827-28; William IV,
                        1830-34)<!-- MRM's Preface to Chas. I in the DW suggests that the D of D became Licensor of Plays after Colman, who died in 1836. CHECK. Leslie Mitchell in Whig World notes that the 6th duke considered himself as great art patron.Lord Chamberlain of the Household served as Licensor of Plays, but the service dates don't quite match.  LMW --></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Duncan_MR" sex="2">
                  <persName>Maria Rebecca Davison, nee Duncan</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Davison</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Duncan</surname>
                     <forename>Rebecca</forename>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British actress (1780?-1858). Although she had acted in the provinces
                        earlier, she appeared as "Miss Duncan from Edinburgh" at <placeName ref="#Drury_Lane_Theatre">Drury Lane</placeName> beginning in 1804 and
                        later as Mrs. Davison after her 1812 marriage to James Davison. Specialized
                        in comic and breeches parts, a rival of Dorothea Jordan in parts such as
                        Nell in The Devil to Pay and Priscilla in The Romp. In The Honey Moon
                        (1805), she created the role of Juliana. Active until 1829 at Drury Lane and
                        Covent Garden. Written about by <persName ref="#Hunt">Hunt</persName>,
                           <persName ref="#Hazlitt_Wm">Hazlitt</persName>,and <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> in the New Monthly Magazine
                        (vol. 6). </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Edgeworth_Maria" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Edgeworth</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1768-01-01">
                     <placeName>Black Bourton, Oxfordshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1849-05-22">
                     <placeName>Engleworthstown, Longford, Ireland</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p>British author and educator. Best known for <bibl>
                           <title>Castle Rackrent</title> (novel, <date>1800</date>)</bibl>; also
                        wrote children's novels and educational treatises.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Elford_MrsE" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hall</surname>
                     <surname>Waldron</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Mrs. Elford2</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb #ajc">Elizabeth is the second wife of <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName>; they married four years after the death of <persName ref="#Elford_MrsM">Mrs. Mary Elford</persName> on <date when="1821-07-05">July 5, 1821</date>. The ODNB's entry on Sir William Elford incorrectly gives her name as  <persName>Elizabeth Walrond (née Hall)</persName>, as parish records of 1822 accord with the spelling in Mitford's letters, and describe Elizabeth Hall Waldron as the heiress of an estate in Devonshire, formerly married to a Colonel Waldron. See <ref target="http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50587">'Parishes: Pancras Week - Plymouth', Magna Britannia: volume 6: Devonshire (1822), pp. 381-408.</ref></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Elford_MrsM" sex="2"><!--ebb: In a listPerson, where you list out the persNames, there's usually one persName broken out formally into component parts, with <surname>(s) and <forename>(s) inside. Notice how the <surname> and <forename> are nested inside (as children) of one persName element. Also, note that we add an @type attribute to <surname> to indicate married and maiden surnames.-->
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Elford</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Davies</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Mrs. Elford 1</persName>
                  <birth when="1753"/>
                  <death when="1817"/>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Mary was the first wife of <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName>; on July 5, 1821, he married <persName ref="#Elford_MrsE">Elizabeth Walrod (nee Hall)</persName> (ODNB)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Elford_SirWm">
                  <persName>Sir William Elford</persName>
                  <!--make sure this is written per standardized editorial guidelines-->
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Elford</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>baronet</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1749-08">
                     <placeName>Kingsbridge, Devon</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1837-11-30">
                     <placeName>Totnes</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">According to <persName>L'Estrange</persName>, Elford
                     was a friend of <persName ref="#Mitford_Geo">Mitford's father</persName>, and
                        <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> met him for the first time in the
                     spring of 1810 when he was nearing the age of 64. "He was a fellow of the Royal
                     and Linnaean Societies, and recorder of <placeName>Plymouth</placeName>, which
                     borough he also represented in Parliament for many years. <persName>Mr.
                        Pitt</persName> had created him a baronet in 1800." [L'Estrange vol. 1 of 3,
                     pp. 104-105]</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ElizI" sex="2">
                  <persName>Queen Elizabeth I</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!-- expand.  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Elliston_Robt" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Elliston</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>theatre manager</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor and theater manager (1774-1831) Born in London. Managed Drury
                        Lane and others. Written about by <persName ref="#Hunt">Leigh
                           Hunt</persName>, <persName ref="#Byron">Byron</persName>, <persName ref="#Macready_Wm">Macready</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Emery_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Emery</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1777-1822). </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Euripides" sex="1">
                  <persName>Euripides</persName>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #lmw">Ancient Greek playwright (ca. 480 B.C.-406 B.C.), considered together with <persName ref="#Aeschylus">Aeschylus</persName> and <persName ref="#Sophocles">Sophocles</persName> as establishing the classical foundation of Western tragedy. Author of <bibl corresp="#Ion_Euripides">
                        <title>Ion</title> (<date notBefore="-0414" notAfter="-0412">between 414 and 412 BC</date>)</bibl>, on which <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName> later based <bibl corresp="#Ion_TNTplay">his own play of the same title</bibl>, as well as <bibl corresp="#Orestes_play">
                        <title>Orestes</title> (<date when="-0408">408
                              B.C.</date>), and <bibl>
                           <title>Cyclops</title> (date unknown)</bibl>, the only known complete example of a burlesque satyr play, translated into <bibl>a satiric poem in <date when="1819">1819</date> by <persName ref="#Shelley_PB">Percy Shelley</persName>
                        </bibl>.</bibl>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fairfax_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas, Lord Fairfax</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <surname>Fairfax</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1612-12-17">17 January 1612<placeName>
                        <district>Nottinghamshire</district>
                        <country>England</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Lord General of the <orgName>New Model Army</orgName>. He later
                     served as Minister of Parliament for <placeName>
                        <district>West Riding</district>
                     </placeName>and<placeName>
                        <district>Yorkshire</district>
                     </placeName>.</note>
                  <death when="1671-11-12">12 November 1671</death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fawcett_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Fawcett</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> English actor and dramatist(1768-1837). MRM likely refers to the younger
                        Fawcett, a contemporary of Emery; John Fawcett his father (1740-1817), was
                        also an actor. Appeared in Colman's The Heir at Law. Wrote pantomime version
                        of <bibl>
                           <title>Obi, or Three-Fingered Jack</title> (<date>1800</date>)</bibl> See
                        DNB vol. 18 </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ferdinand_I">
                  <persName>Ferdinand I
                  <roleName>
                        <date from="1816" to="1825">King of the Two Sicilies</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Ferdinand IV
                     <roleName>
                        <date from="1759" to="1816">King of Naples</date>
                     </roleName>
                     <roleName>
                        <date from="1759" to="1816">King of Sicily</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1751-01-12"/>
                  <death when="1825-01-04"/>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Deposed by <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon</persName> in <date when="1805">1805</date>, and earlier by the short-lived (6-months) <rs type="event">Parthenopean Republic uprising</rs> in <date when="1799">1799</date>, Ferdinand IV became Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies after the restoration of monarchies following Napoleon's defeat.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fielding_Henry" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Fielding</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Henry Fielding</persName>
                  <persName type="pseudo">Scriblerus Secundus</persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <birth when="1707-04-22">
                     <placeName>Sharpham, Somerset</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1754-10-08">
                     <placeName>Lisbon, Portugal</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Satirical novelist and playwright, Fielding was a member of <orgName ref="#Scriblerians">the Scriblerus Club</orgName> and author of <title>Tom Jones</title> and the popularly adapted low tragedy <title ref="#TomThumb_Fielding">Tom Thumb</title>. Fielding published his plays under the pseudonym <persName>Scriblerus Secundus</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fieschi_GL">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Giovanni</forename>
                     <forename>Luigi</forename>
                     <surname>Fieschi</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Fiesco</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Giovanni Luigi Fieschi (or Fiesco), count of Lavagna (c. 1522 – 2 January 1547), nobleman of Genoa and leader of the Fieschi conspiracy of 1547. Subject of a play by Schiller, Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua (1782). Subject of a play by Mitford, written and submitted to the Macready for consideration, but never performed or printed.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fitzharris" sex="1">
                  <persName>Mr. Fitzharris </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Fitzharris</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="kdc">An actor in a local theater company in <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName> before going to <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>. He played the title role in <title ref="#Othello_play">Othello</title> and appeared in the
                        <title>Sentinel</title> at <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent
                        Garden Theater</placeName>. Reviews of his performances in the <title ref="#New_Monthly_Mag">New Monthly Magazine</title> and <title ref="#Lit_Gazette">The Literary Gazette and Journal of Belles
                        Lettres</title> were very unfavorable. </note>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Mr. Fitzharris, Irish actor (first name unknown);
                        <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> saw him perform in <title ref="#Othello_play">Othello</title> at <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>; he played in <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                        the First</title>.
                     <!--Fitzharris references:
New Monthly Magazine 15 (1825): 534.  Drama section mentions Fitzharris
London Literary Gazette (1826)  mentions Fitzharris relegating to small role
Monthly Magazine 60.2 (1825): 354 mentions Fitzharris will appear soon as Othello, new at Covent Garden.
Online Library [Boston public library]  The Theatrical observer and, Daily bills of the play (Volume 1830 v.1 no.2515-2666:(Jan 4,1830-Jun 30,1830)) p. 24 mentions Fitzharris's death.
Life of William Harness (1870s):  mentions Fitzharris as MRM protege and failure. LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fletcher_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Fletcher</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1579">
                     <placeName>Rye, Sussex</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1625">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Flush">
                  <persName>Flush</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">There appear to be a series of spaniels all named Flush.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Foote_Samuel" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Foote</surname>
                     <forename>Samuel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1721-01">
                     <placeName>St Mary's, Truro</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1777-10-21">
                     <placeName>Dover</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author, actor, and theater manager (1721-1777). Haymarket Theater
                        manager. Comic actor, called "The English Aristophanes." Author of The
                        Author (1757, Drury Lane) and The Devil on Two Sticks (Haymarket, 1768),
                        which made comic capital of an 1766 injury in which he lost part of his
                        leg.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Forbes_Capt" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <roleName>Captain</roleName>
                     <surname>Forbes</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>theatre proprietor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British theater proprietor and naval officer. Co-proprietor of <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden</placeName> with
                           <persName>Henry Harris</persName>, <persName ref="#Kemble_C">Charles
                           Kemble</persName>, and <persName>John Willett</persName>, as son-in-law
                        and heir of <persName>George White</persName>. He held a 1/16 share by 1820.
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ford_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Ford</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1586">
                     <placeName>Islington, Devon</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1639"/>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1586-ca.1639), wrote <bibl>
                           <title>'Tis Pity She's a Whore</title> (play, <date>1633</date>)</bibl>
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Foscari_son_hist">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Foscari</surname>
                     <forename>Jacopo</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Historical personage on whom Mitford based <persName ref="#Foscari_Fr">Francesco Foscari</persName> in her play, <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>. <persName ref="#Byron">Byron</persName> followed the historical names for father (Francesco) and
                     son (Jacopo) in his play, <title ref="#The_Two_Foscari">The Two
                     Foscari</title>.</note>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> declared historical source is <title ref="#Moore_ViewItaly">A View of Society and Manners in Italy</title> by
                        <persName ref="#Moore_DrJ">Dr. John Moore</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fox_ChasJ" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <surname>Fox</surname>
                     <roleName>
                        <date notBefore="1762">The Honourable</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1749-01-24">
                     <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1806-09-13"/>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Whig politician, member of the House of Commons, and Prime Minister. Fox was an outspoken opponent of <persName ref="#GeoIII">King George III</persName> and <persName>William Pitt the Younger</persName>, supporter of the American and French Revolutions as well as the abolitionist cause. His politics became widely known as <q>"Foxite radicalism"</q> and synonymous with populist causes. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Franklin_Eleanor" sex="2">
                  <persName>Eleanor Anne Franklin, nee Porden</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Porden</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Franklin</surname>
                     <forename>Eleanor</forename>
                     <forename>Anne</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1795-07-14">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1823-02-22">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British author (1795-1825) Born London, 14 July 1795. Author of The Veils;
                        or the Triumph of Constancy (1815). Author of Coeur de Lion; or the Third
                        Crusade. A Poem in 16 books. (historical epic, 1822). Married Arctic
                        explorer <persName ref="#Franklin_John">Sir John Franklin</persName> in
                        1822. Died 22 Feb. 1823 of consumption.)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Franklin_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sir John Franklin, KCH, FRGS,
                     RN<!-- check best way to code --></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                    Married to <persName ref="#Franklin_Eleanor">Eleanor Porden
                           Franklin</persName>. British naval officer and explorer (1786-1847). Born
                        16 April 1786 Spilsbury, Lincolnshire. Died 11 June 1847 at sea near King
                        William Island, Canada, aboard HMS Terror. Royal Navy (1800-1847), attaining
                        rank of Rear-Admiral. Served in French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic
                        Wars. Explorer of the Canadian Artic, disappeared while attempting to chart
                        the Northwest Passage. Later Lieutenant-Governor of Van Dieman's Land, later
                        Tasmania.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Froissart" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Jean</forename>
                     <surname>Froissart</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1337">
                     <placeName>Valenciennes, France</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1405">
                     <placeName>Chimay, Belgium</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">medieval French poet and historical chronicler.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fuseli_Sophia">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Fuseli</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Rawlins</surname>
                     <forename>Sophia</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note><!--ebb: Who's she?--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Garrick_David" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Garrick</surname>
                     <forename>David</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>theatre manager</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor and theatrical manager (1717-1779). Considered the greatest
                        actor of his era. Prominent in <orgName>Whig</orgName> circles of the late
                        eighteenth century. Frequently painted by <persName>Joshua
                           Reynolds</persName>. <persName>Mary Robinson</persName> was one of his
                        last mentees before his retirement from the stage. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GastonII" sex="1">
                  <persName>Gaston II <roleName>count of Foix</roleName>
                     <roleName/>
                  </persName>
                  <death when="1343"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!-- Coles posits Gaston II and Gaston III in Froissart Coles #12, p. 184, note 3.  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GastonIII" sex="1">
                  <persName>Gaston III <roleName>count of Foix</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Fébus</persName>
                  <birth when="1331"/>
                  <death when="1391"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #lmw">Son of <persName ref="#GastonII">Gaston II</persName>, he wrote a famous <bibl>
                        <title>Book of the Hunt</title>, or <title>Livre de chasse</title>
                     </bibl>.The medieval chronicler <persName ref="#Froissart">Froissart</persName> visited Gaston III's court in 1388.<!-- Coles posits Gaston II and Gaston III in Froissart Coles #12, p. 184, note 3.  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GeoIII" sex="1">
                  <persName>George William Frederick <roleName>King of Great Britain and King of
                        Ireland <date from="1760-10-25" to="1801-01-01"/>
                     </roleName>
                     <roleName>King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland <date from="1801-01-01" to="1820-01-29"/>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1738-06-04"/>
                  <death when="1820-01-29"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The king who <rs type="event" ref="#American_Revol">lost the
                        American colonies</rs>, and suffered porphyria adn mental illness in the
                     1810s, when his son, the future King George IV reigned in his stead as the
                     Prince Regent. King George III's role changed after <rs type="event" ref="#Act_of_Union">the Act of Union</rs> between <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName> and <placeName ref="#Ireland">Ireland</placeName> in
                        <date when="1801">1801</date>. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="GeoIV" sex="1">
                  <persName>George IV <roleName>King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
                        Ireland</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>George Augustus Frederick</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <roleName>Prince Regent</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1762-08-12"/>
                  <death when="1830-06-26"/>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his
                     father's stead <date from="1811" to="1820">from 1811 to 1820</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Gibbon_Edward" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Gibbon</surname>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1737-05-08">
                     <placeName>Putney, Surrey</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1794-01-16">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Best known for writing <bibl>
                           <title>The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire</title>
                           which was originally published in three volumes (<date>1776</date>,
                              <date>1781</date>, and <date>1788</date>)</bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Gifford_William" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Gifford</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>politics</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Editor of the <title ref="#Anti-Jacobin">Anti-Jacobin</title> in the late 1790s as well as the <title ref="#QuarterlyRev_per">Quarterly Review</title>
                     <date from="1809" to="1824">from 1809 to 1824</date>.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Godwin_Wm">
                  <persName>William Godwin</persName>
                  <!--ebb: stub entry-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Groby" sex="1">
                  <persName>Lord Grey of Groby</persName>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <birth when="1623">1623</birth>
                  <death when="1657">1657</death>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Parliamentary Commander-in-Chief in the English
                        <placeName>Midlands</placeName> and <placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Leicester</placeName>
                     </placeName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Halford_SrHen" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sir Henry St John Halford</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Halford</surname>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>St John</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>baronet</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1766-10-02">
                     <placeName>Leicester</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1844-03-09">
                     <placeName>Curzon Street, Mayfair</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ajc"> Appointed physician-extraordinary to George III in 1793; he attended George IV, William IV, and Queen Victoria (ODNB) </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Harness_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <surname>Harness</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1790-03-14">
                     <placeName>near Wickham, Hampshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1869-11-11">
                     <placeName>the deanery at Battle</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>religious</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A lifelong friend of <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> who knew her from their childhood in the 1790s, Harness wrote <bibl>Mitford's biography, which was published after his own death in <date when="1870">1870</date>
                     </bibl>. Harness and <persName ref="#Byron">Byron</persName> were also friends from their schooling at Harrow, as Byron sympathized with Harness's experience of a disabled foot, crushed in an accident in early childhood. Byron considered dedicating <bibl>the first two cantos of <title>Childe Harold's Pilgrimage</title>
                     </bibl> to Harness, but refrained so as not to taint Harness's reputation as he was taking orders as an Anglican curate. Harness admired and encouraged Mitford's playwrighting in particular, and she commented that he was one of the few of her friends who thought she should prioritize the drama over prose. When <persName ref="#Macready_Wm">William Macready</persName> was attacked in <bibl corresp="#Stage">an anonymous Blackwood's Magazine piece in 1825</bibl> for his demands and rudeness to Mitford over revisions to <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>, Macready assumed that Harness was the author of the anonymous piece, though in <date when="1839">1839</date> after many years of distance, Harness assured Macready in person that he was not the writer, though he may have shared word of the poor treatment his friend had endured. [Source: <bibl>
                        <author>Duncan-Jones</author>, <title>Miss Mitford and Mr. Harness</title> (<date when="1955">1955</date>)</bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Harrison_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas Harrison</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <surname>Harrison</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>Fifth Monarchist</occupation>
                  <death when="1660">1660</death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Havard_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Havard, William</reg>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <surname>Havard</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1710-07-12">
                     <placeName>Dublin, Ireland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1778-02-20">
                     <placeName>Tavistock Street, King's Cross, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>poet</occupation>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#rnes">Minor actor, poet, and playwright. A colleague of <persName ref="#Garrick_David">David Garrick</persName> but of reportedly modest talent, Havard wrote a <bibl corresp="#HavardChasI_play">
                        <title>Tragedy of Charles the First</title> (<date when="1747">1747</date>)</bibl>, which, despite being played, caused controversy due to the death of a spectator immediately following a performance. The play's 'melancholy' was considered a factor in her death. [See ODNB]
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hawthorne_N">
                  <persName>Nathaniel Hawthorne</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The New England author, Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose work
                        <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> admired.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Haydon" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Haydon</surname>
                     <forename>Benjamin</forename>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1786-01-26">
                     <placeName>Plymouth, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1846-06-22">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the
                        <orgName>Royal Academy</orgName>, who was famous for contemporary,
                     historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by
                     financial difficulties. He painted <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Wm">William
                        Wordsworth's</persName> portrait in 1842. <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of
                     1817, and <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName> was a
                     mutual friend.
                     <!--Mention some others? What was he working on and exhibiting in fall 1820?-->He
                     committed suicide in 1846.
                     <!--ebb: Look up more on this! Mitford was, I think, asked to write his biography but declined?--></note>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols.
                        (1853) John Keats named him in several poems.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Haydon_Mrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mary Hyman</persName>
                  <persName>Mary Haydon</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Haydon</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Hyman</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Cawse</surname>
                     <addName>Mrs. Haydon</addName>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ghb">The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector
                     of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she
                     married <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert Haydon</persName> on <date when="1821-10-10">10 October 1821</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hazlitt_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hazlitt</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British essayist and critic (10 Apr. 1778-18 Sept. 1830) Born in Maidstone,
                        Kent. Died of stomach cancer. Author of An Essay on the Principles of Human
                        Action (1805), Free Thoughts on Public Affairs (1806), New and Improved
                        Grammar of the English Language (1810). Also authored collections of
                        critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the
                        English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). Best-known work is
                        Political Essays with Sketches of Public Characters (1819).</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hemans_Felicia" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hemans</surname>
                     <forename>Felicia</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1793-09-25">
                     <placeName>Liverpool</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1835-05-16">
                     <placeName>Dublin</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p>Best-known for sentimental and nationalistic poetry such as <title>The Homes
                           of England</title> and <title>Casabianca</title> ("The Boy Stood on the
                        Burning Deck"). Also wrote drama, less successfully than <persName ref="#Baillie_Joanna">Baillie</persName> or <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>. Acclaimed in her time by critics as well as authors
                        from <persName ref="#Byron">Byron</persName> to <persName>George
                           Eliot</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Henry_V" sex="1" role="king">
                  <persName>Henry V</persName>
                  <persName>Harry</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <surname>Plantagenet</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1386-09-16">16 September 1386<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Monmouth</placeName>
                        <country>Wales</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#rnes">conqueror of <placeName ref="#France">France</placeName>
                  </note>
                  <death when="1422-08-31">31 August 1422<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Vincennes</placeName>
                     </placeName>
                  </death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HenryVI">
                  <persName>Henry VI <roleName>King of England <date from="1422" to="1461"/>
                        <date from="1470" to="1471"/>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1421-12-06"/>
                  <death when="1471-05-21">
                     <placeName>Tower of London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Married to <persName ref="#Margaret_Anjou">Margaret of Anjou</persName>, who ruled in his stead during his periods of mental instability. His reign was interrupted by the beginning of <rs type="event">the Wars of the Roses</rs>, begun by conflict between Margaret of Anjou and the Duke of York. He died imprisoned in the <placeName ref="#Tower_of_London">Tower of London</placeName> in the same month as <rs type="event">the Battle of Tewkesbury</rs> which marked the decisive end of his reign and succession with the death of his son <persName>Edward</persName> on the battlefield.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hessey_J" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hessey</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Augustus</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>J. A. Hessey</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #ebb">
                     London bookseller and printer with <persName ref="#Taylor_J">John
                           Taylor</persName>, <orgName ref="#Taylor_Hessey">Taylor and
                           Hessey</orgName>. Hessey owned the <title ref="#LondonMag">London
                           Magazine</title> from 1821-1825, and published <persName ref="#Keats">John Keats</persName>. 
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hofland_B">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Hofland</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Wreaks</surname>
                     <forename>Barbara</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notAfter="1770">
                     <placeName>Yorkshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1844-11-04">
                     <placeName>Richmond-on-Thames</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Novelist and writer of children's books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of <placeName>Sheffield, Yorkshire</placeName>, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, <title ref="#Sheffield_Iris">The Sheffield Iris</title>. Her first marriage to <persName>Thomas Bradshawe Hoole</persName> left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children's books, and by running a girl's school in <placeName>Harrogate</placeName>. second marriage was to the artist <persName ref="#Hofland_TC">Thomas Christopher Hofland</persName>. (Source: ODNB)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hofland_TC" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas Christopher Hofland</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hofland</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Christopher</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1777-12-25">
                     <placeName>Nottinghamshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1843-01-03">
                     <placeName>Leamington Spa</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>artist</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Landscape painter, and second husband of the author <persName ref="#Hofland_B">Barbara Hofland</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Holcroft" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Holcroft</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1745"/>
                  <death when="1809"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1745-1809); Author of The Road to Ruin (play, 1792) and Anna
                        St. Ives (novel, 1792)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Homer" sex="1">
                  <persName>Homer</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">the epic poet, or the single person <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> would have thought was the author of the <title ref="#Iliad">Iliad</title> and the <title ref="#Odyssey">Odyssey</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hood_Thos" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas Hood </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hood</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1799-05-23">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1845-05-03">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p>Recognized for his collaboration with his brother-in-law <persName>John
                           Hamilton Reynolds</persName> on <bibl>
                           <title>Odes and Addresses to a Great People</title> (poetry,
                              <date>1825</date>)</bibl> and for his well-known poem <bibl>
                           <title level="a">"The Song of the Shirt"</title> (<date>1843</date>),
                           first published anonymously in <title level="s">Punch magazine</title>
                        </bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Horace" sex="1">
                  <persName>Horace</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Quintus Horatius</forename>
                     <surname>Flaccus</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>"poet"&gt;</occupation>
                  <occupation>"memoirist"&gt;</occupation>
                  <occupation>"theorist"&gt;</occupation>
                  <birth when="-0065-12-08">8 December 65 BC<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Venusia</placeName>
                     </placeName>
                     <country>Italy</country>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="-0008-11-27">27 November 8 BC<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Rome</placeName>
                        <district>Sicily</district>
                        <country>Italy</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Howard_Tho">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Howard, Thomas</reg>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <surname>Howard</surname>
                     <roleName>fourth duke of Norfolk</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1538-03-10">
                     <placeName>Kenninghall Palace, Norfolk, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1572-06-02">
                     <placeName>Tower Hill, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>nobility</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#esh">The Fourth Duke of Norfolk, convicted of treason and
                     executed for the charge of involvement in the Ridolfi plot against <persName ref="#ElizI">Queen Elizabeth I</persName>, to place <persName ref="#MaryQoS">Mary, Queen of Scots</persName>, on the English throne and to restore
                     Catholicism in England. The Duke also wrote the first complete set of English
                     coursing rules.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HowardBrenton">
                  <persName>Howard Brenton</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Howard</forename>
                     <surname>Brenton</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <birth when="1942-12-13">December 13, 1942</birth>
                  <note>Brenton's plays include <title>The Romans in Britain</title> and <title>Bloody Poetry</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="HughPeters" sex="1">
                  <persName>Hugh Peters</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Hugh</forename>
                     <surname>Peters</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1598"/>
                  <death when="1660-10-16">16 October 1660</death>
                  <occupation>minister</occupation>
                  <occupation>chaplain</occupation>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Chaplain to the <orgName>New Model Army.</orgName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hugo_Victor" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hugo</surname>
                     <forename>Victor</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1802-02-26">
                     <placeName>Besançon, France</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1885-05-22">
                     <placeName>Paris, France</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="hume" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>David</forename>
                     <surname>Hume</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1711-05-07">7 May 1776<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Edinburgh</placeName>
                        <district>Midlothian</district>
                        <country>Scotland</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1776-08-25">
                     <placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Edinburgh</placeName>
                        <district>Midlothian</district>
                        <country>Scotland</country>
                     </placeName>, diagnosis: abdominal cancer</death>
                  <occupation>philosopher</occupation>
                  <persName>David Hume</persName>
                  <occupation>"philosopher"&gt;</occupation>
                  <occupation>"historian"&gt;</occupation>
                  <occupation>"librarian"&gt;</occupation>
                  <note resp="#rnes">The most influential philosopher of the Scottish Enlightenment,
                     Hume championed skepticism in various contexts. He also wrote a celebrated
                        <bibl corresp="#HistEngland_Hume">
                        <title>History of England</title> (<date from="1754" to="1761">1754-61</date>), which covered English history
                     from the Roman Invasion through the reign of <persName ref="#JamesII">James
                        II</persName>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hume_Jos">
                  <persName>Joseph Hume </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Hume</surname>
                     <forename>Joseph</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1777-01-22">
                     <placeName>Montrose, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1855-02-20">
                     <placeName>Burnley Hall, Norfolk</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Known as "the Apothecary," a radical M.P.,
                     represented Aberdeen in the House of Commons from 1818, part of a network of
                     radical leadership in the Commons over the next 30 years. Criticized the
                     government's role in <rs type="event" ref="#Peterloo">the Peterloo massacre</rs>, the Cato Street conspiracy, and
                     the Queen Caroline affair, and worked to repeal the Combination Acts
                     (1824-1825). Defender of the Chartists. See ODNB.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hunt">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <forename>Leigh</forename>
                     <surname>Hunt</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Leigh Hunt</persName>
                  <birth when="1784-10-19">19 October 1784 <placeName>Southgate,
                        Middlesex</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1859-08-28">28 August 1859 <placeName>Charles Reynell's home on
                        Putney High Street, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Founding editor (<date from="1808" to="1821">from 1808 to
                        1821</date>) of the radical weekly journal, <title ref="#Examiner">The
                        Examiner</title>, which advocated for parliamentary and military reform and
                     Catholic emancipation. Hunt was prosecuted and imprisoned for libel from <date from="1813" to="1815">1813 to 1815</date> for his negative depiction of
                        <persName>the Prince Regent</persName> in <bibl corresp="#Examiner">the
                        issue of <date when="1812-03-22">22 March 1812</date>
                     </bibl>. Hunt published <persName ref="#Shelley_PB">Shelley</persName>'s and
                        <persName ref="#Keats">Keats</persName>'s poems in <title ref="#Examiner">The Examiner</title>, and came to be associated after an article in <bibl corresp="#Blackwoods">the <date when="1821-10">October 1817</date> issue of
                           <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's Magazine</title>
                     </bibl> with the "<orgName ref="#CockneyS">Cockney School</orgName>" of
                     poetry.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ingoldsby" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Sir Richard Ingoldsby</reg>
                     <reg>Richard, Lord Ingoldsby</reg>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <surname>Ingoldsby</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1617">
                     <placeName>Lenborough, Buckinghamshire, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1685">
                     <placeName>England</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>Regicide</occupation>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#rnes">An officer in the <orgName ref="#New_Model_Army">New Model Army</orgName>, politician representing <placeName>Buckinghamshire</placeName>, and Regicide, Ingoldsby is perhaps most famous for having claimed, after <rs type="event">the Restoration</rs>, to have signed the king's death warrant under physical duress, <persName ref="#Cromwell">Cromwell</persName> having held his hand to the pen and traced his name. This explanation is not currently considered credible. [See ODNB]</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ireton_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>Henry Ireton</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <surname>Ireton</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>jurist</occupation>
                  <occupation>lawyer</occupation>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <birth when="1611">1611</birth>
                  <death when="1651">1651</death>
                  <note resp="#rnes">A prominent leader of the Parliamentary faction against <persName ref="#ChasI">Charles I</persName> and, after the
                     <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">English Civil War</rs>, the regicides. Ireton was <persName ref="#Cromwell">Cromwell</persName>'s son-in-law - married to Cromwell's daughter <persName>Elizabeth</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="James_Miss" sex="2">
                  <persName>Miss James</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Close friend of <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>,
                     possibly an educator. According to <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> from
                     MRM diary, letters were addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond
                     (Coles 26)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JamesI" sex="1">
                  <persName>James I</persName>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> James I of England and James IV of Scotland. British monarch (19 June
                        1566-27 Mar. 1625) Born in Edinburgh Castle, Scotland to Mary ("Queen of
                        Scots"). King of Scotland until 1603 and the first Stuart king of England.
                        Considered responsible for creating the first united Kingdon of Great
                        Britain.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JamesII">
                  <persName>James II <roleName>King of England and Ireland</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>James VII <roleName>King of Scotland</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">(1633-1701) Last Roman Catholic king of England, he succeeded
                     the throne after the death of <persName ref="#ChasII">Charles II</persName>,
                     his brother, and reigned from <date from="1685" to="1688">1685 to 1688</date>,
                     when he was deposed during the <rs type="event" ref="#Glorious_Revol">Glorious
                        Revolution</rs>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jerrold_Doug" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Jerrold</surname>
                     <forename>Douglas</forename>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British author. (1803-1857)</p>
                  </note>
                  <note resp="#ebb">writer of aqua dramas.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jesus" sex="1">
                  <persName>Jesus</persName>
                  <birth when="0001"/>
                  <death when="0034"/>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="John_Apostle">
                  <persName>John the Apostle</persName>
                  <persName>John the Evangelist</persName>
                  <persName>Saint John</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Presumably (and contestedly) the author of the fourth book of <bibl corresp="#NewTestament_Bible">the New Testament</bibl>, <bibl corresp="#JohnGospel_NewTest">the Gospel of John</bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Johnson" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Johnson, Samuel</reg>
                     <forename>Samuel</forename>
                     <surname>Johnson</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1709-08-18"/>
                  <death when="1784-12-13"/>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#esh">English writer and "man of letters." His many
                     well-known works include best <title>A Dictionary of the English
                        Language</title> (1755), <title>Lives of the Most Eminent English
                        Poets</title> (1781), and <title>A Journey to the Western Islands of
                        Scotland</title> (1775).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Johnstone_Jack" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Johnstone</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <addName>Jack</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Irish actor (1750-1828). Comedian at Drury Lane. See Old Drury Lane, vol. 2,
                        p. 51-53</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jonson_B" sex="1">
                  <persName>Ben Jonson</persName>
                  <persName><forename>Benjamin</forename>
                     <surname>Jonson</surname></persName>
                  <birth when="1572-06-11"/>
                  <death when="1637-08-06"><placeName>London</placeName></death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Renaissance English playwright and contemporary of <persName ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</persName>. Jonson was known for satirical plays, including  <bibl><title>Every Man in His Humour</title> (<date when="1598">1598</date>)</bibl>, <bibl><title>Volpone, or The Foxe</title> (<date when="1605">1605</date>)</bibl>, and <bibl><title>The Alchemist</title> (<date when="1610">1610</date>)</bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jordan_Dorothea" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Jordan</surname>
                     <forename>Dorothea</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1761-1816). Specialized in comic roles. Frequently called
                        "Dora" or "Dolly" Jordan. Longtime mistress of <persName>William, Duke of
                           Clarence (later William IV)</persName> and mother of his ten children
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Julius_Caesar">
                  <persName>Gaius Julius Caesar</persName>
                  <birth when="-0100">100 BC</birth>
                  <death when="-0044-03-15">44 BC</death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The great Roman military commander and emperor, assassinated on
                        <rs type="event">the Ides of March</rs>, as documented by <persName ref="#Plutarch">Plutarch</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kean_Edmund" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Kean</surname>
                     <forename>Edmund</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1787-1833). English actor. Considered the greatest actor of
                        his era. Born Westminster, London</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Keats">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Keats</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1795-10-31">
                     <placeName>Moorgate, London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1821-02-23">
                     <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kemble_C" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Kemble</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kemble_Frances" sex="2">
                  <persName>Frances Anne Kemble </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Kemble</surname>
                     <forename>Frances</forename>
                     <forename>Anne</forename>
                     <addName>Fanny</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Fanny Kemble</persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>British actor and author (1809-1893). Member of Kemble acting clan, daughter
                        of Charles Kemble, niece of Sarah Siddons. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kemble_JP" sex="1">
                  <persName>John Phillip Kemble </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Kemble</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Phillip</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>British actor (1757-1823). Member of Kemble acting clan, brother of Sarah
                        Siddons. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kemble_MrsC" sex="2">
                  <persName>Maria Therese de Camp Kemble</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Kemble</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">
                        <nameLink>de</nameLink> Camp</surname>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Therese</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <!--check name-->
                  <persName>Mrs. Charles Kemble</persName>
                  <persName>Miss deCamp</persName>
                  <birth when="1777-01-01">
                     <placeName>Vienna, Austria</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1838-10-05">
                     <placeName>Addlestone, near Chertsey, Surrey</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British actress, later Mrs. Charles Kemble. Acted under "Miss deCamp."
                        (sometimes spelled "duCamp.") Married actor Charles Kemble 2 July 1806.
                        Starred in a travestied version of <title>The Beggar’s Opera</title> in
                           <date>1792</date> and went on to star in <title>Miss in her
                        Teens</title>, <title>The Recruiting Officer</title> and <title>The Iron
                           Chest</title>. After her marriage, she appeared at <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden</placeName>, assisted
                           <persName ref="#Kemble_C">Charles Kemble</persName> with productions, and
                        authored several comedies. Mother of <persName>Frances Kemble</persName> and
                           <persName>Adelaide Kemble</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Knowles_Sheridan" sex="1">
                  <persName>James Sheridan Knowles </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Knowles</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <forename>Sheridan</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> Irish author and actor (1784-1862). Born Cork, Ireland; Died Torquay,
                        England. Known as "Sheridan" Knowles. Friend of Hazlitt, Lamb, and
                        Coleridge. His father James Knowles was the cousin of Richard Brinsley
                        Sheridan. Wrote William Tell (1825) for Macready. Also wrote The Hunchback
                        (Covent Garden, 1832). Later became a Baptist preacher.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Kotzebue" sex="1">
                  <persName>August von Kotzebue </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>
                        <nameLink>von</nameLink> Kotzebue</surname>
                     <forename>August</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>German author (1761-1819). <persName ref="#Kemble_C">Charles
                           Kemble</persName> adapted many of his plays for the English stage.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lady_Fairfax_hist" sex="2">
                  <persName>, Anne, Lady Fairfax</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Anne Vere</forename>
                     <surname>Fairfax</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <occupation>prisoner of war</occupation>
                  <death when="1665">1665</death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lamb_Caro" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Ponsonby</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Lamb</surname>
                     <forename>Caroline</forename>
                     <roleName>Lady</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1758-1828). Author of <title ref="#Glenarvon_fict">Glenarvon</title> and other satirical novels. Associate of <persName ref="#Byron">Lord Byron</persName>. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lamb_Chas" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Lamb</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British essayist. (10 Feb. 1775-27 Dec. 1834) Born London and died
                        Edmonton, Middlesex. Best known for his Essays of Elia (1823-1833), many of
                        which originally appeared in the <title ref="#LondonMag">London
                           Magazine</title>. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lamb_Mary">
                  <persName>Mary Lamb</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Lamb</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1764-12-03">
                     <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1847-05-20">
                     <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>author</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#err">An elder sister of <persName ref="#Lamb_Chas">Charles
                        Lamb</persName>, Mary Lamb was a noted author of prose fiction and poetry
                     who was a member of literary circles that included her brother Charles,
                        <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName>, <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Wm">William Wordsworth</persName>, <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Dor">Dorothy Wordsworth</persName>, <persName ref="#Coleridge_ST">Samuel Taylor Coleridge</persName>, and, presumably,
                        <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName>. Was also infamous for
                     having murdered her mother in a fit of insanity in <date>1796</date>. She lived
                     in mental institutions on and off for a significant portion of her life.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Landon_LE" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Landon</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Maclean</surname>
                     <forename>Laetitia</forename>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1802"/>
                  <death when="1838"/>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Wrote under L.E.L. or "Miss Landon". Contributed to many giftbooks and
                        annuals in 1830s. Born Chelsea, London. Married <persName>George
                           Maclean</persName> in 1838 and died two months later under mysterious
                        circumstances.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lewis_William_Thomas" sex="1">
                  <persName>William Thomas Lewis </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Lewis</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1749-1811). </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Liston_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Liston</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> English actor. (1776-1846) Specialized in comedy; most famous role was Paul
                        Pry. <bibl>
                           <persName ref="#Lamb_Chas">Charles Lamb</persName> wrote a fictional
                           "Memoir" of the actor in the <title ref="#LondonMag">London
                              Magazine</title> (<date>1825</date>)</bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Liston_SarahT" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Liston</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Tyrer</surname>
                     <forename>Sarah</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Sarah Liston</persName>
                  <persName>Mrs. John Liston</persName>
                  <persName>Miss Tyrer</persName>
                  <persName>Sarah Tyrer</persName>
                  <birth when="1781"/>
                  <death when="1854"/>
                  <note resp="#lmw #ebb">English comic actress known for her singing voice and roles in burlesque operas, and celebrated for her performance as <persName>Miss Tyrer</persName> of <persName ref="#Queen_Dollalolla">Queen Dollalolla</persName> in <bibl corresp="#TomThumb_OHaraAdpt">
                        <author ref="#OHara_Kane">Kane O'Hara</author>'s burlesque adaptation of <author ref="#Fielding_Henry">Henry Fielding</author>'s <title>Tom Thumb</title>
                     </bibl>, in <placeName ref="#Haymarket_Theatre">Haymarket Theatre</placeName>, <date when="1805-07">July 1805</date>. She began her theatrical career at <placeName ref="#Drury_Lane_Theatre">Drury Lane</placeName> and <placeName ref="#Haymarket_Theatre">Haymarket</placeName> theaters in <date from="1801-05" to="1801-06">May and June of 1801</date>, was engaged by <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden Theatre</placeName> in <date when="1805-09">September 1805</date>, and married the comic actor <persName>John Liston</persName> on <date when="1807-03-22">22 March 1807</date>. Both John and Sarah Liston publicly retired from the theatre with valedictory performances at <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden</placeName> on <date when="1822-05-31">31 May 1822</date>. [Sources: entries on John Liston in ODNB, DNB 1885-1900. See in particular <ptr target="http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Liston,_John_(DNB00)"/>]
                        <!-- LMW See Folger "Mrs. Liston as Dollalolla," "I'll spit, I'll squall, /And tear the eyes out of you all." TOM THUMB.  "Drawn and Etched expressly for the British Stage, June 1817" Handcolored image of full-figured actress in full rant.  Source Call Number: ART File L773.3 no.3 (size XS); Digital Image File Name: 30323 Digital Image Type: FSL collection Hamnet Bib ID: 253288 Hamnet Holdings ID:330629.  (Folger says TT by Henry Fielding)  LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lockhart_JG">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Lockhart</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename>Gibson</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>John Gibson Lockhart</persName>
                  <birth when="1794-07-12">
                     <placeName>Lanarkshire, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1854-11-25">
                     <placeName>Abbotsford, Scotland</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>journalist</occupation>
                  <occupation>editor</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A prominent writer for <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's Magazine</title> in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in <date when="1817">1817</date>, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a <orgName ref="#CockneyS">Cockney School</orgName> in <date from="1820" to="1821">1820 and 1821</date>. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood's and <title ref="#LondonMag">The London Magazine</title> resulting in <rs type="event" ref="#ScottChristie_Duel">the death by duel of The London Magazine's editor, <persName ref="#Scott_John">John Scott</persName> in <date when="1821-02">February 1821</date>, at the hands of Lockhart's literary agent <persName ref="#Christie_JH">Jonathan Christie</persName>
                     </rs>. Lockhart married <persName ref="#Scott_Wal">Walter Scott</persName>'s daughter <persName>Sophia</persName> in <date when="1820">1820</date>, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood's campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the <title ref="#QuarterlyRev_per">Quarterly Review</title>
                     <date from="1826" to="1853">from March 1826 until June 1853</date>, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law's <bibl>
                        <biblScope unit="volume" from="1" to="7">7-volume</biblScope> biography, <date>Life of Walter Scott</date>, published in <date from="1837" to="1838">1837-1838</date>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Locks">
                  <persName>
                     <unclear>
                        <supplied resp="#err">Mr. Locks[?]]</supplied>
                     </unclear>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#err">A party concerned in <orgName ref="#Billiard_Club">the Billiard Club</orgName> affair, referenced in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of <date when="1822-08-31">31 August
                     1822</date>.<!-- err: any way we can figure out who Mr. Locks (and his champions) are? I'm not even certain that I've gotten this person's name right. --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Macready_Wm" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Macready</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent
                        Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell (1825)
                        and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Margaret_Anjou" sex="2">
                  <persName>Margaret of Anjou</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Margaret</forename>
                     <forename>Marguerite</forename>
                     <surname>de Anjou</surname>
                     <roleName>Queen Consort of England<date from="1445-04-23" to="1461-03-04"/>
                        <date from="1470-10-30" to="1471-04-11"/>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1430-03-23">
                     <placeName>Lorraine, France</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1482-08-25">
                     <placeName>Pays de la Loire, France</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>Queen</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#rnes #ebb">Margaret of Anjou, daughter of <persName>René I of Anjou, King of Naples</persName>, <rs type="event">married <persName ref="#HenryVI">Henry VI of <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>
                        </persName> in <date when="1445">1445</date>
                     </rs>. She often ruled in her husband's place during his periods of mental instability, and her rule sparked conflict with <persName>Richard, Duke of York</persName>, leading to <rs type="event">the Wars of the Roses, a period of civil wars polarizing the <orgName>Houses of York</orgName> and <orgName>Lancaster</orgName> for over 30 years in England <date from="1455" to="1487">between 1455 and 1487</date>
                     </rs>, during which she and her son vied with <persName>Edward, Duke of York</persName> for control of the English throne. She was exiled, restored, and ultimately defeated at <rs type="event">the Battle of Tewkesbury on <date when="1471-05-04">4 May 1471</date>
                     </rs>, and she died in exile in France. She was immortalized by <persName ref="#Shakespeare">Shakespeare</persName> as an unfaithful wife but grieving, vengeful, and prophetic royal widow, and in Mitford's time, she was the subject of <bibl>a romance poem by <author>Margaret Holford</author> in <date when="1816">1816</date>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Marlowe_Chris" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Marlowe</surname>
                     <forename>Christopher</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1564-1593) Wrote The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus
                        (play)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MaryII">
                  <persName>Mary II <roleName>Sovereign of England, Scotland, and Ireland</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">(1662-1694) Ruled England jointly with <persName ref="#WilliamIII">King William III</persName> after the <rs type="event" ref="#Glorious_Revol">Glorious Revolution</rs>. Protestant monarch and
                     daughter of the Catholic <persName ref="#JamesII">King James
                     II</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MaryQoS" sex="2">
                  <persName>Queen Mary</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <surname>Stuart</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1542-12">December 1542<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Linlithgow</placeName>
                        <country>Scotland</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1587-02-08">08 February 1587<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">Stirling</placeName>
                     </placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Mary, Queen of Scots was executed by the order of <persName ref="#ElizI">Queen Elizabeth I</persName>, against whom she was supposed to
                     have conspired. She was succeeded by her son, <persName ref="#JamesI">James
                        I</persName>, the first Stuart king of England and Scotland.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Massinger_Phil" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Massinger</surname>
                     <forename>Philip</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1583"/>
                  <death when="1640"/>
                  <!--NEEDS Dates and Details-->
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1583-1640). Associate of <persName ref="#Shakespeare">Shakespeare</persName> and <persName ref="#Fletcher_John">Fletcher</persName> with King's Men.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Master_Betty" sex="1">
                  <persName>William Henry West Betty
                     <!-- check against facts to see how tag --></persName>
                  <persName>Master Betty</persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1791-1874) Born Shrewsbury, Died London. A celebrated child
                        actor, known as "Master Betty" and the "Young Roscius." Appeared at Covent
                        Garden and Drury Lane. Played Young Norval in Douglas as well as adult roles
                        such as Hamlet.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="May_J" sex="1">
                  <persName>James May</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!-- expand.  likely "James May, attorney, Friar Street, Reading" according to Coles.  Could not find him elsewhere  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Michelangelo">
                  <persName>Michelangelo</persName>
                  <persName>Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Simoni</surname>
                     <forename>Michelangelo</forename>
                     <forename>di Lodovico</forename>
                     <forename>Buonarroti</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1475-03-06">
                     <placeName>Caprese, Arezzo, Florence</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1564-02-18">
                     <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>artist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ghb">Renaissance artist famous for sculptures, such as
                     "David" and "La Pieta", and frescoes, such as "The Last Judgement" and the
                     ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Millington">
                  <persName>Gilbert Millington</persName>
                  <persName>Gilbert Myllington</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Gilbert</forename>
                     <surname>Millington</surname>
                     <roleName>
                        <date from="1640" to="1648">Member of Parliament for Nottingham</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1598"/>
                  <death when="1666-09-19">
                     <placeName>Mont Orgueil Castle, Jersey</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Elected M. P. for <placeName>Nottingham</placeName> in <rs type="event">the <orgName>Long Parliament</orgName> of <date from="1640" to="1648">1640 to 1648</date>
                     </rs>, Gilbert Millington was one of the barristers vocal for the execution of <persName ref="#ChasI">King Charles I</persName>. He was executed after <rs type="event">the Restoration</rs> for his role in the regicide.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Milman_HH" sex="1">
                  <persName>Henry Hart Milman</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!-- expand.  Reading area clergyman and intellectual.  1791-1868. LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Milton" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Milton, John</reg>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <surname>Milton</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1608-12-09"/>
                  <death when="1674-11-08"/>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#esh">English poet and essayist, best known for his epic
                     poem <title ref="#ParadiseLost">Paradise Lost</title> (1667).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Mitford_Geo" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <surname>Mitford</surname>
                     <roleName>Doctor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>George Midford</persName>
                  <occupation>physician</occupation>
                  <occupation>medical</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>MRM's father (1760-1842) gentleman and sometime physician; name earlier
                        spelled "Midford." Born Northumberland.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Moliere" sex="1">
                  <persName type="stage_name">Molière</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Poquelin</surname>
                     <forename>Jean-Baptiste</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>theater</occupation>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <birth when="1662-01-15">
                     <placeName>Paris, France</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1673-02-17">
                     <placeName>Paris, France</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note>Author of <title ref="#Tartuffe">Tartuffe</title>.
                     <!--Flesh out this entry!--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Monck_JB" sex="1">
                  <persName>John Berkeley Monck</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #ebb">MP for <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading
                        area</placeName>
                     <date from="1820" to="1830">1820-1830</date>, who frequently franked <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName>'s
                     letters.<!-- expand.    LMW --></note>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>'s letter to <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName> of <date when="1820-03-20">20 March 1820</date> describes the election of Monck, describing him in context with a shoemaker who brought him from France: <quote defective="false">"<persName ref="#Monck_JB">Mr. Monck</persName> an opposition man of large fortune brought from <placeName ref="#France">France</placeName> in a fit of patriotism by our celebrated shoemaker &amp; Patriot <persName>Mr. <unclear unit="chars" quantity="4">
                              <supplied resp="#ebb">W</supplied>
                              <!--ebb: Could this be Waring? or Maury?-->
                           </unclear>
                        </persName>."</quote> We are hoping to discover who this shoemaker is.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Monck_Mrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mrs. Monck</persName>
                  <note resp="lmw">wife of <persName ref="#Monck_JB">J.B. Monck, M.P.</persName>
                     <!-- Jane?   Check on her name. LMW-->
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Montagu" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sir Edward Montagu, Earl of Sandwich</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Edward</forename>
                     <surname>Montagu</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1625-07-27">27 July 1625<placeName>
                        <country>England</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>naval officer</occupation>
                  <occupation>Earl of Sandwich</occupation>
                  <note>Montagu fought during the first <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">Civil
                        War</rs> as a Parliamentarian, but later changed sides. He was killed at sea
                     at the Battle of Solebay, fighting against the Dutch. He possessed an estate at
                        <placeName>Hinchinbrooke</placeName>
                  </note>
                  <death when="1672-05-28">28 May 1672<placeName/>
                  </death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Moore_DrJ" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Moore</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <roleName>M.D.</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1729-12-07">
                     <placeName>Stirling</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1802-02-21"> died of congestive heart failure.
                        <placeName>Richmond</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>physician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw ebb">
                     <p>John Moore, M.D. (1729-1802) wrote A View of Society and Manners in Italy
                        (1781)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Morton_Thos" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Morton</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1764"/>
                  <death when="1838"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author and theater manager (1764-1838) Born in Durham. Author of
                        Speed the Plough (play, 1798)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="MRM" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Mitford</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Russell</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1787-12-16">
                     <placeName>New Alresford</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1855-01-10">
                     <placeName>Swallowfield</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>gardening</occupation>
                  <occupation><!--Others that will matter to us for relating groups: artist, performer, theatre manager, editor, publisher--></occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #ebb">
                    Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and <orgName ref="#Mitfords_Ma_Pa">her parents</orgName>. She received a civil list pension in <date>1837</date>. Mitford's long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident, and she is buried in
                        Swallowfield churchyard.
                     <!--We shall expand upon bio note! --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Mudie_Rob" sex="1">
                  <persName>Robert Mudie</persName>
                  <birth when="1877-06-28">
                     <placeName>Angus, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1842-04-29"/>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Newspaper editor and author. Author of <title ref="#Glenfergus_fict">Glenfergus</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Munden_Joseph_Shepherd" sex="1">
                  <persName>Joseph Shepherd Munden</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Munden</surname>
                     <forename>Joseph</forename>
                     <forename>Shepherd</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notAfter="1758-05"/>
                  <death when="1832-02-06">
                     <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #lmw">Comic actor who frequently played sailor and drunken roles, though occasionally took dignified elder roles, like Polonius. Munden married the actress <persName>Frances Butler</persName> in 1789, about the same time that he began his acting career in 1780 at <placeName ref="#Haymarket_Theatre">Haymarket Theatre</placeName>. He retired with a farewell benefit performance on <date when="1824-05-31">31 May 1824</date>. Munden played <persName>Old Rapid</persName> opposite <persName ref="#Lewis_William_Thomas">William Thomas Lewis</persName> as <persName>Young Rapid</persName> in the play, <title>Cure for the Heartache</title> in <date when="1796">1796</date>, and played <persName>Polonius</persName> to <persName ref="#Kean_Edmund">Kean</persName>'s as well as <persName ref="#Kemble_JP">John Philip Kemble</persName>'s <persName>Hamlet</persName>. [Source: ODNB]
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Murray_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>John Murray II</persName>
                  <birth when="1778"/>
                  <death when="1843"/>
                  <note resp="#ajc"> Publisher--<placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>: Albermarle-Street.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Napoleon">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Bonaparte</surname>
                     <forename>Napoleon</forename>
                  </persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Newberry_J" sex="1">
                  <persName>Jacob Newberry</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!-- expand.  Mr. Newberry (Coles identifies as “Jacob Newberry, attorney, of 35 Great Queen Street Lincoln’s Inn Fields [London] and Friar Street, Reading" (Coles #17, p. 109, note 32) LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Nicholls_John">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <surname>Nicholls</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Author</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Nooth_C" sex="2">
                  <persName>Charlotte Nooth</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Wrote a poem to <persName ref="#Valpy_Richard">Dr.
                        Valpy</persName>, <bibl>published volumes of poetry in <date when="1815">1815</date> &amp; <date when="1816">1816</date>
                     </bibl>. <!--Corvey author.  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OHara_Kane">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>O'Hara</surname>
                     <forename>Kane</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1711" notAfter="1712">1711-12?<placeName>Connaught, Ireland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1782">
                     <placeName>Dublin, Ireland</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <occupation>musician</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Popular Irish playwright and musician, O'Hara wrote many comic operas, including <bibl corresp="#TomThumb_OHaraAdpt">a burletta adapted from <bibl corresp="#TomThumb_Fielding">
                           <author ref="#Fielding_Henry">Fielding</author>'s play, <title>Tom Thumb</title>
                        </bibl>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OKeefe" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>O'Keefe</surname>
                     <surname type="alternate">O'Keeffe</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1747-06-24">
                     <placeName>Dublin, Ireland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1833-02-04"/>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Irish author and actor (1747-1833) Author of <bibl>
                           <title>Omai</title> (<date>1785</date>)</bibl>, <bibl>
                           <title>Love in a Camp</title> (<date>1786</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                           <title>Wild Oats</title> (<date>1791</date>)</bibl>. <persName ref="#Hazlitt_Wm">Hazlitt</persName> described him as the "English
                           <persName ref="#Moliere">Molière</persName>."
                        <!-- Also spelled "O'Keeffe"? LMW--></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ONeill_Eliz" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">O'Neill</surname>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Irish actor (1791-1872). Later Lady Becher (married Mr., afterwards Sir
                        William Becher). Born Drogheda, Ireland. Died Ballygiblin, Ireland.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Orger_MA" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mary Ann Orger</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Orger</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Ivers</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1788">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1849"/>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1788-1849?) specializing in comedy. Born Mary Ann Ivers,
                        daughter of Mr. William Ivers. Born in London, Feb. 25, 1788. Married to Mr.
                        Thomas Orger in July 1804. Performed at Drury Lane and Covent Garden. See
                        "Mrs. Orger." The Biography of the British Stage. New York: Collins and
                        Hannay, 1824. 187-188.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Otway_Thos" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Otway</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British author. (3 Mar. 1652-14 Apr. 1685). Born in Trotton, near Midhurst,
                        Sussex; died London. Dramatist and poet whose best-known works include The
                        Orphan and The Soldier’s Fortune (1680) and Venice Preserved (1682).</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Palmer_CF" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Palmer</surname>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                     <forename>Fyshe</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Mr. Palmer</persName>
                  <persName>Long Fyshe</persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1770"><!--when="?1771"-->
                     <placeName>Luckley House, Wokingham</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1843-01-24"/>
                  <note resp="#ajc">On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: <persName ref="#Monck_JB">John Berkeley Monck</persName> (418 votes), <persName ref="#Palmer_CF">Charles Fyshe Palmer</persName>(399 votes), and <persName ref="#Weyland_John">John Weyland</persName>(395 votes.) A Whig politician, he began running for Parliament elections as the member for <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>
                     <date notBefore="1816">after 1816</date>, and appears to have served off and on in that role until <date notAfter="1841">1841</date>. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government's handling of <rs type="event" ref="#Peterloo">the Peterloo Massacre</rs> in <date when="1819">1819</date>. Mitford's letters indicate a pronounced dislike of him as she vastly preferred his opponent <persName ref="#Monck_JB">J. B. Monck</persName>, and she reportedly satirized the Palmer in <date when="1818">1818</date> as <quote defective="false">"vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance."</quote> Palmer mentioned in connection with a potential legal issue with <orgName ref="#Billiard_Club">the Billiard Club</orgName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of <date when="1822-08-31">31 August 1822</date>. Palmer's opponents sometimes undermined his Whiggish position by referencing the noble privileges he accrued by marrying <persName ref="#Palmer_Mad">the Lady Madalina Gordon</persName> in <date when="1805">1805</date>. [Source: see <ptr target="http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading"/>. See also note 2 in The Browning's Correspondence rendering of <rs type="letter">Mitford's letter of <date when="1842-03-12">12 March 1842</date> to <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName>
                     </rs>: <ptr target="http://www.browningscorrespondence.com/correspondence/1066/#D942-00C0002"/>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Palmer_Mad" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Palmer</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Gordon</surname>
                     <forename>Madelina</forename>
                     <roleName>the Lady</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Lady M.P.</persName>
                  <persName>Lady Mad.</persName>
                  <persName>Lady Madalina Palmer</persName>
                  <persName>Lady M. Palmer</persName>
                  <persName>tiresome woman</persName>
                  <persName>my Lady</persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1772">1772?</birth>
                  <death when="1847"/>
                  <note resp="#kab #ebb #ad">Her second marriage was to the Reading Whig politician <persName ref="#Palmer_CF">Charles Fyshe Palmer</persName>. His marriage to her gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the <orgName>Holland House</orgName>. For more on the Palmers see note 2 in The Browning's Correspondence rendering of <rs type="letter">Mitford's letter of <date when="1842-03-12">12 March 1842</date> to <persName ref="#Barrett_E">Elizabeth Barrett Browning</persName>
                     </rs>: <ptr target="http://www.browningscorrespondence.com/correspondence/1066/#D942-00C0002"/>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Petrarch">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Petrarca</surname>
                     <forename>Francesco</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Petrarch</persName>
                  <birth when="1304-07-20">
                     <placeName>Arezzo, Republic of Florence</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1374-07-19">
                     <placeName>Arquà, Republic of Venice</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>scholar</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Petrarch's scholarship and poetry helped to initiate the Italian Renaissance. He investigated the learning of ancient <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome</placeName> and rediscovered <persName>Cicero</persName>'s letters. In poetry he is most widely known for his sonnet cycle to an idealized woman, <persName>Laura</persName>. He was a friend of <persName ref="#Rienzo_hist">Cola di Rienzo</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Philips_Mr" sex="1">
                  <persName>Mr. Philips</persName>
                  <occupation>miller</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">A <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName> millwright mentioned in Mitford's discussion of the Reading elections in her letter to <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName> of <date when="1820-03-20">20 March 1820</date>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pius7_Pope">
                  <persName>
                     <roleName>Pope</roleName> Pius VII</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Chiaramonti</surname>
                     <forename>Barnaba</forename>
                     <forename>Niccolò</forename>
                     <forename>Maria</forename>
                     <forename>Luigi</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1742-08-14">
                     <placeName>Cesena, Papal States</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1823-08-20">
                     <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome, Papal States</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>religion</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Pius the VII reigned the Pope, or patriarch of the Catholic Church, from <date from="1800" to="1823">1800 to 1823</date>. <orgName ref="#Pius7_Court">He and his Cardinals</orgName> were exiled by <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon</persName> to <placeName ref="#Savona">Savona</placeName> from <date from="1809" to="1813">1809 to 1813</date>, and restored to <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome</placeName> by signing a treaty in <date when="1813">1813</date>. <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> mentions an unspecified past visit of <persName ref="#Monck_JB">J. B. Monck</persName> to <orgName ref="#Pius7_Court">the Pope's Court</orgName> in her <rs type="letter">letter to <persName ref="#Elford_SirWm">Sir William Elford</persName> of <date when="1820-09-09">9 September 1820</date>
                     </rs>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Plutarch" sex="1">
                  <persName>Plutarch</persName>
                  <birth notBefore="0045" notAfter="0047">
                     <placeName>Chaeronea, Boeotia</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death notBefore="0119" notAfter="0125"/>
                  <occupation>philosopher</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>essayist</occupation>
                  <occupation>biographer</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="kdc">
                     <p>Studied at the School of Athens, and was a priest at Delphi. Most famous
                        works are <bibl>
                           <title>Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans</title> or <title type="alt">Parallel Lives</title> and <title>Moralia</title>
                        </bibl>
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Poole_J" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Poole</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>playwright</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> English author (1786-1872). Wrote many farces over a sixty-year career
                        <date notBefore="1810" notAfter="1880">between 1810 and the 1870s</date>, including <bibl>
                           <title>Hamlet Travestie: in Three Acts</title> (<date>1810</date>), reportedly the first Shakespeare parody presented since the days of
                           <persName ref="#ChasII">Charles II</persName>
                        </bibl>; <bibl corresp="#DeafasPost_play">
                           <title>Deaf as a Post; A Farce in One Act, Two Scenes</title> (Drury Lane, <date when="1823">1823</date>)</bibl>; <bibl>
                           <title>Paul Pry; a Comedy, in three Acts</title> (<date when="1835">1835</date>)(perhaps his best-known work)</bibl>; <bibl>
                           <title>My Wife? What Wife? A farce, in one or two acts</title> (<date when="1872">1872</date>)</bibl>. Also wrote novels, including <bibl>
                           <title>Paul Pry's Journal of a Residence at Little Pedligton</title> (<date>1836</date>)</bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pope_Alex" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Pope</surname>
                     <forename>Alexander</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1688-05-21">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1744-05-30">
                     <placeName>Twickenham</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1688-1744)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pope_Jane" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Pope</surname>
                     <forename>Jane</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English actor (1742-1818). </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Potter_R">
                  <persName>Robert Potter</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Potter</surname>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <addName>Rev. Potter</addName>
                     <addName>Rev. Robert Potter</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1771">
                     <placeName>Podimore, Somerset</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1804-08-09">
                     <placeName>Lowestoft, Suffolk</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>clergy</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ghb">While a clergyman in Scarning, Norfolk, and the
                     Master of Seckar's School, he completed some of the earliest English
                     translations, in blank verse, of <persName ref="#Aeschylus">Aeschylus</persName> in 1779, <persName ref="#Euripides">Euripides</persName> in 1783, and Sophocles in 1788.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Praed_Winthrop" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Praed</surname>
                     <forename>Winthrop</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1820-07-26"/>
                  <death when="1839-07-15">
                     <placeName>Chester Square, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw, #cmm">
                     <p> British author and policitician. Although Praed began his career at
                        Cambridge with Whig sympathies, he was returned to parliament for St.
                        Germans in 1830 as a <orgName ref="#Tory">Tory</orgName> candidate. He later
                        sat for Great Yarmouth (1835-37) and Aylesbury (from 1837 until his death)
                        as a Tory. An authorized edition of his poems did not appear until 1859
                        (edited and with a memoir by Derwent Coleridge); a collected edition, The
                        Political and Occasional Poems of W.M. Praed appeared in 1888. Well-known
                        poems include “Good Night to the Season” (1827) and “The Belle of the
                        Ball-Room” (1831) as well as "The Talented Man" and “Stanzas on Seeing the
                        Speaker Asleep in His Chair.” <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName> profiles
                        him in <title ref="#Recollections">Recollections</title>. </p>
                  </note>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British author. MRM profiles him in Recollections
                        (1854)<!-- NEEDS INFO -->)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Princess_E_hist" sex="2">
                  <persName>Elizabeth Stuart</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Elizabeth</forename>
                     <surname>Stuart</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>princess</occupation>
                  <occupation>prisoner of war</occupation>
                  <birth when="1635-12-28">28 December 1635<placeName>St James's Palace<placeName type="city">London</placeName>
                        <country>England</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1650-09-08">8 September 1650<placeName>Carisbrooke
                           Castle<district>Isle of Wight</district>
                        <country>England</country>
                     </placeName>
                  </death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Procter_BW" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Bryan</forename>
                     <forename>Wallace</forename>
                     <surname>Procter</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <persName type="pseudo">Barry Cornwall <!--ebb: pseudonym--></persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!--Poet, pen name "Barry Cornwall"  (21 November 1787 – 5 October 1874) Later wrote for MRM in Finden's Tableaux.  LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Quayle_Mr" sex="1">
                  <persName>Mr. Quayle</persName>
                  <persName>Mr. Quale</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">In 1821-11-06-Talfourd and 1821-11-16-Talfourd;
                     spelled in 11-16 letter as Quale. Not identified.
                     <!--First name? Needs more research; I could not easily id.  LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Queen_Caroline" sex="2">
                  <persName>Caroline <roleName>Queen Consort of the United Kingdom</roleName>
                     <date from="1820-01-29" to="1821-08-07"/>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Caroline of Brunswick</persName>
                  <persName>Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <roleName>Princess of Wales</roleName>
                     <date from="1795" to="1820"/>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1768-05-17"/>
                  <death when="1821-08-07"/>
                  <note resp="#lmw #ebb">The cousin and estranged wife of <persName ref="#GeoIV">the
                        Prince Regent (later George IV)</persName>. Caroline was adopted as the
                     leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent
                     attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in <date when="1818">1818</date>, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent
                     her from becoming Queen are known as <rs type="event" ref="#Qu_Caroline_Affair">the Queen Caroline Affair</rs>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Racine" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Racine</surname>
                     <forename>Jean-Baptiste</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>French author (1639-1699)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Radcliffe_Ann" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Radcliffe</surname>
                     <forename>Ann</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1764-07-09">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1823-02-07">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p>Best known for Gothic romances <bibl>
                           <title>The Mysteries of Udolpho</title> (novel, <date>1794</date>)</bibl>
                        and <bibl>
                           <title>The Italian</title> (novel, <date>1797</date>)</bibl>. Her novel
                           <title ref="#Gaston_novel">Gaston de Blondeville</title>, published
                        posthumously in <date>1826</date>, inspired <title ref="#Gaston_deBlondeville">Mitford's play of the same name</title>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Raphael">
                  <persName>Raphael</persName>
                  <persName>Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino</persName>
                  <birth when="1483"/>
                  <death when="1520-04-06"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Italian Renaissance artist and architect.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RichardI" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Richard I</forename>
                     <roleName>King of England</roleName>
                     <roleName>Duke of Normandy</roleName>
                     <roleName>Duke of Aquitaine</roleName>
                     <roleName>Count of Anjou</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English monarch (1157-1199). House of Plantaganet. Son of Henry II of
                        England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Also known as Richard Coeur de Lion or
                        Richard the Lionhart.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RichardIII">
                  <persName>Richard III <roleName>
                        <date from="1483" to="1485">King of England</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Richard of Gloucester</persName>
                  <birth when="1452-10-02">
                     <placeName>Fotheringhay Castle, Northamptonshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1485-08-22">
                     <placeName>Bosworth Field, Leicestershire</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">After the death of his brother <persName>King Edward IV</persName>, Richard of Gloucester was appointed protector to his young sons, <persName>King Edward V</persName> and <persName>Richard of Shrewsbury, the Duke of York</persName>, and in preparation for Edward V's coronation, he lodged them at the <placeName ref="#Tower_of_London">Tower of London</placeName>, and upon the mysterious disappearance of the boys, Richard took the throne. Richard is often accused, without proof, of having ordered the boys execution to usurp the throne, a plot immortalized in <bibl>
                        <author ref="#Shakespeare">Shakespeare</author>'s play, <title>Richard III</title>
                     </bibl>. His death at the Battle of Bosworth Field made him the last English king to die in battle, and effectively ended the dynastic Wars of the Roses between the Houses of York and Lancaster.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rienzo_hist">
                  <persName>Cola di Rienzo <roleName>Tribune of Rome</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1313"/>
                  <death when="1354-10-08"/>
                  <occupation>scholar</occupation>
                  <occupation>politics</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The historical figure on whom Mitford's character, <persName ref="#Rienzi_Cola">Cola di Rienzi</persName>, is based. Rienzo rose from humble origins as the son of a washerwoman and a tavern keeper to lead a bloodless coup against Rome’s aristocracy through his powerful oratory in the 1340s. <rs type="event">He named himself in <date when="1347">1347</date> the Tribune of Rome</rs>, and he aimed to restore <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome</placeName> to its classical glory as the capitol of a united Italian nation and empire. Although he would lose power within a year to vengeful barons united in opposition against him, Rienzo became legendary for his meteoric career, his humiliation of bullying overlords, and his rule dedicated to the restoring the dignity of Roman people in a time of chaos and confusion. His contemporary poet, <persName ref="#Petrarch">Petrarch</persName>, admired Rienzo as a man of humble origins who could unite the Roman people with his inspiring oratory and construct a new regime to punish abusers of power.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Robertson_William">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Robertson</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1721"/>
                  <death when="1793"/>
                  <note>A Scottish historian, and author of <title ref="#CharlesV">Charles the Fifth</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Robertson_Wm">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <surname>Robertson</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Scottish historian (1721-1793) Author of The History of Scotland, 1542-1603 (1759) and The History of Charles V (1769), considered his most important work.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Robins_Geo" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Robins</surname>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>auctioneer</occupation>
                  <occupation>theatre patron</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British auctioneer and theater patron (1778-1847). Acquaintance of
                           <persName ref="#Byron">Byron</persName>, <persName ref="#Sheridan_RichardB">Sheridan</persName>,
                           <persName>Colman<!--ebb: which Colman?--></persName>, <persName ref="#Kemble_JP">JP Kemble</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rowden_Fr" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Rowden</surname>
                     <forename>Frances</forename>
                     <forename>Arabella</forename>
                     <addName>Fanny</addName>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>educator</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English schoolmistress, author, and <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>
                        tutor.
                        <!--  (dates unknown, WC lists "flourished 1801-1821" based on her dates of publication)  LMW.-->
                        Also taught <persName>Caroline Lamb</persName> and
                           <persName>L.E.L.</persName> Worked at <placeName>M. St. Quintin
                           School</placeName> at 22 Hans Place, <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, started by <persName>M. St. Quintin</persName>, a
                        French emigre
                        <!-- variant spellings of "St. Quintin" occur, including "St. Quentin"  LMW -->.
                        Wrote poetry, including <bibl>
                           <title ref="#St_Botany">Poetical Introduction to the Study of
                              Botany</title> (<date>1801</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                           <title ref="#Pl_Friendship">The Pleasures of Friendship: A Poem, in two
                              parts</title> (<date>1810</date>, rpt. 1812, 1818)</bibl>; also wrote
                        textbooks, including <bibl>A Christian Wreath for the Pagan Dieties (1820,
                           illus. Caroline Lamb)</bibl>, and <bibl>A Biographical Sketch of the Most
                           Distinguished Writers of Ancient and Modern Times (1821, illus. Caroline
                           Lamb)</bibl>. (See <bibl>Landon Memoirs</bibl>; See also
                           <bibl>L'Estrange, ed. The Life of Mary Russell Mitford: Told by Herself,
                           p. 21</bibl>)
                        <!-- According to Melissa Ianetta post, Victoria listserv, Sept. 2001, "later Countess St. Quentin" 
                           which suggests she eventually married the French emigre who started the school  LMW--></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Russell_M" sex="2">
                  <persName>Mrs. Mitford</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Mitford</surname>
                     <surname type="maiden">Russell</surname>
                     <forename>Mary</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1750"/>
                  <death when="1830"/>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Wife of George Mitford, mother of Mary Russell Mitford; she was a wealthy distant relation of the
                     dukes of Bedford (ODNB)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Russell_Richard" sex="1"><!-- KAB: added MRM's grandfather on Lexi's advice, the bio info and dates are from her.-->
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Russell</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <roleName>Reverend</roleName>
                     <roleName>Dr</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1695"/>
                  <death when="1783"/>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ad">
                     <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName>'s maternal grandfather. He
                     was the rector of Ashe and the Vicar of Overton.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rutt_John">
                  <persName>
                     <surname> Rutt</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <forename type="middle">Towill</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1760-04-04">
                     <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1841-03-03">
                     <placeName>Bexley</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>politician and writer</occupation>
                  <!-- Reference in Coles page 476 letter 93, footnote 2; letter 38 page 393, footnote 4; ONB -->
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ajc">
                     <persName ref="#Talfourd_Mrs">Rachel</persName>, his eldest daughter, married <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Salisbury_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>William Cecil, Lord Salisbury</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <surname>Cecil</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <birth when="1591-03-28">28 March 1591</birth>
                  <death when="1668-12-03">3 December 1668</death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Say_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>William Say</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <surname>Say</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <occupation>Minister of Parliament for Camelford</occupation>
                  <birth when="1604">1604</birth>
                  <note resp="#rnes">A Regicide, Say ultimatey eluded capture by escaping to
                        <placeName ref="#Switzerland">Switzerland</placeName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Schiller_F" sex="1">
                  <persName>Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>
                        <nameLink>von</nameLink> Schiller</surname>
                     <forename>Johann</forename>
                     <forename>Christoph</forename>
                     <forename>Friedrich</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> German author (1759-1805) Wrote Die Räuber or The Robbers (play, 1781),
                        Fiesco (play, 1783), and Wilhelm Tell or William Tell play, 1804). Early in
                        her playwriting career, <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> attempted an
                        adaptation of his <title ref="#Fiesco_play">Fiesco</title> which was never
                        performed.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Scott_John">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <surname>Scott</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>John Scott</persName>
                  <birth when="1784-10-24">
                     <placeName>Broadgate, Aberdeen</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1821-02-21">
                     <placeName ref="#ChalkFarm">Chalk Farm</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>editor</occupation>
                  <note resp="#lmw #ebb">Editor who revived <title ref="#LondonMag">The London Magazine</title> in 1820 and edited it until his death on <date when="1821-02-27">27 February 1821</date>.  Died as the result of a gunshot wound received in a duel fought on <date when="1821-02-16">16 February</date> with <persName ref="#Christie_JH">Jonathan Henry Christie</persName> (<persName ref="#Lockhart_JG">John Gibson Lockhart</persName>'s agent) at <placeName>Chalk Farm</placeName>. The duel resulted from an escalation of attacks and counterattacks between the editors of the London and <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's Magazines</title> over Blackwood's characterizations of a <orgName ref="#CockneyS">Cockney School</orgName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Scott_Wal" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Scott, Walter</reg>
                     <forename>Walter</forename>
                     <surname>Scott</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1771-08-15">
                     <placeName>Edinburgh, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1832-09-21">
                     <placeName>Abbotsford, Scotland</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #esh">Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also
                     worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled <bibl>a
                        collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed,
                        in <title>Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border</title>, first published in
                           <date from="1802" to="1812">1802, but continually expanded in revised
                           editions through 1812</date>
                     </bibl>. Author of the long romance poems, <bibl>
                        <title>The Lay of the Last Minstrel</title> (<date>1805</date>)</bibl>, <bibl>
                        <title>Marmion</title> (<date>1808</date>)</bibl>, and <bibl>
                        <title>The Lady of the Lake</title> (<date>1810</date>)</bibl>. From
                     1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary
                     career, he wrote review articles for the <title>Edinburgh Review</title>, The
                        <title>Quarterly Review</title>, <title>Blackwood's Edinburgh
                        Magazine</title>, and the <title>Foreign Quarterly Review</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sedgwick_Cath">
                  <persName>Catherine Maria Sedgwick</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">American writer, correspondent of Mitford's.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Serle_TJ" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas James Serle</persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <occupation>theatre manager</occupation>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British actor, author, theater manager (1798-1889). Appeared with <persName ref="#Kean_Edmund">Kean</persName> and <persName ref="#Kemble_C">Charles
                           Kemble</persName>. Married <persName>Cecilia Kemble</persName>. Wrote
                           <title>Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orleans, a Historical Drama</title>; and
                           <title>The Shadow on the Wall</title>. Served as Secretary of
                           <orgName>The Dramatic Author's Society</orgName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sforza_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sforza</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">General Sforza, historical person <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</persName>'s character is based on, Venetian
                     military officer.<!-- expand.   LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Shakespeare" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Shakespeare</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1564-04"> Probably born April 21-23, the 23rd has been the usually
                     assumed date. <placeName>Stratford upon Avon</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1616-04-23">
                     <placeName>Stratford upon Avon</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author and actor (1564-1616)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Shelley_MW">
                  <persName>Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley</persName>
                  <!--ebb: stub entry-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Shelley_PB">
                  <persName>Percy Bysshe Shelley</persName>
                  <!--ebb: stub entry-->
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sheridan_RichardB" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Sheridan</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <forename>Brinsley</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1751"> born either in September of October <placeName>12 Dorset
                        Street, Dublin</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1816-07-07">
                     <placeName>14 Savile Row, London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author, politician, and theater manager(1751-1816) Managed Drury
                        Lane. A prominent Whig politician. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Siddons_Sarah" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="maiden">Kemble</surname>
                     <surname type="married">Siddons</surname>
                     <forename>Sarah</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>British actor (1755-1831). Born Brecon, Brecknockshire, Wales. Died London.
                        Considered the best tragic actress of her era, better than her three
                        actor-brothers. Member of the Kemble acting clan. Most famous role was Lady
                        Macbeth.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sinclair_SrJohn" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sir John Sinclair</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Sinclair</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>baronet</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1754-05-10">
                     <placeName>Thurso Castle, Thurso, Caithness</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1835-12-21">
                     <placeName>133 George Street, Edinburgh</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ajc">Sir William Sinclair was an agricultural improver, politician, and
                     codifier of "useful knowledge." His political life ended in 1811 due to bankruptcy (ODNB)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sloman_Mrs" sex="2">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Sloman</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1799"/>
                  <death when="1858-02-08">
                     <placeName>Charleston, SC</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British actress.(1799?- 8 Feb. 1858) Specialized in tragedy, performed at
                           <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden Theatre</placeName>
                        and later appeared in <placeName>New York</placeName>. Miss Whitaker, first
                        married Willian Downton, actor; later married John Sloman. Appeared as
                        Belvidera in <title>Venice Preserved</title> and Mrs. Haller in <title ref="#Stranger_play">The Stranger</title>. Mrs. Sloman died in
                           <placeName>Charleston, SC</placeName> at the age of 59.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Smith_Horace">
                  <persName>Horace Smith</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Smollett_Tob" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Smollett, Tobias</reg>
                     <forename>Tobias</forename>
                     <forename>George</forename>
                     <surname>Smollett</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1721-03-19">
                     <placeName>Dalquhurn, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1771-09-17">
                     <placeName>Antignano, near Livorno, Italy</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>medical</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #esh">Novelist and poet, as well as editor,
                     translator, critic, and medical practitioner. Smollett's best-known novels were
                     written between <date from="1748" to="1753">1748 and 1753</date>: <bibl>
                        <title>The Adventures of Roderick Random</title> (<date when="1748">1748</date>)</bibl>, <bibl>
                        <title>The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle</title> (<date when="1751">1751</date>)</bibl>, and <bibl>
                        <title>The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom</title> (<date when="1753">1753</date>)</bibl>, and his <bibl>four-volume <title>Complete History
                           of England</title> was published in <date when="1754">1754</date>,
                        revised in <date when="1758">1758</date>
                     </bibl>. Together with <persName>Thomas Francklin</persName>, Smollett helped
                     edit the <bibl>35-volume English translation of <title>The Works of
                           Voltaire</title>, from <date from="1761" to="1765">1761-1765</date>
                     </bibl>. He travelled extensively in France and Italy in his last years.
                     (Source ODNB).</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Soane_G" sex="1">
                  <persName>George Soane</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> posits George Soane, "(1790-1860),
                     miscellaneous writer" (Coles p. 172, note 14)</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sophocles" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sophocles</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> (ca. 496 BC-406 BC) Born in Colonus (near Athens) Greece and died in
                        Athens. Sophocles is best known for <bibl>his cycle of Oedipus plays</bibl>, and particularly the tragedy <bibl corresp="#Oedipus_play">
                           <title>Oedipus Tyrranus</title> (otherwise known in Latin or English forms as <title>Oedipus Rex</title>, or <title>Oedipus the King</title>)</bibl>. As an Athenian citizen, Sophocles held many roles, such as serving on the treasury, leading the paean (choral chant), serving as a a strategoi (armed forces official); and was a junior colleague of <persName>Pericles</persName>. </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Strafford" sex="1">
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <persName>Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <surname>Wentworth</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1593">1593</birth>
                  <death when="1641-05-12">12 May 1641<placeName>
                        <placeName type="city">London</placeName>
                        <district>Tower Hill</district>
                     </placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Caroline administrator who was tried, convicted, and executed
                     in 1641. Arguably, <persName ref="#ChasI">Charles I</persName> betrayed
                     Strafford to repair his own public image--unsuccessfully.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Talbot_Geo">
                  <persName>George Talbot
                     <roleName>the Sixth Earl of Shrewsbury</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth notBefore="1528"/>
                  <death when="1590-11-18"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Appointed by Queen Elizabeth I to imprison Mary Queen of Scots in 1568 at <placeName ref="#Sheffield_Castle">Sheffield Castle and Manor Lodge</placeName>. <persName ref="#Bess_of_Hardwick">Bess of Hardwick</persName> was his second wife, and he was her fourth husband.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Talfourd_Mrs">
                  <persName>
                     <surname type="married">Talfourd</surname>
                     <surname type="paternal">Rutt</surname>
                     <forename>Rachel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Mrs. Thomas Talfourd</persName>
                  <note resp="#ajc"> She's the eldest daughter of <persName ref="#Rutt_John">John Rutt</persName>.<!-- Reference in Coles page 476 letter 93, footnote 2; letter 38 page 393, footnote 4 --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Talfourd_Thos" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas Noon Talfourd </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Talfourd</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Noon</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> British author and jurist (26 May 1795-13 Mar. 1854) Born in <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading, Berkshire</placeName>; died while serving in
                        the <placeName>Court of Stafford</placeName> in 1854. <persName>Charles
                           Dickens</persName> dedicated <title>The Pickwick Papers</title> to
                        Talfourd. Talfourd’s best-known works include his plays <bibl>
                           <title ref="#Ion_TNTplay">Ion</title> (1835)</bibl>, <bibl>
                           <title>The Athenian Captive</title> (<date>1837</date>)</bibl> and <bibl>
                           <title>Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds</title>
                           (<date>1839</date>)</bibl>. Friend, mentor, and frequent correspondent
                        with <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Taylor_J" sex="1">
                  <persName>John Taylor</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>b. 1781 d. 1864. <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> writer and
                        publisher with <persName ref="#Hessey_J">James Augustus Hessey</persName>,
                           <orgName ref="#Taylor_Hessey">Taylor and Hessey</orgName>
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Taylor_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>John Taylor</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!-- 1757-1832 (journalist, poet).  Eventually proprietor of the London Sun (conservative newpaper); earlier, friend of Mary Robinson and associated with the Morning Post (Whig) LMW --></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Thackeray_TJ" sex="1">
                  <persName>Thomas James (T.J.) Thackeray</persName>
                  <occupation>musician</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> (1795?-1850?) British musician and librettist/lyricist. Wrote <bibl>
                           <title>The Mountain Sylph</title> (two-act opera, <date>1834</date>) with
                              <persName>John Barnett</persName> (1809-1890)</bibl>. Also write <bibl>
                           <title>My Wife or My Place, A Petite Comedy in Two Acts</title>
                              (<date>1831</date>) with <persName>Charles Shannon</persName>
                        </bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Tichburne_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>Robert Tichborne</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <surname>Tichborne</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>Mayor of <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </occupation>
                  <death when="1682">1682</death>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Tierney_SrMat" sex="2">
                  <persName>Sir Matthew Tierney</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Tierney</surname>
                     <forename>Matthew</forename>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                     <roleName>baronet</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1776-11-04">
                     <placeName>Ballyscandland, County Limerick</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1845-10-28">
                     <placeName> Pavilion Parade, Brighton</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ajc">Tierney was a physician who became a Physician-in-Ordinary to Kings George IV and
                     William IV of the UK.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Tobin_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Tobin</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1770-1804) Died Cork, of consumption. Most successful work,
                        The Honeymoon (or Honey Moon), began its run just before his
                        death.<!-- ADD INFO --></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Traill_James">
                  <persName>James Traill</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Valpy_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>Abraham John Valpy</persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw"><!--"John" Valpy, publisher, Dr. Richard Valpy's son (1787–1854).  LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Valpy_Richard" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Valpy</surname>
                     <forename>Richard</forename>
                     <roleName>Doctor</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1754-12-07">
                     <placeName>Jersey</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1836-03-28">
                     <placeName>London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>educator</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb #lmw">Headmaster of <placeName ref="#Reading_School">Reading Grammar School</placeName> for boys for 50 years, during which time he expanded the boarding school and added new buildings. Friend and mentor to <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>. Author of <bibl>Greek Delectus</bibl> and <bibl>Latin Delectus</bibl>, grammars much used as schoolbooks in public schools. Valpy had his students perform <persName ref="#Sophocles">Sophocles</persName>' tragedies in Reading, and requested that MRM attend and write reviews of the productions for the <title ref="#ReadingMer_per">Reading Mercury</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Vane_hist" sex="1">
                  <persName>Henry Vane</persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Henry</forename>
                     <surname>Vane</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>politician</occupation>
                  <occupation>Governor of the <placeName>Massachusetts Bay Colony</placeName>
                  </occupation>
                  <birth when="1613">1613</birth>
                  <death when="1662-06-14">14 June 1662</death>
                  <note>Vane was executed for treason by <persName ref="#ChasII">Charles
                        II</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Victoria_Queen" sex="2">
                  <persName>Victoria <roleName>
                        <date from="1837-06-20" to="1901-01-22">Queen of the United Kingdom</date>
                     </roleName>
                     <roleName>
                        <date from="1876-05-01" to="1901-01-22">Empress of India</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Alexandrina</forename>
                     <forename>Victoria</forename>
                     <surname type="maiden">Hanover</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1819-05-24">
                     <placeName>Kensington Palace, London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1901-01-22">
                     <placeName>Osborne House, Isle of Wight</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The longest reigning monarch in English history, and the longest reigning female monarch in recorded history.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Voltaire" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Voltaire</surname>
                     <forename>François-Marie</forename>
                     <forename>Arouet</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw #cmm">
                     <p> (1694-1778) French Enlightenment author, critic, essayist, historian, and
                        philosopher. Best-known today for his satirical novel <bibl>
                           <title>Candide</title> (<date>1759</date>)</bibl>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wakefield_D">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Wakefield</surname>
                     <forename>Daniel</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1776">
                     <placeName>Tottenham, Middlesex</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1846-07-19">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>barrister</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#ebb">Mentioned in letter of <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> of
                        <date when="1821-06-21">June 21 1821</date>, known to Mitford and <persName ref="#Mitford_Geo">her father</persName> and Talfourd and privy to law court
                     gossip. Identified by <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> as Daniel
                     Wakefield, which seems likely, cross-checking with the ODNB. Wakefield's mother
                     was the Quaker writer Priscella Bell Wakefield, though Wakefield himself
                     converted to the Church of England. He published <title>An Essay of Political
                        Economy</title> in 1799, and qualified for the law in 1807. His first wife,
                        <persName>Isabella Mackie</persName>, swindled him of much of his income and
                     nearly bankrupted him, before she fatally poisoned herself in August 1813.
                     Later that year, 11 November 1813, Wakefield married <persName>Elizabeth
                        Kilgour</persName>. He was eventually very successful and much consulted on
                     legal cases. </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Warde_Mr" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Prescott</surname>
                     <forename>James</forename>
                     <surname>Warde</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>James Prescott Warde</persName>
                  <persName>Mr. Warde</persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> British actor. (1792-1840). Used the professional name "Mr. Warde".
                        Appeared at <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent
                           Garden</placeName>.<!-- NEED DATES & DETAILS--></p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Watteau_Wil">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Watteau, Jean-Antoine</reg>
                     <forename>Jean-Antoine</forename>
                     <surname>Watteau</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1684-10-10">born 10 October 1684, Valenciennes, France</birth>
                  <death when="1721-07-18">death 18 July 1721</death>
                  <occupation>artist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#esh">French painter known for his bucolic landscapes and
                     country scenes in the Late-Baroque, or Roccoco, style.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Webb_Eliza" sex="2"><!-- KAB: added Miss Webb on Becca's advice, she also appears in the 1820-09-01 letter done by Karen, Erica and Elizabeth -->
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Webb</surname>
                     <forename>Eliza</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio">Miss Webb is a neighbour of <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell
                        Mitford</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Webster_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Webster</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p>English author (1580-1634) Born and died London.. Wrote The Duchess of Malfi
                        (play)</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wellington_Duke">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Wellesley</surname>
                     <forename>Arthur</forename>
                     <roleName>Field Marshal</roleName>
                     <roleName>
                        <date from="1814">First Duke of Wellington</date>
                     </roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName type="nickname">The Iron Duke</persName>
                  <birth when="1769-05-01">
                     <placeName>Dublin, Ireland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1852-09-14">
                     <placeName>Walmer, Kent</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Before his fame in the Napoleonic Wars, Wellesley served in the Irish House of Commons, and after fighting against <persName>Tipu Sultan, the "Tiger of Mysore"</persName> in the <rs type="event">Siege of Seringapatam</rs> he served as the governor of <placeName>Seringapatam</placeName> and <placeName>Mysore</placeName> in <date when="1799">1799</date>. He was promoted to general during the <rs type="event">Peninsular Wars against <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon</persName> (the battles fought in the Iberian Peninsula)</rs>, and was granted the title, the First Duke of Wellingto, after Napoleon's first defeat and exile in <date when="1814">1814</date>. He led the Allied English and European armies in <rs type="event" ref="#Waterloo">Napoleon's decisive defeat at <placeName ref="#Waterloo_Belgium">Waterloo</placeName> on <date when="1815-06-18">18 June 1815</date>
                     </rs>. A prominent influence on <orgName ref="#Tory">the Tory party</orgName>, he served as <roleName>Prime Minister <date from="1828" to="1830">from 1828 to 1830</date>, <date when="1834">and again in 1834</date>
                     </roleName>. 
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Weyland_John" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Weyland</surname>
                     <forename>John</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>Mr. Weyland</persName>
                  <note resp="#ajc">On <date when="1820-03-16">March 16, 1820</date>, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: <persName ref="#Monck_JB">John Berkeley Monck</persName> (418 votes), <persName ref="#Palmer_CF">Charles Fyshe Palmer</persName>(399 votes), and <persName ref="#Weyland_John">John Weyland</persName> (395 votes.) <ptr target="http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading"/>.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WhiteGilbert">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Gilbert</surname>
                     <forename>White</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1720-07-18">
                     <placeName>Selborne, Hampshire</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1793-06-26">
                     <placeName>Selborne, Hampshire</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>Curate, writer, naturalist, botanist</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#scw">White's most famous and widely cited book, <bibl>The
                        Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne</bibl> is cited by the narrator
                     of <title ref="#Our_Village1st_ed">Our Village</title> in the introductory
                        <title>Our Village sketch</title> as well as in <title>Frost and
                        Thaw</title>...<!--I am sure we will come across his name in other sketches-->Because
                     of his botanical work, his name has been accorded a standard abbreviation for
                     citation purposes in the <bibl>International Code of Botanic
                        Nomenclature</bibl>
                     <!--ebb: Make xml:ids for OV sketches-->.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wilkie_Wil" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Wilkie, William</reg>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                     <surname>Wilkie</surname>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1721-10-05">
                     <placeName>Echlin, Scotland</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1772-10-10">
                     <placeName>St. Andrews, Scotland</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
                  <occupation>farmer</occupation>
                  <occupation>clergy</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#esh #ebb">Scottish poet and minister of Ratho, most known
                     for his epic in nine books, <bibl>
                        <title>The Epigoniad</title> (<date>1757</date>)</bibl>, written in the
                     style made popular by <persName>Alexander Pope</persName>. Locally dubbed the
                     "potatoe minister" for his continuing to work the Fisher's Tryste farm, whose
                     unexpired lease he inherited from his deceased father. [See ODNB and Electric
                     Scotland.]</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WilliamIII">
                  <persName>William III <roleName>King of England and Ireland</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>William II <roleName>King of Scotland</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <roleName>Stadtholder</roleName> Willem III van Oranje</persName>
                  <persName>William of Orange</persName>
                  <persName>King Billy</persName>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">(1650-1702) Ousted <persName ref="#JamesII">King James
                        II</persName> from power during the <rs type="event" ref="#Glorious_Revol">Glorious Revolution of 1688</rs>, and reigned together with <persName ref="#MaryII">Queen Mary II</persName>, his wife and the daughter of James
                     II. Protestant monarch.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="WilliamIV" sex="1">
                  <persName>William IV <roleName>King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and King of Hanover</roleName>
                     <persName>
                        <forename>William</forename>
                        <surname>Hanover</surname>
                     </persName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1765-08-21">
                     <placeName>Buckingham House, Westminster, London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1837-06-20">
                     <placeName>Windsor Castle, Berkshire</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>monarch</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#rnes">Successor of his brother <persName ref="#GeoIV">George IV</persName>, William enjoyed comparative popularity, reigned during the Age of Reform, and was succeeded by his niece <persName>Victoria</persName>. Earlier, he was <roleName>Duke of Clarence and St Andrews</roleName>, and <roleName>Earl of Munster</roleName>. His longtime mistress, the Irish actress <persName>Dorothy Jordan</persName> (also known as <persName>Dorothy Jerdan</persName> was the most famous Hanoverian comedian. [ODNB]</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wilson_RT">
                  <persName>Sir Robert Thomas Wilson </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Wilson</surname>
                     <forename>Thomas</forename>
                     <forename>Robert</forename>
                     <roleName>Sir</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1777-08-17">
                     <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1849-05-09"/>
                  <occupation>military</occupation>
                  <occupation>government</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">Liberal M.P for Southwark from <date>1818</date> to
                        <date>1831</date>. Served in British army and diplomatic service; eventually
                     becoming a General in <date>1841</date>. Served in the French Revolutionary and
                     Napoleonic Wars.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wordsworth_Dor">
                  <persName>Dorothy Wordsworth</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">1771-1855. Sister of <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Wm">William
                        Wordsworth</persName>,whose diary entries, poems, and sketches were not
                     published until after her death, but demonstrably influenced her brother's more
                     famous work. <!--Expand this.--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wordsworth_Wm">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Wordsworth</surname>
                     <forename>William</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <birth when="1770-04-07">
                     <placeName>Cockermouth, England</placeName>
                  </birth>
                  <death when="1850-04-23">
                     <placeName>Cumberland, England</placeName>
                  </death>
                  <occupation>literary</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Young_CM" sex="1">
                  <persName>Charles Mayne Young </persName>
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Young</surname>
                     <forename>Mayne</forename>
                     <forename>Charles</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>actor</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#lmw">
                     <p> English actor (1777-1856). Performed at <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden</placeName> and <placeName ref="#Drury_Lane_Theatre">Drury Lane</placeName> between 1807 and 1832.
                        Rival of <persName ref="#Kean_Edmund">Kean</persName>. Known for his Hamlet.
                        Written about by <persName>Washington Irving</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>
         <div type="fictional_and_archetypal" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listOrg type="fict">
               <org xml:id="Attendants_R">
                  <orgName>Attendants &amp;c.</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Attendants in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Citizens_R">
                  <orgName>Citizens</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Citizens of <placeName ref="#Rome">Rome</placeName> in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Guards_Jul">
                  <orgName>Guards</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Guards in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Guards_R">
                  <orgName>Guards</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Guards in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Ladies_R">
                  <orgName>Ladies</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Ladies in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Nobles_Jul">
                  <orgName>Nobles</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Nobles in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Nobles_R">
                  <orgName>Nobles</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Nobles of <placeName>Rome</placeName> in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="officer_Ch1">
                  <orgName>officers in <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>
                  </orgName>
               </org>
               <org xml:id="Prelates_Jul">
                  <orgName>Prelates</orgName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Prelates in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </org>
            </listOrg>
            <listPerson type="arch">
               <person xml:id="Ahab" sex="1">
                  <persName>Ahab</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Historic and legendary ancient King of Israel, married to
                        <persName ref="#Jezebel">Jezebel</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Amaziah" sex="1">
                  <persName>Amaziah</persName>
                  <occupation>king</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Baal" sex="1">
                  <occupation>god</occupation>
                  <occupation>demon</occupation>
                  <occupation>idol</occupation>
                  <persName>Baal</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Deborah" sex="2">
                  <occupation>prophet</occupation>
                  <occupation>leader</occupation>
                  <occupation>judge</occupation>
                  <persName>Deborah</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Hebrew leader, prophet, and judge, who predicted a woman would kill <persName>Sisera</persName>, the leader of the Canaanites. <persName ref="#Jael">Jael</persName> fulfilled Deborah's prophecy.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jael" sex="2">
                  <persName>Jael</persName>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Jael fulfilled <persName ref="#Deborah">Deborah</persName>'s prophecy that a woman would kill <persName>Sisera</persName>, the Canaanite military leader attacking the Israelites. Jael welcomed Sisera into her tent and killed him by pounding a tent stake into his temple.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jezebel">
                  <persName>Jezebel</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Queen of the Israelites, married to <persName ref="#Ahab">King Ahab</persName>, who influenced him to worship multiple gods, <persName ref="#Baal">Baal</persName> and <persName>Asherah</persName>, instead of the Hebrew god. She is generally associated with pagan worship and likened to a prostitute in dress and the use of "painted" cosmetics: hence, the phrase, "a painted Jezebel."</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jonah">
                  <persName>Jonah</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Prophet from <bibl corresp="#OldTestament_Bible">the Hebrew Bible and Old Testament</bibl> famous for surviving the experience of being swallowed by a whale.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lazarus">
                  <persName>Lazarus</persName>
                  <persName>Lazarus of Bethany</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">According to <title ref="#JohnGospel_NewTest">the Gospel of St. John the Evangelist</title>, Jesus Christ raised or resurrected Lazarus from the grave four days after his death. The raising of Lazarus is the subject of <bibl corresp="#Lazarus_Haydon">a painting</bibl> by <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert Haydon</persName>, mentioned in his correspondence with <persName ref="#MRM">MRM</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Nathan" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Nathan</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>prophet</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rehoboam" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <forename>Rehoboam</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>warrior</occupation>
                  <occupation>king</occupation>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Satan" sex="1">
                  <persName>
                     <reg>Satan</reg>
                  </persName>
                  <occupation>"The Adversary" of God and Man.</occupation>
                  <note type="bio" resp="#rnes">In Judeo-Christian theology, the opponent of God and mankind. The word's derivation Hebrew means "adversary."</note>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
            <listPerson type="fict">
               <person xml:id="Abbe_de_L_Epee_DD">
                  <persName>Abbé de L'Épée</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Deaf_Dumb_play"> Deaf and Dumb</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Abbot_J">
                  <persName>An Abbot</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">character in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Alberti">
                  <persName>Alberti</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Alfonso_J">
                  <persName>Alfonso</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">King of <placeName ref="#Naples">Naples</placeName>, disguised
                     as "Theodore," in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Alice">
                  <persName>Alice</persName>
                  <note resp="#kdc">apparently deleted character in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName>
                     <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles</title>. <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> identifies the undated fragment in which Alice appears as
                     having been written in <date when="1823-07">July</date> or <date when="1823-08">August, 1823</date>, although in her letter to <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> dated <date when="1823-09-09">9
                        November 1823</date>, <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> indicates that
                     she will delete the scene. The character does not appear in the final version
                     of the play.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ambassador_R">
                  <persName>Ambassador</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Annabel_J">
                  <persName>Annabel</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Wife of <persName ref="#Julian">Julian</persName>, in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Antigone_A">
                  <persName>Antigone</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Antigone_play">Antigone</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="ArchBishop_Jul">
                  <persName>An Archbishop</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">character in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ariel"/>
               <person xml:id="Aspatia">
                  <persName>Aspatia</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Maids_Tragedy_play">The Maid's
                        Tale</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Balfour_John">
                  <persName>John Balfour</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Old_Mortality">Old
                     Mortality</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bellario">
                  <persName>Bellario (Euphrasia)</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Philaster_play">Philaster</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Berta_R">
                  <persName>Berta</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Attendant to <persName ref="#Claudia_R">Claudia</persName> in
                        <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bertone_J">
                  <persName>Bertone</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Servant to <persName ref="#DAlba">Count D'Alba</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Blacksmith"/>
               <person xml:id="BlacksmithsWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Bradshaw">
                  <persName>Lord President Bradshaw</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Judge appointed by Parliament to try the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Bramble_Matthew" sex="1">
                  <persName>Matthew Bramble</persName>
                  <note resp="#ajc">character in <title ref="#Humphrey_Clinker_fict">The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker</title>
                     by <persName ref="#Smollett_Tob">Smollett</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="BustlingDame"/>
               <person xml:id="BustlingDamesChildren"/>
               <person xml:id="Cafarello">
                  <persName>Cafarello</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Caliban"/>
               <person xml:id="Calvi_J">
                  <persName>Calvi</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">a Sicilian noble in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Camilla">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Donato</surname>
                     <forename>Camilla</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">daughter of Senator Donato in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Camillo_R">
                  <persName>Camillo</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cantwell">
                  <persName>Cantwell</persName>
                  <note resp="#kdc">Title character in <persName ref="#Bickerstaff_Is">Bickerstaff's</persName> comedy <title ref="#Hypocrite">The Hypocrite
                     </title>, a satirical version of <title ref="#Tartuffe">Tartuffe</title> by
                        <persName ref="#Moliere">Molière</persName>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cassandra">
                  <persName>Cassandra </persName>
                  <note resp="#err">Daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy, Cassandra was a
                     prophet in Greek mythology whose prophecies were never believed.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Celso_F" sex="1">
                  <persName>Celso</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Celso in
                     Foscari<!-- in the Cast List as "a follower of Erizzo." played by <persName ref="#Fitzharris">Mr. Fitzharris</persName>. LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Centinel_Ch1">
                  <persName>Centinel</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A character in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play,
                        <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Chas1_MRM">
                  <persName>Charles the First</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">King of England in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName>
                     play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Claudia_R">
                  <persName>Claudia</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">daughter of <persName ref="#Rienzi_Cola">Cola di
                        Rienzi</persName> in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Colonna_Ang">
                  <persName>Angelo Colonna</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">character in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Colonna_Lady">
                  <persName>Lady Colonna</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">wife of <persName ref="#Colonna_Stph">Stephen Colonna</persName>
                     in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Colonna_Stph">
                  <persName>Stephen Colonna</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">character in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>. Father of
                     Angelo Colonna</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cook_Ch1">
                  <persName>Cook</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Solicitor to the Commons in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Coriolanus_C">
                  <persName>Coriolanus</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Coriolanus_play"> Coriolanus</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cosmo">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Donato</surname>
                     <forename>Cosmo</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">son of Senator Donato in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cromwell_MRM">
                  <persName>Oliver Cromwell</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Cromwell's character in <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Cupid"/>
               <person xml:id="Curate"/>
               <person xml:id="DAlba">
                  <persName>Count D'Alba</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">a powerful Nobleman in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dandie_Dinmont">
                  <persName>Dandie Dinmont</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Guy_Mannering">Guy
                     Mannering</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Desdemona_O">
                  <persName>Desdemona</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Othello_play">Othello</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dirk_Hatteraick">
                  <persName>Dirk Hatteraick</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Guy_Mannering">Guy
                     Mannering</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Dogberry_MA">
                  <persName>Dogberry</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p>character in <title ref="#Much_Ado_play"> Much Ado About Nothing</title>
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Doge_F">
                  <persName>Doge Foscari</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
                  <note resp="ebb">See also historical counterpart: <persName ref="#Doge_F_hist">Doge Foscari</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Donato">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Donato</surname>
                     <roleName>Senator</roleName>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
                  <note resp="ebb">See also historical counterpart: <persName ref="#Donato_hist">Senator Donato</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Downes">
                  <persName>Downes</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Judge appointed by Parliament to try the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Edie_Ochiltree">
                  <persName>Edie Ochiltree</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Antiquary">The
                     Antiquary</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Elspeth">
                  <persName>Elspeth</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Antiquary">Antiquary</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Erizzo">
                  <persName>Erizzo</persName>
                  <note>Count Erizzo, character in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Fairfax">
                  <persName>Lord Fairfax</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">General of the Parliamentary Army in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ferdinand"/>
               <person xml:id="Foscari_Fr">
                  <persName>
                     <surname>Foscari</surname>
                     <forename>Francesco</forename>
                  </persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">character in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
                  <note resp="ebb">See also historical counterpart: <persName ref="#Foscari_son_hist">son of Doge Foscari</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Frangipani">
                  <persName>Frangipani</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Friday"/>
               <person xml:id="Gloucester">
                  <persName>Duke of Gloucester</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Son of King Charles I, a boy of seven years old in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                        I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hacker_Ch1">
                  <persName>Hacker</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Colonel of the Guard in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hamlet_H">
                  <persName>Hamlet</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Hamlet_play">Hamlet</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hammond_Ch1">
                  <persName>Hammond</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Governor of the Isle of Wight in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Harrison">
                  <persName>Harrison</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Judge appointed by Parliament to try the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Helen_H">
                  <persName>Helen</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Helen_play">Helen</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hengo_B">
                  <persName>Hengo</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Bonduca_play">Bonduca</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Herbert_Ch1">
                  <persName>Sir Thomas Herbert</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Gentleman attending on the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Hermione_WT">
                  <persName>Hermione</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Winters_Tale_play"> The Winter's
                        Tale</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Imogen_C">
                  <persName>Imogen</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Cymbeline_play">Cymbeline</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ireton">
                  <persName>Ireton</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Judge appointed by Parliament to try the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Jailer_F">
                  <persName>Jailer</persName>
                  <note>character in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="JohnEvans"/>
               <person xml:id="JohnEvansWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Julian">
                  <persName>Julian</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#Melfi">Melfi's</persName> son in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Katharine_H8">
                  <persName>Katharine</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#HenryVIII_play"> Henry VIII</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="LadyFairfax">
                  <persName>Lady Fairfax</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Married to <persName ref="#Fairfax">Lord Fairfax</persName> in
                        <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Laura_F" sex="2">
                  <persName>Laura</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Senator Donato's niece in Foscari, as mentioned in Cast
                     List</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Leanti_J">
                  <persName>Leanti</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">a Sicilian noble in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Leontes_WT">
                  <persName>Leontes</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Winters_Tale_play"> The Winter's
                        Tale</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Lieutenant"/>
               <person xml:id="Lizzy"/>
               <person xml:id="LizzysFather"/>
               <person xml:id="LizzysMother"/>
               <person xml:id="Macbeth_Lady">
                  <persName>Lady Macbeth</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Macbeth_play"> Macbeth</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Maggs_Sally_DP">
                  <persName>Sally Maggs</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p>character in <title ref="#DeafasPost_play">Deaf as a Post</title>
                     </p>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Marten">
                  <persName>Marten</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Judge appointed by Parliament to try the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Mason"/>
               <person xml:id="MasonsWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Mayflower"/>
               <person xml:id="Meg_Merrilies">
                  <persName>Meg Merrilies</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Guy_Mannering">Guy
                     Mannering</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Melfi">
                  <persName>The Duke of Melfi</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Uncle to <persName ref="#Alfonso_J">Alfonso</persName> and
                     Regent of the Kingdom of <placeName ref="#Naples">Naples</placeName> in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Miranda"/>
               <person xml:id="Nuncio">
                  <persName>Nuncio</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Officer"/>
               <person xml:id="OfficersEldestSon"/>
               <person xml:id="Oldbuck_Jonathan">
                  <persName>John Oldbuck</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Antiquary">The
                     Antiquary</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Olivia_F" sex="2">
                  <persName>Olivia</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">One of the Ladies in
                     Foscari<!-- presumably one of the unlisted Ladies, not listed by name in Cast List. LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Othello_O">
                  <persName>Othello</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Othello_play">Othello</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="OVNarrator"/>
               <person xml:id="Paolo_J">
                  <persName>Paolo</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#Julian">Julian's</persName> servant in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Paolo_R">
                  <persName>Paolo</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Paolo, the character in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Penelope"/>
               <person xml:id="Penruddock_WF">
                  <persName>Penruddock</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Wheel_Fortune_play"> Wheel of
                        Fortune</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Phoebe"/>
               <person xml:id="Pierce_G">
                  <persName>Pierce</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Gaston_deBlondeville">Gaston de
                        Blondeville</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pisani_F" sex="1">
                  <persName>Count Pisani</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Count Pisani in
                     Foscari<!-- presumably one of the unlisted Senators, not listed by name in Cast List. LMW--></note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pleydell">
                  <persName>Pleydell</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Guy_Mannering">Guy
                     Mannering</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Pride_Ch1">
                  <persName>Pride</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">An Officer in the Parliamentary Army in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="PrincessE_Ch1">
                  <persName>Princess Elizabeth</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Daughter of <persName ref="#Queen_Ch1">Queen Henrietta
                        Maria</persName> and <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King Charles I</persName>, a
                     girl aged 12, in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Prospero">
                  <persName>Prospero</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">magician in <persName ref="#Shakespeare">Shakespeare</persName>'s play, <title ref="#Tempest_play">The Tempest</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Queen_Ch1">
                  <persName>Queen Henrietta Maria</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Queen of England in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName>
                     play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Queen_Dollalolla" sex="2">
                  <persName>Queen Dollalolla</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Comic role in <bibl corresp="#TomThumb_Fielding">Henry Fielding's play Tom Thumb</bibl>, adapted in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s day <bibl corresp="#TomThumb_OHaraAdpt">by Kane O'Hara as a comic opera</bibl>, with <persName ref="#Liston_SarahT">Sarah Tyrer</persName> famously playing this role.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Queen_Hamlet">
                  <persName>Gertrude, Queen of Denmark</persName>
                  <!--EBB: check her name from the play.-->
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Hamlet_play">Hamlet</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rachel_Aunt" sex="2">
                  <persName>Aunt Rachel</persName>
                  <note resp="#ajc">character in <title ref="#Glenfergus_fict">Glenfergus</title>
                     by <persName ref="#Mudie_Rob">Mudie</persName>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rebecca_Ivanhoe">
                  <persName>Rebecca</persName>
                  <note resp="#esh">character in <title ref="#Ivanhoe">Ivanhoe</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RecruitingSerjeant"/>
               <person xml:id="Renzi_J">
                  <persName>Renzi</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">an old Huntsman in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RetiredPublican"/>
               <person xml:id="RetiredPublicansWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Rienzi_Cola">
                  <persName>Cola di Rienzi</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">character in <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Robinson_Crusoe"/>
               <person xml:id="Rolla_P">
                  <persName>Rolla</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Pizarro_play"> Pizarro</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Rosa_R">
                  <persName>Rosa</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Attendant to <persName ref="#Claudia_R">Claudia</persName> in
                        <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="RoseInnLandlord"/>
               <person xml:id="RoseInnLandlordsSon"/>
               <person xml:id="RoseInnLandlordsWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Salisbury"><!--ebb: We need to correlate the fictional refs from Mitford's Charles I to their historical counterparts-->
                  <persName>Lord Salisbury</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Commissioner appointed by Parliament to treat with the
                        <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Savelli">
                  <persName>Savelli</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Say">
                  <persName>Lord Say</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Commissioner appointed by Parliament to treat with the
                        <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="servant_Ch1">
                  <persName>Servant</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A servant belonging to <persName ref="#Cromwell_MRM">Cromwell</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play,
                        <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Sforza" sex="1">
                  <persName>Sforza</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw #tlh">character in <title ref="#Foscari_MRMplay">Foscari</title>,
                     based on the historical <persName ref="#Sforza_hist">General Sforza</persName>.
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Shoemaker"/>
               <person xml:id="ShoemakersDaughter"/>
               <person xml:id="ShoemakersWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Shopkeeper"/>
               <person xml:id="ShopkeepersLodger1"/>
               <person xml:id="ShopkeepersLodger2"/>
               <person xml:id="ShopkeepersWife"/>
               <person xml:id="Teresa_R">
                  <persName>Teresa</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Attendant to <persName ref="#Claudia_R">Claudia</persName> in
                        <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Tichburne">
                  <persName>Tichburn</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Judge appointed by Parliament to try the <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ulric_O">
                  <persName>Ulric</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Otto">Otto of Wittelsbach</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Ursini">
                  <persName>Ursini</persName>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Valore_J">
                  <persName>Valore</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">a Sicilian noble in <title ref="#Julian_MRMplay">Julian</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Vane">
                  <persName>Sir Harry Vane</persName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A Commissioner appointed by Parliament to treat with the
                        <persName ref="#Chas1_MRM">King</persName> in <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford's</persName> play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles
                     I</title>.</note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Volumnia_C">
                  <persName>Volumnia</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#Coriolanus_play"> Coriolanus</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Wheeler"/>
               <person xml:id="WheelersWife"/>
               <person xml:id="WhimsicalPerson"/>
               <person xml:id="Wolsey_H8">
                  <persName>Wolsey</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">character in <title ref="#HenryVIII_play"> Henry VIII</title>
                  </note>
               </person>
               <person xml:id="Zeno_F" sex="1">
                  <persName>Count Zeno</persName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Count Zeno in
                     Foscari<!-- one of the named Venetian Senators from the Cast List. LMW--></note>
               </person>
            </listPerson>
         </div>
         <div type="places" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listPlace type="hist">
               <place xml:id="Abingdon">
                  <placeName>Abingdon</placeName>
                  <note>Assizes alternate between Reading and Abingdon, according to <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Agincourt">
                  <country>France</country>
                  <placeName type="city">Agincourt</placeName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">At the Battle of Agincourtin 1415, Henry V consolidated his
                     conquest of <placeName ref="#France">France</placeName>. This event is famously memorialized in <bibl>
                        <author>Shakespeare</author>'s play <title ref="#HenryV_play">Henry
                           V</title>
                     </bibl>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Alresford_Hamps">
                  <placeName>Alresford, Hampshire, <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>
                  </placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Birthplace of <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell
                        Mitford</persName>, on Broad Street.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="America">
                  <placeName>America</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">For generalized references to the Americas.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Banqueting_House">
                  <country>England</country>
                  <placeName>The Banqueting House</placeName>
                  <district>Westminster</district>
                  <note resp="#rnes">Designed by <persName>Inigo Jones</persName>, the Banqueting
                     House  in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> is the only surviving remnant of <placeName ref="#Whitehall_Palace">Whitehall Palace</placeName>, and was in Mitford's lifetime. It was also
                     the scene of <rs type="event" ref="#regicide">the Regicide</rs> in
                        <date>1649</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Barton_street"><!-- If this is in London, I wonder if it is actually Burton Street? --><!--ebb: This needs some explanation: What is the significance of this place?-->
                  <placeName>No. 10 Barton Street</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Berkshire"/>
               <place xml:id="BernersSt">
                  <placeName>Berners Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, location of
                     nearest postal receiving to <persName ref="#Hofland_B">Hofland</persName>'s
                     address.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bertram_house">
                  <placeName>Bertram House</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Mansion built by <persName ref="#Mitford_Geo">Dr. George
                        Mitford</persName> for his family residence, begun in <date when="1802-04">April 1802</date> and completed in <date when="1804-06">June 1804</date>,
                     after tearing down the previous estate, Grazeley Court--a farmhouse about three
                     miles outside of <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>. Dr.
                     Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the
                     Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of
                     Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George
                     Mitford's status as a country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family
                     lived in <placeName ref="#Alresford_Hamps">Alresford</placeName> and then
                        <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Bickham_village">
                  <placeName>Bickham</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Boston">
                  <placeName>Boston, Massachusetts</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Brighton">
                  <placeName>Brighton</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ajc"> A town on the south coast of Great Britain</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Carisbrooke">
                  <country ref="#England">England</country>
                  <placeName type="castle">Isle of Wight</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ChalkFarm">
                  <placeName>Chalk Farm</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">On the outskirts of London, between Camden Town and <placeName ref="#Hampstead">Hampstead Heath</placeName>: the site of <rs type="event" ref="#ScottChristie_Duel">the duel between <persName ref="#Scott_John">John Scott</persName> and <persName ref="#Christie_JH">Jonathan Christie</persName> on <date when="1821-02-16">16 February 1821</date>, which resulted in Scott's death</rs>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Charing_Cross">
                  <placeName> Charing Cross </placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Chippenham">
                  <placeName>Chippenham</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Cincinnati">
                  <placeName>Cincinnati, Ohio</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Coley_Berks">
                  <placeName>Coley</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Coley, <placeName ref="#Berkshire">Berkshire</placeName>, a
                     district near the center of the town of <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>
                     <!-- Is this the location of a post office MRM used?  LMW -->
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Court_of_Kings_Bench">
                  <placeName>Court of King's Bench</placeName>
                  <note resp="#err">One of the high courts of <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName> that heard both criminal and civil cases.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Covent_Garden_Theatre">
                  <placeName>Covent Garden Theatre, London</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p> A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of
                        Westminster. One of the "patent theaters." First theater on this site was
                        opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792,
                        and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by
                        Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809, managed by <persName ref="#Kemble_JP">John Phillip Kemble</persName>. Because of rent
                        increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased
                        ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual
                        lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose
                        money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March
                        1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858
                        and remains the nucleus of today's theater. The theater became the Royal
                        Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expaneded in the
                        1980s and 1990s.</p>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Crecy">
                  <district>Picardy</district>
                  <country ref="#France">France</country>
                  <!--EBB: new entry-->
                  <note resp="#rnes">Location of the Battle of Crecy (26 August 1436), during which
                        <persName>Edward IIII</persName> of <placeName>England</placeName> achieved
                     a significant victory over <country>France</country> in the Hundred Years'
                     War.(</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Devonshire">
                  <placeName>Devon</placeName>
                  <placeName>Devonshire</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">County in the southwest of <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName> bordering with <placeName>the English Channel</placeName> and the <placeName> Bristol Channel</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Devonshire_county">
                  <placeName>Devonshire</placeName>
                  <!-- the county of Devonshire LMW -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Drury_Lane_Theatre">
                  <placeName> The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane </placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p>A West End theatre located in Covent Garden in the London borough of
                        Westminster. One of the "patent theatres." Between 1674 and 1791, a building
                        designed by Christopher Wren and commissioned by manager Thomas Killgrew.
                        The Wren building was torn down by R. B. Sheridan and rebuilt. It reopened
                        in 1791 and was destroyed by fire in 1809. It reopened in 1812 and still
                        stands today.</p>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Edinburgh">
                  <placeName>city of Edinburgh</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="EgyptianHall">
                  <placeName>Egyptian Hall</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A building designed in Egyptian style, Egyptian Hall was built
                     in <date when="1812">1812</date> for <persName ref="#Bullock_Wm">William
                        Bullock's</persName> collection of artifacts from <persName ref="#Cook_CaptJ">Captain Cook's</persName> Pacific voyages. After Bullock
                     auctioned off his South Seas collection, the building was frequently used after
                        <date when="1819">1819</date> to exhibit panoramas and enormous paintings,
                     such as <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert Haydon's</persName>
                     <title ref="#ChrstEJrslm_Haydon">Christ's Entry into Jerusalem</title>, and
                        <title ref="#Lazarus_Haydon">The Raising of Lazarus</title>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Elm_Court">
                  <placeName>Elm Court</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">address in <placeName ref="#Temple">Temple</placeName>,
                        <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Eng_Channel">
                  <placeName> The English Channel</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="England">
                  <placeName>England</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Europe"/>
               <place xml:id="Forest_of_Ardennes">
                  <country ref="#France">France</country>
                  <district>Wallonie</district>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Fotheringay">
                  <placeName type="castle"/>
                  <district>Northamptonshire</district>
                  <country>England</country>
                  <note resp="#rnes">
                     <persName ref="#MaryQoS">Mary, Queen of Scots</persName> was imprisoned, tried,
                     and executed at Fotheringay in <date when="1587">1587</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="France">
                  <placeName>France</placeName>
                  <!-- the country LMW -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Germany">
                  <placeName>Germany</placeName>
                  <!-- the country LMW -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Glasgow">
                  <placeName>Glasgow, Scotland</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Guildhall_London">
                  <placeName>Guildhall</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Site of the Sheriff's Court in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> over which <persName ref="#Bradshaw_hist">John Bradshaw</persName> presided as judge <date from="1640" to="1649">from 1640 to 1659</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Hampstead">
                  <placeName>Hampstead</placeName>
                  <placeName>Hampstead Village</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw #ebb">village very close to <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, now enclosed by it. Its population was rapidly growing
                     through the nineteenth century, and its famous <placeName>Hampstead
                        Heath</placeName> is now a public park in London. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="HampstTh">
                  <placeName>Hampstead Theatre</placeName>
                  <district>Swiss Cottage</district>
                  <district ref="#Hampstead">Hampstead</district>
                  <settlement type="city" ref="#London_city">London</settlement>
                  <country ref="#England">England</country>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Hardwick_Hall">
                  <placeName>Hardwick Hall</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Palatial Elizabethan country house in <placeName>Derbyshire</placeName> in the north midlands of England, built <date from="1590" to="1597">between 1590 and 1597</date> by the wealthy <persName ref="#Bess_of_Hardwick">Bess of Hardwick</persName>. Mentioned in the play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles the First</title>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Haymarket_Theatre">
                  <placeName>Theatre Royal Haymarket</placeName>
                  <placeName>Haymarket Theatre</placeName>
                  <placeName>the Little Theatre</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Theatre in <placeName ref="#Westmnstr">Westminster, London</placeName>, built in <date when="1720">1720</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Hinchinbrooke">
                  <country>England</country>
                  <placeName type="city">Hinchinbrooke</placeName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">From 1627, estate of the Parliamentary army leader Sir
                        <persName ref="#Montagu">Edward Montagu</persName>. Also spelled
                     "Hinchingbrooke"</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Holmby_House">
                  <placeName>Holmby House</placeName>
                  <placeName>Holdenby House</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Palace near <placeName>Althorp, Northamptonshire</placeName> where King Charles I was held captive in <date when="1647">1647</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ireland"/>
               <place xml:id="Isle_of_Wight">
                  <country>England</country>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Israel">
                  <placeName>Israel</placeName>
                  <placeName>land of Israel</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">In Mitford's time, the ancient lost kingdom of the Hebrews.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Italy">
                  <placeName>Italy</placeName>
                  <!-- the country LMW -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Jerusalem">
                  <placeName type="city">Jerusalem</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Ancient city sacred to Jews, Muslims, and Christians, and the modern capital of the nation of <placeName ref="#Israel">Israel</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kentucky">
                  <placeName>Kentucky, <placeName ref="#USA">USA</placeName>
                  </placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Kew_village">
                  <placeName>Kew</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lancaster">
                  <country ref="#England">England</country>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lincolnshire">
                  <placeName>Lincolnshire</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">County in the northeast of <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Lisson_Grove">
                  <district>Lisson Grove, within City of Westminster, London</district>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="London_city">
                  <placeName> city of London</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Madrid"/>
               <place xml:id="Mexico">
                  <placeName>Mexico</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Mortimer_Comm">
                  <placeName>Mortimer Common</placeName>
                  <!-- research where this is. near Reading/Monck's? LMW -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Mt_Ida">
                  <placeName>Mount Ida</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Sacred mountain of classical Greek antiquity.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Muscovy">
                  <country>Russia</country>
                  <note>i.e., Moscow.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Naples">
                  <placeName>Naples, Italy</placeName>
                  <!--needs info-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Naseby">
                  <district>Nottinghamshire</district>
                  <country ref="#England">England</country>
                  <!--EBB: new entry-->
                  <note resp="#rnes">Location of the Battle of Naseby (14 June 1645), the decisive
                     Parliamentary victory in the Civil War.(</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="New_York_city">
                  <placeName>New York city, New York</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Newbury">
                  <placeName>Newbury</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">town on the <placeName>River Kennet</placeName> in <placeName ref="#Berkshire">Berkshire county</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="NewmanSt">
                  <placeName>Newman Street</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Newman Street in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, <persName ref="#Hofland_B">Hofland</persName>'s
                     address.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Oxford_Circuit">
                  <placeName>Oxford Circuit</placeName>
                  <note resp="#kdc">
                     <p>Oxford Circuit was one of six assize circuits in <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName> and <placeName ref="#Wales">Wales</placeName>.
                        Judges were appointed by the monarch and traveled the Circuit twice per year
                        to hear trials of serious crimes. <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> was appointed to the Oxford Circuit in
                           <date>1821</date>.</p>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Oxford_city">
                  <placeName>Oxford, England</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Painted_Chmbr">
                  <placeName>Painted Chamber</placeName>
                  <note resp="#rnes">A room in <placeName ref="#Westmnst_Palace">Westminster Palace</placeName>, it was destroyed during <rs type="event">the accidental burning of <placeName>the Houses of <orgName ref="#Parliament_UK">Parliament</orgName>
                        </placeName> in 1834</rs>. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Philadelphia">
                  <placeName>Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Piccadilly">
                  <placeName>Piccadilly</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">wide road in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> in
                     the <placeName ref="#Westmnstr">City of Westminster</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Plymouth_city">
                  <placeName>Plymouth</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Pump_Court">
                  <placeName>Pump Court</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb #err">Thomas Noon Talfourd's address in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, in the <placeName ref="#Temple">Temple</placeName> district. Presumably this address is in <placeName>Hare
                        Court</placeName>, part of the Inner Temple, one of the four Inns of Court.
                     Hare Court features a famous pump whose waters were reknowned for their purity
                     in the nineteenth century. </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Ravenna">
                  <placeName>Ravenna, Italy</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">City in the Province of Ravenna, Emilia-Romagna region on the
                     northeast coast of Italy (on the Adriatic Sea). <persName ref="#Byron">Lord
                        Byron</persName> lived in Ravenna from <date from="1819" to="1821">1819-1821</date>, the site of his love affair with <persName>Teresa
                        Guiccioli</persName>, and where he composed <title ref="#The_Two_Foscari">The Two Foscari</title> here in the summer of 1821.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Reading_city">
                  <placeName> city of Reading, England</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Reading_School">
                  <placeName>Reading School, Reading</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     Public school founded by <persName>Dr. Richard Valpy</persName>, located in
                           <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>. <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> wrote reviews for the <title ref="#ReadingMer_per">Reading Mercury</title> of the plays performed there by the schoolboys.
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Reading_Theatre">
                  <placeName>Reading Theatre</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Theater in <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Regents_Park">
                  <placeName>"Regent's Park</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ghb">An upscale neighborhood in north <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, Regent's Park is named for the Royal Park it
                     encompasses.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Rialto">
                  <placeName>the Rialto</placeName>
                  <!--ebb: the neighborhood and bridge in Venice?-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Richmond">
                  <district>Richmond upon Thames, a borough of <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </district>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Rome">
                  <country>Papal States</country>
                  <placeName type="city">Rome</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Savona">
                  <placeName>Savona, Papal States</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <orgName ref="#Pius7_Court">
                        <persName ref="#Pius7_Pope">Pope Pius VII</persName> and his Cardinals</orgName> were driven to exile here by <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon</persName>, between <date from="1809" to="1813">1809 and 1813</date>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Sheffield_Castle">
                  <placeName>Sheffield Castle and Manor Lodge</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A location in which <persName ref="#MaryQoS">Mary Queen of Scots</persName> was held captive in <date when="1568">1568</date> by order of <persName ref="#ElizI">Queen Elizabeth I</persName>. Here, Mary was guarded by <persName ref="#Talbot_Geo">George Talbot, the Sixth Earl of Shrewsbury</persName>, and his wife, <persName ref="#Bess_of_Hardwick">Elizabeth Talbot or "Bess of Hardwick"</persName> befriended the royal captive.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Somerset_House">
                  <placeName>Somerset House</placeName>
                  <!--ebb: This needs some explanation: What is the significance of this place?-->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="St_Cyr">
                  <placeName> St. Cyr, France</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p>Village 5 km west of Versailles in France, where <persName>M.
                           d'Aubigné</persName> died; she founded Maison royle de Saint-Louis there,
                        a school for poor girls of the artistocracy.</p>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="StJohns_Place">
                  <placeName>St. John's Place</placeName>
                  <placeName>St. John's Wood</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ghb #ebb">Occasional residence from <date when="1817">1817</date>
                     onward of <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert Haydon</persName> in
                        <placeName ref="#Lisson_Grove">Lisson Grove</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Regents_Park">Regent's Park</placeName>, <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>. Site of Haydon's famous dinner gathering with guests
                        <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Wm">William Wordsworth</persName>, <persName ref="#Keats">John Keats</persName>, <persName ref="#Lamb_Chas">Charles
                        Lamb</persName>, Thomas Monkhouse, and Joseph Ritchie on <date when="1817-12-28">28 December 1817</date>. Haydon's enormous painting,
                        <title ref="#ChrstEJrslm_Haydon">Christ's Entry into Jerusalem</title> hung
                     in Haydon's painting room as background.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="StQuintin_School">
                  <placeName> St. Quintin School, 22 Hans Place, London</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p>School founded by French emigre M. St. Quintin or Quentin, Frances Rowden
                        was schoolmistress there, and taught MRM, LEL, and Caroline Lamb.</p>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Swallowfield_village">
                  <placeName> village of Swallowfield</placeName>
                  <note resp="#lmw #ebb">Village in the English county of <placeName ref="#Berkshire">Berkshire</placeName>, where <persName ref="#MRM">Mary
                        Russell Mitford</persName> moved to a cottage in <date when="1851">1851</date>, three miles south of her long-time home at <placeName ref="#ThreeMileCross">Three Mile Cross</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Switzerland">
                  <placeName>Switzerland</placeName>
                  <!-- the country LMW -->
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Temple">
                  <placeName>Temple</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb #err">neighborhood of central <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>, a central area for law offices and legal practice, with
                     its four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple, one of the four Inns of Court, was
                     responsible for training and licensing barristers.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Thames">
                  <placeName>River Thames</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The longest river in <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName>, the Thames has its source in <placeName>Gloucestershire</placeName> and flows through <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading</placeName>, <placeName ref="#Oxford_city">Oxford</placeName>, <placeName>Windsor</placeName>, and <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> into the <placeName>Thames Estuary</placeName> to the <placeName>North Sea</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="ThreeMileCross">
                  <placeName>village of Three Mile Cross</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Village in the English county of <placeName ref="#Berkshire">Berkshire</placeName>, where <persName ref="#MRM">Mary Russell
                        Mitford</persName> moved with her parents in <date when="1820">1820</date>.
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Tours_France">
                  <placeName type="city">Tours</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">City in <placeName ref="#France">France</placeName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Tower_of_London">
                  <placeName>Tower of London</placeName>
                  <location>
                     <geo>51.508056 -0.076111</geo>
                  </location>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Dating from the Norman Conquest of England, this famous complex of fortified towers was begun by William the Conqueror in <date when="1066">1066</date> and used variously as a royal residence, an armory, a treasury, and a prison.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Twickenham">
                  <district> Twickenham, 10 miles southwest of the <placeName ref="#London_city">London city center</placeName>
                  </district>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="USA">
                  <placeName>United States of America</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Vict_Theatre">
                  <placeName> Royal Victoria Theater, London</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Vienna"/>
               <place xml:id="Wales">
                  <placeName>Wales</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Waterloo_Belgium">
                  <placeName>Waterloo battlefield</placeName>
                  <location>
                     <geo>50.683333 4.4</geo>
                  </location>
                  <!--ebb: Note the form inside geo: latitude followed by longitude, separated only by white space. -->
                  <note resp="#ebb">Location of the Battle of Waterloo, near <placeName>the municipality of Waterloo, Belgium</placeName> and 15 kilometers south of <placeName>Brussels</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Westminster_Abbey">
                  <placeName>Westminster Abbey</placeName>
                  <location>
                     <geo>51.499444 -0.1275</geo>
                  </location>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Gothic style church in Westminster, London, where English monarchs have traditionally been crowned and buried. Many important literary and historical people are buried with memorials throughout this famous abbey. The present structure began construction in <date when="1245">1245</date> by <persName>King Henry III</persName>
                  </note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Westmnst_Palace">
                  <placeName>Houses of Parliament</placeName>
                  <placeName>Palace of Westminster</placeName>
                  <placeName>Westminster Hall</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Located in <placeName ref="#Westmnstr">Westminster, London</placeName> along the <placeName>Thames River</placeName>, this is the meeting place of England's two Houses of <orgName ref="#Parliament_UK">Parliament</orgName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Westmnstr">
                  <placeName>City of Westminster, <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Whitehall">
                  <country>England</country>
                  <placeName type="city">London</placeName>
                  <district>Westminster</district>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The word "Whitehall," used without specific reference to the palace, refers to the centers of power of the English government, including the monarchy and parliament. Literally, Whitehall is a road in <placeName ref="#Westmnstr">Westminster</placeName>, running from <placeName>Trafalgar Square</placeName> to <placeName>Parliament Square</placeName>, which takes its name from <placeName ref="#Whitehall_Palace">Whitehall Palace</placeName> on its route.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Whitehall_Palace">
                  <placeName>Whitehall Palace</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Site of the execution of <persName ref="#ChasI">King Charles
                        I</persName> in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>.</note>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Winchester_city">
                  <placeName>Winchester</placeName>
               </place>
            </listPlace>
            <listPlace type="fict">
               <place xml:id="ProsperosIsland">
                  <placeName>Prospero's Island</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="RobinsonCrusoesIsland">
                  <placeName>Robinson Crusoe's Island</placeName>
               </place>
               <place xml:id="Styx"><!--ebb: put in fictional listPlace-->
                  <placeName>River Styx</placeName>
                  <note resp="#ebb #lmw">River in Greek mythology that separates the realms of the living from the dead, and encircling Hades (the realm of the dead or underworld). For more, see the reference in Encyclopedia Mythica: <ptr target="http://www.pantheon.org/articles/s/styx_river.html"/>
                  </note>
               </place>
            </listPlace>
         </div>
         <div type="plant" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <list type="plants">
               <item xml:id="China_Aster">
                  <name>China Aster</name>
                  <note resp="#ebb">One of <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s favorite flowers, blooms in autumn in <placeName ref="#Berkshire">Berkshire</placeName>
                  </note>
               </item>
            </list>
         </div>
         <div type="events" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listEvent>
               <event xml:id="Act_of_Union" when="1801">
                  <label>The Act of Union</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The unification of Ireland with Great Britain (England and
                     Scotland, to form the United Kingdom, during the reign of <persName ref="#GeoIII">King George III</persName>.</note>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="American_Revol" from="1775" to="1783">
                  <label>The American Revolutionary War</label>
                  <label>The American War of Independence</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">in which Great Britain under <persName ref="#GeoIII">King George
                        III</persName> lost its North American colonies, and following which
                        <placeName ref="#USA">the United States</placeName> was formed.</note>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="EngCivilWar" type="war" from="1642" to="1651">
                  <label>English Civil War</label>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="French_Revol" from="1789" to="1804">
                  <label>The French Revolution</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Period of conflict and crisis in France, at first characterized by peaceful efforts at compromise and reform but shifting to bloody conflict in the 1793-1794 Reign of Terror driven by <persName>Robespierre</persName>, symbolized in the use of the guillotine to execute enemies of the Republic, and used ultimately against Robespierre himself. After a period of instability during which <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon Bonaparte</persName> rose to power through military coup d'etat, the republican cause of Revolution in France can be said to have ended in 1804 with Napoleon's crowning as Emperor of France.</note>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="Glorious_Revol" when="1688">
                  <label>Glorious Revolution of 1688</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Parliamentary alliance with the Dutch <persName ref="#WilliamIII">William of Orange</persName> to oust <persName ref="#JamesII">King James II</persName> from power, establish a lasting
                     Protestant monarchy, and establish a Bill of Rights.</note>
               </event>
               <event type="wedding" xml:id="HaydonHymanWed" when="1821-10-10">
                  <label>wedding of <persName ref="#Haydon_Mrs">Mary Cawse Hyman</persName> and
                        <persName ref="#Haydon">Benjamin Robert Haydon</persName>
                  </label>
               </event>
               <event type="war" xml:id="MexIndependence" from="1810" to="1821">
                  <label>Mexican War of Independence</label>
                  <desc>War led by Mexican-born population for liberation from Spain.</desc>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="Peterloo" when="1819-08-19">
                  <label>The Peterloo Massacre</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The British cavalry charged into a crowd of by some estimates 60,000 to 80,000, who had gathered at St. Peter's Field to protest Manchester's lack of representation in Parliament. Death tolls were estimated in the teens, and hundreds were injured. The event was named "Peterloo" in ironic contrast with the British military role in <rs type="event" ref="#Waterloo">the Battle of Waterloo</rs>
                  </note>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="Qu_Caroline_Affair" when="1820">
                  <label>The Queen Caroline Affair</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">
                     <persName ref="#GeoIV">King George IV</persName>'s struggles with Parliament to
                     divorce his estranged wife, <persName ref="#Queen_Caroline">Caroline</persName>, and prevent her from becoming queen in <date when="1820">1820</date>, the year of her death.</note>
               </event>
               <event xml:id="regicide" when="1649">
                  <label>the execution of King Charles I at <placeName>Whitehall Palace</placeName>,
                        <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                  </label>
               </event>
               <event type="riot" xml:id="riot1795" when="1795">
                  <label>Food Riots in 1795</label>
                  <desc>A poor harvest led to rioting. . .</desc>
                  <!--ebb:incomplete entry from model in our coding guidelines-->
               </event>
               <event xml:id="ScottChristie_Duel" when="1821-02-16">
                  <label>Duel of John Scott and Jonathan Christie</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The duel which led to <persName ref="#Scott_John">John Scott</persName>'s death, brought on by escalating conflicts between John Scott and <persName ref="#Lockhart_JG">John Gibson Lockhart</persName> in <title ref="#LondonMag">The London Magazine</title> and <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's Magazine</title>, rooted in Blackwood's insulting characterizations of a <orgName ref="#CockneyS">Cockney School</orgName> beginning in <date when="1820">1820</date>. <persName ref="#Christie_JH">Christie</persName> was Lockhart's literary agent, and after a trial in <date when="1821-04">April 1821</date> he was acquitted of any wrongdoing in the duel. For a detailed account of the duel, with supporting documents in publications from each magazine, see <ref target="http://lordbyron.cath.lib.vt.edu/archives.php?choose=ScottBlckwd">Lord Byron and His Times: "Blackwood's Magazine, The London Magazine, and the Scott-Christie Duel"</ref>.</note>
               </event>
               <event type="battle" xml:id="Waterloo" when="1815-06-18">
                  <label>Battle of Waterloo</label>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The battle fought at <placeName ref="#Waterloo_Belgium">Waterloo, Belgium</placeName> on <date when="1815-06-18">Sunday, 18 June 1815</date> that decisively defeated <persName ref="#Napoleon">Napoleon Bonaparte</persName> after his <rs type="event">Hundred Days Exile</rs>.</note>
               </event>
            </listEvent>
         </div>
         <div type="art" org="uniform" sample="complete"><!--ebb: for graphical works of art: paintings, engravings, etc. Not stuff that's published in print form.-->
            <list type="art">
               <item/>
               <figure xml:id="ChrstEJrslm_Haydon" type="painting" rend="oil">
                  <bibl>
                     <title>Christ's Entry into Jerusalem</title>
                     <author ref="#Haydon"/>
                     <date from="1814" to="1820"/>
                  </bibl>
                  <graphic url="http://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/the-sublime/lydia-hamlett-sublime-religion-benjamin-robert-haydons-the-raising-of-lazarus-r1129549"/>
                  <desc/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">One of Haydon's three enormous paintings of biblical scenes, together with <title ref="#JudgmntSolomon_Haydon">The Judgment of Solomon</title> and <title ref="#Lazarus_Haydon">The Resurrection of Lazarus</title>. The ODNB notes the dimensions of Christ's Entry into Jerusalem as "12 ft 6 in. × 15 ft
                     1 in., with a frame weighing 600 lb." Exhibited at <placeName ref="#EgyptianHall">Egyptian Hall</placeName> in Piccadilly, <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>. <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Wm">Wiliam
                        Wordsworth's</persName> head appears in the picture. Now housed in the
                     Athenaeum of Ohio Art Collection of Mount St. Mary's Seminary. [Source: ODNB]</note>
               </figure>
               <figure xml:id="JudgmntSolomon_Haydon" type="painting" rend="oil">
                  <bibl>
                     <title>The Judgment of Solomon</title>
                     <author ref="#Haydon"/>
                     <date when="1814">1814</date>
                  </bibl>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The earliest of the three enormous biblical paintings for which <persName ref="#Haydon">Haydon</persName> was known, completed in 1814.</note>
               </figure>
               <figure xml:id="Lazarus_Haydon" type="painting" rend="oil">
                  <bibl>
                     <title>The Resurrection of Lazarus</title>
                     <title>The Raising of Lazarus</title>
                     <author ref="#Haydon"/>
                     <date from="1821" to="1823">1821-1823</date>
                  </bibl>
                  <graphic url="http://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/the-sublime/lydia-hamlett-sublime-religion-benjamin-robert-haydons-the-raising-of-lazarus-r1129549"/>
                  <desc/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Painting of enormous dimensions exhibited in <date when="1823">1823</date> at <placeName ref="#EgyptianHall">Egyptian Hall</placeName> in
                     Piccadilly, London. While on exhibit in 1823, the picture was seized from the
                     gallery when Haydon was arrested for debt and imprisoned for two months.</note>
               </figure>
            </list>
         </div>
         <div type="publications" org="uniform" sample="complete">
            <listBibl type="ref_19thc">
               <bibl xml:id="Daniells">
                  <title>Rural Sports</title>
                  <author>William Barker Daniel</author>
                  <note resp="esh">Printed in numerous editions between <date from="1801" to="1817">1801-1817</date>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Enc_Metr">
                  <title>Encyclopedia Metropolitana; or, Universal Dictionary of Knowledge (30
                     vols., 1817-1845)</title>
                  <author><!-- various editors, including Coleridge. LMW --></author>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
            <listBibl type="per_19thc">
               <bibl xml:id="Anti-Jacobin">
                  <title>The Anti-Jacobin, or Weekly Examiner</title>
                  <editor ref="#Gifford_William">Wiliam Gifford</editor>
                  <date from="1797-11-20" to="1798-07-09">from November 20, 1797 to July 9, 1798</date>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Conserative newspaper founded by <persName ref="#Canning_George">George Canning</persName> whose short run of 36 issues was highly influential in satirizing revolutionary politics.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Blackwoods">
                  <title>Blackwood's Magazine</title>
                  <date from="1817-04" to="1980"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Founded as a <orgName ref="#Tory">Tory</orgName> magazine in opposition to the Whiggish <title>Edinburgh Review</title>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Examiner">
                  <title>The Examiner</title>
                  <title type="subtitle">A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals</title>
                  <date from="1808" to="1886"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Weekly periodical launched by editor <persName ref="#Hunt">Leigh
                        Hunt</persName> and his brother, the printer <persName>John
                     Hunt</persName>. <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to <title>The Examiner</title> and <title ref="#LondonMag">The London Magazine</title>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="John_Bull">
                  <title>John Bull</title>
                  <note resp="#err">Presumably the popular periodical founded in
                     <date>1820</date>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Ladys_Monthly_Museum">
                  <title>Lady's Monthly Museum; Or, Polite Repository of Amusement and
                     Instruction</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A monthly periodical running from <date from="1798" to="1832">1798 to 1832</date>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Lit_Gazette">
                  <title>The Literary Gazette, and Journal of Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences</title>
                  <title>The London Literary Gazette</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Periodical founded by <persName ref="#Colburn">Henry
                        Colburn</persName>, ran from <date from="1817" to="1863">1817 to
                     1863</date>. For details on the journal, see the Corvey Women Writers on the
                     Web contribution page by Glenn T. Himes on "L.E.L: The Literary Gazette
                     Collection" <ptr target="https://www2.shu.ac.uk/corvey/cw3/ContribPage.cfm?Contrib=23"/>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="LondonMag">
                  <title>The London Magazine</title>
                  <date from="1820" to="1829">1820 to 1829</date>
                  <note resp="#ebb #lmw">
                     <bibl>An 18th-century periodical of this title (<title>The London Magazine, or Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer</title>) ran from <date from="1732" to="1785">1732 to 1785</date>
                     </bibl>. In <date when="1820">1820</date>, <persName ref="#Scott_John">John Scott</persName> launched a new series of <title>The London Magazine</title> emulating the style of <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's Magazine</title>, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until <date when="1829">1829</date>, and this is the series to which <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott's editorship lasted until his death by duel on <date when="1821-02-27">27 February 1821</date> resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwood's Magazine</title> connected with their insulting characterization of a <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName>
                     <orgName ref="#CockneyS">Cockney School</orgName>. After Scott's death, <persName ref="#Hazlitt_Wm">William Hazlitt</persName> took up editing the magazine with the <date when="1821-04">April 1821</date> issue.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Museum_per">
                  <title>The Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama,
                     &amp;c.</title>
                  <date from="1822-04-27">first issue: 27 April 1822</date>
                  <note resp="#lmw">a weekly periodical edited by <persName ref="#Bayley_P">Peter
                        Bayley</persName> and printed by <persName ref="#Valpy_John">John
                        Valpy</persName>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="New_Monthly_Mag">
                  <title>New Monthly Magazine</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Periodical edited by <persName ref="#Campbell_Thos">Thomas
                        Campbell</persName> from <date from="1821" to="1830">1821 to 1830</date>.
                        <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Talfourd</persName> was a contributor.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Observer">
                  <title>The Observer</title>
                  <note resp="#kdc">
                     <p>Founded on <date when="1791-12-04">December 4, 1791</date> by
                           <persName>W.S&gt; Bourne</persName>. It is the first Sunday newspaper in
                        the world. Although its earliest years supported a conservative view, it has
                        been generally centrist/liberal for most of its existence.</p>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Political_Register">
                  <title>The Political Register</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Weekly periodical issued by William Cobbett from <date from="1802" to="1835">1802 to 1835</date>. Originally anti-Jacobin, the
                     politics of the magazine became increasingly reformist. Cobbett's magazine
                     advocated in defense of the English countryside and its traditional ways of
                     life against industrial change.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="QuarterlyRev_per">
                  <title>Quarterly Review</title>
                  <date from="1809" to="1967"/>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <orgName ref="#Tory">Tory</orgName> periodical founded by <persName>George
                           Canning</persName> in <date>1809</date>, published by <persName>John
                           Murray</persName>. <persName ref="#Gifford_William">William Gifford</persName> edited the Quarterly Review from its founding in <date from="1809" to="1824">1809 until 1824</date>, was succeeded briefly by <persName>John Taylor Coleridge</persName> in <date when="1825">1825</date>, until <persName ref="#Lockhart_JG">John Gibson Lockhart</persName> took over as editor <date from="1826" to="1853">from 1826 through 1853</date>.
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ReadingMer_per">
                  <title>The Reading Mercury and Oxford Gazette, etc.</title>
                  <title>Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette and Berkshire County Paper, etc.</title>
                  <title>Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette, Newsbury Herald and Berks County Paper, etc.</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Newspaper of <placeName ref="#Reading_city">Reading, Berkshire</placeName>. Founded as <title>The Reading Mercury, or Weekly Entertainer</title> in <date when="1723">1723</date>, the newspaper changed its name twice during Mitford's lifetime. It was titled <title>The Reading Mercury and Oxford Gazette, etc.</title>
                     <date from="1767" to="1731">from 1767-1731</date>, was renamed <title>Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette and Berkshire County Paper, etc.</title>
                     <date from="1831" to="1839">from 1831-1839</date>, and <date from="1839" to="1960">from 1839-1960</date> it was titled <title>Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette, Newsbury Herald and Berks County Paper, etc.</title>
                     <ref target="http://www.berksfhs.org.uk/cms/Berkshire-Newspapers/berkshirenewspapers/Reading.html">Source: Berkshire Family History Society</ref>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Review_RaisingLaz">
                  <title level="a">"Mr. Haydon's Raising of Lazarus"</title>
                  <title level="s">The Repository of Arts, Literature, Fashions, &amp; Manufactures</title>
                  <biblScope unit="volume">I.</biblScope>
                  <biblScope unit="issue">No. 4</biblScope>
                  <date when="1823-04-01">April 1, 1823</date>
                  <biblScope unit="page" from="239" to="241">239-241</biblScope>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Detailed discussion of the contents of <persName ref="#Haydon">Haydon</persName>'s painting, <bibl corresp="#Lazarus_Haydon">The Raising of Lazarus</bibl>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Sheffield_Iris">
                  <title>The Iris</title>
                  <editor>Robert Montgomery</editor>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Newspaper of <placeName>Sheffield, Yorkshire</placeName>, to which <persName ref="#Hofland_B">Barbara Hofland</persName> contributed poems.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Stage">
                  <note resp="#kdc">Letter reprinted in <title ref="#Observer">the Observer</title>
                     on <date when="1825-06-20">June 20, 1825</date> from <title ref="#Blackwoods">Blackwoods</title>. The letter is signed by
                     <persName>Philo-Dramaticus</persName>, and urges <persName ref="#Kemble_C">Charles Kemble</persName> and <persName ref="#Elliston_Robt">Robert Elliston</persName>, managers of <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent Garden</placeName> and <placeName ref="#Drury_Lane_Theatre">Drury Lane</placeName>, respectively, to resist the demands of the leading actors of the day, which Philo-Dramaticus sees as ruining the theater. The letter specifically identifies <persName ref="#Kean_Edmund">Edmund Kean</persName>, <persName ref="#Young_CM">Charles Young</persName>, and <persName ref="#Macready_Wm">William Macready</persName>. Such demands include insisting on a limited run of performances and rewrites from the authors of plays to suit the actors' tastes. The letter refers to the changes that <persName ref="#Macready_Wm">Macready</persName> required for <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>'s play <title ref="#Rienzi">Rienzi</title>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Times_news">
                  <title>The Times</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Newspaper issued daily, begun in <placeName ref="#London_city">London</placeName> in <date when="1785">1785</date> as <title>The Daily Universal Register</title>, and titled <title>The Times</title> from <date when="1788-01-01">1 January 1788</date>.</note>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
            <listBibl type="literary">
               <bibl xml:id="_55Days_play">
                  <title>55 Days</title>
                  <author>Howard Brenton</author>
                  <placeName>London: Nick Hern</placeName>
                  <date when="2012"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Abbot_WS">
                  <title>The Abbot</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal">Walter Scott</author>
                  <date when="1820">1820</date>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher>Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown</publisher>
                  <pubPlace>Edinburgh</pubPlace>
                  <publisher>Archibald Constable and Company, and John Ballantyne</publisher>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Historical novel: One of Scott's series of <title level="s">Tales from Benedictine Sources</title>, <title>The Abbot</title> introduces the character <persName>Roland Graeme</persName>, and renders <rs type="event">the experiences of <persName ref="#MaryQoS">Mary, Queen of Scots</persName> during her imprisonment and escape from <placeName>Loch Leven Castle</placeName> in <date when="1567">1567</date>
                     </rs>.</note>
               </bibl>
              
               <bibl xml:id="Aeschylus_Potter">
                  <title>The Tragedies of Aeschylus</title>
                  <author ref="#Aeschylus">Aeschylus</author>
                  <editor role="translator" ref="#Potter_R">Robert Potter</editor>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Translation of <persName ref="#Aeschylus">Aeschylus</persName>'s
                     plays read by <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Aladdin_panto">
                  <title>Aladdin</title>
                  <note resp="#lmw">There were many pantomimes under this name on the English stage,
                     many combining the story of Aladdin with that of other <title>Arabian
                        Nights</title> tales such as <title>Ali Baba</title> and moving the story to
                     a mythologized <placeName>China</placeName> from <placeName>Arabia</placeName>.
                     Pantomime versions introduce the character of the "Widow Twankey," Aladdian's
                     mother. <persName ref="#OKeefe">John O'Keefe</persName> dramatized the story as
                     early as <date>1788</date> at <placeName ref="#Covent_Garden_Theatre">Covent
                        Garden</placeName>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="All_For_Love_play">
                  <title>All for Love</title>
                  <author ref="#Dryden"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Antigone_play">
                  <title>Antigone</title>
                  <author ref="#Sophocles"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Antiquary">
                  <title>The Antiquary</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="As_You_Like_It_play">
                  <title>As You Like It</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Athalie_play">
                  <title>Athalie</title>
                  <author ref="#Racine"/>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <p> One of two plays written by Jean Racine (along with Esther), for the
                        students at St. Cyr.</p>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Atherton">
                  <title>Atherton, and Other Tales</title>
                  <date>1854</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Belford_Regis">
                  <title>Belford Regis; or, Sketches of a Country Town</title>
                  <date>1835</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Bible">
                  <title>The Bible</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The Bible in its many versions collects canonical scriptures sacred to both the Christian and Jewish faiths.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Blanch">
                  <title>Blanch: A Poem in Four Cantos</title> from <title>Narrative Poems on the
                     Female Character</title>
                  <date>1827</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Bonduca_play">
                  <title>Bonduca</title>
                  <author ref="#Fletcher_John"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="CharlesI_MRMplay">
                  <title>Charles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts</title>
                  <date>1834</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="CharlesV">
                  <title>Charles the Fifth</title>
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#Robertson_William">William Robertson</persName>
                  </author>
                  <!--ebb: This needs more info.-->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Christina">
                  <title>Christina, The Maid of the South Seas; A Poem</title>
                  <date>1811</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Cid_play">
                  <title>The Cid (1637)</title>
                  <author ref="#Corneille"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Cinna_play">
                  <title>Cinna (1643)</title>
                  <author ref="#Corneille"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Claudias_Dr">
                  <title>Claudia's Dream</title>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
                  <note resp="#lmw">One of Mitford's dramatic sketches, appeared in <bibl>
                        <title level="j">Lady's Magazine</title>
                        <date when="1822-03-30">September 30, 1822</date>
                        <biblScope unit="pp" from="462" to="466">462-66</biblScope>
                     </bibl>, retitled as "<title>The Siege</title>" in <title ref="#DramaticScenes">Dramatic Scenes</title>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Coeur_de_Lion_poem">
                  <title>Coeur de Lion; or the Third Crusade. A Poem in 16 books. (historical epic,
                     1822) </title>
                  <author ref="#Franklin_Eleanor"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Confessions_OpiumEater_nonfict"
                     default="false"
                     status="draft">
                  <title>Confessions of an English Opium-Eater</title>
                  <author ref="#DeQuincey_Thos"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Coriolanus_play">
                  <title>Coriolanus</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Country_Stories">
                  <title>Country Stories</title>
                  <date>1835</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Critic_play">
                  <title>The Critic: or, a Tragedy Rehearsed</title>
                  <author ref="#Sheridan_RichardB">Sheridan</author>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A burlesque satire on theatrical production and performance,
                     first performed in <date when="1779">1779</date> at <placeName ref="#Drury_Lane_Theatre">Drury Lane Theatre</placeName>
                     <!--ebb: publication dates, various editions?-->
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Cymbeline_play">
                  <title>Cymbeline</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Deaf_Dumb_play">
                  <title>Deaf and Dumb </title>
                  <author ref="#Holcroft"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="DeafasPost_play">
                  <title>Deaf as a Post (Drury Lane, 1823)</title>
                  <author ref="#Poole_J"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">a one-act farce</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Decline_Fall">
                  <title>The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire</title>
                  <author ref="#Gibbon_Edward"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Don_Sebastian_play">
                  <title>Don Sebastian</title>
                  <author ref="#Dryden"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Dramatic_Works_of_MRM">
                  <title>The Dramatic Works of Mary Russell Mitford</title>
                  <date>1854</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="DramaticScenes">
                  <title>Dramatic Scenes, Sonnets, and Other Poems</title>
                  <date>1827</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Endymion">
                  <title>Endymion</title>
                  <author ref="#Keats"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Essays_of_Elia_nonfict">
                  <title>The Essays of Elia</title>
                  <author ref="#Lamb_Chas"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Fiesco_play">
                  <title>Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua; or Fiesco's Conspiracy at Genoa
                     <!--Check on date of trans., if available to MRM, if she read German.  LMW--></title>
                  <author ref="#Schiller_F"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Foscari_MRMplay">
                  <title>Foscari: A Tragedy</title>
                  <date>1826</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Gaston_deBlondeville">
                  <title> Gaston de Blondeville</title>
                  <date>1854</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Gaston_novel">
                  <title>Gaston de Blondeville</title>
                  <author ref="#Radcliffe_Ann"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Glenarvon_fict">
                  <title>Glenarvon</title>
                  <author ref="#Lamb_Caro"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Glenfergus_fict">
                  <title>Glenfergus. In Three Volumes</title>
                  <date when="1820"/>
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#Mudie_Rob"/>
                  </author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Guy_Mannering">
                  <title>Guy Mannering</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HalidonHill">
                  <title>Halidon Hill; A Dramatic Sketch from Scottish History</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal">Walter Scott</author>
                  <date when="1822">1822</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hamlet_play">
                  <title>Hamlet</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HavardChasI_play">
                  <title>The Tragedy of Charles I</title>
                  <author>William Havard</author>
                  <date when="1747">1747</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Haydon_Corresp">
                  <title>Benjamin Robert Haydon: Correspondence and Table-Talk</title>
                  <author>Benjamin Robert Haydon</author>
                  <author>Frederick Wordsworth Haydon</author>
                  <biblScope unit="vol">1 of 2</biblScope>
                  <publisher>Chatto and Windus, Piccadilly</publisher>
                  <date>1876</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hazlitt_LecComic">
                  <title>Lectures on the English Comic Writers</title>
                  <author ref="#Hazlitt_Wm">Hazlitt</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hazlitt_LecDrama">
                  <title>Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth</title>
                  <author ref="#Hazlitt_Wm">William Hazlitt</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Heiress_MRM">
                  <title>The Heiress</title>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
                  <note resp="#lmw">Projected novel by <persName ref="#MRM"/>Mary Russell Mitford,
                     apparently never completed. <persName ref="#coles">Coles</persName> posits that
                     this work was later incorporated into <title ref="#Atherton">Atherton</title>
                        (<date>1854</date>) (Coles 87, p. 450, note 3)</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Helen_play">
                  <title>Helen</title>
                  <author ref="#Euripides"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HenryV_play">
                  <title>Henry V</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HenryVIII_play">
                  <title>Henry VIII</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hist_of_ChasV">
                  <title>The History of Charles the Fifth</title> by <author ref="#Robertson_Wm">William Robertson</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="HistEngland_Hume">
                  <title>The History of England</title>
                  <biblScope unit="volume" n="6">six volumes</biblScope>
                  <date from="1754" to="1761">1754-61</date>
                  <note resp="#rnes #ebb">Hume wrote the six volumes of this monumental history in reverse chronological order, beginning with <rs type="event">the unification of <placeName ref="#England">England</placeName> and <placeName>Scotland</placeName> in <date when="1603">1603</date>
                     </rs> and the recent climactic events of <rs type="event" ref="#EngCivilWar">the English Civil War</rs> and <rs type="event">Restoration</rs>, which comprise volumes five and six. He then turned to earlier periods, so that the complete text covers English history
                     from the Roman Invasion through the reign of <persName ref="#JamesII">James
                        II</persName>. <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> refers to Hume's text in the preface to the published version of her play, <title ref="#CharlesI_MRMplay">Charles the First</title>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Honeymoon_play">
                  <title>The Honeymoon</title>
                  <author ref="#Tobin_John"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Horace_play">
                  <title>Horace (1640)</title>
                  <author ref="#Corneille"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Humphrey_Clinker_fict">
                  <title>The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker</title>
                  <date when="1771"/>
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#Smollett_Tob"/>
                  </author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Hypocrite">
                  <title>The Hypocrite</title>
                  <author ref="#Bickerstaff_Is"/>
                  <note resp="#kdc">
                     <p>A satirical version of <persName ref="#Moliere">Moliere's</persName>play,
                           <title ref="#Tartuffe">Tartuffe</title> by <persName ref="#Bickerstaff_Is">Bickerstaff</persName>.</p>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Iliad">
                  <title>The Iliad</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb #lmw">The author of this poem would have been presumed to be
                        <persName ref="#Homer">Homer</persName> in Mitford's time.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Inez_deCastro_MRMplay">
                  <title>Inez de Castro; A Tragedy in Five Acts</title>
                  <date>1841</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Ion_Euripides">
                  <title>Ion</title>
                  <author ref="#Euripides">Euripides</author>
                  <date notBefore="-0414" notAfter="-0412">between 414 and 412 BC</date>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The ancient Greek play on which <persName ref="#Talfourd_Thos">Thomas Noon Talfourd</persName> based <bibl corresp="#Ion_TNTplay">his political tragedy, <title>Ion</title> of <date when="1835">1835</date>
                     </bibl>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Ion_TNTplay">
                  <title>Ion</title>
                  <author ref="#Talfourd_Thos"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Ivanhoe">
                  <title>Ivanhoe</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="JohnGospel_NewTest">
                  <title>The Gospel of John</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Fourth Book of the <bibl corresp="#NewTestament_Bible">New Testament</bibl> of <bibl corresp="#Bible">the Christian Bible, presumably (and contestedly) composed by <persName ref="#John_Apostle">John the Apostle</persName>.</bibl>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Julian_MRMplay">
                  <title>Julian; a Tragedy in Five Acts</title>
                  <date>1823</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Kenilworth_WS">
                  <title>Kenilworth</title> by <author ref="#Scott_Wal">Walter Scott</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="King_Lear_play">
                  <title>King Lear</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Macbeth_play">
                  <title>Macbeth</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Mahomet_play">
                  <title>Mahomet (1741)</title>
                  <author ref="#Voltaire"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Maids_Tragedy_play">
                  <title>The Maid's Tragedy</title>
                  <author ref="#Beaumont_Fr">Beaumont</author>
                  <author ref="#Fletcher_John">Fletcher</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Manfred">
                  <title>Manfred</title>
                  <author ref="#Byron"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Marino_Faliero">
                  <title>Marino Faliero</title>
                  <author ref="#Byron"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Merchant_of_Venice_play">
                  <title>The Merchant of Venice</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Merope_play">
                  <title>Merope</title>
                  <author ref="#Voltaire"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Mirandola_play">
                  <title>Mirandola</title>
                  <!--ebb: This needs more info.-->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Monastery">
                  <title>The Monastery</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Moore_ViewItaly">
                  <title>A View of Society and Manners in Italy: with Anecdotes relating to some
                     Eminent Characters</title>
                  <author ref="#Moore_DrJ">John Moore, M.D.</author>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher>Printed for W. Strahan and T. Cadell</publisher>
                  <date>1781</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Much_Ado_play">
                  <title>Much Ado About Nothing</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Napoleon_memoir_nonfict"><!--ebb: Would an English translation of this be relevant? Or no?-->
                  <title>Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon</title>
                  <date when="1819"/>
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#de_Chaboulon"/>
                  </author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="NarrativePoems">
                  <title>Narrative Poems on the Female Character in the Various Relations of Human
                     Life</title>
                  <date when="1813">1813</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
                  <bibl corresp="#Blanch"/>
                  <bibl corresp="#Rival_Sisters"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="NewTestament_Bible">
                  <title>The New Testament</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The second half of <bibl corresp="#Bible">the Christian Bible</bibl>, containing scriptures composed in Greek documenting the life of Christ and the experiences and visions of his apostles.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Odyssey">
                  <title>The Odyssey</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb #lmw">The author of this poem would have been presumed to be
                        <persName ref="#Homer">Homer</persName> in Mitford's time.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Oedipus_play">
                  <title>Oedipus Tyrranus</title>
                  <title>Oedipus Rex</title>
                  <title>Oedipus the King</title>
                  <author ref="#Sophocles">Sophocles</author>
                  <note resp="#lmw">
                     <persName ref="#MRM">Mitford</persName> tends to refer to this play by its Greek title, <title>Oedipus Tyrranus</title>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Old_Mortality">
                  <title>Old Mortality</title>
                  <author ref="#Scott_Wal"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OldTestament_Bible">
                  <title>The Old Testament</title>
                  <title>Hebrew Bible</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The collection of ancient Hebrew scriptures comprising the first half of <bibl corresp="#Bible">the Christian Bible</bibl>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OnRdngBalldWW_MRMpoem">
                  <title level="a">On Reading a Ballad of <persName ref="#Wordsworth_Wm">Wordsworth</persName>
                  </title>
                  <author ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</author>
                  <title level="j" ref="#Museum_per">Museum</title>
                  <biblScope unit="volume">I</biblScope>
                  <date when="1822-08-31">August 31, 1822</date>
                  <biblScope unit="page">301</biblScope>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Orestes_play">
                  <title>Orestes</title>
                  <author ref="#Euripides">Euripides</author>
                  <date when="-0408">408 B.C.</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Othello_play">
                  <title>Othello</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Otto">
                  <title> Otto of Wittelsbach: A Tragedy</title>
                  <date>1854</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Our_Village1st_ed">
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
                  <title>Our Village: Sketches of Rural Character and Scenery [vol. 1]</title>
                  <date>1824</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OurVillage_3rd">
                  <title>Our Village, 3rd edition</title>
                  <author ref="#MRM"> Mary Russell Mitford</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="OV">
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
                  <title>Our Village</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">All editions of Our Village.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="ParadiseLost">
                  <author ref="#Milton">John Milton</author>
                  <title>Paradise Lost</title>
                  <date>1667</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Philaster_play">
                  <title>Philaster</title>
                  <author ref="#Beaumont_Fr">Beaumont</author>
                  <author ref="#Fletcher_John">Fletcher</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Philoctetes_play">
                  <title>Philoctetes</title>
                  <author ref="#Sophocles"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Pizarro_play">
                  <title>Pizarro</title>
                  <author ref="#Sheridan_RichardB"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Pl_Friendship">
                  <title>The Pleasures of Friendship: A Poem, in two parts (1810, rpt. 1812,
                     1818)</title>
                  <author ref="#Rowden_Fr"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Poems_1st_ed_MRM">
                  <title>Poems. 1 vol.</title>
                  <date when="1810">1810</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Poems_2nd_ed_MRM">
                  <title>Poems. 2nd edition. With considerable additions. 2 vols.</title>
                  <date when="1811">1811</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="PopetoArbuthnot">
                  <title>An Epistle from Mr. Pope to Dr. Arbuthnot (1734)</title>
                  <author ref="#Pope_Alex">Alexander Pope</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Prom_Chained">
                  <title>Prometheus Chained</title>
                  <author ref="#Potter_R"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">One of R. Potter's eighteenth-century translations of Aeschylus's plays, from <bibl corresp="#Aeschylus_Potter">his volume The Tragedies of Aeschylus</bibl>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="PromBound_Aesch">
                  <title>Prometheus Bound</title>
                  <note resp="#ebb">The authorship of this influential ancient Greek tragedy was classically attributed to <persName ref="#Aeschylus">Aeschylus</persName>, but this has been disputed since the mid-19th century.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Recoll_Reign_GeoIII">
                  <title>Recollections and Reflections, Personal and Political, as Connected with Public Affairs, During the Reign of George III </title> by <author ref="#Nicholls_John">John Nicholls</author>
                  <!-- 2 vols.  London:  Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1822.  Google Books.  LMW -->
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Recollections">
                  <title>Recollections of a Literary Life; or, Books, Places, and People 3
                     vols.</title>
                  <date>1852</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="RichardIII_play">
                  <title>The Life and Death of Richard the Third</title>
                  <title>King Richard III</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</author>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Dramatizes <persName ref="#RichardIII">King Richard III</persName>'s usurpation of the throne of England. The date of composition for this play is uncertain, but conjectured around <date when="1592">1592</date>, and its first known performance was in <date when="1633">1633</date> for <persName ref="#ChasI">King Charles I</persName>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Rienzi">
                  <title>Rienzi; a Tragedy, in Five Acts</title>
                  <date>1828</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Rival_Sisters">
                  <title>The Rival Sisters a Poem in Three Cantos</title>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
                  <bibl corresp="#NarrativePoems"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Sadak_Kalasrade">
                  <title>Sadak and Kalasrade; or, The Waters of Oblivions. A Romantic Opera in Two
                     Acts</title>
                  <date>1835</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Shakespeare_Times_nonfict">
                  <title>Shakespeare and his Times</title>
                  <date when="1817"/>
                  <author>
                     <persName ref="#Drake_Nathan"/>
                  </author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="St_Botany">
                  <title>Poetical Introduction to the Study of Botany (1801)</title>
                  <author ref="#Rowden_Fr"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Stranger_play">
                  <title>The Stranger</title>
                  <author ref="#Kotzebue">Kotzebue</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Tartuffe">
                  <title>Tartuffe</title>
                  <author ref="#Moliere"/>
                  <note resp="#kdc">
                     <p>Controversial play by the French author <persName ref="#Moliere">Molière</persName>. The title character poses as a pious man and
                        insinuates himself into a family. He tries to seduce the wife and daughter,
                        and attempts to dispossess the family from their house, but his schemes are
                        ultimately foiled.</p>
                  </note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Tempest_play">
                  <title>The Tempest</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Th_d_Gr">
                  <title>Théâtre des Grecs</title>
                  <author ref="#Brumoy_Pierre"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="The_Two_Foscari">
                  <title>The Two Foscari</title>
                  <author ref="#Byron">Lord Byron</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TomThumb_Fielding">
                  <author ref="#Fielding_Henry">Scriblerus Secundus</author>
                  <title>Tom Thumb</title>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher>Printed and sold by J. Roberts in Warwick-Lane</publisher>
                  <date when="1730">1730</date>
                  <note resp="#ebb">First performed outside the <placeName ref="#Haymarket_Theatre">Haymarket Theatre</placeName> in September 1730.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TomThumb_OHaraAdpt">
                  <author ref="#OHara_Kane">Kane O'Hara</author>
                  <author ref="#Fielding_Henry">Henry Fielding</author>
                  <bibl>
                     <title>Airs, duets, &amp;c. in the comic opera of Tom Thumb, in two acts</title>
                     <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                     <date when="1780">1780</date>.</bibl>
                  <bibl>
                     <title>Tom Thumb: a burlesque tragedy</title>
                     <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                     <publisher>Printed by and for J. Roach, at the Britannia Printing Office</publisher>
                     <date when="1805">1805</date>
                  </bibl>
                  <note resp="#ebb">Comic opera adapation of <bibl corresp="#TomThumb_Fielding">
                        <author ref="#Fielding_Henry">Henry Fielding</author>'s <title>Tom Thumb</title>
                     </bibl>. Roach's edition of <date when="1811">1811</date> features illustrations of <persName ref="#Liston_SarahT">Sarah Tyrer</persName> in the role of <persName ref="#Queen_Dollalolla">Queen Dollalolla</persName> in the <date when="1805">1805</date> production. [Source: WorldCAT]</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="TwelfthNight_Shkspr">
                  <title>Twelfth Night</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare">William Shakespeare</author>
                  <date notBefore="1601"/>
                  <note resp="#ebb">A late dark romantic comedy in Shakespeare's oeuvre, with first recorded production in <date when="1602-02">February 1602</date>.</note>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Venice_Preserved_play">
                  <title>Venice Preserv'd</title>
                  <author ref="#Otway_Thos"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Vespers_of_Palermo">
                  <title>The Vespers of Palermo: A Tragedy in Five Acts</title>
                  <author ref="#Hemans_Felicia">Felicia Hemans</author>
                  <date when="1823">1823</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Virginius_play">
                  <title>Virginius</title>
                  <author ref="#Knowles_Sheridan">Sheridan Knowles</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="WatlingtonH">
                  <title>Watlington Hill; A Poem</title>
                  <date>1811</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Wheel_Fortune_play">
                  <title>Wheel of Fortune</title>
                  <author ref="#Cumberland_Rich"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Winters_Tale_play">
                  <title>The Winter's Tale</title>
                  <author ref="#Shakespeare"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="WmTell_play">
                  <title>William Tell</title>
                  <author ref="#Knowles_Sheridan"/>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Works_of_MRM">
                  <title>The Works of Mary Russell Mitford: Prose and Verse; viz. Our village,
                     Belford Regis, Country Stories, Finden's Tableaux, Foscari, Julian, Rienzi,
                     Charles the First</title>
                  <date>1841</date>
                  <author ref="#MRM">Mary Russell Mitford</author>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Zaire_play">
                  <title>Zai're (1732)</title>
                  <author ref="#Voltaire">Voltaire</author>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
            <listBibl type="currSchol">
               <bibl xml:id="BannedThtr_Findlater">
                  <title>Banned!: A Review of Theatrical Censorship in Britain</title>
                  <author>Richard Findlater</author>
                  <pubPlace>London</pubPlace>
                  <publisher>Gibbon &amp; McKee</publisher>
                  <date when="1967">1967</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="CensorshipEnglDrama">
                  <title>The Censorship of English Drama, 1824-1901</title>
                  <placeName>Cambridge: Cambridge University press</placeName>
                  <date when="2010">2010</date>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="Review_55Days">
                  <title level="a">Review: 55 Days</title>
                  <title level="m">The Telegraph</title>
                  <author>Charles Spencer</author>
                  <placeName>London</placeName>
                  <date when="2012-10-25"> October 25, 2012</date>
                  <biblScope unit="page"><!--ebb: Indicate the page here.--></biblScope>
                  <biblScope unit="column"><!--ebb: Indicate the columns on the page, since this is a newspaper, right?--></biblScope>
               </bibl>
               <bibl xml:id="RomDrama_Hoagwood">
                  <title level="a">Romantic Drama and Historical Hermeneutics</title>
                  <title level="m">British Romantic Drama: Historical and Critical Essays</title>
                  <author>Terence Allan Hoagwood</author>
                  <editor>Terence Allan Hoagwood</editor>
                  <editor>Daniel Watkins</editor>
                  <pubPlace>Cranbury, NJ</pubPlace>
                  <publisher>Associated University Presses</publisher>
                  <date when="1998">1998</date>
                  <biblScope unit="page"><!--ebb: please include the page numbers of Hoagwood's chapter that you're citing here.--></biblScope>
               </bibl>
            </listBibl>
         </div>
      </body>
   </text>
</TEI>
Site Index of Named Entities in the Digital Mitford Archive Digital Mitford Editors Elisa Beshero-Bondar Mary Russell Mitford Society: Digital Mitford Project University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Elisa Beshero-Bondar Data extraction and compiling by Elisa Beshero-Bondar Proofing and corrections by Elisa Beshero-Bondar Site Index for the Digital Mitford project. Date: 2014-07-15T03:18:07.126-04:00. Extracted by Elisa Beshero-Bondar. Count of all @xml:ids in the current file: 809. First digital edition in TEI P5, launched on 19 August 2013. Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive Greensburg, PA, USA 2013 Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License Any special notes on this text? (optional)

Information on named entities in this file has been extracted from files in the Digital Mitford Archive.

Describes our editorial practice.

China Aster 513 One of Mitford's favorite flowers, blooms in autumn in Berkshire
514 The unification of Ireland with Great Britain (England and Scotland, to form the United Kingdom, during the reign of King George III. 515 in which Great Britain under King George III lost its North American colonies, and following which the United States was formed. 516 Period of conflict and crisis in France, at first characterized by peaceful efforts at compromise and reform but shifting to bloody conflict in the 1793-1794 Reign of Terror driven by Robespierre, symbolized in the use of the guillotine to execute enemies of the Republic, and used ultimately against Robespierre himself. After a period of instability during which Napoleon Bonaparte rose to power through military coup d'etat, the republican cause of Revolution in France can be said to have ended in 1804 with Napoleon's crowning as Emperor of France. 517 Parliamentary alliance with the Dutch William of Orange to oust King James II from power, establish a lasting Protestant monarchy, and establish a Bill of Rights. War led by Mexican-born population for liberation from Spain. 518 The British cavalry charged into a crowd of by some estimates 60,000 to 80,000, who had gathered at St. Peter's Field to protest Manchester's lack of representation in Parliament. Death tolls were estimated in the teens, and hundreds were injured. The event was named "Peterloo" in ironic contrast with the British military role in the Battle of Waterloo 519 King George IV's struggles with Parliament to divorce his estranged wife, Caroline, and prevent her from becoming queen in 1820, the year of her death. A poor harvest led to rioting. . . 520 The duel which led to John Scott's death, brought on by escalating conflicts between John Scott and John Gibson Lockhart in The London Magazine and Blackwood's Magazine, rooted in Blackwood's insulting characterizations of a Cockney School beginning in 1820. Christie was Lockhart's literary agent, and after a trial in April 1821 he was acquitted of any wrongdoing in the duel. For a detailed account of the duel, with supporting documents in publications from each magazine, see Lord Byron and His Times: "Blackwood's Magazine, The London Magazine, and the Scott-Christie Duel". 521 The battle fought at Waterloo, Belgium on Sunday, 18 June 1815 that decisively defeated Napoleon Bonaparte after his Hundred Days Exile.
Christ's Entry into Jerusalem 522 One of Haydon's three enormous paintings of biblical scenes, together with The Judgment of Solomon and The Resurrection of Lazarus. The ODNB notes the dimensions of Christ's Entry into Jerusalem as "12 ft 6 in. × 15 ft 1 in., with a frame weighing 600 lb." Exhibited at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. Wiliam Wordsworth's head appears in the picture. Now housed in the Athenaeum of Ohio Art Collection of Mount St. Mary's Seminary. [Source: ODNB]
The Judgment of Solomon 1814 523 The earliest of the three enormous biblical paintings for which Haydon was known, completed in 1814.
The Resurrection of Lazarus The Raising of Lazarus 1821-1823 524 Painting of enormous dimensions exhibited in 1823 at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. While on exhibit in 1823, the picture was seized from the gallery when Haydon was arrested for debt and imprisoned for two months.
Rural Sports William Barker Daniel 525 Printed in numerous editions between 1801-1817. Encyclopedia Metropolitana; or, Universal Dictionary of Knowledge (30 vols., 1817-1845) The Anti-Jacobin, or Weekly Examiner Wiliam Gifford from November 20, 1797 to July 9, 1798 526 Conserative newspaper founded by George Canning whose short run of 36 issues was highly influential in satirizing revolutionary politics. Blackwood's Magazine 527 Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review. The Examiner A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals 528 Weekly periodical launched by editor Leigh Hunt and his brother, the printer John Hunt. Mitford's correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to The Examiner and The London Magazine. John Bull 529 Presumably the popular periodical founded in 1820. Lady's Monthly Museum; Or, Polite Repository of Amusement and Instruction 530 A monthly periodical running from 1798 to 1832. The Literary Gazette, and Journal of Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences The London Literary Gazette 531 Periodical founded by Henry Colburn, ran from 1817 to 1863. For details on the journal, see the Corvey Women Writers on the Web contribution page by Glenn T. Himes on "L.E.L: The Literary Gazette Collection" https://www2.shu.ac.uk/corvey/cw3/ContribPage.cfm?Contrib=23 The London Magazine 1820 to 1829 532 An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood's Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott's editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood's Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott's death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue. The Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama, &c. first issue: 27 April 1822 533 a weekly periodical edited by Peter Bayley and printed by John Valpy. New Monthly Magazine 534 Periodical edited by Thomas Campbell from 1821 to 1830. Talfourd was a contributor. The Observer 535

Founded on December 4, 1791 by W.S> Bourne. It is the first Sunday newspaper in the world. Although its earliest years supported a conservative view, it has been generally centrist/liberal for most of its existence.

The Political Register 536 Weekly periodical issued by William Cobbett from 1802 to 1835. Originally anti-Jacobin, the politics of the magazine became increasingly reformist. Cobbett's magazine advocated in defense of the English countryside and its traditional ways of life against industrial change. Quarterly Review 537 Tory periodical founded by George Canning in 1809, published by John Murray. William Gifford edited the Quarterly Review from its founding in 1809 until 1824, was succeeded briefly by John Taylor Coleridge in 1825, until John Gibson Lockhart took over as editor from 1826 through 1853. The Reading Mercury and Oxford Gazette, etc. Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette and Berkshire County Paper, etc. Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette, Newsbury Herald and Berks County Paper, etc. 538 Newspaper of Reading, Berkshire. Founded as The Reading Mercury, or Weekly Entertainer in 1723, the newspaper changed its name twice during Mitford's lifetime. It was titled The Reading Mercury and Oxford Gazette, etc. from 1767-1731, was renamed Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette and Berkshire County Paper, etc. from 1831-1839, and from 1839-1960 it was titled Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette, Newsbury Herald and Berks County Paper, etc. Source: Berkshire Family History Society. "Mr. Haydon's Raising of Lazarus" The Repository of Arts, Literature, Fashions, & Manufactures I. No. 4 April 1, 1823 239-241 539 Detailed discussion of the contents of Haydon's painting, The Raising of Lazarus. The Iris Robert Montgomery 540 Newspaper of Sheffield, Yorkshire, to which Barbara Hofland contributed poems. 541 Letter reprinted in the Observer on June 20, 1825 from Blackwoods. The letter is signed by Philo-Dramaticus, and urges Charles Kemble and Robert Elliston, managers of Covent Garden and Drury Lane, respectively, to resist the demands of the leading actors of the day, which Philo-Dramaticus sees as ruining the theater. The letter specifically identifies Edmund Kean, Charles Young, and William Macready. Such demands include insisting on a limited run of performances and rewrites from the authors of plays to suit the actors' tastes. The letter refers to the changes that Macready required for Mitford's play Rienzi. The Times 542 Newspaper issued daily, begun in London in 1785 as The Daily Universal Register, and titled The Times from 1 January 1788.
55 Days Howard Brenton London: Nick Hern The Abbot Walter Scott 1820 London Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown Edinburgh Archibald Constable and Company, and John Ballantyne 543 Historical novel: One of Scott's series of Tales from Benedictine Sources, The Abbot introduces the character Roland Graeme, and renders the experiences of Mary, Queen of Scots during her imprisonment and escape from Loch Leven Castle in 1567 . The Tragedies of Aeschylus Aeschylus Robert Potter 544 Translation of Aeschylus's plays read by Mitford. Aladdin 545 There were many pantomimes under this name on the English stage, many combining the story of Aladdin with that of other Arabian Nights tales such as Ali Baba and moving the story to a mythologized China from Arabia. Pantomime versions introduce the character of the "Widow Twankey," Aladdian's mother. John O'Keefe dramatized the story as early as 1788 at Covent Garden. All for Love Antigone The Antiquary As You Like It William Shakespeare Athalie 546

One of two plays written by Jean Racine (along with Esther), for the students at St. Cyr.

Atherton, and Other Tales 1854 Belford Regis; or, Sketches of a Country Town 1835 The Bible 547 The Bible in its many versions collects canonical scriptures sacred to both the Christian and Jewish faiths. Blanch: A Poem in Four Cantos from Narrative Poems on the Female Character 1827 Bonduca Charles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts 1834 Charles the Fifth William Robertson Christina, The Maid of the South Seas; A Poem 1811 The Cid (1637) Cinna (1643) Claudia's Dream 548 One of Mitford's dramatic sketches, appeared in Lady's Magazine September 30, 1822 462-66 , retitled as "The Siege" in Dramatic Scenes Coeur de Lion; or the Third Crusade. A Poem in 16 books. (historical epic, 1822) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater Coriolanus Country Stories 1835 The Critic: or, a Tragedy Rehearsed Sheridan 549 A burlesque satire on theatrical production and performance, first performed in 1779 at Drury Lane Theatre Cymbeline Deaf and Dumb Deaf as a Post (Drury Lane, 1823) 550 a one-act farce The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Don Sebastian The Dramatic Works of Mary Russell Mitford 1854 Dramatic Scenes, Sonnets, and Other Poems 1827 Endymion The Essays of Elia Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua; or Fiesco's Conspiracy at Genoa Foscari: A Tragedy 1826 Gaston de Blondeville 1854 Gaston de Blondeville Glenarvon Glenfergus. In Three Volumes Guy Mannering Halidon Hill; A Dramatic Sketch from Scottish History Walter Scott 1822 Hamlet The Tragedy of Charles I William Havard 1747 Benjamin Robert Haydon: Correspondence and Table-Talk Benjamin Robert Haydon Frederick Wordsworth Haydon 1 of 2 Chatto and Windus, Piccadilly 1876 Lectures on the English Comic Writers Hazlitt Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth William Hazlitt The Heiress 551 Projected novel by Mary Russell Mitford, apparently never completed. Coles posits that this work was later incorporated into Atherton (1854) (Coles 87, p. 450, note 3) Helen Henry V William Shakespeare Henry VIII The History of Charles the Fifth by William Robertson The History of England six volumes 1754-61 552 Hume wrote the six volumes of this monumental history in reverse chronological order, beginning with the unification of England and Scotland in 1603 and the recent climactic events of the English Civil War and Restoration, which comprise volumes five and six. He then turned to earlier periods, so that the complete text covers English history from the Roman Invasion through the reign of James II. Mitford refers to Hume's text in the preface to the published version of her play, Charles the First. The Honeymoon Horace (1640) The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker The Hypocrite 553

A satirical version of Moliere'splay, Tartuffe by Bickerstaff.

The Iliad 554 The author of this poem would have been presumed to be Homer in Mitford's time. Inez de Castro; A Tragedy in Five Acts 1841 Ion Euripides between 414 and 412 BC 555 The ancient Greek play on which Thomas Noon Talfourd based his political tragedy, Ion of 1835 . Ion Ivanhoe The Gospel of John 556 Fourth Book of the New Testament of the Christian Bible, presumably (and contestedly) composed by John the Apostle.. Julian; a Tragedy in Five Acts 1823 Kenilworth by Walter Scott King Lear Macbeth Mahomet (1741) The Maid's Tragedy Beaumont Fletcher Manfred Marino Faliero The Merchant of Venice Merope Mirandola The Monastery A View of Society and Manners in Italy: with Anecdotes relating to some Eminent Characters John Moore, M.D. London Printed for W. Strahan and T. Cadell 1781 Much Ado About Nothing Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon Narrative Poems on the Female Character in the Various Relations of Human Life 1813 The New Testament 557 The second half of the Christian Bible, containing scriptures composed in Greek documenting the life of Christ and the experiences and visions of his apostles. The Odyssey 558 The author of this poem would have been presumed to be Homer in Mitford's time. Oedipus Tyrranus Oedipus Rex Oedipus the King Sophocles 559 Mitford tends to refer to this play by its Greek title, Oedipus Tyrranus. Old Mortality The Old Testament Hebrew Bible 560 The collection of ancient Hebrew scriptures comprising the first half of the Christian Bible. On Reading a Ballad of Wordsworth Mary Russell Mitford Museum I August 31, 1822 301 Orestes Euripides 408 B.C. Othello Otto of Wittelsbach: A Tragedy 1854 Our Village: Sketches of Rural Character and Scenery [vol. 1] 1824 Our Village, 3rd edition Mary Russell Mitford Our Village 561 All editions of Our Village. John Milton Paradise Lost 1667 Philaster Beaumont Fletcher Philoctetes Pizarro The Pleasures of Friendship: A Poem, in two parts (1810, rpt. 1812, 1818) Poems. 1 vol. 1810 Mary Russell Mitford Poems. 2nd edition. With considerable additions. 2 vols. 1811 Mary Russell Mitford An Epistle from Mr. Pope to Dr. Arbuthnot (1734) Alexander Pope Prometheus Chained 562 One of R. Potter's eighteenth-century translations of Aeschylus's plays, from his volume The Tragedies of Aeschylus. Prometheus Bound 563 The authorship of this influential ancient Greek tragedy was classically attributed to Aeschylus, but this has been disputed since the mid-19th century. Recollections and Reflections, Personal and Political, as Connected with Public Affairs, During the Reign of George III by John Nicholls Recollections of a Literary Life; or, Books, Places, and People 3 vols. 1852 The Life and Death of Richard the Third King Richard III William Shakespeare 564 Dramatizes King Richard III's usurpation of the throne of England. The date of composition for this play is uncertain, but conjectured around 1592, and its first known performance was in 1633 for King Charles I. Rienzi; a Tragedy, in Five Acts 1828 The Rival Sisters a Poem in Three Cantos Sadak and Kalasrade; or, The Waters of Oblivions. A Romantic Opera in Two Acts 1835 Shakespeare and his Times Poetical Introduction to the Study of Botany (1801) The Stranger Kotzebue Tartuffe 565

Controversial play by the French author Molière. The title character poses as a pious man and insinuates himself into a family. He tries to seduce the wife and daughter, and attempts to dispossess the family from their house, but his schemes are ultimately foiled.

The Tempest Théâtre des Grecs The Two Foscari Lord Byron Scriblerus Secundus Tom Thumb London Printed and sold by J. Roberts in Warwick-Lane 1730 566 First performed outside the Haymarket Theatre in September 1730. Kane O'Hara Henry Fielding Airs, duets, &c. in the comic opera of Tom Thumb, in two acts London 1780. Tom Thumb: a burlesque tragedy London Printed by and for J. Roach, at the Britannia Printing Office 1805 567 Comic opera adapation of Henry Fielding's Tom Thumb . Roach's edition of 1811 features illustrations of Sarah Tyrer in the role of Queen Dollalolla in the 1805 production. [Source: WorldCAT] Twelfth Night William Shakespeare 568 A late dark romantic comedy in Shakespeare's oeuvre, with first recorded production in February 1602. Venice Preserv'd The Vespers of Palermo: A Tragedy in Five Acts Felicia Hemans 1823 Virginius Sheridan Knowles Watlington Hill; A Poem 1811 Mary Russell Mitford Wheel of Fortune The Winter's Tale William Tell The Works of Mary Russell Mitford: Prose and Verse; viz. Our village, Belford Regis, Country Stories, Finden's Tableaux, Foscari, Julian, Rienzi, Charles the First 1841 Mary Russell Mitford Zai're (1732) Voltaire
Banned!: A Review of Theatrical Censorship in Britain Richard Findlater London Gibbon & McKee 1967 The Censorship of English Drama, 1824-1901 Cambridge: Cambridge University press 2010 Review: 55 Days The Telegraph Charles Spencer London October 25, 2012 Romantic Drama and Historical Hermeneutics British Romantic Drama: Historical and Critical Essays Terence Allan Hoagwood Terence Allan Hoagwood Daniel Watkins Cranbury, NJ Associated University Presses 1998

Beshero-Bondar Elisa Principal Editor

Associate Professor of English University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg

Webb Samantha Founding Editor

University of Montevallo

Samantha Webb teaches classes in British Romantic literature, children's literature, and global literature. She specializes in British Romanticism, with an interest in food and agricultural politics, ecology, and women's writing.

Mitford Mary Russell

female

1787-12-16

1855-01-10

literarygardening

Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Mitford's long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident, and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard.

Nathaniel Hawthorne

The New England author, Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose work Mitford admired.

Robert Browning

Victorian poet, married to Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Barrett Browning Barrett Elizabeth

Barrett BrowningBarrettElizabeth

Elizabeth Barrett

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Victorian poet, long-time correspondent, mentee, and friend of MRM.

Bennett William Cox

BennettWilliamCox

William Cox Bennett

1820-10-14

1895-03-04

literarywatchmakerjournalist

A friend of MRM. Married to Elizabeth Sinnock Bennett and younger sibling of Sir John Bennett. Organizer of very liberal politics in Greenwich. In 1868 he helped stump for the liberal William Gladstone in his first successful campaign for Prime Minister. Lead writer and art critic for the Weekly Dispatch in 1869-1870, contributor to the London paper, Figaro, and editor of the literary periodical, The Lark, from 1883 to 1884. Author of Prometheus the Fire Giver published in 1877, and Songs for Sailors in 1878.

Chorley Fothergill Henry

1808-12-15

1872-02-16

literaryjournalistmusic critic

Of Quaker parentage, Chorley worked unhappily in clerical positions and cultivated the arts as a music and literary critic publishing reviews of around 2500 books, weekly reviews of musical performances, and "columns of musical 'gossip'" for The Athenaeum beginning in 1830 through 1868, "the most prolific of all its reviewers," according to the ODNB. Reviewed Nathaniel Hawthorne and Charles Dickens, and promoted the compositions and operas of Rossini, Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, and Gounod, though he disliked Verdi. Felicia Hemans and E. T. A. Hoffman made lasting impressions on him. Wrote Memorials of Mrs. Hemans, in two volumes, published in 1836 . Served as editor of The Ladies' Companion in 1850 (after Jane Loudon), and wrote plays, novels, and short stories, though these did not receive much recognition. Correspondent of MRM, as well as Elizabeth Barrett, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Sullivan. Edited the 1872 edition of Mitford's correspondence, Letters of Mary Russell Mitford, Second Series .

Haydon Benjamin Robert

male

1786-01-26

1846-06-22

Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth's portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846.

English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems.

Thomas Noon Talfourd

Thomas Noon Talfourd

TalfourdThomasNoon

male

British author and jurist (26 May 1795-13 Mar. 1854) Born in Reading, Berkshire; died while serving in the Court of Stafford in 1854. Charles Dickens dedicated The Pickwick Papers to Talfourd. Talfourd’s best-known works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds (1839). Friend, mentor, and frequent correspondent with Mitford.

Berkshire Record Office

Holds 11 letters, as well as transcripts of Mitford papers--possibly of material at the Huntingdon. The majority of the letters in this collection are addressed to William Cox Bennett, and one to Chorley.

Bennoch Francis Esq.

male

Scottish merchant and wealthy arts patron (1812-1890). Head of firm of Bennoch, Twentyman, and Rigg, wholesalers. Resided in city of London, served as common councilman and deputy of a ward. Dedicatee of Mitford's Dramatic Works (1854), and assisted in publication of Atherton and Other Tales (1854).

Sir William Elford

Sir William Elford

ElfordWilliamSirbaronet

1749-08

1837-11-30

According to L'Estrange, Elford was a friend of Mitford's father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was nearing the age of 64. "He was a fellow of the Royal and Linnaean Societies, and recorder of Plymouth, which borough he also represented in Parliament for many years. Mr. Pitt had created him a baronet in 1800." [L'Estrange vol. 1 of 3, pp. 104-105]

Reading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford's personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.

Hofland Wreaks Barbara

sometime before 1770

1844-11-04

literary

Novelist and writer of children's books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children's books, and by running a girl's school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)

Needham Francis R

Francis R. Needham was librarian and secretary to the Duke Wellington (based at Stratfield Saye in Hampshire). He was a passionate Mitfordian and worked tirelessly to try and collect Mitford's letters. He corresponded with W. A. Coles and W. J. Roberts, two Mitford biographers, and may have also corresponded with Vera Watson, the most reliable of Mitford's biographer. He attempted to set up a Mitford Society and is largely responsible for the Mitford collection at Reading Central Library

Coles William Allan

Wrote his PhD Dissertation to the Dept. of English at Harvard University of August 1956 as an edition of the correspondence of Mary Russell Mitford and Thomas Noon Talfourd, representing parts of the collections at the John Rylands Library and the Harvard and Yale special collections.

Roberts William James

male

Scholar

Early Mitford critic and author of The Tragedy of a Blue Stocking

Watson Vera

female

Scholar

Early Mitford critic and author of the biography Mary Russell Mitford

George Mitford Doctor

GeorgeMitfordDoctor

George Midford

male

physicianmedical

MRM's father (1760-1842) gentleman and sometime physician; name earlier spelled "Midford." Born Northumberland.

Palmer Charles Fyshe

PalmerCharlesFyshe

Mr. Palmer

Long Fyshe

male

sometime after 1770

1843-01-24

On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) A Whig politician, he began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government's handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. Mitford's letters indicate a pronounced dislike of him as she vastly preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she reportedly satirized the Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Palmer mentioned in connection with a potential legal issue with the Billiard Club in Mitford's letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822. Palmer's opponents sometimes undermined his Whiggish position by referencing the noble privileges he accrued by marrying the Lady Madalina Gordon in 1805. [Source: see . See also note 2 in The Browning's Correspondence rendering of Mitford's letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning : .

Keats John

1795-10-31

1821-02-23

literary

Hazlitt William

male

British essayist and critic (10 Apr. 1778-18 Sept. 1830) Born in Maidstone, Kent. Died of stomach cancer. Author of An Essay on the Principles of Human Action (1805), Free Thoughts on Public Affairs (1806), New and Improved Grammar of the English Language (1810). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). Best-known work is Political Essays with Sketches of Public Characters (1819).

James Henry Leigh Hunt

JamesHenryLeighHunt

Leigh Hunt

1784-10-1919 October 1784

1859-08-2828 August 1859

Founding editor (from 1808 to 1821) of the radical weekly journal, The Examiner, which advocated for parliamentary and military reform and Catholic emancipation. Hunt was prosecuted and imprisoned for libel from 1813 to 1815 for his negative depiction of the Prince Regent in the issue of 22 March 1812 . Hunt published Shelley's and Keats's poems in The Examiner, and came to be associated after an article in the October 1817 issue of Blackwood's Magazine with the "Cockney School" of poetry.

Charles I King of England

male

John Berkeley Monck

male

MP for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford's letters.

MRM's letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 describes the election of Monck, describing him in context with a shoemaker who brought him from France: "Mr. Monck an opposition man of large fortune brought from France in a fit of patriotism by our celebrated shoemaker & Patriot Mr. W ." We are hoping to discover who this shoemaker is.

England

Pope Pius VII

PopeChiaramontiBarnabaNiccolòMariaLuigi

1742-08-14

1823-08-20

religion

Pius the VII reigned the Pope, or patriarch of the Catholic Church, from 1800 to 1823. He and his Cardinals were exiled by Napoleon to Savona from 1809 to 1813, and restored to Rome by signing a treaty in 1813. Mitford mentions an unspecified past visit of J. B. Monck to the Pope's Court in her letter to Sir William Elford of 9 September 1820 .

Bonaparte Napoleon

Parliament

Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; supreme legislative body in England.

New Model Army

Parliamentary army founded in 1645; victor in the English Civil War.

city of London

Pope Alexander

male

1688-05-21

1744-05-30

literary

English author (1688-1744)

Fielding Henry

FieldingHenry

Henry Fielding

Scriblerus Secundus

male

1707-04-22

1754-10-08

literary

Satirical novelist and playwright, Fielding was a member of the Scriblerus Club and author of Tom Jones and the popularly adapted low tragedy Tom Thumb. Fielding published his plays under the pseudonym Scriblerus Secundus.

John Taylor

male

b. 1781 d. 1864. London writer and publisher with James Augustus Hessey, Taylor and Hessey

Hessey James Augustus

HesseyJamesAugustus

J. A. Hessey

male

London bookseller and printer with John Taylor, Taylor and Hessey. Hessey owned the London Magazine from 1821-1825, and published John Keats.

James II King of England and Ireland

King of England and IrelandKing of Scotland

monarch

(1633-1701) Last Roman Catholic king of England, he succeeded the throne after the death of Charles II, his brother, and reigned from 1685 to 1688, when he was deposed during the Glorious Revolution.

Weyland John

WeylandJohn

Mr. Weyland

male

On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) .

Euripides

male

playwrightliterary

Ancient Greek playwright (ca. 480 B.C.-406 B.C.), considered together with Aeschylus and Sophocles as establishing the classical foundation of Western tragedy. Author of Ion (between 414 and 412 BC), on which Thomas Noon Talfourd later based his own play of the same title, as well as Orestes (408 B.C.), and Cyclops (date unknown), the only known complete example of a burlesque satyr play, translated into a satiric poem in 1819 by Percy Shelley .

Sophocles

male

(ca. 496 BC-406 BC) Born in Colonus (near Athens) Greece and died in Athens. Sophocles is best known for his cycle of Oedipus plays, and particularly the tragedy Oedipus Tyrranus (otherwise known in Latin or English forms as Oedipus Rex, or Oedipus the King). As an Athenian citizen, Sophocles held many roles, such as serving on the treasury, leading the paean (choral chant), serving as a a strategoi (armed forces official); and was a junior colleague of Pericles.

Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom Empress of India

Queen of the United Kingdom Empress of India AlexandrinaVictoriaHanover

female

1819-05-24

1901-01-22

monarch

The longest reigning monarch in English history, and the longest reigning female monarch in recorded history.

in which Great Britain under lost its North American colonies, and following which was formed.

Mrs. Mitford

Mrs. Mitford

MitfordRussellMary

female

1750

1830

Wife of George Mitford, mother of Mary Russell Mitford; she was a wealthy distant relation of the dukes of Bedford (ODNB)

Mrs. Bayley

female

Mrs. Bayley, presumably the wife (here, the widow?) of Bayley the editor of Lady's Monthly Museum. Mrs. Bayley is mentioned in Mitford's letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825. See Coles 87, note 2.

Mr. Bayley

male

Editor of the Lady's Monthly Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford's letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825. According to Coles, he drafted the as yet unidentified play mentioned in that letter before his death.

George Talbot the Sixth Earl of Shrewsbury

sometime after 1528

1590-11-18

Appointed by Queen Elizabeth I to imprison Mary Queen of Scots in 1568 at Sheffield Castle and Manor Lodge. Bess of Hardwick was his second wife, and he was her fourth husband.

Queen Mary

Queen Mary

MaryStuart

female

1542-12December 1542

1587-02-0808 February 1587

Mary, Queen of Scots was executed by the order of Queen Elizabeth I, against whom she was supposed to have conspired. She was succeeded by her son, James I, the first Stuart king of England and Scotland.

Sheffield Castle and Manor Lodge

A location in which Mary Queen of Scots was held captive in 1568 by order of Queen Elizabeth I. Here, Mary was guarded by George Talbot, the Sixth Earl of Shrewsbury, and his wife, Elizabeth Talbot or "Bess of Hardwick" befriended the royal captive.

Hardwick Hall

Palatial Elizabethan country house in Derbyshire in the north midlands of England, built between 1590 and 1597 by the wealthy Bess of Hardwick. Mentioned in the play, Charles the First.

The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane

A West End theatre located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the "patent theatres." Between 1674 and 1791, a building designed by Christopher Wren and commissioned by manager Thomas Killgrew. The Wren building was torn down by R. B. Sheridan and rebuilt. It reopened in 1791 and was destroyed by fire in 1809. It reopened in 1812 and still stands today.

Germany

France

Guildhall

Site of the Sheriff's Court in London over which John Bradshaw presided as judge from 1640 to 1659.

Houses of Parliament

Located in Westminster, London along the Thames River, this is the meeting place of England's two Houses of Parliament.

Egyptian Hall

A building designed in Egyptian style, Egyptian Hall was built in 1812 for William Bullock's collection of artifacts from Captain Cook's Pacific voyages. After Bullock auctioned off his South Seas collection, the building was frequently used after 1819 to exhibit panoramas and enormous paintings, such as Benjamin Robert Haydon's Christ's Entry into Jerusalem, and The Raising of Lazarus.

Mexico

War led by Mexican-born population for liberation from Spain.

United States of America

Cincinnati, Ohio

Kentucky, USA

Tower of London

51.508056 -0.076111

Dating from the Norman Conquest of England, this famous complex of fortified towers was begun by William the Conqueror in 1066 and used variously as a royal residence, an armory, a treasury, and a prison.

The British cavalry charged into a crowd of by some estimates 60,000 to 80,000, who had gathered at St. Peter's Field to protest Manchester's lack of representation in Parliament. Death tolls were estimated in the teens, and hundreds were injured. The event was named "Peterloo" in ironic contrast with the British military role in the Battle of Waterloo

city of Reading, England

Palmerite

Supporter of Charles Fyshe Palmer in the Reading elections of March 16, 1820.

Tory Party

Conservative Party

Originally, a 17th-century insulting nickname for those who supported James II's right to the throne of England, even though he was Catholic. The term connoted "Irish Catholic outlaw." The term was adopted by the party, which became generally affiliated with the interests of the country gentry, Anglicanism, and support of the divine right of kings. The party was loosely affiliated until the late 18th century, when William Pitt the Younger emerged as the leader of a revitalized party. The Conservative Party, founded in 1834 by Sir Robert Peel, absorbed and organized the Tory Party and retained the party nickname.

Hemans Felicia

female

1793-09-25

1835-05-16

literary

Best-known for sentimental and nationalistic poetry such as The Homes of England and Casabianca ("The Boy Stood on the Burning Deck"). Also wrote drama, less successfully than Baillie or Mitford. Acclaimed in her time by critics as well as authors from Byron to George Eliot.

John Scott

JohnScott

John Scott

1784-10-24

1821-02-21

literaryeditor

Editor who revived The London Magazine in 1820 and edited it until his death on 27 February 1821. Died as the result of a gunshot wound received in a duel fought on 16 February with Jonathan Henry Christie (John Gibson Lockhart's agent) at Chalk Farm. The duel resulted from an escalation of attacks and counterattacks between the editors of the London and Blackwood's Magazines over Blackwood's characterizations of a Cockney School.

Lockhart John Gibson

LockhartJohnGibson

John Gibson Lockhart

1794-07-12

1854-11-25

journalisteditorliterary

A prominent writer for Blackwood's Magazine in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in 1817, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a Cockney School in 1820 and 1821. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood's and The London Magazine resulting in the death by duel of The London Magazine's editor, John Scott in February 1821, at the hands of Lockhart's literary agent Jonathan Christie . Lockhart married Walter Scott's daughter Sophia in 1820, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood's campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the Quarterly Review from March 1826 until June 1853, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law's 7-volume biography, Life of Walter Scott, published in 1837-1838 .

Covent Garden Theatre, London

A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the "patent theaters." First theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809, managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains the nucleus of today's theater. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expaneded in the 1980s and 1990s.

Colman George the Younger the licenser

male

1762-10-21

1836-10-26

literarytheatre managerExaminer of Plays

English author and theater manager (1762-1836) His father, George Colman the Elder, was also an author and theater manager. Author of The Heir at Law, and The Iron Chest, a play based on William Godwin's novel Caleb Williams. As Lord Chamberlain's Examiner of Plays from 1824 until his death in 1836, he was responsible for rejecting production of Mitford's Charles I.

Garrick David

male

actortheatre manager

English actor and theatrical manager (1717-1779). Considered the greatest actor of his era. Prominent in Whig circles of the late eighteenth century. Frequently painted by Joshua Reynolds. Mary Robinson was one of his last mentees before his retirement from the stage.

Colman George the Elder

male

1732-04

1794-08-14

literarytheatre managerbarrister

English author, barrister, Covent Garden theater manager (1732-1794) Also called "George the First." His son, George Colman the Younger, was also an author and theater manager. Friend of David Garrick. Author of The Clandestine Marriage (1766) and The Jealous Wife (1761), partly based on Fielding's novel Tom Jones .

Thomas Coutts

male

Banker (1735-1822) and founder of Coutts & Co.

Westminster Abbey

51.499444 -0.1275

Gothic style church in Westminster, London, where English monarchs have traditionally been crowned and buried. Many important literary and historical people are buried with memorials throughout this famous abbey. The present structure began construction in 1245 by King Henry III

Cromwell Oliver

male

1599-04-25

1658-09-03

militarygovernment

Member of Parliament, Puritan, Parliamentarian ("Roundhead") military commander. 1st Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland (25 Dec. 1653-3 Sept. 1658). He was buried in Westminster Abbey in 1658, then exhumed and posthumously "executed" by Royalists after 1660 and is buried in Tyburn.

Valpy Richard Doctor

male

1754-12-07

1836-03-28

educator

Headmaster of Reading Grammar School for boys for 50 years, during which time he expanded the boarding school and added new buildings. Friend and mentor to MRM. Author of Greek Delectus and Latin Delectus, grammars much used as schoolbooks in public schools. Valpy had his students perform Sophocles' tragedies in Reading, and requested that MRM attend and write reviews of the productions for the Reading Mercury.

Dickinson Charles

DickinsonCharles

Mr. Dickinson

male

Husband of Mrs. Dickinson, owner of a private press--See letters to Sir W. Elford, March 13th, 1819, June 21st, 1820, L'Estrange

Doge Foscari

character in Foscari

See also historical counterpart: Doge Foscari.

Moore John M.D.

male

1729-12-07

1802-02-21 died of congestive heart failure.

literaryphysician

John Moore, M.D. (1729-1802) wrote A View of Society and Manners in Italy (1781)

Donato Senator

character in Foscari

See also historical counterpart: Senator Donato.

Shakespeare William

male

1564-04 Probably born April 21-23, the 23rd has been the usually assumed date.

1616-04-23

literary

English author and actor (1564-1616)

Ben Jonson

Ben Jonson

BenjaminJonson

male

1572-06-11

1637-08-06

Renaissance English playwright and contemporary of William Shakespeare. Jonson was known for satirical plays, including Every Man in His Humour (1598), Volpone, or The Foxe (1605), and The Alchemist (1610).

Charles II king of England, Scotland, and Ireland King Charles II Charles Stuart

male

1630-05-29

1685-02-06

king

The son of the executed King Charles I, Charles II was restored to his father's kingdoms in 1660, occasioning the naming of his reign the Restoration. King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, reigned 29 May 1660-6 Feb. 1685. King of Scotland, reigned 30 Jan. 1649-3 Sept. 1651. House of Stuart. Born 29 May 1630, St. James Place, London. Died 6 Feb. 1685 Whitehall Palace, London.

Elford Davies Mary

ElfordDaviesMary

Mrs. Elford 1

female

1753

1817

Mary was the first wife of Sir William Elford; on July 5, 1821, he married Elizabeth Walrod (nee Hall) (ODNB)

Hall Waldron Elizabeth

HallWaldronElizabeth

Mrs. Elford2

female

Elizabeth is the second wife of Sir William Elford; they married four years after the death of Mrs. Mary Elford on July 5, 1821. The ODNB's entry on Sir William Elford incorrectly gives her name as Elizabeth Walrond (née Hall), as parish records of 1822 accord with the spelling in Mitford's letters, and describe Elizabeth Hall Waldron as the heiress of an estate in Devonshire, formerly married to a Colonel Waldron. See 'Parishes: Pancras Week - Plymouth', Magna Britannia: volume 6: Devonshire (1822), pp. 381-408.

Byron George Gordon Noel sixth Baron Byron

1788-01-22

1824-04-19

literary

Macready William

male

actor

English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840)

Aeschylus

male

sometime after -0525525 BC

sometime before -0455455 BC

playwright

Ancient writer of tragedies, the earliest of the three celebrated progenitors of classical tragedy, including Euripides and Sophocles against both of whom he successfully competed for prize-winning plays in ancient Greece. His plays are some of the earliest existing examples of tragedy, though the genre likely predates him. Aeschylus, like Euripides and Sophocles, served in military roles to fight the Persians. Author of the historical tragedy, Persians (472 BC), as well as the Oresteia (458 BC, the only complete trilogy cycle of plays from ancient Greece, Aeschylus was credited by the librarians at Alexandria with writing Prometheus Bound, though the authorship is now disputed. Mitford knew and discussed the eighteenth-century translation of Aeschylus's plays by Robert Potter .

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Scriblerus Club

London organization of prominent writers, including Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Henry Fielding, John Arbuthnot, and John Gay among others. The Scriblerians organized in 1715 and disbanded in 1745 after the deaths of its founders, Pope and Swift. The club's various members often wrote under "Scriblerus" pseudonyms.

Kemble Charles

male

Foscari Francesco

character in Foscari

See also historical counterpart: son of Doge Foscari.

George William Frederick King of Great Britain and King of Ireland King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

male

1738-06-04

1820-01-29

The king who lost the American colonies, and suffered porphyria adn mental illness in the 1810s, when his son, the future King George IV reigned in his stead as the Prince Regent. King George III's role changed after the Act of Union between England and Ireland in 1801.

Sir John Franklin, KCH, FRGS, RN

male

Married to Eleanor Porden Franklin. British naval officer and explorer (1786-1847). Born 16 April 1786 Spilsbury, Lincolnshire. Died 11 June 1847 at sea near King William Island, Canada, aboard HMS Terror. Royal Navy (1800-1847), attaining rank of Rear-Admiral. Served in French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars. Explorer of the Canadian Artic, disappeared while attempting to chart the Northwest Passage. Later Lieutenant-Governor of Van Dieman's Land, later Tasmania.

Eleanor Anne Franklin, nee Porden

Eleanor Anne Franklin, nee Porden

PordenFranklinEleanorAnne

female

1795-07-14

1823-02-22

literary

British author (1795-1825) Born London, 14 July 1795. Author of The Veils; or the Triumph of Constancy (1815). Author of Coeur de Lion; or the Third Crusade. A Poem in 16 books. (historical epic, 1822). Married Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin in 1822. Died 22 Feb. 1823 of consumption.)

Gaston II count of Foix

male

1343

Jean Froissart

male

1337

1405

literary

medieval French poet and historical chronicler.

The unification of Ireland with Great Britain (England and Scotland, to form the United Kingdom, during the reign of .

Ireland

Wordsworth William

1770-04-07

1850-04-23

literary

Baillie Joanna

female

1762-09-11

1851-02-23

literary

Successful poet and playwright, authored Poems: Wherein It Is Attempted to Describe Certain Views of Nature and of Rustic Manners (1790) and more than 25 plays. Her best-known works are included in Plays on the Passions (1798) and were later collected in The Dramatic and Poetical Works of Joanna Baillie (1851).

Margaret of Anjou

Margaret of Anjou

MargaretMargueritede AnjouQueen Consort of England

female

1430-03-23

1482-08-25

Queen

Margaret of Anjou, daughter of René I of Anjou, King of Naples, married Henry VI of England in 1445 . She often ruled in her husband's place during his periods of mental instability, and her rule sparked conflict with Richard, Duke of York, leading to the Wars of the Roses, a period of civil wars polarizing the Houses of York and Lancaster for over 30 years in England between 1455 and 1487 , during which she and her son vied with Edward, Duke of York for control of the English throne. She was exiled, restored, and ultimately defeated at the Battle of Tewkesbury on 4 May 1471 , and she died in exile in France. She was immortalized by Shakespeare as an unfaithful wife but grieving, vengeful, and prophetic royal widow, and in Mitford's time, she was the subject of a romance poem by Margaret Holford in 1816 .

Taylor and Hessey

London publishers at 93 Fleet Street, began around 1819. The firm included John Taylor and J. A. Hessey

Thomas Christopher Hofland

Thomas Christopher Hofland

HoflandThomasChristopher

male

1777-12-25

1843-01-03

artist

Landscape painter, and second husband of the author Barbara Hofland.

Queen Elizabeth I

female

the Cockney School

Satirical term coined by an anonymous Blackwood's article of October 1817 targeting a circle of intellectuals, writers, and artists specifically including John Keats, William Hazlitt, Leigh Hunt, and Benjamin Robert Haydon.

Parliamentary alliance with the Dutch

William of Orange

to oust

King James II

from power, establish a lasting Protestant monarchy, and establish a Bill of Rights.

Plutarch

male

sometime between 0045 and 0047

sometime between 0119 and 0125

philosopherliteraryessayistbiographer

Studied at the School of Athens, and was a priest at Delphi. Most famous works are Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans or Parallel Lives and Moralia

Rome

Papal States

Lamb Charles

male

British essayist. (10 Feb. 1775-27 Dec. 1834) Born London and died Edmonton, Middlesex. Best known for his Essays of Elia (1823-1833), many of which originally appeared in the London Magazine.

Dorothy Wordsworth

1771-1855. Sister of William Wordsworth,whose diary entries, poems, and sketches were not published until after her death, but demonstrably influenced her brother's more famous work.

Coleridge Samuel Taylor

male

1772-10-21

1834-07-25

literary

Queen Dollalolla

female

Comic role in Henry Fielding's play Tom Thumb, adapted in Mitford's day by Kane O'Hara as a comic opera, with Sarah Tyrer famously playing this role.

Theatre Royal Haymarket

Theatre in Westminster, London, built in 1720.

The duel which led to

John Scott

's death, brought on by escalating conflicts between John Scott and

John Gibson Lockhart

in The London Magazine and Blackwood's Magazine, rooted in Blackwood's insulting characterizations of a beginning in 1820.

Christie

was Lockhart's literary agent, and after a trial in April 1821 he was acquitted of any wrongdoing in the duel. For a detailed account of the duel, with supporting documents in publications from each magazine, see Lord Byron and His Times: "Blackwood's Magazine, The London Magazine, and the Scott-Christie Duel".

Jonathan Henry Christie

Fought the duel on 27 February 1821 with John Scott that resulted in Scott's death; after trial in April 1821 acquitted of murder; James Traill was his second. Christie was the literary agent of J. G. Lockhart.

Scott, Walter Walter Scott

male

1771-08-15

1832-09-21

literarygovernment

Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.

Billiard Club

A club that George Mitford and perhaps Mr. Palmer are members of.

Henry VI King of England

1421-12-06

1471-05-21

Married to Margaret of Anjou, who ruled in his stead during his periods of mental instability. His reign was interrupted by the beginning of the Wars of the Roses, begun by conflict between Margaret of Anjou and the Duke of York. He died imprisoned in the Tower of London in the same month as the Battle of Tewkesbury which marked the decisive end of his reign and succession with the death of his son Edward on the battlefield.

William III King of England and Ireland

King of England and IrelandKing of ScotlandStadtholder

William of Orange

King Billy

monarch

(1650-1702) Ousted King James II from power during the Glorious Revolution of 1688, and reigned together with Queen Mary II, his wife and the daughter of James II. Protestant monarch.

James I

male

monarch

James I of England and James IV of Scotland. British monarch (19 June 1566-27 Mar. 1625) Born in Edinburgh Castle, Scotland to Mary ("Queen of Scots"). King of Scotland until 1603 and the first Stuart king of England. Considered responsible for creating the first united Kingdon of Great Britain.

Fletcher John

male

1579

1625

literary

English author

Mr.and Mrs.Mitford

William Thomas Lewis

William Thomas Lewis

LewisWilliamThomas

male

actor

English actor (1749-1811).

Kean Edmund

male

actor

English actor (1787-1833). English actor. Considered the greatest actor of his era. Born Westminster, London

John Phillip Kemble

John Phillip Kemble

KembleJohnPhillip

male

actor

British actor (1757-1823). Member of Kemble acting clan, brother of Sarah Siddons.

Molière

Molière

PoquelinJean-Baptiste

male

1662-01-15

1673-02-17

theaterplaywrightactor

Author of Tartuffe.

Palmer Gordon Madelina the Lady

PalmerGordonMadelinathe Lady

Lady M.P.

Lady Mad.

Lady Madalina Palmer

Lady M. Palmer

tiresome woman

my Lady

female

sometime after 17721772?

1847

Her second marriage was to the Reading Whig politician Charles Fyshe Palmer. His marriage to her gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. For more on the Palmers see note 2 in The Browning's Correspondence rendering of Mitford's letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning : .

Cola di Rienzo Tribune of Rome

sometime after 1313

1354-10-08

scholarpolitics

The historical figure on whom Mitford's character, Cola di Rienzi, is based. Rienzo rose from humble origins as the son of a washerwoman and a tavern keeper to lead a bloodless coup against Rome’s aristocracy through his powerful oratory in the 1340s. He named himself in 1347 the Tribune of Rome, and he aimed to restore Rome to its classical glory as the capitol of a united Italian nation and empire. Although he would lose power within a year to vengeful barons united in opposition against him, Rienzo became legendary for his meteoric career, his humiliation of bullying overlords, and his rule dedicated to the restoring the dignity of Roman people in a time of chaos and confusion. His contemporary poet, Petrarch, admired Rienzo as a man of humble origins who could unite the Roman people with his inspiring oratory and construct a new regime to punish abusers of power.

Court of Pope Pius VII

Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals, from 1800 to 1823. The court was driven to exile in Savona between 1809 and 1813, but restored to Rome after a treaty with Napoleon.

Savona, Papal States

Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals were driven to exile here by Napoleon, between 1809 and 1813.

George IV King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

George Augustus Frederick

Prince Regent

male

1762-08-12

1830-06-26

monarch

The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his father's stead from 1811 to 1820.

King George IV

's struggles with Parliament to divorce his estranged wife,

Caroline

, and prevent her from becoming queen in 1820, the year of her death.

Cola di Rienzi

character in Rienzi.

Petrarca Francesco

PetrarcaFrancesco

Petrarch

1304-07-20

1374-07-19

literaryscholar

Petrarch's scholarship and poetry helped to initiate the Italian Renaissance. He investigated the learning of ancient Rome and rediscovered Cicero's letters. In poetry he is most widely known for his sonnet cycle to an idealized woman, Laura. He was a friend of Cola di Rienzo.

Sheridan Richard Brinsley

male

1751 born either in September of October

1816-07-07

literary

English author, politician, and theater manager(1751-1816) Managed Drury Lane. A prominent Whig politician.

Talfourd Rutt Rachel

TalfourdRuttRachel

Mrs. Thomas Talfourd

She's the eldest daughter of John Rutt.

Switzerland

Chalk Farm

On the outskirts of London, between Camden Town and Hampstead Heath: the site of the duel between John Scott and Jonathan Christie on 16 February 1821, which resulted in Scott's death.

Elizabeth Talbot Countess of Shrewsbury

Countess of Shrewsbury

Bess of Hardwick

sometime after 1521

1608-02-13

A very rich and powerful woman in Elizabethan England, Bess of Hardwick married four times, and her last husband, George Talbot, gave her the title Countess of Shrewsbury. While Mary Queen of Scots was held captive and under Talbot's guard at Sheffield Castle in 1568, Bess befriended her, and the two worked on the Oxburgh Hangings tapestries during the queen's confinement. After Talbot's death in 1590 she commissioned the architect Robert Smythson to build Hardwick Hall in Renaisssance style. Bess of Hardwick's Letters archives her complete correspondence from 1550 to 1608.

Rutt John Towill

1760-04-04

1841-03-03

politician and writer

Rachel, his eldest daughter, married Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd.

Reading School, Reading

Public school founded by Dr. Richard Valpy, located in Reading. Mitford wrote reviews for the Reading Mercury of the plays performed there by the schoolboys.

The battle fought at on Sunday, 18 June 1815 that decisively defeated after his Hundred Days Exile.

Waterloo battlefield

50.683333 4.4

Location of the Battle of Waterloo, near the municipality of Waterloo, Belgium and 15 kilometers south of Brussels.

Mary II Sovereign of England, Scotland, and Ireland

monarch

(1662-1694) Ruled England jointly with King William III after the Glorious Revolution. Protestant monarch and daughter of the Catholic King James II.

Jezebel

Queen of the Israelites, married to King Ahab, who influenced him to worship multiple gods, Baal and Asherah, instead of the Hebrew god. She is generally associated with pagan worship and likened to a prostitute in dress and the use of "painted" cosmetics: hence, the phrase, "a painted Jezebel."

Jael

female

warrior

Jael fulfilled Deborah's prophecy that a woman would kill Sisera, the Canaanite military leader attacking the Israelites. Jael welcomed Sisera into her tent and killed him by pounding a tent stake into his temple.

Deborah

female

prophetleaderjudge

Hebrew leader, prophet, and judge, who predicted a woman would kill Sisera, the leader of the Canaanites. Jael fulfilled Deborah's prophecy.

Ahab

male

Historic and legendary ancient King of Israel, married to Jezebel.

Baal

male

goddemonidol

Naples, Italy

Julian

Melfi's son in Julian

Claudia

daughter of Cola di Rienzi in Rienzi.

Count D'Alba

a powerful Nobleman in Julian.

Charles the First

King of England in Mitford's play, Charles I.

Smollett, Tobias Tobias George Smollett

male

1721-03-19

1771-09-17

literarymedical

Novelist and poet, as well as editor, translator, critic, and medical practitioner. Smollett's best-known novels were written between 1748 and 1753: The Adventures of Roderick Random (1748), The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle (1751), and The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom (1753), and his four-volume Complete History of England was published in 1754, revised in 1758 . Together with Thomas Francklin, Smollett helped edit the 35-volume English translation of The Works of Voltaire, from 1761-1765 . He travelled extensively in France and Italy in his last years. (Source ODNB).

Bickerstaff, Isaac Bickerstaff Isaac

male

1733-09-26

sometime after 1808

militaryliterary

Irish librettist and writer of musical theater and comic opera in London and for Drury Lane Theatre. Commissioned first in the Northumberland Fusiliers, then in the marines. Author of several very popular comedies, including Thomas and Sally: or the Sailor's Return , Love in a Village (1762), Love in the City (1767), and the internationally successful play, The Padlock (1768), which was produced in Germany and Hungary. Bickerstaff went into exile from England due to published reports from a blackmailing soldier who accused him of a sodomous encounter. He is known to have travelled in France, Austria, and Italy under assumed names, but his finale whereabouts are unknown. The ODNB cites records that he was receiving army half pay in 1808, and perhaps died shortly thereafter.

Stephen Colonna

character in Rienzi. Father of Angelo Colonna

Foscari Doge

Historical Doge of Venice on whom Mitford based her Doge in Foscari

Mitford's declared historical source is A View of Society and Manners in Italy by Dr. John Moore.

Donato Senator

Historical personage on whom Mitford based Senator Donato in her play, Foscari.

Mitford's declared historical source is A View of Society and Manners in Italy by Dr. John Moore.

Foscari Jacopo

Historical personage on whom Mitford based Francesco Foscari in her play, Foscari. Byron followed the historical names for father (Francesco) and son (Jacopo) in his play, The Two Foscari.

Mitford's declared historical source is A View of Society and Manners in Italy by Dr. John Moore.

The Duke of Melfi

Uncle to Alfonso and Regent of the Kingdom of Naples in Julian

Lord Fairfax

General of the Parliamentary Army in Mitford's play, Charles I.

Alfonso

King of Naples, disguised as "Theodore," in Julian.

Queen Henrietta Maria

Queen of England in Mitford's play, Charles I.

Liston Tyrer Sarah

ListonTyrerSarah

Sarah Liston

Mrs. John Liston

Miss Tyrer

Sarah Tyrer

female

1781

1854

English comic actress known for her singing voice and roles in burlesque operas, and celebrated for her performance as Miss Tyrer of Queen Dollalolla in Kane O'Hara's burlesque adaptation of Henry Fielding's Tom Thumb , in Haymarket Theatre, July 1805. She began her theatrical career at Drury Lane and Haymarket theaters in May and June of 1801, was engaged by Covent Garden Theatre in September 1805, and married the comic actor John Liston on 22 March 1807. Both John and Sarah Liston publicly retired from the theatre with valedictory performances at Covent Garden on 31 May 1822. [Sources: entries on John Liston in ODNB, DNB 1885-1900. See in particular ]

Robert Mudie

male

1877-06-28

1842-04-29

Newspaper editor and author. Author of Glenfergus

Oliver Cromwell

Cromwell's character in King in Mitford's play, Charles I.

Sforza

male

General Sforza, historical person Mary Russell Mitford's character is based on, Venetian military officer.

Whitehall Palace

Site of the execution of King Charles I in London.

Alresford, Hampshire, England

Birthplace of Mary Russell Mitford, on Broad Street.

Hampstead

village very close to London, now enclosed by it. Its population was rapidly growing through the nineteenth century, and its famous Hampstead Heath is now a public park in London.

Berkshire

Bullock William

1773

1849-03-07

naturalistantiquarianmuseum

Collector and systematic organizer of museums, including the Liverpool Museum at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London, which housed artifacts from Captain Cook's voyages that Bullock had acquired from other collections. An early British traveller to Mexico in 1822, after Mexican independence in 1821, Bullock returned in 1823 with Mexican artifacts that he exhibited at Egyptian Hall, and published catalogs as well as Six Months' Residence and Travels in Mexico in 1824 . Between 1825 and 1825 he travelled again in Mexico and the United States, where he purchased an estate called The Elms or Elmwood near Cincinnati on the Kentucky border, and laid out an unsuccessful but admired town plan called "Hygeia" that would become Ludlow, Kentucky. (ODNB)

James Cook

James Cook

CookJamesCaptain

1728-10-27 village in

1779-02-14

navigatorcartographercaptain

Mapped Newfoundland and explored the Pacific, including New Zealand and Australia, as well as the Antarctic Circle in three historic voyages between 1768 and 1779. Died in an unexpectedly hostile encounter with islanders on Hawaii.

Temple

neighborhood of central London, a central area for law offices and legal practice, with its four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple, one of the four Inns of Court, was responsible for training and licensing barristers.

John Bradshaw

John Bradshaw

JohnBradshaw

male

1602-07-1515 July 1602

1659-10-3131 October 1651

magistrate

Appointed Judge of the Sheriff's Court at the Guildhall in London, Bradshaw was the presiding judge who sentenced King Charles I to death on 27 January 1649 at Westminster Hall .

City of Westminster, London

Sir Edward Montagu, Earl of Sandwich

Sir Edward Montagu, Earl of Sandwich

EdwardMontagu

male

1625-07-2727 July 1625

1672-05-2828 May 1672

politicianwarriornaval officerEarl of Sandwich

Montagu fought during the first Civil War as a Parliamentarian, but later changed sides. He was killed at sea at the Battle of Solebay, fighting against the Dutch. He possessed an estate at Hinchinbrooke

Israel

In Mitford's time, the ancient lost kingdom of the Hebrews.

Wales

Lisson_Grove

Lisson Grove, within City of Westminster, London

"Regent's Park

An upscale neighborhood in north London, Regent's Park is named for the Royal Park it encompasses.

village of Three Mile Cross

Village in the English county of Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820.

Oxford, England

Mary Hyman

Mary Hyman

Mary Haydon

HaydonHymanCawse Mrs. HaydonMary

female

The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.

Caroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom

Queen Consort of the United Kingdom

Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

Princess of Wales

female

1768-05-17

1821-08-07

The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair.

Canning George

male

1770-04-11

1827-08-08

literaryeditorpolitics

English author and Tory politician (1770-1827) Founder of The Anti-Jacobin, or Weekly Examiner conservative newspaper in 1797 . Served as Foreign Secretary and briefly as Prime Minister.

Henry Colburn

male

Founding editor of The Literary Gazette.

Peter Bayley

male

Peter Bayley (1778?-1823) Editor of the Museum.

Abraham John Valpy

male

Thomas Campbell

1777-07-27

1844-06-15

Scottish poet and editor: author of The Pleasures of Hope (1799) and Gertrude of Wyoming (1799). Editor of the New Monthly Magazine from 1821 to 1830, in which capacity he knew Thomas Noon Talfourd as a contributor. See Cyrus Redding's Literary Reminiscences and Memoirs of Thomas Campbell . Possibly the Mr. Campbell that Mitford mentions in her letter to Talfourd of 13 August 1822.

Gifford William

male

literaryeditorpolitics

Editor of the Anti-Jacobin in the late 1790s as well as the Quarterly Review from 1809 to 1824.

Elliston Robert William

male

actortheatre manager

English actor and theater manager (1774-1831) Born in London. Managed Drury Lane and others. Written about by Leigh Hunt, Byron, Macready.

Charles Mayne Young

Charles Mayne Young

YoungMayneCharles

male

actor

English actor (1777-1856). Performed at Covent Garden and Drury Lane between 1807 and 1832. Rival of Kean. Known for his Hamlet. Written about by Washington Irving.

O'Keefe O'Keeffe John

male

1747-06-24

1833-02-04

literaryactor

Irish author and actor (1747-1833) Author of Omai (1785), Love in a Camp (1786) and Wild Oats (1791). Hazlitt described him as the "English Molière."

Robertson William

1721

1793

A Scottish historian, and author of Charles the Fifth.

Homer

male

the epic poet, or the single person MRM would have thought was the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

John the Apostle

John the Apostle

John the Evangelist

Saint John

Presumably (and contestedly) the author of the fourth book of the New Testament, the Gospel of John.

Pierre Alexandre Fleury de Chaboulon

male

1779

1835-09-28

Cabinet secretary of Napoleon after his return from Elba. in 1820 he published Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon

Richard III King of England

King of England

Richard of Gloucester

1452-10-02

1485-08-22

After the death of his brother King Edward IV, Richard of Gloucester was appointed protector to his young sons, King Edward V and Richard of Shrewsbury, the Duke of York, and in preparation for Edward V's coronation, he lodged them at the Tower of London, and upon the mysterious disappearance of the boys, Richard took the throne. Richard is often accused, without proof, of having ordered the boys execution to usurp the throne, a plot immortalized in Shakespeare's play, Richard III . His death at the Battle of Bosworth Field made him the last English king to die in battle, and effectively ended the dynastic Wars of the Roses between the Houses of York and Lancaster.

Nathan Drake

male

1766-01-15

1836

Essayist and physician; his most ambitious work was Shakespeare and his Times (ODNB)

Toolbox

Themes:

Site Index of Named Entities in the Digital Mitford Archive Digital Mitford Editors Elisa Beshero-Bondar Mary Russell Mitford Society: Digital Mitford Project University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Elisa Beshero-Bondar Data extraction and compiling by Elisa Beshero-Bondar Proofing and corrections by Elisa Beshero-Bondar Site Index for the Digital Mitford project. Date: 2014-07-15T03:18:07.126-04:00. Extracted by Elisa Beshero-Bondar. Count of all @xml:ids in the current file: 809. First digital edition in TEI P5, launched on 19 August 2013. Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive Greensburg, PA, USA 2013 Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License Any special notes on this text? (optional)

Information on named entities in this file has been extracted from files in the Digital Mitford Archive.

Describes our editorial practice.

Algee-Hewitt Mark Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group Advisory Board Stanford Literary Lab Colombo Amy Editor Virginia Commonwealth University Murray Chelsie Research Assistant M. A. English & Communication State University of New York, Potsdam

Cox Catherine S Editor University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown Catherine S Cox teaches at the University of Pittsburgh's Johnstown campus, offering classes in biblical and medieval literature and culture, history of the English language, and contemporary critical theory, her areas of professional publication as well. She recently joined the Mitford project, which she sees as an exciting opportunity to create digital resources in a collaborative environment. Robinson David Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg: Computing and Telecommunications Birnbaum David Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group Advisory Board University of Pittsburgh

Hitt Daniel M. A. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Primary research interest: contemporary reception of 19th Century American authors, specifically Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe, by European readers. Other interests: issues in composition, the writing process, manuscripts, early short stories, Mitford's connection to Hawthorne, and Dark Romanticism. Saglia Diego Advisory Board Università degli Studi di Parma

Beshero-Bondar Elisa Principal Editor Associate Professor of English University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Parsons Elaine Frantz Consulting Editor Duquesne University

Raisanen Elizabeth Editor University of California, Los Angeles Elizabeth Raisanen writes on literary representations of the pregnant and birthing body in British Romantic Literature, although her research interests also extend to Romantic drama, during the study of which she first discovered Mary Russell Mitford. Elizabeth has presented papers on Mitford's plays at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, the Wordsworth Summer Conference, and the British Women Writer's Conference, and her article on Mitford's play Rienzi appeared in European Romantic Review in 2011 . Hood Eric Ph.D. Founding Editor Adrian College Eric Hood is an Assistant Professor at Adrian College and holds a PhD from the University of Kansas. He specializes in literary theory, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British poetry (particularly, the epic), and intellectual networks. http://academichood.wordpress.com

Burwick Frederick Advisory Board University of California, Los Angeles

Bondar Gregory Founding Editor Penn State University University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Greg Bondar has photographed over 300 of Mitford's letters in the Reading Central Library, and another 150 letters in the John Rylands Library in Manchester. He maintains the Digital Mitford project's Excel database documenting over 1000 individual letters and manuscripts. He teaches courses in Anthropology and Archaeology for Penn State Greater Allegheny and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg campuses, and he co-teaches Pitt-Greensburg's Digital Humanities course with Elisa Beshero-Bondar. His research involves studying ancient stone tools with nuclear reactor technology, and combines his undergraduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Anthropology. While he has only been involved with Digital Humanities applications since 2013, he has spent many years marking up ethnographic data in the mid-1990s. Sarsfield Heather Research Assistant B.A. in English Literature, in progress State University of New York, Potsdam Burwell Jaime Breanna M.A. in English & Communication, in progress State University of New York, Potsdam M.L.S. in progress University at Buffalo Jaime is working on an M.A. thesis the reception of the early works of Eliza Haywood. Rovira James Ph.D. Editor Tiffin University http://www.jamesrovira.comJames Rovira teaches British literature, Creative Writing: Poetry, Creative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction, and Literary Theory at Tiffin University in Tiffin, OH. His research interests include William Blake, Søren Kierkegaard, British and Danish history and literature, poetry, and theory. His book, Blake and Kierkegaard: Creation and Anxiety is available in both hardcover and paperback from Bloomsbury/Continuum. He currently lives in the greater Columbus area with his wife Sheridan and his children Penn, Grace, and Zoe. Bourrier Karen Editor University of Calgary Karen Bourrier is an assistant professor at the University of Calgary. She is currently working on a biography and digital edition of the letters of best-selling Victorian novelist Dinah Mulock Craik. She is very pleased to be part of Digital Mitford. #www.karenbourrier.com Donovan-Condron Kellie Ph.D. Founding Editor Babson College Kellie Donovan-Condron writes about the intersection of urban and Gothic in the Romantic era. She is also interested in questions of genre and social networking. She has written about Mitford's epic poem Blanch and Mitford's network of women writers. Previously, she worked on a project to digitize a collection of 17th- and 18th-century maps and ephemeral materials through the Tufts University Perseus Project.

Wilson Lisa M. Founding Editor State University of New York at Potsdam Lisa Wilson is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of English and Communication at SUNY Potsdam, where she has taught since 2005. Her areas of interest include transatlantic Romantic and Victorian era literature, particularly women’s writing and popular forms such as the Gothic novel and the ballad revival. She is also interested in book history and bibliographical studies, particularly in the study of authorship in the long nineteenth century (1780-1900). She has published in European Romantic Review, Romanticism on the Net (now RaVon), Romantic Circles, Romantic Textualities, and elsewhere. She is currently working on a monograph on Romantic-period authorship and literary celebrity. Her work on Digital Mitford thus far includes editing and coding Mitford’s lengthy “Introduction” to her collected Dramatic Works (1854), a critical memoir that recounts the author’s influences and experiences at Covent Garden and Drury Lane in the 1820s and 30s. It also includes researching Mitford’s publication history for the site’s working bibliography, particularly tracking the migration of Mitford’s stories from their first publication to their later reappearances in collections and periodicals. She and her team of undergraduate student researchers are also working on transcribing, coding, and researching Mitford’s letters from the early 1820s as found in the John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester.

Hughes Megan Abigail Editor Green Scholar, B.A. in English Literature and English Writing, Minor: Visual and Performing Arts University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg M.F.A. in progress Loyola Marymount University

O'Donnell Molly C. Editor University of Nevada, Las Vegas Molly O’Donnell is the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, President’s Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She has recently contributed to Victoriographies and the Norton Anthology, and was formerly associate faculty at Notre Dame of Maryland University. Her dissertation uses contemporary sociolinguistics to examine the nineteenth-century tales novel as a useful mode for exploration in the areas of genre, narrative, and gender studies. Zimmer Mary Erica Editor Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group Editorial Institute, Boston University Mary Erica Zimmer comes to Digital Mitford through her interests in scholarly editing, data visualization, textual scholarship, literary influence, and media change. She is a Ph.D. Candidate in Editorial Studies at Boston University’s Editorial Institute and is also associated with several projects through the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Early Modern Digital Agendas group (http://emdigitalagendas.folger.edu/2013/12/03/emda-news/). Murray M. Stephanie Consulting Editor Carnegie Mellon University

Joukovsky Nicholas Advisory Board Penn State University

LoRusso Natalie B.A. in English Literature, in progress State University of New York, Potsdam Parker Rebecca Research Assistant Green Scholar, B.A. in History and English Literature, in progress University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Nesvet Rebecca Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill University of Wisconsin, Green Bay Rebecca Nesvet's research on Romanticism, travel literature, and drama appears in the Keats-Shelley Journal Prism(s): Essays in Romanticism Women's Writing, The Review of English Studies, Literature Compass, Shakespearean International Yearbook, and, in Romania,> American, British, and Canadian Studies. She won the International Conference on Romanticism's 2012 Lore Metzger Award for the best graduate paper. Her dissertation The Vanishing Voyager and the Emerging Outsider, 1818-1930, was directed by Prof. Jeanne Moskal and won UNC-Chapel Hill's Thomson award for the best nineteenth-century literature dissertation http://uwgb.academia.edu/RebeccaNesvet. Webb Samantha Founding Editor Samantha Webb teaches classes in British Romantic literature, children's literature, and global literature. She specializes in British Romanticism, with an interest in food and agricultural politics, ecology, and women's writing. University of Montevallo Lombardi Thomas Consulting Editor: Data Visualization Group Washington and Jefferson College

Harnish Tracy Research Assistant B.F.A. in Creative Writing, in progress State University of New York, Potsdam

Barr William B.A. in History and English Literature, in progress State University of New York, Potsdam
Baylor University, Armstrong Browning Library Holds 3 letters, among correspondence written and received by the Victorian poets Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Featuring materials from the collection of the Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor University and the holdings of Wellesley College in Wellesley, Massachusetts. Berkshire Record Office Holds 11 letters, as well as transcripts of Mitford papers--possibly of material at the Huntingdon. The majority of the letters in this collection are addressed to William Cox Bennett, and one to Chorley. British Library Holds around 125 letters, as well as manuscripts of Mitford's plays submitted to the Examiner's Office after 1825, including Charles I, Foscari, Rienzi, Inez de Castro, and Sadak and Kalasrade. Boston Public Library Holds 17 letters. Cambridge University: Fitzwilliam Museum ? No record at the Cambridge FW library archive. National Archives lists that they hold "1841-6: letters (34) from Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Duke University Rubenstein Library Holds unspecified quantity of letters from MRM to Sir John Easthope, from 1807 to 1846. Eton College ? No record found at library, but National Archives lists they hold letters from Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Florida State University Special Collections Holds 4 letters from MRM to unspecified recipients. The Women's Library, Glasgow 2 letters from MRM, 1835 and 1852. Houghton Library, Harvard Holds over 300 letters, including letters from Benjamin Robert Haydon to MRM, as well as MRM to various recipients including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thomas William Parsons, James Thomas Fields, Thomas Noon Talfourd, and William Cox Bennett. Some transcriptions of these letters may be at the Berkshire Records Office. Huntington Library Holds over 252 letters of MRM spanning 1821 to 1855, including letters to Francis Bennoch from 1837 to 1855. University of Iowa Special Collections Possibly 50 letters here, both from and to MRM, including letters from Francis Bennoch and Thomas Noon Talfourd. Massachusetts Historical Society 10 letters from Catherine Maria Sedgwick to MRM, apparently in microfilm. New York Public Library 74 letters in 4 collections here, spanning 1814 to 1854. 70 letters in the Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature are described as "a synthetic collection consisting of manuscripts, correspondence, and portraits of the author." 10 letters in the Pforzheimer Collection, to William Cox Bennett, to Cecilia Lucy Brightwell (a memorial to Amelia Opie), and to Abraham Hayward. Oxford University, Balliol College Archives 2 letters from Elizabeth Barrett Browning to MRM. Oxford University, Bodleian Library 83 letters from MRM to Thomas Noon Talfourd. Reading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford's personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications. John Ruskin Library, Lancaster Holds 11 letters from John James Ruskin to MRM, written between 1848 and 1854. The John Rylands Library The John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester holds 180 of Mitford's letters from 1821 to 1843, including most of her correspondence to Thomas Noon Talfourd. National Library of Scotland, Manuscript Collections ? No record found at this library, but the National Archives lists letters from MRM to Blackwoods magazine, spanning 1826 to 1854. Check the Location Register of English Literary Manuscripts. University of Texas, Ransom Center 1 letter from Elizabeth Barrett Browning. University of Reading Special Collections Something may be here, but there's an apparently erroneous National Archives listing of 800 letters from MRM to Sir William Elford spanning 1806 to 1855. Possibly these are actually at Reading Central Library. University of Virginia Special Collections 20+ letters from MRM to various recipients including William Cox Bennet and Frances Trollope. Letters to MRM from Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Francis Trollope, and Nathaniel Parker Willis. Wellesley College, Margaret Clapp Library, Special Collections Robert Browning's letters to Elizabeth Barrett, presumably some of which mention MRM. Wordsworth Trust 14 letters from MRM, spanning 1825 to 1843, 13 of which are to Francis Wrangham and 1 to Captain Osbaldeston. Yale University, Beineke Library Two collections: The first contains 119 letters spanning 1817 to 1851, from MRM to Charles Boner (19 letters, 1845-1849), to Barbara Hofland (42 letters, 1817-1838), Mrs. William Edwards Partridge, née L. O. H. Anderdon (57 letters, 1837-1851). The second collection contains letters from MRM to various recipients on Our Village, as well as manuscripts of poems and drama.
Coles William Allan Wrote his PhD Dissertation to the Dept. of English at Harvard University of August 1956 as an edition of the correspondence of Mary Russell Mitford and Thomas Noon Talfourd, representing parts of the collections at the John Rylands Library and the Harvard and Yale special collections. Needham Francis R Francis R. Needham was librarian and secretary to the Duke Wellington (based at Stratfield Saye in Hampshire). He was a passionate Mitfordian and worked tirelessly to try and collect Mitford's letters. He corresponded with W. A. Coles and W. J. Roberts, two Mitford biographers, and may have also corresponded with Vera Watson, the most reliable of Mitford's biographer. He attempted to set up a Mitford Society and is largely responsible for the Mitford collection at Reading Central Library unknown Someone, apparently other than Mitford, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who left grey pencil marks on her letters now in the Reading Central Library's collection. unknown Someone, apparently other than Mitford, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who left grey pencil marks on her letters now in the The John Rylands Library collection. unknown Someone, apparently other than Mitford, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who left red crayon marks on her letters now in the Reading Central Library's collection. Roberts William James Scholar Early Mitford critic and author of The Tragedy of a Blue Stocking Watson Vera Early Mitford critic and author of the biography Mary Russell Mitford Scholar
Billiard Club A club that George Mitford and perhaps Mr. Palmer are members of. House of Bourbon . Dynasty that ruled France from 1589-1792 and 1814-30. Cavaliers . Colloquialism for the Monarchist faction in the English Civil Wars (1642-51). Court of Chancery Court founded in Norman England, adjudicating equity cases with a tradition of leniency. This court had powers to cancel debts in cases of poverty. Church of England . The English national church, generally adhering to the Anglican (Protestant) Communion since the reign of Henry III. the Cockney School Satirical term coined by an anonymous Blackwood's article of October 1817 targeting a circle of intellectuals, writers, and artists specifically including John Keats, William Hazlitt, Leigh Hunt, and Benjamin Robert Haydon. Eton College Boarding school for boys, located in Eton, Berkshire. High Court of Justice Commissioners of the High Court of Justice Commissioners . The Commissioners of the High Court of Justice tried Charles I for treason. Those who convicted him and signed the death warrant were subsequently termed the Regicides[See Britannica.] House of Commons . The "lower" house of the bicameral Parliament, the Commons was established in the mid-thirteenth century. the Kembles House of Medici Dynasty that ruled various Italian territories from 1434 to 1737, excepting in 1494-1512 and 1527-30, and also provided France with several queens. Mr.and Mrs.Mitford the Moncks, family of John Berkeley Monck New Model Army Parliamentary army founded in 1645; victor in the English Civil War. Palmerite Supporter of Charles Fyshe Palmer in the Reading elections of March 16, 1820. Parliament Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; supreme legislative body in England. Court of Pope Pius VII Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals, from 1800 to 1823. The court was driven to exile in Savona between 1809 and 1813, but restored to Rome after a treaty with Napoleon. Prelacy Prelates . Colloquially, the Archbishops and bishops of the Church of England. [See Britannica.] the Presybterian faction Peace Party Faction in Parliament during the English Civil War which sought peace and negotiation with King Charles I. Its members were not all Presbyterian by religious persuasion, but they sought support for Presbyterianism as a state sanctioned church. They were opposed by the Independents and leaders of the New Model Army. [Source: BCW Project] Privy Council . Councillors to the British king or queen. Richmond Coach or Stage Scriblerus Club Scriblerians London organization of prominent writers, including Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Henry Fielding, John Arbuthnot, and John Gay among others. The Scriblerians organized in 1715 and disbanded in 1745 after the deaths of its founders, Pope and Swift. The club's various members often wrote under "Scriblerus" pseudonyms. Slade The Slades are referenced in Mitford's letter to Thomas Noon Talfourd of June 21, 1821, a family distantly related to Mitford involved as adversaries in a law case taken on by Talfourd. Taylor and Hessey London publishers at 93 Fleet Street, began around 1819. The firm included John Taylor and J. A. Hessey Tory Party Conservative Party

Originally, a 17th-century insulting nickname for those who supported James II's right to the throne of England, even though he was Catholic. The term connoted "Irish Catholic outlaw." The term was adopted by the party, which became generally affiliated with the interests of the country gentry, Anglicanism, and support of the divine right of kings. The party was loosely affiliated until the late 18th century, when William Pitt the Younger emerged as the leader of a revitalized party. The Conservative Party, founded in 1834 by Sir Robert Peel, absorbed and organized the Tory Party and retained the party nickname.

Twickenham Coach or Stage Weylandite Weyland supporter; On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.)http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading
Aeschylus 525 BC Eleusis, Greece 455 BC Gela, Sicily playwright Ancient writer of tragedies, the earliest of the three celebrated progenitors of classical tragedy, including Euripides and Sophocles against both of whom he successfully competed for prize-winning plays in ancient Greece. His plays are some of the earliest existing examples of tragedy, though the genre likely predates him. Aeschylus, like Euripides and Sophocles, served in military roles to fight the Persians. Author of the historical tragedy, Persians (472 BC), as well as the Oresteia (458 BC, the only complete trilogy cycle of plays from ancient Greece, Aeschylus was credited by the librarians at Alexandria with writing Prometheus Bound, though the authorship is now disputed. Mitford knew and discussed the eighteenth-century translation of Aeschylus's plays by Robert Potter . Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Albert Prince Consort Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld Windsor Castle, Berkshire Queen Victoria's first cousin and spouse, whose death at the age of 48 led her to a prolonged period of mourning as the "Widow at Windsor." Alfieri Vittorio Count Asti, Piedmont region Florence playwright literary Credited with reviving Italian tragedy in the eighteenth century, Alfieri's plays included Filippo, Polinice, Antigone, Virginia,and the highly acclaimed Saul. He also authored an ode on American Independence and a satirical poem, The Antigallican, on the French Revolution. Baring Alexander First Baron Ashburton Jane Austen Steventon, Hampshire Winchester, Hampshire literary Novelist celebrated for her wit and style, whose works investigated women's social and economic vulnerabilities in English society. During her lifetime she published Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815), all anonymously. Northanger Abbey, the first written of her novels (composed in 1798-1799) was published posthumously in 1818 along with her last finished novel, Persuasion. Mitford claims in a letter to Sir William Elford of 3 April 1815 that she has recently discovered Austen "is my countrywoman,", that is, a neighbor. Later in a letter of 2 July 1816 praised Emma in particular among Austen's novels. She and Elford evidently knew the identity of Austen as the author long before the information was public knowledge, and she claims in the April 3 letter that her mother remembered Jane in her youth as "the prettiest, silliest, most affected, husband-hunting butterfly she ever remembers", but that Jane was by the 1810s extremely quiet, which impressed Mitford: "till Pride and Prejudice showed what a precious gem was hidden in that unbending case, she was no more regarded in society than a poker or a fire-screen, or any other thin upright piece of wood or iron that fills its corner in peace and quietness. The case is very different now; she is still a poker--but a poker of whom every one is afraid. It must be confessed that this silent observation from such an observer is rather formidable. Most writers are good-humoured chatterers--neither very wise nor very witty:--but nine times out of ten (at least in the few that I have known) unaffected and pleasant, and quite removing by their conversation any awe that may have been excited by their works. But a wit, a delineator of character, who does not talk, is terrific indeed!" [Source: L'Estrange.] Baillie Joanna Hamilton, Lanark, Scotland London literary

Successful poet and playwright, authored Poems: Wherein It Is Attempted to Describe Certain Views of Nature and of Rustic Manners (1790) and more than 25 plays. Her best-known works are included in Plays on the Passions (1798) and were later collected in The Dramatic and Poetical Works of Joanna Baillie (1851).

Robert Baldwin Printer of the London Magazine; London printer and bookseller. See Coles 14. Bannister John Jack actor

British actor (1760-1836). Specialized in comic roles.

Barrett Browning Barrett Elizabeth Elizabeth Barrett Elizabeth Barrett Browning Victorian poet, long-time correspondent, mentee, and friend of MRM. Mr. Bayley Editor of the Lady's Monthly Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford's letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825. According to Coles, he drafted the as yet unidentified play mentioned in that letter before his death. Mrs. Bayley Mrs. Bayley, presumably the wife (here, the widow?) of Bayley the editor of Lady's Monthly Museum. Mrs. Bayley is mentioned in Mitford's letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825. See Coles 87, note 2. Peter Bayley Peter Bayley (1778?-1823) Editor of the Museum. Beaumont Francis Grace-Dieu, Leicestershire London literary Beaumont George Howland Sir Seventh Baronet Art collector and patron of the arts, donated the first collection to form the National Gallery in London. The Hon. Henry Grey Bennet Bennet Henry Grey Grey Bennett Lake Como, Italy government M.P. for Shrewsbury after 1806 and into the 1820s, known as "Grey Bennett," the brother of Charles Augustus Bennet (1776-1854) who shared his Whig politics and like him belonged to the Whig Brooks's Club. Advocate of Catholic emancipation and parliament reform. Bennet gave up his parliament seat in 1826 amid a cloud of scandal after a threat of prosecution "for importuning a young male servant at Spa in August 1825" (ODNB). He had been travelling in Italy after the deaths of a son and daughter from consumption in 1824, and remained in exile near Lake Como until his death in 1836. Bennett William Cox William Cox Bennett Greenwich 4 Eliot Cottages, Blackheath literary watchmaker journalist A friend of MRM. Married to Elizabeth Sinnock Bennett and younger sibling of Sir John Bennett. Organizer of very liberal politics in Greenwich. In 1868 he helped stump for the liberal William Gladstone in his first successful campaign for Prime Minister. Lead writer and art critic for the Weekly Dispatch in 1869-1870, contributor to the London paper, Figaro, and editor of the literary periodical, The Lark, from 1883 to 1884. Author of Prometheus the Fire Giver published in 1877, and Songs for Sailors in 1878. Bennoch Francis Esq.

Scottish merchant and wealthy arts patron (1812-1890). Head of firm of Bennoch, Twentyman, and Rigg, wholesalers. Resided in city of London, served as common councilman and deputy of a ward. Dedicatee of Mitford's Dramatic Works (1854), and assisted in publication of Atherton and Other Tales (1854).

Berengaria of Navarre Queen Consort of England

Queen Consort of Richard I of England, 1191-1199. Born ca. 1165, Died 1230. Eldest daughter of King Sancho VI of Navarre and Sancha of Castile. She reportedly accompanied her new husband on his first crusade but they returned separately. Berengaria remained in Europe and later attempted to raise money for his return after he was captured. Became proverbial for wifely faithfulness.

Nicholas Berghem Berghem Nicholas Berchem Haarlem, Holland Amsterdam artist Dutch landscape painter known for his pastoral subjects and scenes of rural village life in Holland and Italy. His works are signed both as Berghem and Berchem. Elizabeth Talbot Countess of Shrewsbury Bess of Hardwick A very rich and powerful woman in Elizabethan England, Bess of Hardwick married four times, and her last husband, George Talbot, gave her the title Countess of Shrewsbury. While Mary Queen of Scots was held captive and under Talbot's guard at Sheffield Castle in 1568, Bess befriended her, and the two worked on the Oxburgh Hangings tapestries during the queen's confinement. After Talbot's death in 1590 she commissioned the architect Robert Smythson to build Hardwick Hall in Renaisssance style. Bess of Hardwick's Letters archives her complete correspondence from 1550 to 1608. Bickerstaff, Isaac Bickerstaff Isaac Dublin, Ireland military literary

Irish librettist and writer of musical theater and comic opera in London and for Drury Lane Theatre. Commissioned first in the Northumberland Fusiliers, then in the marines. Author of several very popular comedies, including Thomas and Sally: or the Sailor's Return , Love in a Village (1762), Love in the City (1767), and the internationally successful play, The Padlock (1768), which was produced in Germany and Hungary. Bickerstaff went into exile from England due to published reports from a blackmailing soldier who accused him of a sodomous encounter. He is known to have travelled in France, Austria, and Italy under assumed names, but his finale whereabouts are unknown. The ODNB cites records that he was receiving army half pay in 1808, and perhaps died shortly thereafter.

John Bradshaw John Bradshaw magistrate 15 July 1602 31 October 1651 Appointed Judge of the Sheriff's Court at the Guildhall in London, Bradshaw was the presiding judge who sentenced King Charles I to death on 27 January 1649 at Westminster Hall . Roger Boyle, Lord Broghill Roger Boyle "playwright"> "warrior"> "politician"> 25 April 1621 Lismore Castle Waterford Ireland 16 October 1679 Broghill defended his ancestral estate, Lismore Castle against an Irish rebellion in 1641-2, then defied his Royalist family by fighting for the Parliamentary cause in the Civil War. He tortured prisoners and committed other atrocities to intimidate the Royalists in Ireland. After the war, he received confiscated property in Ireland. He changed allegiances again at the Restoration, and supported Charles II. Broghill's literary works include several stage plays and a novel, Parthenissa(1655). Robert Browning Victorian poet, married to Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Father Pierre Brumoy Brumoy Pierre Father Catholic priest literary

French author and Jesuit priest (1688-1742). "le pere Brumoy," author of Theatre des Greces, later translated by Charlotte Lennox as "The Greek Theatre of Father Brumoy"(2 vols., 1759). According to her letters, Mitford read this work in the original French.

Marcus Junius Brutus June 85 BC assassin rebel republican senator warrior orator 23 October 42 Philippi Bullock William Plymouth, Devon, England Chelsea, England naturalist antiquarian museum Collector and systematic organizer of museums, including the Liverpool Museum at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London, which housed artifacts from Captain Cook's voyages that Bullock had acquired from other collections. An early British traveller to Mexico in 1822, after Mexican independence in 1821, Bullock returned in 1823 with Mexican artifacts that he exhibited at Egyptian Hall, and published catalogs as well as Six Months' Residence and Travels in Mexico in 1824 . Between 1825 and 1825 he travelled again in Mexico and the United States, where he purchased an estate called The Elms or Elmwood near Cincinnati on the Kentucky border, and laid out an unsuccessful but admired town plan called "Hygeia" that would become Ludlow, Kentucky. (ODNB) Sir Francis Burdett Burdett Francis Sir fifth baronet Foremark, Derbyshire St. James's Place government Famous, frequently caricatured radical politician, and M.P. for Westminster. Gave many public speeches, protested abuse of prisoners and flogging of soldiers. His harsh critique of the House of Commons for excluding reporters from their debates led to the Commons voting to imprison Burdett in the Tower of London in 1810, where he was committed until June after clashes between crowds of Burdett's supporters and the army in London. The incident increased his popularity. Burdett introduced a parliamentary reform bill in 1818, condemned the Peterloo Massacre in 1820, and remained politically active into the 1830s. (See ODNB). Mr. Burgess A "Mr. Burgess" who recommended a particular volume of Sophocles' plays to MRM, mentioned in her letter to Talfourd of Nov. 12-13 1821. Burns, Robert Robert Burns Alloway, Scotland Dumfries, Scotland literary tax collector farmer Scottish poet, author of Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect (1786). Rented and farmed the 170-acre Ellisand Farm, where he built a house and collected and rewrote local songs and ballads from his neighbors. Burns's poems and songs were mostly published in posthumous collections between 1799 and 1808 . Butler merchant A Reading shop owner and Palmerite mentioned in Mitford's discussion of the Reading elections in her letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 Byron George Gordon Noel sixth Baron Byron Holles Street, London Missolonghi, Greece literary Thomas Campbell Glasgow, Scotland Boulogne-sur-Mer, France Scottish poet and editor: author of The Pleasures of Hope (1799) and Gertrude of Wyoming (1799). Editor of the New Monthly Magazine from 1821 to 1830, in which capacity he knew Thomas Noon Talfourd as a contributor. See http://lordbyron.cath.lib.vt.edu/contents.php?doc=CyReddi.Campbell.Contents Cyrus Redding's Literary Reminiscences and Memoirs of Thomas Campbell . Possibly the Mr. Campbell that Mitford mentions in her letter to Talfourd of 13 August 1822. Canning George literary editor politics Marylebone, England Chiswick, London

English author and Tory politician (1770-1827) Founder of The Anti-Jacobin, or Weekly Examiner conservative newspaper in 1797 . Served as Foreign Secretary and briefly as Prime Minister.

Charles Spencer Charles Spencer critic Since 1991, Charles Spencer has been a theatre critic for the conservative London paper The Daily Telegraph. Charles I King of England

Charles II king of England, Scotland, and Ireland King Charles II Charles Stuart king St James's Palace, London Whitehall Palace, London The son of the executed King Charles I, Charles II was restored to his father's kingdoms in 1660, occasioning the naming of his reign the Restoration.

King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, reigned 29 May 1660-6 Feb. 1685. King of Scotland, reigned 30 Jan. 1649-3 Sept. 1651. House of Stuart. Born 29 May 1630, St. James Place, London. Died 6 Feb. 1685 Whitehall Palace, London.

Chorley Fothergill Henry Blackley Hurst, Lancashire London literary journalist music critic Of Quaker parentage, Chorley worked unhappily in clerical positions and cultivated the arts as a music and literary critic publishing reviews of around 2500 books, weekly reviews of musical performances, and "columns of musical 'gossip'" for The Athenaeum beginning in 1830 through 1868, "the most prolific of all its reviewers," according to the ODNB. Reviewed Nathaniel Hawthorne and Charles Dickens, and promoted the compositions and operas of Rossini, Mendelssohn, Meyerbeer, and Gounod, though he disliked Verdi. Felicia Hemans and E. T. A. Hoffman made lasting impressions on him. Wrote Memorials of Mrs. Hemans, in two volumes, published in 1836 . Served as editor of The Ladies' Companion in 1850 (after Jane Loudon), and wrote plays, novels, and short stories, though these did not receive much recognition. Correspondent of MRM, as well as Elizabeth Barrett, Charles Dickens, and Arthur Sullivan. Edited the 1872 edition of Mitford's correspondence, Letters of Mary Russell Mitford, Second Series . Jonathan Henry Christie Fought the duel on 27 February 1821 with John Scott that resulted in Scott's death; after trial in April 1821 acquitted of murder; James Traill was his second. Christie was the literary agent of J. G. Lockhart. Cobbett, William Cobbett William Peter Porcupine Surrey, England London, England farmer literary journalist politics

English farmer, editor, and M.P. for Oldham from late 1832 to his death in 1835. Lived in the United States between 1792 and 1800 and again between 1817 and 1819. Founded The Political Register in 1802, and contributed to it until his death. Held strongly anti-Jacobin views during the French Revolution, although he came to support various financial and parliamentary reforms; he was primarily concerned with issues pertaining to farmers and agriculture in his later years. "As Mary Russell Mitford observed in 1806, Cobbett's ready hospitality, together with his ruddy complexion, red waistcoat, ample mid-section, and twinkling eye, gave him the appearance ‘of a great English yeoman of the old time" ( Recollections of a Literary Life 1883, edn, 200–01)" (ONDB). Author of twenty books, most of which initially appeared serially in The Political Register.

Henry Colburn Founding editor of The Literary Gazette. Coleridge Samuel Taylor Ottery St. Mary Highgate literary "little Collins" actor

British actor.

Colman George the Elder Florence, Italy Paddington, London literary theatre manager barrister

English author, barrister, Covent Garden theater manager (1732-1794) Also called "George the First." His son, George Colman the Younger, was also an author and theater manager. Friend of David Garrick. Author of The Clandestine Marriage (1766) and The Jealous Wife (1761), partly based on Fielding's novel Tom Jones .

Colman George the Younger the licenser London 22 Brompton Square, London literary theatre manager Examiner of Plays

English author and theater manager (1762-1836) His father, George Colman the Elder, was also an author and theater manager. Author of The Heir at Law, and The Iron Chest, a play based on William Godwin's novel Caleb Williams. As Lord Chamberlain's Examiner of Plays from 1824 until his death in 1836, he was responsible for rejecting production of Mitford's Charles I.

Congreve William Either born on 24th or 31st. Bardsey Grange, Yorkshire Surrey Street, London literary

English author (1670-1729)

James Cook Cook James Captain Marton village in Yorkshire Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii navigator cartographer captain Mapped Newfoundland and explored the Pacific, including New Zealand and Australia, as well as the Antarctic Circle in three historic voyages between 1768 and 1779. Died in an unexpectedly hostile encounter with islanders on Hawaii. Corneille Pierre Rouen, France Paris, France literary

French author (1606-1684)

Harriot Mellon Coutts Harriot Mellon Harriot Beauclerk, Duchess of St. Albans Mrs. Coutts was the second wife of Thomas Coutts, banker; she was the former actress Harriot Mellon and later became Harriot Beauclerk, Duchess of St. Albans upon her second marriage. Her first name seems to be variously spelled Harriot and Harriet. She was widowed early 1822 and inherited the bulk of her husband's estate, including controlling shares in his banking interests. She gave a famous party at Holly Hill in July 1822 (not sure of exact date, whether before or after the date of this letter.) See "Harriot Coutts," http://heritagearchives.rbs.com/people/list/harriot-coutts.html. Thomas Coutts Banker (1735-1822) and founder of Coutts & Co. George Croly

b. 17 Aug. 1780 d. 24 Nov. 1860. Irish writer and cleric, held the living of St. Stephen Walbrook in the City of London. Contributor to Blackwoods Magazine and other Tory periodicals.

Cromwell Oliver military government Huntingdon Whitehall, London

Member of Parliament, Puritan, Parliamentarian ("Roundhead") military commander. 1st Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland (25 Dec. 1653-3 Sept. 1658). He was buried in Westminster Abbey in 1658, then exhumed and posthumously "executed" by Royalists after 1660 and is buried in Tyburn.

Henry Cromwell Henry Cromwell Huntingdon, England Spinney Abbey, Northborough, England warrior politician The fourth of Oliver Cromwell's five sons (out of nine children total), Henry served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and in various capacities during his father's rise and regime. He corresponded copiously with his father. [ODNB] Mrs. Culpepper According to Coles, Dr. Valpy's eldest daughter (Coles #15, p. 90, note 14). Cumberland Richard London literary

Older brother of poet Mary Alcock. Author of The West Indian (play, 1771) and The Wheel of Fortune (play, 1795).

d'Aubigné Françoise Marquise de Maintenon

French aristocrat (1639-1699) Second morganatic wife of Louis XIV of France (1635-1719)

A pet dog. Daphne

Harvey Davenport Mary Ann actor

English actor (1759-1843).

Pierre Alexandre Fleury de Chaboulon Cabinet secretary of Napoleon after his return from Elba. in 1820 he published Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon Dekker Thomas London London literary de Quince